SALTER, Captain Ernest James - Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 November 1918. Born in Greenbank, Ontario (near Ottawa) about 1897. Home in Mimico, Ontario; joined RFC in Canada, 3 June 1917; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.7211, 27 August 1917; sailed from Canada, 29 October 1917; graded as Flying Officer, 26 February 1918; Captain, 9 August 1918; to France, 15 March 1918; with No.54 Squadron, 19 March to 12 April 1918 (hospitalized) and again from 19 May to 2 September 1918 (wounded). Invalided to UK, 7 September 1918; at Repatriation Camp, 29 March 1919. Died in Oakville, Ontario, 26 March 1959. Ottawa newsclipping of 28 March 1959 says he returned to Canada in 1919 and was engaged in bush flying for three years; credited with 18 enemy aircraft shot down [!!!] and was a bombing instructor in Second World War. No citation oother than "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the war".

 

SALTER, Captain Ernest James - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the war."

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1838/204/208/13 has a letter dated 22 July 1918 from the Officer Commanding, 51st Wing to Headquarters, 9th Brigade, Royal Air Force. It states that he had joined the Royal Air Force [sic] in November 1917 and had been in France since March 1918. With this was a recommendation for an unspecified non-immediate award, sent on the same day (22 July 1918) from the Commanding Officer, No.54 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.51 Wing:

 

For exceptional gallantry and devotion to duty.

 

On 21 July 1918 he went over to an enemy aerodrome and attacked five two-seater Halberstadter and crashed two near their aerodrome.

 

On the evening of the same day when on Offensive Patrol his formation was attacked by 35 enemy aeroplanes. After clever manoeuvring he succeeded in bringing down a Fokker biplane in flames.

 

On 5 July 1918 when with nine other Camels attacked a formation of 30 enemy aeroplanes, bringing down one Albatross.

 

On 4 July 1918 he attacked four Hannoveraner and brought one down.

 

On 19 June 1918 he chased a two-seater about seven miles over the lines at low altitude and sent it down out of control.

 

His example of gallantry of the highest order has been a very great influence in the squadron.

 


Although no British award was granted, this clearly became the basis for one of his French awards, for another document has the following statement; although in French, the absence of accents indicates it was typed on a British typewriter:

 

A fait preuve d'un courage exceptionnel et d'un parfait sentiment de son devoir en detruisant six avion ennemis.

 

Les 19 juin a force un biplane ennemis a atterrir desempare - a descendu les 4 et 5 juillet a attaque au dessus du terrain de Seringes, cinq biplanes Halberstadt dont deux se sont ecrases au sol.

 

Pendant la meme journee au cours d'une seconde patrouille attaque par un group de 35 Fokker biplanes a descendu d'entre eux en flammes.

 

* * * * *

 

SANGSTER, Lieutenant John - Croix de Guerre avec Etoile en Vermeil (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Home uncertain; former locomotive engineer with Grand Trunk Railway. To Oxford, 11 May 1917; to No.2 Air Stores Depot, 7 April 1918; to No.82 Squadron, 16 April 1918; wounded 28 September 1918; invalided to UK, 13 November 1918; with No.11 TDS, 28 December 1918. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war." Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 4 November 1918. The Lieutenant Skinner mentioned is possible Lieutenant Harold William Skinner, who was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross on 8 February 1919. The document itself is mutilated and part of the text is missing from the second paragraph, though it is evident that his machine was attacked by enemy aircraft.

 

During patrol on the morning of 28th September, the weather was very bad and thick fog reaching almost to the ground, and visibility almost impossible - in spite of this Lieutenant Sangster succeeded in locating and bringing back an extremely valuable report as to the position of hostile batteries. In order to do this, he was obliged to fly for considerable periods practically vertically over the enemy's batteries at a height of 1,000 to 2,000 feet, and in doing so had his machine considerably shot about. He attacked and silenced anti-aircraft batteries with his forward gun at a low height.

 


In the afternoon of the same day, hearing that enemy troops had ben reported on the move on roads behind their lines, both he and his observer (Lieutenant Skinner) took up eight bombs with which to attack them. In spite of the presence of numerous hostile machines, the pilot made his way alone to Hooglede, between which town and Staden were found targets which the pilot and observer attacked with bombs and machine guns. Their machine...one of which, in the...which ensued, many of the controls of the machine were cut, and in spite of two severe wounds the observer fired 400 rounds at the enemy machines and kept them off until his pilot was able to reach our own lines and land.

 

Lieutenant Sangster has taken part in some 45 bomb raids and has always shown the greatest determination. When about to be evacuated he prevailed upon the Medical authorities to allow him to return to the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

SAUNDERS, Captain Kenneth Foster - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 May 1918. Born in Victoria, 19 February 1893; home there (electrician employed by B.C. Electric Railway). Attended Wright School at Dayton, Ohio and received ACA certificate 353, 27 October 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 3 November 1915. As of 18 June 1916 at Eastchurch (not under instruction); to Ark Royal, 17 September 1916; at Eastchurch, 18 December 1916; still there as Acting Flight Lieutenant, 18 March 1917; confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 1 April 1917; still at Eastchurch throughout 1917; as of 7 November 1918 with No.204 TDS.

 

For gallantry and devotion to duty during the period from July 1 to December 31, 1917.

 

SAUNDERS, Captain Kenneth Foster - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable flying services". Public Record Office ADM 116/1560 has recommendation dated 1 February 1918 while he was on strength on Dadalus, Eastchurch. No specific award was requested, but the text is undoubtedly the material that would have led to an Air Force Cross.

 

Exceptional zeal and ability in connection with training.

 

I cannot speak too highly of this officer. His example and keenness have done much to keep the standard of work up to a high state of efficiency. He has shown great energy and skill both day and night in going up after hostile machines and on one occasion found and attacked a formation of Gothas by night. He has done 250 hours flying in the last six months which probably constitutes a record.

 

* * * * *

 


SCANDRETT, Captain James Herbert, MC - Mentioned in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. From London, Ontario; commissioned Lieutenant, 6th (London) Battery, Canadian Field Artillery (Non-Permanent Active Militia), January 1913; Lieutenant, 12th Battery, 3rd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, CEF, 25 September 1914; sailed overseas with First Contingent; to France, February 1915; awarded Military Cross (London Gazette, 22 June 1915); appears to have been attached to No.5 Squadron, RFC as observer about this time; shot down 1 August 1915 (broke ribs); to UK, 13 August 1915. Seconded to RFC, Canada, 11 April 1917 to 14 April 1919 (with time off to Air Ministry, 20 December 1918 to April 1919). Served as instructor and adjutant, Leaside and Armour Heights (technical).

 

SCANDRETT, Captain James Herbert, MC - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

SCANDRETT, Captain Wilmer Leonard - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada. Born 24 February 1890 in London, Ontario (brother of J.H. Scandrett); educated at Ridley College and University of Toronto (Bachelor of Forestry Science, 1912). Attended Curtiss Flying School, Toronto, 1915 but no certificate. Commissioned in RFC while in Canada, 7 December 1915; graded Flying Officer, 22 June 1916. Trained in UK at Norwich, Thetford, Gosport and Sedgeford. Served in No.45 Squadron, 22 June to 1 July 1917; No.22 Squadron, 2 July 1916 to 14 January and No.21 Squadron, 14 January to 24 May 1917. To Home Establishment, 24 May 1917; to Canada, 7 December 1917; with No.91 CTS, 7 March 1918; with No.11 TDS, 21 January 1919; to Unemployed List, 5 March 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

SCHROEDER, Lieutenant Richard Henry - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. Born (in England) 16 September 1896; home in Vancouver (although Collishaw thought he was American); Private in 47th Battalion, CEF; overseas November 1915. Attached to RFC as Observer, 2 February 1918; to Reading, 25 February 1918; to A and ICS, Winchester, 2 March 1918; to No.17 TDS, 25 May 1918; to A and ICS, 1 July 1918; to No.4 Squadron, 7 August 1918 to 16 November 1918. With "M" Flight, 16 November 1918 to 10 January 1919. As of 2 May 1919 he was with No.123 (Canadian) Squadron. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

SCOTT, 2nd Lieutenant (Honorary Lieutenant) Blayney Edmund, MC - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918 (citation in issue dated 3 September 1918). Born 12 August 1891; home in Victoria (salesman); went to France as a trooper, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifle; commissioned and awarded Military Cross, 18 October 1917. Appointed Observer (on probation) with RFC, 24 January 1918; to Reading, 18 February 1918; to A and I School, 2 March 1918; to No.1 School of Aerial Gunnery, 13 April 1918; injured, 15 April 1918; to No.53 Squadron, 25 April 1918; qualified as Observer, 26 May 1918; wounded, 5 September 1918; to No.1 School of Armament, 22 November 1918.

 


Whilst on counter-battery attack patrol, flying at a height of 1,500 feet, this officer's petrol tank was struck by machine-gun fire from the ground. As much petrol was escaping he climbed out on the right wing and attempted to plug the hole, but finding he was unable to reach it, he returned to his seat for the spare "Cloche"; he then again climbed back to the tank and succeeded in plugging the hole. During the whole time he was under heavy anti-aircraft and machine-gun fire. The pilot then decided to carry on the patrol, and much valuable information was obtained.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded to Royal Air Force Headquarters on 7 July 1918.

 

On 5th July 1918 at 4.35 a.m. this officer with Temporary Lieutenant Duncan Campbell Dunlop as pilot, whilst on Counter Attack Patrol and flying at a height of 1,500 feet over a point 6,000 yards behind the enemy's line, had the petrol tank hit with machine gun fire from the ground.

 

After carrying on with the patrol for ten minutes and gaining much valuable information, this officer, as much petrol was escaping, climbed on the right wing and attempted to plug the hole, but finding that he was unable to reach the hole because of the longeron, he returned to his seat for the spare "Cloche". He climbed back to the tank again and by means of the "Cloche" he plugged the hole with a handkerchief and cap. This was done under heavy antiaircraft and machine gun fire from the ground. The pilot then decided to carry on with the patrol and much further valuable information of movement of transport and artillery on roads was gained.

 

During the patrol this officer fired 200 rounds at horsed transport with much effect.

 

* * * * *

 

SCOTT, Lieutenant George Tree - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919 or 5 July 1919. Described as "Canadian Expeditionary Force" and services for "Coast Patrol". There may be some confusion, as the DHist cards have two G.T. Scotts, one from Canadian Engineers, CEF, detached to RFC in January 1918 (who does not seem to be out decorated man) and Gordon Tree Scott who was also CEF but appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 25 September 1917; trained at Greenwich, Vendome and Cranwell; to Manston, 15 March 1918; to Dunkirk, 28 March 1918; with No.211 Squadron, 29 March to 1 May 1918; with No.212 Squadron, 1 May to 12 July 1918.

 

* * * * *

 


SCOTT, Lieutenant James Stanley - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 July 1916. Born at Roberval, Quebec, February 18th, 1889. Educated at the Quebec High School and privately. Gazetted as Provisional Lieutenant, 18th Regiment (Franc Tireurs du Saguenay) on October 10th, 1914. Transferred to 5th Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, (1st Quebec Battery), December 31st, 1914. Attended Royal Schools of Artillery at Quebec and Kingston, qualifying for all grades up to field officer by June 1915. Transferred at his own request, June 3rd, 1915, to 26th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery, with which he went to England (August 10th, 1915). Seconded to Royal Flying Corps, October 11th, 1915 at Castle Bromwich. Trained as pilot on Maurice Farmans at RFC School, Birmingham; received Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1988 on November 5th, 1915. Qualified as Flying Officer, March 21st, 1916. Served in France, April 21st to August 1916. Served first with No.5 Squadron (April 21st to July 20th, 1916) and then No.6 Squadron (July 20th to August 24th, 1916). Promoted to Captain and Flight Commander, July 20th, 1916. In August, returning from a flight over enemy lines, he crashed after dark and was severely injured. Graded as "unfit for general service" until 29 January 1917 and sunvequently until 18 July 117. Posted to Canada with Royal Flying Corps Training Brigade, he was (successively) staff officer in charge of training, station commander when part of the training programme was located in Texas, and commander of No.44 Wing, Camp Borden, a post he held until the Armistice. Promoted to Major, June 18th, 1917 and Lieutenant-Colonel, September 1st, 1918. In May 1919, Scott relinquished his commission in the Royal Air Force to return to Army duty. Demobilized, June 3rd, 1919. Appointed Superintendent, Certificates Branch, Canadian Air Board, November 4th, 1919. Soon afterwards the post became that of Controller of Civil Aviation in Canada under the Air Board. He held this position from April 1920 to the end of June 1922. He was also a member of the Air Board (April 1920 to July 1922). From July 13th, 1921 to June 30th, 1922 he was a Wing Commander and Commanding Officer of the semi-permanent Canadian Air Force. After some months in command at Camp Borden, he went overseas to take the RAF Staff Course at Andover. First Canadian officer to qualify as "p.s.a." On his return he became head of the Air Service (Director, RCAF), May 19th, 1924 to February 14th, 1928. Promoted to Group Captain, April 1st, 1925; also appointed Honourary Aide de Camp to the Governor General. He left the RCAF but returned to service during the Second World War. At various times he commanded No.1 Wireless School, No.2 Manning Depot, and No.13 Service Flying Training School. He was also Senior Air Staff Officer at Nos.1 and 2 Training Commands. Upon retirement in February 1945 he was promoted to Air Commodore. Died in Halifax, July 19th, 1975. Canadian War Museum has his medals as AN 19800963-001: Military Cross; Air Force Cross; British War Medal 1914-1919; Victory Medal 19141-1919; Canadian Volunteer Service Medal; War Medal 1939-1945; Jubilee Medal 1935; Efficiency Decoration. See Canadian Defence Quarterly, April 1927.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill. He descended to 1,000 feet to attack a train well behind the enemy's lines, and although his engine was much damaged, his tank pierced and his flying wires carried away by hostile fire he succeeded in landing his machine safely within our lines.

 

SCOTT, Captain James Stanley, MC - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "in recognitoon of distinguished service."

 

* * * * *

 


SENIOR, Captain Harvey Clinton - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. As 2nd Lieutenant (pilot) he sails from Canada, 19 November 1917; with No.106 Squadron, 13 December 1917; to Headquarters, Training Division, 14 December 1917; to No.51 Squadron, 21 December 1917; to No.36 Squadron, 2 February 1918; with No.102 Squadron, 8 February to 12 October 1918; to Home Establishment, 12 October 1918; with No.13 Training Squadron, 27 March 1919.

 

This officer has carried out over 100 night bombing flights and he has been conspicuous for his gallantry and disregard of danger. On the night of the 28th-29th of September [1918], he was detailed to carry out an important reconnaissance of the Army front. Flying very low, he was enabled to make a complete and exhaustive report. During the flight, he obtained direct hits on an ammunition dump, causing a big and prolonged explosion.

 

* * * * *

 

SEYMOUR, Captain Murton Adams - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. Home in Vancouver; attended British Columbia Aero Club flying school. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC in Canada, 15 May 1916; taken on strength at Oxford, 16 June 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.3512 on 1 September 1916; served in No.41 Squadron, 15 October to 22 November 1916. Boarded as "permanently unfit for flying at high altitudes" on 22 January 1917. To Canada, 4 May 1917; appointed Captain and Adjutant, Headquarters, Toronto, 1 July 1918; still with RAF in Toronto, July 1919. Later President of Canadian Flying Clubs Association.

 

* * * * *

 

SEYMOUR, Lieutenant Walter Cecil - Commended for Presence of Mind in Emergency - Air Council statement in London Gazette of 27 September 1918. Home in Niagara Falls, Ontario. Joined RFC in Toronto and as a 2nd Lieutenant he sailed from Halifax on 12 January 1918. At Headquarters, Training Division, 1 February 1918; to No.91 Squadron, 31 May 1918; to No.1 ASD, 30 November 1918; with No.19 Squadron, 4 November to 18 November 1918; invalided to UK, 28 December 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

SHARMAN, Flight Sub-Lieutenant John Edward - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 May 1917. Born in Oak Lake, Manitoba, 11 September 1892; home there; educated there, St.John's Collegiate (Winnipeg) and Jarvis Street Collegiate Institute (Toronto); attended University of Toronto (Applied Science), 1913-1915; with HMCS Niobe, RCNVR, December 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 3 February 1916; served in No.3 (Naval) Wing at Luxeuil and Nancy; to No.10 (N) Squadron in April 1917; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, June 1917 and then to Flight Commander; killed in action, 22 July 1917.

 

For devotion to duty during long distance air raids. On one occasion, after leading a flight in the morning and returning safely he volunteered and flew a bombing machine with a second flight in the afternoon, again acting as leader.


NOTE: This appears to have originated with a recommendation dated 20 March 1917 (found in Public Record Office Air 1/113/15/39/36).

 

For devotion to duty in taking part in nine long distance raids from the Advanced Base, and for successfully protecting the bombing machines in air fights over the objective.

 

SHARMAN, Flight Commander John Edward - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917.

 

For courage and skill in attacking enemy aircraft. On the evening of the 14th June, 1917, while on an offensive patrol with three other scouts, he observed five Albatross scouts. He dived on one of these, firing from his machine gun at about 50 feet range. The scout then went down in a spin.

 

On the 24th June, 1917, with six other machines, he attacked fifteen Albatross scouts. After a combat at close range he destroyed one of these, its right plane and tail plane falling off.

 

SHARMAN, Flight Commander John Edward - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917; mentioned in Canada, 4 August 1917.

 

* * * * *

 

SHARP, Lieutenant Jonathan Gumersal - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1917; citation published in London Gazette dated 9 January 1918. Born 1894; home in Toronto (Divinity Student, University of Toronto); as 2nd Lieutenant, RCA, appointed Balloon Observer, 22 February 1917; joined 4th Balloon Wing on 20 March 1917; appointed Observer, 1 June 1917; to No.34 Squadron, 8 June 1917. May have gone to No.28 Squadron, 28 March 1918; wounded in Italy, 29 March 1918; hospitalized until 6 May 1918 when he rejoined No.34 Squadron; to Home Establishment, 2 June 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When on patrol his machine was brought down by an anti-aircraft gun and turned completely over on landing, pinning the pilot underneath. Second Lieutenant Sharp, who had been thrown clear, immediately went to his assistance and pulled him out. They then ran towards the canal, which they swam, and reached our lines in safety. From the moment their machine was hit until the reached our lines they were under continual fire, but both escaped unwounded.

 

* * * * *

 


SHAW, 2nd Lieutenant Frederick Barr - Croix de Guerre (France) - authority uncertain; mentioned in Bank of Commerce Letters from the Front but should be checked. Born 14 May 1895 in Forest, Ontario; enlisted in RNAS, 18 April 1917; flew night bombing raids on Handley-Page machines with No.100 Squadron; demobilized 13 November 1919 (all this should be checked). Possibly American (Kansas City, Missouri) by the time he enlisted.

 

* * * * *

 

SHEARER, Captain Ambrose Bernice - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918. Born 8 May 1893 in Ontario; home in Neepawa, Manitoba (mechanic and driver). On 10 June 1915 he was with "Canadian School of Aviation, Toronto"; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1864 at Curtiss School, Toronto, 6 October 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant that day; sailed from Montreal on Metagawa, 15 October 1915; at Chingford, 3 November 1915; injured in bomb explosion, 23 January 1917 while with No.3 (Naval) Wing; in Canada on sick leave, June 1917; at Maidstone, 25 November 1915; at Manstone, 15 October 1917; with No.66 Wing, 12 September 1918; wounded 21 October 1918; NEP, 17 November 1918; hospitalized in London, 2 January 1919. Later an RCAF Air Vice-Marshal. NOTE: A document in his biographical file lists his awards as including the French Croix de Guerre with Palm (confirmed by photographs), Italian Silver Medal for Military Valour and Italian Croci de Guerra. A fuzzy picture taken about 1925 seems to confirm this; the clear wartime portrait which shows his French medal does not show ribbons for the Italian awards - but in any case he would at that time have been forbidden to wear them as having been granted by what was then an enemy country.

 

SHEARER, Major Ambrose Bernice - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. For services in Mediterranean.

 

SHEARER, Major Ambrose Bernice - Croix de Guerre with Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated ? Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a document dated 18 March 1917 indicating he was cited in French Army Order 4632D for services in No.3 (N) Wing.

 

SHEARER, Captain (Acting) Major Ambrose Bernice - Silver Medal for Military Valour (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

* * * * *

 

SHEPARD, Lieutenant Evander - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. American, home in Tennessee but joined Canadian Forces (Jackson List); to Headquarters, Training Division, 14 February 1918; joined No.92 Squadron, 26 June 1918.

 


On 4th November, in low clouds and heavy rain, this officer led his patrol to attack enemy troops on the ground. Descending to so low an altitude that his machine was marked by his own bombs, he attacked a dense concentration of enemy troops and transport in face of heavy fire at point-blank range. He has accounted for six enemy aircraft and inspires the greatest confidence in his patrol by his intrepid daring and resource.

 

* * * * *

 

SHERREN, Lieutenant Percy Clark - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 November 1916. Born 26 July 1893 at Crapaud, Prince Edward Island; home there; commissioned in 26th Canadian Infantry Battalion. To Reading, 16 May 1916; to No.14 RS, 19 June 1916. Obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.3281 on 6 July 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 30 July 1916; to No.49 Squadron, 1 August 1916; served in No.27 Squadron, 11 August 1916 to 14 March 1917; to Central Flying School, 24 March 1917; to Canada as instructor, 30 April 1917; with No.92 CTS, 28 October 1917; to No.124 (?), 27 May 1918; to Home Establishment, 19 August, 1918; to No.98 Squadron, 24 August 1918 as Major and Commanding Officer. Remained in RAF after the war; served in Waziristan Campaign, 1920-1922; promoted to Wing Commander, 1930, commanding No.10 (B) Squadron for three years. In 1934 named to command No.1 Armament Training Camp, Catfoss; later had administrative duties at Home Aircraft Depot, Henlow. Retired in June 1936. Killed 10 September 1937 in King's Cup Race.

 

He led a successful bomb raid, collecting and landing his formation with great skill. Later, he dropped bombs on an ammunition train from 500 feet, causing much damage.

 

SHERREN, Captain Percy Clark - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 June 1917. No published citation. Public Record Office Air 1/1158/204/5/2488 has recommendation submitted by Major-General H.M. Trenchard, CB, DSO, Commanding Royal Flying Corps in the Field.

 

For consistent good work as Flight Commander as the leader of many raids. He is an excellent formation leader and was especially successful on November 18th, 1916, when he blew up the rolling stock at Hirson and partially destroyed the station.

 

* * * * *

 

SHIELDS, Lieutenant William Ernest - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Toronto, 15 October 1892; home in Lipton, Saskatchewan (father managed a grain elevator). Possibly in CEF before joining RFC in Canada, 1917; sailed from Canada, 29 October 1917; appointed Flying Officer, 3 November 1917; to No.93 Squadron, 23 November 1917; served with No.41 Squadron, 25 March 1918 to 19 January 1919. It appears that the DFC was recommended about 17 August 1918. Killed at High River Air Station, Alberta, 1 August 1921 in crash of DH.4, G-CYBV. When taking off for a forestry patrol, he began a climbing turn before attaining sufficient airspeed and side-slipped into the ground. See RCAF file 1021-3-125, "DH.4 Machine, G-CYBV" in National Archives of Canada, RG.24, Volume 5090.

 


A gallant officer who inspires others by his courage and dash. In six weeks he destroyed six enemy aircraft and drove down three others outs of control. On one occasion he single-handed engaged three scouts, driving down two of them.

 

SHIELDS, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) William Ernest - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

Bold in the attack and skilful in manoeuvre, this officer is conspicuous for his success and daring in aerial combats. On 22nd September, when on offensive patrol, he was attacked by fourteen Fokkers; he succeeded in shooting down one. On another occasion he was attacked by six scouts and destroyed one of those. In all, since 28th June, this officer has accounted for fourteen enemy aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation passed from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 3 November 1918:

 

On the 17 August 1918 when on offensive patrol northeast of Armentieres, Captain Shields was attacked by six enemy scouts. He destroyed one, which fell near Deulemont.

 

On the 24 September 1918 when on offensive patrol near Comines, his formation was attacked by 14 Fokkers. Captain Shields shot down one of them.

 

On the 29 September 1918 when on offensive patrol southeast of Comines, Captain Shields shot down a balloon in flames.

 

On the 27 October 1918 when on patrol south of Mullem, Captain Shields shot down a balloon over Audenarde.

 

On the 30 October 1918 when on offensive patrol east of Tournai, Captain Shields shot down a Halberstadt two-seater, and another two-seater, type unknown, both of them falling near Mansart.

 

This officer has now accounted for 14 enemy aircraft since the 28th June 1918.

 

SHIELDS, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) William Ernest - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 July 1919. Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommedation.

 

A Flight Commander of great courage and untiring energy who inspires his patrols with the real fighting spirit. He has successfully destroyed 17 enemy aeroplanes.

 

Examples of Combat Reports filed by Shields:

 


12 June 1918, 1.00 p.m. SE.5 D6023 "At about 1.00 p.m. while on offensive patrol over Guerbigny our formation dived on five E.A. Albatross Scouts. I fired two bursts into one H.A. and observed him go down evidently out of control. I engaged a second E.A. but was obliged to break off the combat on account of engine trouble and gun trouble."

 

3 July 1918, 7.10 p.m., SE5a D.3567, "While on O.P. at about 7.10 pm, southeast of Villers Brettonneaux, at 14,500 feet, patrol engaged 12 E.A., Pfalz Scouts. In dived on one E.A. and fired two bursts of 25 rounds from each gun into it whereupon E.A. went down vertically completely out of control. One of the E.A. getting on my tail, I immediately half-rolled, E.A. doing the same and going down, getting onto this E.A.'s tail I fired two bursts of about 50 rounds at close range, E.A. went vertically down and crashed. I climbed to get height, 2 E.A. following me. I dived upon them, E.A. turning east and diving, I followed, got three good bursts into one E.A. who spun and I observed him crash in a small wood S.E. of Villers-Brettoneaux. Engaging a fourth E.A. my Lewis jammed and Vickers belt broke so I was obliged to break off the combat. Some Camels joined in just before I left." CO write "I consider first E.A, to be completely out of control, the other two decisive."

 

5 July 1918, 0710 hours, D.3567, "Whilst on O.P. at about 14,000 feet over Hangest at 7.10 a.m. I observed 3 E.A., Pfalz Scouts. I climbed and got into the sun and dived on E.A., firing two long bursts at one at short range. E.A. went down vertically but I could not observe any further result owing to the presence of the remaining E.A. I then dived on another E.A. and first two good bursts at short range. E.A. went down out of control and crashed east of Hangest. The third E.A. was by this time too far off to engage, going east."

 

17 August 1918: 9.15 to 9.30 a.m., SE.5 C1912 "Whilst on O.P. at 9.00 a.m. over Armentieres, I dropped two 20-pound bombs as I was attacked by six E.A., Pfalz Scouts. At 9.15 a.m. I attacked one E.A., Pfalz Scout, at 10,000 feet N.E. of Armentieres, firing two long bursts into same at 100 yards range. E.A. spun towards the ground, I followed, and when he flattened out, fired another burst at very close range causing E.A. to crash near Deulemont.

 

"At 9.30 a.m. east of Armentieres I attacked another E.A. Pfalz Scout and was in a dogfight with E.A. when four other Pfalz Scouts dived on me from out of the sun. My Lewis gun jammed so I immediately dived towards our lines. E.A. followed and fired at long range and then retired.

 

27 October 1918, SE5 C1912 - "Whilst on O.P. at 0940 hours I went down on a H.K.B. south of Mellen and fired 60 rounds Buckingham and 60 rounds ordinary into it from 30 yards range at a height of 1,000 feet. The balloon began to smoke and then burst into flames. I then had to return on account of my radiator being hit by A.A. fire."

 

28 October 1918, C1912, 0810 on Line Patrol "At 0810 I dived on a H.K.B. at Audenarde which was at about 700 feet. I fired about 70 rounds Buckingham and 70 rounds Vickers from about 75 yards range and had to zoom over balloon to avoid colliding with it. Lieutenant MacLeod followed me in dive and the balloon burst into flames. I was hit several times by 'Archie' which was very active.


30 October 1918, C1912, 1045, "Whilst on O/P. I attacked a Fokker biplane at 8,000 feet east of Tournai, and followed it to within about 50 feet of the ground but was unable to crash same.

 

"At 1130 I dived on a Halberstadt 2-seater over Mansart Station and fired about 100 rounds into it. E.A. dived east, and Lieutenant MacLeod followed it. I immediately dived on a second Halberstadt and followed it down to about 900 feet, firing 150 rounds into E.A. which crashed in a field near Mansart Station.

 

"At 1145 I attacked an E.A. two-seater, D.F.W. North of Mansart Station. I fired about 150 rounds into this E.A. from about 100 yards range, following E.A. to within 500 feet of the ground, and observed it crash just north of Mansart Station.

 

* * * * *

 

SHOEBOTTOM, Lieutenant Lionel Robert - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918; citation in London Gazette dated 3 August 1918. Born 30 July 1895 in Lucknow, Ontario; home in London, Ontario (civil engineer, although his mother is reported as living in Detroit, Michigan). Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, in Ottawa, 14 March 1917; at Vendome, 28 April 1917; at Cranwell, 3 July 1917; at Manston, 23 August 1917; at Dover, 15 September 1917; served with Nos.7 and 16 (Naval) Squadrons. To Home Establishment, 28 August 1918. As of 7 November 1918 with No.116 Squadron; to Unemployed List, 27 April 1919. Worked in England after the war in a steel company; killed in factory explosion following bombing, 5 May 1941.

 

A pilot of great skill, courage and determination. On one day within the past month he has been in the air for 4 1/2 hours, and on returning, learned that a long distance bombing raid would take place that night. He immediately obtained permission to join in the raid, and was in the air for 5 3/4 hours on this expedition - a total period of ten hours in a twelve-hour day.

 

This officer has been successful on numerous occasions in bombing expeditions by night and displays a fine spirit of perseverance in all difficulties.

 

* * * * *

 


SHOOK, Flight Commander Alexander MacDonald - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1917. Born 2 December 1888 in Clarkson or Tioga, Peel County, Ontario; home in Red Deer, Alberta (school teacher); attended Curtiss School, Toronto, and obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.2056, 5 November, 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, same date; sailed from Montreal on SS Missanabi, 13 November 1915 (although also given as being on strength, Eastbourne, 5 November 1915); to Dover, 10 January 1916; to No.5 Wing, 11 March 1916; injured in Caudron accident, 14 May 1916; to Cranwell, 27 September 1916; to Dover, 7 October 1916; returned to duty, 19 October 1916; Flight Lieutenant, January 1917 with No.5 (N) Wing, Dunkirk; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 29 April 1917; Flight Commander, May 1917; to No.4 (N) Squadron, August 1917; wounded, 21 October 1917; No.204 Squadron, 15 April to 3 July 1918; as Major, RAF, in charge of Leysdown Station, July 1918; to No.2 School of Observation, Manston, 14 September 1918; to Repatriation Depot, 20 February 1919; to Unemployed List, 15 March 1919.

 

For exceptional gallantry and remarkable skill and courage whilst serving with the RNAS at Dunkirk during May and June 1917, in repeatedly attacking and destroying hostile aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a letter from Wing Captain (Dover Patrol) to Headquarters, RNAS dated 15 June 1917 citing A.M. Shook, A.J. Chadwick, and L.F.W. Smith as above, adding "more especially on the occasions of hostile bombing attacks on England."

 

The same document also has a memo dated 11 June 1917 from Headquarters, No.4 (Naval) Wing, Dunkirk, stating he was on "No.4 Squadron attached to this Wing" and stating that he was "deserving of special recognition" (although no particular award named):

 

This officer has led his flight with great skill since the squadron was formed. He has had many combats, and I credit him with the destruction of six hostile machines.

 

On May 18th he was forced to land in the sea owing to engine failure and swam to a destroyer which picked him up; he was again leading his flight the next day with his usual energy and determination.

 

He is largely responsible for the training in formation flying of the remainder of the pilots in the squadron.

 

Folio 165 of Air 1/74 also has the following (drafted circa July 1917):

 

He has fought very many actions in the air, in the course of which he has destroyed seven enemy machines and one enemy balloon. His conduct has always been most courageous.

 

SHOOK, Flight Lieutenant Alexander MacDonald - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917. Public Records Office Air 1/74 has extracts from French Army General Order No.46 (date missing from sheet supplied) with citation:

 

A pris part de nombreuses patrouilles offensives qui ont efficacement protg contre l'aviation ennemie, les reconnaissance photographiques francaises et les avions de rglage.

 

SHOOK, Flight Commander Alexander MacDonald - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1918.


In recognition of services in the prosecution of the war.

 

SHOOK, Captain (Acting Major) Alexander MacDonald - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

SHRIVE, 2nd Lieutenant Frank J. - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per ?. Born in England, 2 December 1897; home in Hamilton, Ontario (ledger keeper). Taken on strength of No.1 School of Aeronautics, 21 June 1918; to RAF Headquarters, 25 April 1919; with Elope Squadron, North Russian Expeditionary Force. Served in RCAF, Second World War, Non-Flying List.

 

SHRIVE, 2nd Lieutenant Frank J. - Order of St. Anne (Russia) - awarded as per ?

 

* * * * *

 

*SIMON, Lieutenant Walter Carl - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. American (home in New Orleans, Louisiana where he was a salesman and advertiser); joined RFC in Canada; sailed from Halifax as 2nd Lieutenant, 12 January 1918; taken on strength in England, 1 February 1918; with No.34 Squadron, Italy, 23 June to 3 July 1918; with No.139 Squadron, Italy, 3 July to 15 November 1918; to Home Establishment, 15 November 1918; to BEF, 27 March 1919. Died in Kingsport, Tennessee, 16 May 1971 (see Cross and Cockade, Winter 1971); reputed to have helped form Peruvian Air Corps and was a Colonel in USAAF during Second World War. J.J. Smith list (wahetever that is) credited him with five enemy aircraft, although this seems unlikely given the nature of his work.

 

This officer has carried out sixteen successful reconnaissances, many at long distances, and frequently strongly opposed by hostile aircraft. In this service Lieutenant Simon has shown great ability and determination, rendering excellent reports and obtaining much valuable information. In the encounters with hostile aircraft he has proved himself a gallant and skilful fighter.

 

* * * * *

 

SIMPSON, Captain George Howard - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Toronto, 11 November 1890; home there (salesman). Obtained ACA Certificate No.346 at Wright School, Dayton, Ohio, 13 October 1915; appoined Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 6 October 19915; Chingford, 3 November 1915; Killingholme, 5 March 1916; Yarmouth, 5 September 1916; Pegasus, 14 August 1917; leave in Canada, December 1917 to January 1918; Cranwell, 10 March 1918; Nairana, 14 August 1918; Ayr, 18 November 1918; relinquished commission, 24 January 1919. For services in White Sea.

 

* * * * *


SIMPSON, 2nd Lieutenant George Kenneth - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1917. Born in Liverpool, England; educated at Dulwich College; home in Vancouver but returned to Britain soon after outgreat of war, although his mother continued to reside in Vancouver. Commissioned in RGA [?] in March 1915; to RFC in October 1915; posted to Kite Balloon Section as observer in March 1916. Went to front on 25 May 1916; gazetted Balloon Commander, 6 March 1917. Severely wounded, 1 March 1917 while serving with No.14 Kite Balloon Section, 4th Army; died of wounds, 7 March 1917. Another officer wrote, "Simpson's accident was due to his own gallantry in waiting till the air mechanic who was with him was clear of the balloon, which was in flames, before he himself jumped. If ever a man deserved honour it is dear old Simpson. The flaming balloon suddenly dropped, overtook Simpson, set fire to his parachute, and the whole lot dropped blazing to the ground." It was his second parachute descent. The citation suggests that it was drafted after the fatal incident but before Simpson's death, as a posthumous MC was not allowed:

 

While observing from a balloon which was set on fire, he went to the assistance of his fellow observer, and would not leave the balloon himself until he had seen the other observer clear. He was severely burnt.

 

* * * * *

 

SINCLAIR, 2nd Lieutenant Findlay Willard - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919. The records at Directorate of History and Heritage are confusing, for they show a 2nd Lieutenant Findlay. Sinclair from Calgary as joining No.4 Squadron on 26 June 1918 but being with No.4 Squadron, 7 November 1918. They also show one F. Willard Sinclair of Calgary who joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force (21st Battalion), 19 June 1916 who transferred to the RFC, 20 February 1918 and as of 1 January 1919 was with No.7 Squadron. There is nothing indicate that either was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross, and there is even the possibility that they may (or may not) be the same man. Nevertheless, a DFC is awarded in October 1919 to Findlay Willard Sinclair. Aeroplane of 16 May 1928 carries a notice that Flight Lieutenant Findlay Willard Sinclair, DFC. youngest son of Mr. And Mrs, F.D. Sinclair of Calgary, Alberta, Canada was engaged to Dora, only daughter of Mr. And Mrs. Washington Jewell, of Bullard, Hadley Grove, Barnet, and Wiveliscombe, Somerset. There seems no doubt, then, that he was Canadian and was awarded a DFC, but the question arises as to the unit in which he was serving when recommended for this award.

 

* * * * *

 

SISLEY, Major Malcolm Millard - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in Toronto; appointed Probationary 2nd Lieutenant in RFC, Canada, 1 January 1916; to RFC, Reading, 13 January 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 10 July 1916; with No.10 Squadron, 17 July (or 25 July) to 25 November 1916; with No.16 Squadron, 25 November to 4 December 1916; with No.10 Squadron, 4 December 1916 to 19 March 1917. To Eastern Group, N.E.P., 11 July 1917; to Canada, 1 June 1918; to Headquarters, 30 December 1918. RCAF Group Captain in Second World War. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".


* * * * *

 

*SMITH, Flight Lieutenant Guy Duncan - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 July 1917. Born 21 October 1894 in Britain; parents still British when his father operated a motion picture theatre in Oakland, California; educated in England. Prior to joining RNAS he was a radio telegraph operator; he had a cloak-and-dagger experience (in Mexico ?); in a letter he said, "I am the operator who put the wireless set on the German steamer Mazatlan out of commission last September [1914] on account of them wanting me to let a German Navy operator use it and get into communication with the cruiser Leipzig and send her the positions, dates of sailing and destinations of British merchant ships, coming up and down the Pacific coast." Accepted in Canada as RNAS candidate, June 1915; returned to San Francisco and began training at Christofferson School about 14 July 1915. A letter from the school stated he had passed his tests, and the Naval Service accepted this without waiting for ACA Certificate. Sworn in at Ottawa as Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 18 September 1915, backdated to 6 September 1915; sailed on Corinthian from Montreal, 21 September 1915. Reported drowned on 21 April 1917, but on 7 May 1917 reported as having returned to base safely. After service in Egypt he was returned to Britain, and on 12 September 1919 sailed on Megantic for North America, his destination being given as Oakland, California. See RG.9 C.14 Folder 15, File 2.

 

In recognition of his services in the East Indies and Egypt Seaplane Squadron during the period April 1st, 1916 to March 31st, 1917. During this time he took part in several valuable reconnaissances and bombing flights, obtaining important information and doing considerable damage to enemy organizations.

 

SMITH, Flight Lieutenant Guy Duncan - Croix de Guerre (France) - effective 22 February 1918.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1717 has a remarkable document. On 30 January 1919, writing from No.64 (Naval) Wing, Seaplane Base, Port Said, Egypt, he described a remarkable adventure:

 

I have the honour to lay before you my claim to the 1914-1915 medal under the Admiralty regulations which entitles the Merchant Service to it.

 

In August 1914 I was employed aboard the German steamer Mazattan in the capacity of Assistant Purser and Wireless Operator.

 

At the outbreak of war, the German flag was replaced by the Mexican and, in my capacity as Assistant Purser, I became aware that the ship was loading coal for the German cruiser Leipzig.

 

I immediately sent word to the British Counsel in San Francisco to that effect; upon his informing the U.S. authorities, the ship was stopped and an investigation held, and not until the German Consul, General von Bupp, has sworn that the coal was for a bona fide merchant in Guaymas, mexico, and put up a bond for $ 20,000 to that effect, was the ship allowed to proceed.

 

After we had got to sea, Captain F. Jebsen of the Imperial German Navy came to me and said that the coal was for the Leipzig and that I had to get into communication with her and gave me the secret call-signs. Upon my refusing he became very threatening, as also did the rest of the crew who were at all times very abusive to me.

 

So they said I must show the German Wireless Operator how to work the set, which I pretended to do, but in reality put it out of commission by closing the coupling and altering the clips of the helix, thereby shortening the wave-length to such an extent that the set was useless for transmitting, but could not be detected without the use of a wave meter.

 

Gustav Traub, the German operator, spent three nights and two days trying to get the Leipzig but failed. Finally we met the Leipzig but only transferred a few stores and some reservists.

 


We then proceeded to Guaymas, the arrangement being that we should leave the coal on lighters at the entrance of the harbour and the Leipzig would come alongside afterwards and take it.

 

I slipped ashore in a dug-out canoe and told Mr. Fearson, the British Consul there, that the Leipzig was coming round in a few days time. He sent word to Esquimault, British Columbia and as a result of this eight hours after the Leipzig had taken the coal and left, the HMS Newcastle came into Guaymas Harbour.

 

We then proceeded to Topolobampo harbour, and while there Captain Jebsen came to me with a long code message and which he said was press news for the Leipzig and that I had to send it as Gustav Traub was unable to work the set.

 

I refused at first, but afterwards said I would, and then pretended to send it with the set on the wrong wave length.

 

I told the Captain I had sent it and tore it up and threw it overboard. The next day the same thing was repeated.

 

The crew had made a number of threats to kill me and throw me overboard, and one of them struck me and another spat at men.

 

The message referred to I found out later related to the dates of sailings of British and Allied merchant ships. Finally the Germans found out that I hadn't sent the messages, and I have no doubt as the Austrian cook came and warned me [they] would have killed me had we not been captured by Mexicans the same night.

 

As a result of my evidence given later the Mazattan was captured by HMS Kent and the German Consul von Bopp forfeited his bond of $ 20,000, and is now serving a sentence of seven years for un-neutral acts. I also served as Wireless Operator on the British steamer Knight of the Thistle in November and December 1914.

 

All these facts Admiral Storey, who was in charge of HMC Dockyard, Esquimault, British Columbia is well acquainted with, as also is Sir Samuel Evans, President of the Prize Courts.

 

Also, I joined the Royal Naval Air Service on July 2nd, 1915, and was flying on the South Coast of England in 1915.

 

The peculiar circumstances surrounding my case necessitates me making this rather lengthy statement of my services in 1914-15.

 

* * * * *

 

*SMITH, 2nd Lieutenant Jewitt Rice - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, 26 April 1900 (parents from Hamilton, Ontario); home in Brooklyn; educated in United States. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, 8 December 1917. Cited with 2nd Lieutenant Conrad Alan Moth.

 

On the night of November 4/5, these officer started out to bomb a railway station, but after two hours they were conpelled to return owing to engine trouble. Obtaining another machine they again set out, although from the weather chart they realized that there was every probability of a gale before morning. Reaching the objective they obtained three direct hits. On the return journey they mey a storm and landed at the aerodrome in a 60-mile per hour gale after a flight of six hours and fifteen minutes in addition to the two hours' flight on their first attempt. It is difficult to speak too highly of the fine spirit of determination and devotion to duty displayed by these officers on this occasion.

 

* * * * *

 

SMITH, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Lewis Ewing - Croix de Guerre (France) - reported in Canada, 16 June 1917. Born 8 December 1889 in Pike River, Quebec; home in Mystic, Quebec; student at McGill University, 1910-1911 and 1913-1914; also surveyor for railways. Attended Curtiss Flying School, obtaining Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1853 dated 30 September 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant in Ottawa same day; January 1916 at Detling, Kent; shot down and killed on No.3 (Naval) Wing on Brebach, 25 February 1917; medal sent to his fatherat "<ystic", Quebec. Public Records Office Air 1/74 has communication dated 5 March 1917 from Grand Quartier Generale, Service Aeronautique noting several RNAS personnel cited in Orders of 4 Groupe de Bombardement (the French formation operating with No.3 Wing); citation repeated in Air 1/113/15/39/36; for Smith it reads:

 

A eu de nombreux combats avec les avions ennemis au cours d'une expdition grande distance; s'est toujours fait remarquer par sa bravoure et son sang-froid.

 

* * * * *

 

SMITH, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Langley Frank Willard - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1917. Born 15 August 1897 in Philipsburg, Ontario; educated in St.Louis, Missouri, 1904-1907, New York City 1907-1909, Toronto 1910-1914 (auto salesman). Accepted as RNAS candidate, 27 January 1916 on proviso that he obtain a pilot's certificate. Attended Thomas School at St.Augustine, Florida but on failure of school he joined Curtiss School, Newport Mews, obtaining ACA Certificate No.521 on 5 July 1916. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 29 June 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.3998 on 11 December 1916. Killed in action 13 June 1917 with No.4 (Naval) Squadron, No.4 Wing. Citation to DSC same as for Shook, Chadwick and Enstone.

 

For exceptional gallantry and remarkable skill and courage whilst serving with the RNAS at Dunkirk during May and June 1917, in repeatedly attacking and destroying hostile aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a letter from Wing Captain (Dover Patrol) to Headquarters, RNAS dated 15 June 1917 citing A.M. Shook, A.J. Chadwick, and L.F.W. Smith as above, adding "more especially on the occasions of hostile bombing attacks on England."

 

The same document also has a memo dated 11 June 1917 from Headquarters, No.4 (Naval) Wing, Dunkirk, stating he was on "No.4 Squadron attached to this Wing" and stating that he was "deserving of special recognition" (although no particular award named):

 

This officer has shown great courage and daring as a pilot. I credit him with the destruction of five hostile machines and two hostile balloons.

 

He has on several occasions descended very low in order to attack hostile aircraft and on the 5th June after attacking a balloon crossed the lines at 2,000 feet.

 

SMITH, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Langley Frank Willard - Commander, Order of the Crown (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 February 1918.

 

SMITH, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Langley Frank Willard - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 February 1918. Not citation other than "for distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

* * * * *

 

SMITH, Captain Russell Nelson - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Home in Leamington, Ontario; attended University of Toronto; proceeded overseas with a COTC draft, December 1915; commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 13th Hampshire Regiment; to RFC, November 1916 and to France, December 1916 (No.54 Squadron). Wounded, Monchy-le-Preux, 14 April 1917. Instructor, No.40 Squadron, Croydon, June 1917; instructor, Special Flying School, Gosport, August 1917; Flight Commander, Flying Instructor School, Shoreham, August 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

SMYTH, Lieutenant Conn - Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919. Home in Toronto; prominent athlete (and later of Maple Leafs Hockey Team); awarded MC for services with CEF. To RFC, Reading, 18 May 1917; to No.6 Squadron, 26 September 1917; shot down and taken prisoner, 14 October 1917; repatriated 28 December 1918. One of several listed in a block of awards to personnel "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

* * * * *

 

SODEN, Captain Frank Ormond - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born in Canada, 3 November 1895, but may have been raised in England (father in UK during war). Commissioned in South Staffordshire Regiment, November 1914; granted Royal Aero Club Certificate 3502, 9 September 1916; seconded to RFC, 16 November 1916; served in No.60 Squadron, July 1917 to 1918; No.41 Squadron, 13 July 1918 to war's end. Remained in postwar RAF (to No.7 Squadron as Wing Commander, December 1935); awarded Bar to DFC, 19 December 1922 "for distinguished services in Kurdistan"; retired as Group Captain, General Duties, 1 April 1939.

 

A bold and skilful officer who has accounted for three enemy aeroplanes and two balloons during recent operations.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation sent from 2nd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 31 October 1918.

 

On the 25 August 1918 when on Offensive Patrol south of Comines, Captain Soden shot down a Fokker biplane which was seen to crash by another squadron.

 

On the 15 September 1918 when on Offensive Patrol near Beaucamps, Captain Soden shot down an enemy balloon.

 

On the 14 October 1918 when on Offensive Patrol east of Roulers, Captain Soden destroyed a Fokker which crashed northeast of Courtrai.

 

On the 26 October 1918 Captain Soden destroyed a balloon near Mellen.

 

On the 28 October 1918 when on Offensive Patrol near Ooteghem Captain Soden forced a Fokker biplane to land within our lines, having wounded the pilot in the leg.

 

Previous to joining this Brigade, Captain Soden destroyed a Fokker biplane west of Frayard on 8 August 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

SORSOLEIL, 2nd Lieutenant Jack Victor - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 April 1918. Home in Toronto (student); joined RFC in Canada and described as "the youngest cadet yet graduated from Burwash Hall and the aviation Camps, Mohawk and Borden." Enlisted at 17 and had no accidnts. Overseas in August 1917. With "C" Squadron, Upavon, 14 September 1917l to Expeditionary Force, No.2 ASD, 3 November 1917; with No.84 Squadron, 16 November 1917 to 13 July 1918; to Home Establishment, 13 July 1918; to Canada, 27 February 1919; relinquished commission, 12 March 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While on patrol with three other scouts he engaged a hostile formation of ten scouts, driving one of these down. While climbing to rejoin his patrol he was attacked by an enemy scout, upon which he opened fire at close range, bringing it down spinning, with the result that it crashed to earth. He has also driven down one enemy machine in flames, and sent another crashing to earth, where it was destroyed. His gallantry and skill have been most conspicuous.

 

* * * * *

 

*SPEAKS, Lieutenant John C. - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. American in the RFC (home in Columbus, Ohio). Joined RFC in Canada, 16 July 1917; appointed Flying Officer and 2nd Lieutenant, 1 November 1917; instructed with RFC/Canada scheme. Overseas to No.42 Training Squadron, 4 July 1918; to No.2 Fighting School, 5 August 1918; with No.56 Squadron, 16 August or 28 September 1918 to 4 April 1919 (wounded or injured). Reported to have shot down two enemy aircraft. Afterwards instructed Polish air force with another American, Lieutenant Graves (reported killed stunting in Poland sometime after 1925). Died in Westport, Connecticut, 9 January 1965.

 

A gallant and courageous officer. On October 8 he attacked from a height of 100 feet an enemy balloon on the ground, nine miles over the line, setting it on fire. Later, seeing a train, he descended to 50 feet and fired at it until it stopped. He then attacked and scattered horse transport, causing great confusion, and before finishing his patrol Lieutenant Speaks bombed a hostile town.

 

* * * * *

 

SPRANGLE, 2nd Lieutenant Archibald Thomas - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Home and background uncertain; joined RFC Canada, 28 November 1917. Mentioned 27 August and 30 August 1918 in No.5 Squadron work; No.5 Squadron history credits him and Galbraith as destroying first enemy aircraft in Battle of Amiens.5th Brigade War Diary mentions him and Lieutenant Galbraith of No.5 Squadron sending down many Zone Calls on hostile batteries, 3 September 1918.

 

A skilful observer of great determination. Between September 1st and 5th, under most adverse weather conditions, and in face of hostile attacks in the air, Second Lieutenant Sprangle directed fire on 61 enemy batteries, besides infantry, mechanical transport and artillery on the move. In this service he displayed marked ability, and the successful results were largely due to his keenness and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1255/204/8/39 has recommendation submitted by Major C.H. Gardner, Commanding Officer, No.5 Squadron and subsequently screened by Lieutenant Colonel E.L. Gossage, Officer Commanding, No.1 Wing, Royal Air Force; essentially the same text is also found in Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127, when it was being sent from Headquarters, 1st Brigade, Royal Air Force to Royal Air Force Headquarters in the field (10 September 1918).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the recent operations carried out by the Canadian Corps. During the period 1st to 5th September 1918, this officer, as observer with Lieutenant C.F. Galbraith, DFC, has been instrumental in bringing fire to bear on 61 hostile batteries with most successful results. Besides this, he has directed the fire of our artillery on to infantry and mechanical transport targets as well as artillery on the move, in addition to dealing with them effectively with machine gun fire from low altitudes. This has been carried out under exceedingly adverse weather conditions and in the face of hostile opposition in the air, and the whole of his work has been characterized with the utmost skill and determination.

 

* * * * *

 

SPRIGGS, 2nd Lieutenant William - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Home in Elgemere, Port Williams, Nova Scotia; student at Acadia University; formerly in 17th Reserve Battalion, CEF; taken on strength of RFC at Oxford, 4 January 1918; to BEF, 16 August 1918 (A and W Pilot); with No.8 Squadron, 16 August 1918 to 11 January 1919. Cited with 2nd Lieutenant Oscar Berridge.

 

On October 17 these officers carried out a contact patrol reconnaissance of the enemy lines in the face of most trying weather conditions. Flying for three quarters of an hour in pouring rain they located enemy troops, and dispersed them with bombs and machine-gun fire. They also engaged and shot down in flames an enemy two-seater. The courage and endurance displayed by these officers on this occasion deserve very high praise.

 

* * * * *

 

SPROAT, Charles Beverley, Flight Sub-Lieutenant - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1917. Born 30 October 1896; home in Toronto; son of an architect, he attended Upper Canada College and Ridley College, 1907-1915. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 1 December 1915; to Chingford, 1 December 1915; to Eastchurch, 20 March 1916; to Dover, 25 April 1916; with No.5 (N) Wing, 28 May 1916 to 17 March 1917; to Dover, 17 March 1917 to 2 July 1917 (War Flight, 6 June 1917 onwards); to No.5 (N) Squadron, 2 July 1917; in Canada on leave, January to May, 1918; to Yarmouth, 17 May 1918 for North Sea patrols; to No.212 Squadron (date uncertain); to Crystal Palace, 17 March 1919; to Unemployed List, 18 March 1919. The following is from Canada, 10 November 1917 and from Jackson List notes; should it be considered an official citation ?

 

Carried out a bombing attack on Brugge Docks on September 4th, 1917, obtaining direct hits. He was subject to heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire, and his machine was shot about and radiator pierced.

 

NOTE: AIR 1/640/17/122/202 (MG.40 D.1 Volume 12) has details of raid of 4 September 1917 using DH.4s, with the following official notation:

 

Flight Sub-Lieutenant Charles Beverley Sproatt is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Service Cross. In addition, this officer has taken part in twenty-six bombing raids.

 

* * * * *

 

STANGER, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Stanley - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Born 10 July 1894. Home in Montreal (investment broker; served in CEF (dispatch rider); taken on strength at Oxford, 4 April 1917; served with No.66 Squadron, 18 October 1917 to 27 April 1918; with No.28 Squadron, 27 April to 6 November 1918 (hospitalized 23 August 1918); to Home Establishment, 6 November 1918. Employed in Guardian Trust after war; died 10 September 1967.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in destroying six enemy aeroplanes. He did splendid service.

 

STANGER, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.

 

A dashing and determined leader who has frequently engaged enemy formations in superior numbers, inflicting heavy casualties. On 4th October he, in company with another machine, engaged six enemy aeroplanes; three of these were destroyed, Captain Stanger accounting for two. In all he has destroyed five enemy machines, displaying on all occasions great courage and skill.

 

* * * * *

 

STAPLES, Lieutenant Melvin E. - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. Born in Treherne, Manitoba, 5 September 1893; educated there and University of Manitoba (LL.B, 1915); joined Canadian Field Artillery in December 1915 and overseas in March 1916. To RFC, 17 February 1917. S (School ? Station ?), 23 February 1917; to No.3 School of Aeronautics, 30 July 1918; to No.204 TDS, 26 March 1919 and thence to unemployed list. Statements he made claim that he went to Egypt in December 1917 and served with No.55 Kite Balloon Section until July 1918, after which he was a navigational instructor at Cairo.

 

* * * * *

 

*STARKE, 2nd Lieutenant Henry McDermott - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in New York; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RAF, Canada, 6 April 1917; proceeding overseas, April 1918; served in No.242 Squadron, date uncertain to 7 Novemver 1918, and No.43 Squadron thereafter. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

 

STARLEY, 2nd Lieutenant Richard Douglas - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1917. Citation published in Flight, 17 January 1918. Served in 12th Battalion, CEF; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), School of Military Aeronautics, Oxford, 27 February 1917, having passed graduation examinations, 21-23 February 1917. Served as a pilot in No.4 Squadron in 1917. RFC Communique No.100 (10 August 1917) states, "During a counter-attack patrol, 2nd Lieutenant Starley and Lieutenant Grimwood of No.4 Squadron reported a party of 20 and another of 200 infantry in old battery positions, and as a result of the artillery fire, many casualties were caused."

 

When he had located a large force of the enemy infantry who were about to counter-attack, his machine was immediately afterwards hit by a shell, which destroyed the wireless, and so prevented his reporting what he had seen. His machine was obviously so badly damaged that no expert would have believed that it could possibly hold together in the air. In spite of this he went down and dropped a message on Divisional Headquarters, who were able to put nine batteries onto the counter-attack. He then managed to get his machine back to the aerodrome and confirmed the message by telephone. Throughout the operations he has on all occasions shown the same spirit of pluck and determination.

* * * * *

 

*STEDMAN, Major (Acting Lieutent-Colonel) Ernest Walter - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Although he had no contacts with Canada until 1919, he is listed here as an "Associate" in view of his long postwar career with the RCAF. See Second World War data base for biographical details. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

STEELE, 2nd Lieutenant Robert Crawford - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 December 1917; citation in issue of 23 April 1918. Born in Enniskillen, Ontario, 12 April 1890; attended Yorkton High School; home in Birch Creek, Saskatchewan. Obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.3536, 25 August 1916 from Curtiss School in Toronto; direct entrant to RFC in Canada; sailed on Corsican from Halifax, 25 September 1916. To Reading, 6 October 1916; served with No.14 Squadron (Egypt), 20 March to 7 August 1917 (artillery co-operation, bombing, photography and reconnaissance) and with No.111 Squadron (Egypt), 7 August 1917 to 13 February 1918 (photography, bombing, escort duty and OPs). To No.22 TS (Egypt), 13 February 1918; to Home Establishment, 6 July 1918. An aerial victory with No.111 Squadron is described in Official History of Australia in the War, 1914-18, Vol.8, p.76. DHist cards variously say that he was given leave in Canada in August 1918 and that he died on 9 August 1918,

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has done consistent good work in aerial fighting during eight months. On one occasion he brought down within our lines an enemy scout of the latest type, and landing alongside it, made the enemy pilot a prisoner before he could destroy his machine.

 

STEELE, Lieutenant Robert Crawford - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

STEPHENS, Captain Thomas Gordon Mair - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917. Born in Toronto, 13 December 1892; home there; attended Curtiss School and obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1715 dated 1 September 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 1 September 1915. Sailed on Corinthian from Montreal, 19 September 1915. At Portsmouth, 17 October 1915; at Hendon, 12 November 1915; to Eastchurch, 16 November 1915; to Calshot, 28 December 1915; to Bembridge, 17 February 1916; to Dover, 17 March 1916; to Westgate, 14 October 1916; to Port Said, 28 December 1916; to Hospital, 29 October 1917; invalided to UK, 22 February 1918; in March 1918 given three months leave in Canada which was later extended.

 

STEPHENS, Captain Thomas Gordon Mair - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918. Public Record Office Air 1/1717 has a report dated 20 December 1917 from Seaplane Depot, Port Said. Although an assessment rather than a specific award recommendation, it indicates the attitude of his superiors. Describing him in conjuction with Flight Lieutenant Arthur E. Popham, it reads:

 

Have carried out bombing raids, their best being a 40-mile inland flight to Chikaldere Bridge, where they obtained many direct hits in the face of a vigorous anti-aircraft fire.

 

* * * * *

 

STEPHENSON, 2nd Lieutenant Cowan Douglas - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RAF, 24 April 1918; proceeded overseas from Canada, 7 May 1918; to No.251 Squadron (Hornsea), 11 May 1918; to Duffield, 8 June 1918; at Killingholme, 5 January 1919; when repatriated in June 1919 he gave home as New York. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

 

STEPHENSON, 2nd Lieutenant William Samuel - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Born 11 January 1896. Joined Canadian Engineers, England, 12 January 1916; to RFC, 16 August 1917; served with No.73 Squadron, 9 February to 28 July 1918 (POW, held at Karlsruhe). Repatriated 30 December 1918; to Home Establishment, 3 February 1919. Knighted, 1 January 1945. A card says he was also awarded Air Force Cross, 1 January 1919; this appears unlikely given his career and time as a POW, nor is it claimed in his biographies (this is later Sir William Stephenson, "Intrepid"). Awarded Companion, Order of Canada, 22 December 1979; died in Bermuda, 31 January 1989.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When flying low and observing an open staff car on a road, he attacked it with such success that later it was seen lying in the ditch upside down. During the same flight he caused a stampede amongst some enemy transport horses on a road. Previous to this he has destroyed a hostile scout and a two-seater plane. His work has been of the highest order, and he has shown the greatest courage and energy in engaging every kind of target.

 

STEPHENSON, Lieutenant William Samuel - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

This officer has shown conspicuous gallantry and skill in attacking enemy troops and transports from low altitudes, causing heavy casualties. His reports, also, have contained valuable and accurate information. he has further proved himself a keen antagonist in the air, having, during recent operations, accounted for six enemy aeroplanes.

 

* * * * *

 

STEVENSON, Captain Frederick Joseph - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 2 December 1896 at Parry Sound, Ontario; joined 196th (University) Battalion, CEF, in Winnipeg, late 1916 and went overseas. To RFC, 8 September 1917; No.2 School of Aeronautics, Oxford, 18 October 1917; Lieutenant, RAF, 1 April 1918; No.2 ASD, 13 May 1918; served with No.79 Squadron, 1 June 1918 to 4 April 1919 (wounded 8 August 1918); to Home Establishment, 2 April 1919; at Repatriation camp, 8 April 1919. Frank Ellis, Canada's Flying Heritage, says he later joined RAF Mission at Sevastopol, South Russia. However, Air 1/462/15/312 (MG.40 D.1 Vol.9) has message, War Office to GOC Murmansk, 17 July 1919 listing seven Fairey Seaplane pilots being sent to Murmansk, including Lieutenant FJ. Stevenson. No published citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war". Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has the following recommendation:

 

A very capable flying officer of exceptional judgement and courage, who has been engaged in a number of combats and personally destroyed three enemy aeroplanes.

 

STEVENSON, Captain Frederick Joseph - Order of St.Stanislas, 2nd Class - date and authority of award uncertain.

 

* * * * *

 

STEVENSON, 2nd Lieutenant Robert Lancelot - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Carman, Manitoba; home in Winnipeg. Enlisted in 2nd Field Company, Canadian Engineers, 12 August 1914; to France, February 1915; appointed Probationary Observer Officer, RNAS, 14 December 1917; to Eastchurch, 29 December 1917; confirmed in rank and trade, 6 May 1918; served with No.238 Squadron, Cattewater from 10 May 1918 onwards.

 

* * * * *

 

STEVENSON, Captain William Gordon - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in North Bay, Ontario, 2 November 1891 (son of a police constable); worked in Toronto filtration plant and educated at Toronto public schools, 1898 to 1906. Accepted as RNAS candidate, 18 August 1915. Had 33 minutes at Toronto Curtiss School; not considered qualified enough for even probationary rank, he was brought on strength, 10 January 1916 as Chief petty Officer. With Arthur Henry Williams (also CPO) he was considered unsuitable by Admiralty upon arrival in UK and in March 1916 was returned to Canada. Finally succeeded in joining RFC, 24 December 1917. Served with No.99 Squadron, 21 April 1918 to 26 February 1919 (acting Captain, 4 September 1918); repatriated to Canada, 2 April 1919. Served in RCAF in Second World War.

 

A fine leader who has taken part in twenty-six successful raids, displaying marked skill and gallantry, notably on the 7th July, when with five other machines he carried out a successful raid. On the return journey the formation was engaged by ten hostile aircraft who made repeated and determined attacks; that these attacks were repulsed without loss was due to the cool judgment and strong initiative shown by this officer.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has a letter dated 7 September 1918 from the Lieutenant-Colonel in command of No.41 Wing (not clear but seems to be "Baldwin") to Headquarters, 8th Brigade, Royal Air Force, stating he had flown on 26 successful raids, several of which were detailed. Brigade Headquarters in turn submitted a formal recommendation for a DFC to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 8 September 1918. Although the wording had been altered, the substance of the latter document (quoted here) was the same as that of the earlier one, other than it failed to mention his cumulative total of 26 raids.

 

For consistent gallantry, determination and skill as a pilot and leader of patrols on day bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:-

 

7 July 1918 - Kaiserlautern

 

Captain Stevenson with five other machines of No.99 Squadron took part in this successful raid. On the return journey the DH.9 formation was attacked by ten enemy aeroplanes who kept up repeated and vigorous onslaughts the last 20 miles back to the lines. Owing to the closeness of the formation kept, all enemy attacks were repulsed without loss. Captain Stevenson was flying "left-front" and the excellence of the formation maintained was largely due to his judicious handling and initiative.

 

22 July 1918 - Offenburg

 

Captain Stevenson took part in this most successful raid on which ten machines of No.99 Squadron were successful in reaching the objective and bombing the target with excellent effect in spite of being attacked over the objective by 16 enemy aeroplanes, one of which was destroyed. The whole of our machines returned safely.

 

22 August 1918 - Hagenau Aerodrome

 

Captain Stevenson set out on this raid with twelve machines. Owing to engine failure and a mistaken signal from the leader of the second formation, only three machines crossed the lines with him. On approaching Hagenau, 15 enemy aeroplanes appeared to the northwest above his formation and another formation of eight enemy aeroplanes to the northeast. In spite of desperate efforts by these superior enemy formations to break up the formation and prevent the operation, Captain Stevenson led his formation over the aerodrome and successfully bombed it. He then led the whole of his formation safely back in spite of continuous and vigorous enemy aeroplane attacks. The courage and coolness displayed by him on this occasion were magnificent, and to his judicious leadership the lack of casualties can be entirely attributed.

 

2 September 1918 - Buhl

 

On this date Captain Stevenson led two raids on Buhl aerodrome with conspicuous success; photographs subsequently confirmed the damage claimed. The accuracy with which Captain Stevenson's formations dropped their bombs was observed and commented on by the other squadrons taking part in the raid.

 

3 September 1918 - Morhange Aerodrome

 

Captain Stevenson led two formations on this raid and getting well over the target, obtained excellent results, two enemy aeroplanes on the ground being destroyed and direct hits being obtained on the hangars. This was subsequently confirmed by photographs.

 

In addition this officer has taken part in the following raids:-

 

21 May 1918 - Metz Sablons

22 May 1918 - do.

24 May 1918 - Hagondange

 

* * * * *

 

STEWART, 2nd Lieutenant Earle Richard - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. Born in Owen Sound, Ontario, 1899. Home in Vancouver; Enlisted in 1966 (Western Universities) Battalion in June 1917; bugler with that unit at Camp Hughes. Lance-Corporal, Canadian Signals Corps; appointed 2nd Lieutenant for duty with RFC, 6 October 1916. Served in No.55 Squadron, 12 March to 12 August 1918 (killed in action). In a letter to his father, Captain B.J. Silly stated that Stewart had destroyed five enemy machines. Elsewhere it is stated he had flown 36 raids.

 

For gallantry and skill as an observer on long distance bombing raids. During a raid a few months back he was in the deputy-leader's machine (which usually had to bear the brunt of an attack), and in the course of repelling vigorous enemy attacks he had a breakage in his gun, with the result he could only fire single shots. In these circumstances he would have been justified in causing his pilot to close up under the remainder of the formation, but with great coolness and sound judgement he maintained his place, and thus avoided the risk of impairing the squadron's defensive efficiency. By his action he rendered the most valuable assistance to his formation in holding off the enemy, and by the time the enemy had been dispersed he had fired 200 rounds by single shots with excellent effect. Lieutenant Stewart has rendered further distinguished services during the past month, displaying great ability and absolute fearlessness.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has recommendation sent by Headquarters, 8th Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 6 August 1918.

 

For consistent good work, gallantry and skill as an Observer on long distance bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:

 

24th March 1918 - Mannheim

 

On the occasion of this raid the DH.4 formation was heavily attacked. This officer was in the Deputy Leader's machine which usually has to bear the brunt of an attack. In the fighting in this instance, in the course of repelling vigorous enemy attacks, this officer had a breakage in his gun, with the result that he could only fire single shots. In these circumstances he would have been quite justified in causing his pilot to close up under the remainder of the formation. With great coolness and judgement, however, he maintained his place in the formation, thus avoiding the slightest risk of upsetting its defensive efficiency, and succeeded in rendering the most valuable assistance to his formation inholding off the enemy. By the time the hostile attack had been finally repelled and the line reached this officer had fired 200 rounds by single shots with excellent judgement and effect.

 

30th July, 1918 - Offenburg

 

In the course of this raid a strong formation of enemy aeroplanes obtained an undeniable position for attack on some of the rear machines of the DH.4 formation, at a time when the latter were otherwise heavily engaged. This officer showed the greatest coolness and judgement in directing his fire on to these enemy aeroplanes. By well controlled and excellent bursts of fire he succeeded in driving one of these enemy aeroplanes down out of control, and had a very large share in driving off the remainder, thus proving of the most material assistance in extricating a large part of the formation from a very critical situation.

 

In addition this officer has taken part in the following raids:-

 

 

16 March 1918 Zweibrucken

17 March 1918 Kaiserlautern

18 March 1918 Mannheim

27 March 1918 Metz

28 March 1918 Luxembourg

5 April 1918 Luxembourg

11 April 1918 Luxembourg

12 April 1918 Metz

3 May 1918 Thionville

18 May 1918 Cologne

20 May 1918 Landau

21 May 1918 Namur

22 May 1918 Liege

29 May 1918 Thionville

30 May 1918 Thionville

31 May 1918 Karlsruhe

1 June 1918 Karthaus

3 June 1918 Luxembourg

4 June 1918 Treves

6 June 1918 Coblenz

7 June 1918 Conz

8 June 1918 Thionville

9 June 1918 Photographic reconnaissance, Area No.3

23 June 1918 Metz

24 June 1918 Dillinghem

26 June 1918 Karlsruhe

27 June 1918 Thionville

29 June 1918 Mannheim

30 June 1918 Hagenau

5 July 1918 Coblenz

31 July 1918 Photographic reconnaissance of aerodrome

1 August 1918 Duren

 

Since this officer joined No.55 Squadron on 13th March 1918, he has taken part in 32 long distance bomb raids and three long distance photographic reconnaissances. On every occasion on raids on which his formation has been attacked, his coolness and bravery under fire have been most noticeable, and his shooting throughout has been remarkable for its well judged accuracy.

 

In the course of these raids this officer has accounted for three enemy aeroplanes driven down out of control. The results of his reconnaissance work, for which he has shown special aptitude, have been exceedingly accurate, and have proved of considerable value.

 

This officer's work has been distinguished throughout by his high sense of duty and extreme reliability, while the example set by his coolness and entire disregard of danger when in action has proved of incalculable value to the morale of the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

STEWART, Lieutenant James Alexander - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Montreal, 1895. Held a commission in Montreal Militia as of July 1916. Sailed from Canada as 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 29 October 1917. To Headquarters, Training Division, CEF and to No.98 Squadron, 23 November 1917; to No.97 Squadron, 4 August 1918; with No.216 Squadron, 25 January to 11 May 1919; to Canada, 11 May 1919. Postwar shirt manufacturer, Montreal; worked with Air Cadets in Second World War; died at Hudson Heights, Quebec, 1962.

 

A very gallant and capable pilot, who has been engaged in thirteen successful night bombing long-distance raids. He has never failed to achieve his object under the most trying weather conditions. He displays excellent judgement as to the correct altitude from which bombs should be dropped, and consequently has invariably hit his objectives.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has a letter dated 17 September 1918 from the Commanding Officer, No.97 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.83 Wing, Royal Air Force, describing his work in conjuction with his Canadian observer, George T. Reid (which see for the text of this letter).

 

* * * * *

 

STOCK, Lieutenant Alfred Percy - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 7 March 1892; home in Peterborough, Ontario. Proceeded overseas with 93rd Battalion, CEF, September 1916; wounded in France, 3 May 1917. Resigned CEF commission and transferred to RNAS, 11 August 1917. To Crystal Palace, 12 August 1917; to Eastbourne, 24 August 1917; to Cranwell, 13 October 1917; to Freiston, 28 November 1917; to Manston, 15 December 1917. On Canadian leave, December 1917 and January 1918. To 2 Wing, 21 March 1918; to No.222 Squadron, 26 October 1918; to England, 25 November 1918 [?]. A Royal Navy List for 18 September 1918 states he was among those "Detailed for No.62 and 63 Wings"; on 18 December 1918 he was at Thermi-Mitylene.

 

* * * * *

 

STONEMAN, Captain Edwin Curtis Robinson - Italian Silver Medal for Military Valour - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Ontario, 24 April 1891; home in Toronto (graduate of University of Toronto; engineer with Bell Telephone). Attended Curtiss School in Toronto; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.3827 dated 28 October 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 28 October 1916. At Crystal Palace, 1916; at Vendome, 11 January 1917; at Cranwell, 29 March 1917; at Dover, 28 May 1917; to No.11 (N) Squadron, Dunkirk, 6 June 1917; at Cranwell, 24 September 1917; at Calshot (under seaplane instruction), 10 November 1917; to 6th Wing, 27 December 1917; to No.224 Squadron, 7 March 1918; with Adriatic Group, 18 June 1918; with No.66 Wing, 18 December 1918. University of Toronto Roll of Service says that he had been sent to Italy in January 1918 (this seems incorrect as to date) and had served on Albanian, Montenegrin and Austrian frontiers; one of his awards was for bombing Kuche bridge in Albania, September 1917. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered".

 

STONEMAN, Captain Edwin Curtis Robinson - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

 

STUPART, Lieutenant Alan Victor - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Toronto, 24 July 1897, son of Sir Frederick Stupart, meteorologist at Toronto University; at Upper Canada College, 1909-1911 and University of Toronto Schools, 1911-1915. Enlisted as Sapper, Canadian Engineers, and went overseas, June 1916. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), RFC, 21 June 1917; appointed Flying Officer and confirmed in rank, 14 August 1917; at Oxford, 15 February 1917; at No.60 TS, 18 July 1917; with No.15 Squadron in France, 1 September 1917; to Home Establishment, 22 October 1917; to No.60 (further instruction), date uncertain; to No.53 Training Squadron, 16 December 1917; to Artillery and Infantry Co-Operation School, 21 January 1918; to No.12 Squadron, France, 23 February 1918; wounded 23 August 1918; invalided to UK, 1 September 1918; to No.45 TDS, 1 April 1919; repatriated 20 May 1919. Reported that his first tour in France had been interrupted in consequence of a bad landing after machine shot about. An elder brother killed on the Somme in 1916.

 

A courageous and resolute officer, who displayed great gallantry on a recent patrol when he was attacked by seven hostile aircraft; with skill and courage he drove these off and continued his patrol. Later on he was again attacked by a large formation; in this engagement both he and his observer were wounded, but they continued the combat until they eventually drove off the enemy. Having brought back his machine, Lieutenant Stupart fainted from loss of blood.

 

* * * * *

 

SULLIVAN, 2nd Lieutenant Edward Alan - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). Graduate, University of Toronto (Applied Science, 1889); Engineering and Technical Officer with RFC/RAF Canada Scheme. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

SULLY, Captain John Alfred - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born Metcalfe, Ontario, 19 November 1892; held commission in militia at Youngstown, Alberta in March 1916. Overseas as Lieutenant, CEF, October 1916; to RFC, 14 February 1917; to Reading, 15 February 1917; to Hythe, 2 March 1917; served in No.70 Squadron as Observer on Probation, 25 March to 12 July 1917; appointed Flying Officer (Observer), 12 May 1917; to Home Establishment, 12 July 1917; to Reading, 1 August 1918; to School of Special Flying, Gosport, 11 September 1917; to British Aviation Mission to United States, 31 December 1917 to 1 June 1918 (but elsewhere given as 20 February or 18 April 1918 onwards); Acting Captain, 18 April 1918; to No.13 MD, 14 December 1918; struck off strength of CEF, 28 February 1919. See Second World War data base for additional career details and honours. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

 

SUSSAN, Captain Walter James - Mention in Despatches - date and authority not known (mentioned on DHist blue card). Born 8 October 1891 in Ireland; educated at Lachute; home in Ottawa where he had been a machinist and mechanic for at least four years. Obtained ACA Certificate No.358 at Wright School, Dayton, Ohio, 17 November 1915; had been appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 15 November 1915. At Chingford, 15 November 1915; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.2531, 12 February 1916; at Eastchurch, 1 May 1916; at No.3 (N) Wing, 22 May 1916. Invalided from RNAS, 18 October 1916 and returned to Canada (nervous breakdown); returned to UK at own expense, February 1917 and rejoined RNAS. At Cranwell, 2 April 1917; at Mullion, 9 May 1917; at Dover, 16 August 1917; with Oak Royal, 20 September 1917; with No.63 Wing, No.220 Squadron, 7 March 1917; with No.2 (N) Squadron, 18 August 1917; with No.1 Balloon Base, 24 May 1919;

 

SUSSAN, Captain Walter James - Military Cross, Grade 3 (Greece) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 April 1920. No mentioned on DHist card. Confirmed by London Gazette which gives unit as No.220 Squadron, Imbros. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

SUTHERLAND, Lieutenant James Henry Richardson - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. At Oxford, 9 July 1916; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 26 September 1916; with No.29 Squadron, 15 November 1916 to 4 May 1917; to Home Establishment, 4 May 1917; Lieutenant, 1 August 1917; to No.3 AAP, 13 March 1918; at Midland Area, 18 November 1918; to Crystal Palace, 5 March 1919; to Unemployed List, 6 March 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

SUTHERLAND, Lieutenant James Henry Richardson - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished sSALTERervices rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

SUTHERLAND, Captain Robert Bruce - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. Home in Ingersoll, Ontario; father was Donald Sutherland, Member of Parliament for Oxford South. Commissioned in Canadian Engineers, Non-Permanent Active Militia, 1 October 1914. Lieutenant in Canadian Engineers, CEF, 14 January 1915; to 1st Field Company, Canadian Engineers, France, 12 July 1915; invalided to UK, 4 February 1916; to School of Aviation, Reading, 19 September 1916; to No.3 School of Military Aeronautics, Aboukir, 29 December 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 20 February 1917 (same day as he was granted Royal Aero Club Certificate No.5275); to No.14 Squadron (No.3 Wing), 20 March 1917; hospitalized, 30 August 1917; to No.14 Squadron, 16 September 1917; reported in No.111 Squadron (Balkans ?), November 1917; to Palestine Brigade, 24 July 1918; to Madras, 29 October 1918; to Alexandria and Base Depot, 29 November 1918; returned to UK, 4 December 1918.

 

SUTHERLAND, Captain Robert Bruce - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919, for services in Egypt.

 

This officer has done very valuable work during the last year on this front. Between September 17 and 23 he was conspicuous for his gallant and brilliant leadership.

 

* * * * *

 

SUTTON, Captain Arthur Edward - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). Canadian Army Medical Corps, transferred to RFC, 21 February 1918; served with RFC/RAF Training Program in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 

SUTTON, Lieutenant George Ernest Frederick - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 August 1916. Born in England but next-of-kin in Saskatoon; enlisted in a militia unit in Saskatoon, November 1914. Overseas with 28th Canadian Infantry Battalion in May 1915 and to France, September 1915. Attached to RFC, 18 January 1916; graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 13 July 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.4018, 15 December 1916; Flying Officer, 15 February 1917. Served in No.4 Squadron, 19 January to 6 September where his pilot was another Canadian - Lieutenant James Hector Ross. At 5 TDS, 7 November 1918.

 

 

As observer with Second Lieutenant Ross, he carried out two reconnaissances at very low altitude. Their machine was repeatedly hit by bullets, and the pilot was severely wounded in the arm. The reports were most valuable.

 

* * * * *

 

SWEENEY, Lieutenant Leo John - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918. Next of kin in Vancouver; overseas as a Private, CEF, November 1916. Commissioned a Lieutenant, 16th Reserve Battalion, CEF, 25 May 1917; to Reading, 28 June 1917; to CFS, Hendon, 14 August 1917; to 42 CTS and seconded to RFC, both on 11 November 1917; served in No.4 Squadron, 1 January to 30 April 1918 (killed in action).

 

When leading a bombing raid this officer attacked enemy troops and transport with bombs and machine-gun fire from 500 feet, causing a great many casualties. Although his observer was wounded and his machine badly damaged, he succeeded in landing behind our lines. During two subsequent low flight he caused many casualties, his observer being again wounded and his machine badly damaged.

 

* * * * *

 

TANQUERAY, Lieutenant John Francis Dymore - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 30 April 1893; father living in British Columbia; served in Canadian Expeditionary Force; seconded to RFC, 20 January 1918; to Reading, 5 February 1918; to Hythe, 18 February 1918; to No.57 Squadron as Observer, 4 April 1918; to Home Establishment, 15 September 1918; to Air Ministry, 3 October 1918; to Independent Force, 29 October 1918; to No.55 Squadron, 4 November 1918; to No.57 Squadron, 22 February 1919 until 30 July 1919, when posted to No.18 Squadron. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

TATTAM, Second Lieutenant Francis Frederic - Croix de Guerre avex Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. Born in England; lived in Winnipeg where he joined 28th Battalion, CEF, November 1914; to France, September 1915; RFC Cadet, Octover 1917; commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 22 February 1918; in North Russia, 1918-1920. Air 1/435/15/274/3 states, "On 31 March 1919 2ndl Lieutenant Tattam, RAF, accompanied by 2 /ACM (Wirelss Operator) J.E. Johnson and 1/ACM (Wireless Operator) J. McCardle, were ambushed whilst proceeding on the road from Obosezkaia to our forward positions at Bolshie-Ozerki for the purpose of doing artillery co-op. Lieutenant Tattam was wounded and made prisoner. Johnson was killed and McCardle, who was dangeously wounded whilst heroically attempting to save Lt.Tattam, succumbed to his injuries on the following day." As of May 1922 he was with No.100 Squadron, next-of-kin in Buskinghamshire. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

* * * * *

 

TAYLOR, Lieutenant Frank Harold - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Born 11 August 1896 in Toronto; home there. Overseas as Lieutenant, 3nd Battalion, CEF, September 1917. At Hythe or Brooklands, 4 April 1917; to Reading, 14 May 1917; seconded to RFC, 6 June 1917; to Vendome, 10 June 1917; to 45 TS, 17 July 1917; with No.41 Squadron, 22 September 1917 to 13 May 1918; to Canada on leave, 14 May 1918; to Southeast area, 29 August 1918; to No.2 Flying School, 9 September 1918; with No.84 Squadron, 14 September 1918 to 5 March 1919. Relinquished commission, 18 March 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, whilst on offensive patrol, he shot down a hostile scout in flames and a second out of control. On the following day he shot down an enemy triplane, which finally crashed to earth. During the recent operations he has carried out many successful attacks on enemy infantry from low altitudes, and has taken part in over eight offensive patrols. His gallantry and good service merit the highest praise.

 

Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation as forwarded from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 5 April 1918:

 

For gallantry and good work during the operations March 21st to March 31st, 1918.

 

On March 23rd, 1918, whilst on offensive patrol, this officer attacked a formation of Albatross Scouts. He destroyed one which fell in flames, and shot down a second out of control. Both these machines fell in the neighbourhood of Bourlon Wood.

 

On March 24th, 1918, whilst on offensive patrol, this officer shot down a Fokker Triplane which crashed near Vaulx.

 

Lieutenant Taylor has taken part in 84 offensive patrols and has done 158 hours flying over the enemy's lines.

 

During the recent fighting he has made many successful attacks on enemy infantry from low altitudes. In all he has destroyed five enemy aeroplanes, one in flames, four crashed, and one driven down out of control.

 

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TAYLOR, Lieutenant Merrill Samuel - Croix de Guerre (France) - date and authority not certain; mentioned in DNS 7-3 files and University of Toronto Roll of Service. Born 15 April 1893 at Singhampton, Ontario; educated there plus Yellow Grass, Saskatchewan, Regina, and University of Toronto (Applied Science, 1912-1916). Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 January 1917; appointed Flight Sub-Lieutenant, August 1917; to Dover Patrol, 23 August 1917; to No.9 (N) Squadron, September 1917 until 7 July 1918 (killed in action); elsewhere reported as killed 6 October 1918.

 

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TEMPEST, Captain Edmund Roger - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918. Home in Perdue, Saskatchewan; commissioned with KOYLI; attached to No.6 Squadron, RFC, April 1915 (letter from W.J. Tempest); obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1604 on 18 August 1915 after tests at Birmigham; Graded as Flying Officer and placed on General List, 3 November 1915; seconded to RFC from New Armies, 30 July 1917; gazetted Flight Commander, 22 August 1917. Served with No.64 Squadron, August 1917 to August 1918. Killed in aircraft accident near Baghdad in 1921. Described by Culley as "brilliant, if rather unpredictable."

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He attacked a formation of seven enemy machines, firing at one from a distance of a few feet and destroying it. On another occasion with his patrol he engaged thirteen enemy machines. Though both his guns were out of action, he continued fighting for fifteen minutes in order to enable the rest of his patrol to keep up the fight. Having driven off the enemy, he brought his patrol back safely. He showed splendid courage and initiative.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation passed from 3rd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 17 March 1918.

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

On the 8th March 1918 he attacked a formation of seven Albatross Scouts, firing on one from a distance of a few feet, causing it to crash near Graincourt.

 

On the 11th March 1918 he attacked another formation of seven scouts near Marquion, who were reinforced by six more. Although both his guns were out of action, he continued fighting for 15 minutes to enable the remainder of his patrol to continue the fight. All the enemy machines were driven away eventually, and he collected his formation and returned with it.

 

This officer has shot down six enemy machines in all.

 

TEMPEST, Captain Edmund Roger - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.

 

Since March last this officer has destroyed nine enemy machines. A daring and most capable officer who never hesitates to engage the enemy. By brilliant leadership he achieves success with the minimum of loss.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/20/36/127 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, First Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 18 August 1918.

 

For most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has shown himself to be a most capable and efficient flight commander and by his able and dashing leadership has successfully led his formation into action with a minimum of casualties. He has led numerous patrols and never misses an opportunity to engage the enemy. Since the award of the Military Cross, Captain Tempest has personally accounted for enemy aircraft as follows:

 

On 14 August 1918, with two other pilots he shot down an Albatross two-seater out of control.

 

On 12 August 1918, when east of Chaulne at 17,000 feet, five Fokker biplanes were seen crossing the lines at 10,000 feet. SE.5s attacked and Captain Tempest shot down one which crashed on our side of the lines.

 

On 11 August 1918, when leading an offensive patrol near Roye he saw Fokker biplanes crossing the lines to attack our balloons. He fired a good burst from close behind one enemy aircraft which fell completely out of control and crashed east of the lines north of Roye. This enemy machine was later seen crashed on the ground.

 

On 10 August 1918, when leading an offensive patrol near Roye, he observed two formations of Fokker biplanes. He engaged one and fired 100 rounds from behind at close range; enemy aeroplane fell in a completely uncontrolled spin and was seen by another pilot on patrol to crash north of Roye.

 

On 20 July 1918, when on offensive patrol near Vimy, he engaged a Rumpler with two other pilots. Shortly after the first burst the enemy machine dived east but was followed and after 300 rounds had been fired it fell in a steep nose dive and crashed near Drocourt. Confirmed by "E" Battery Anti-Aircraft.

 

On 12 June 1918, when at 17,000 feet near Festubert he attacked a two seater Albatross, and when on tail of enemy aeroplane fired 250 rounds. The enemy machine emitted much smoke, burst into flames, fell in a vertical dive, and when at about 8,000 feet the right hand plane fell off.

 

In addition to the above, and also since the award of the Military Cross, this officer has destroyed three other enemy machines.

 

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TEMPEST, 2nd Lieutenant Wulstan Joseph - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1916. Born in England; home in Perdue, Saskatchewan; appointed Flying Officer, 17 June 1916 while a 2nd Lieutenant with KOYLI. To No.64 Squadron, July 1916. Not sure when he went to No.100 Squadron (appears to have been on a raid as of 29/30 April 1917); commanded that unit, 11 December 1917 to 12 June 1918.

 

In recognition of conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in connection with the destruction of an enemy airship.

 

TEMPEST, 2nd Lieutenant Wulstan Joseph - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1917. No citation other than "for distinguished services rendered in connection with the war".

 

TEMPEST, Captain Wulstan Joseph - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 October 1917; citation in London Gazette of 6 March 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on many occasions. He has successfully bombed railway sidings and aerodromes, often in mist and cloudy weather and at low altitudes, causing much damage to his objectives. On one occasion he descended to a very low altitude and dropped bombs on two moving trains, causing them both to be derailed. This officer has taken part in 34 night bombing raids.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, 9 September 1917, confirming unit as No.100 Squadron and reading as follows:

 

For gallantry, determination and devotion to duty, particularly on the following occasions:

 

On the night of September 3rd/4th, he successfully bombed the sidings at Ascq Station from a height of 700 feet causing a large fire to break out.

 

On the night of August 31st/September 1st, he took part in a successful bomb raid on Lezennes Aerodrome, in spite of unfavourable weather conditions.

 

On the night of July 2nd/3rd in misty and cloudy weather he bombed the aerodrome at Heule from a height of 800 feet obtaining direct hits on some of the hangars.

 

On the night of May 2nd/3rd he descended to 200 feet and dropped bombs on two moving trains near Somain, causing them both to be derailed.

 

This officer has altogether taken part in 34 night bombing raids.

 

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THOM, Captain George - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 13 March 1890 in Scotland; educated there; to Canada in 1910 and was articled in British Columbia as a "Land Surveyor Pupil"; gave home as Nicola, British Columbia; attended Curtiss School, Toronto and obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1860, 3 October 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, same date. Arrived in England, 25 October 1915 and posted to Chingford; to Dover, 31 January 1916; an original member of No.8 (N) Squadron; from Dunkirk to Redcar, 8 April 1918; to No.202 Training Depot School, Cranwell (instructor), 29 April 1918; to No.56 TDS (date uncertain; he was there on 7 November 1918) and as of 5 May 1919 to Midland Area (duties at Cranwell). Available for disposal, 10 May 1919 but returned to Cranwell, 13 July 1919; struck off strength about 23 December 1919. Note on Air 76 file (undated) says "Since joining RNAS: - flown Curtiss, Avro, BE.2c, Bleriot monoplane, Morane Parasol, Caudron, Breguet, Nieuport, 1 1/2 Strutter, Pup, Triplane, Camel. Had been confirmed as Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 26 January 1916, Flight Lieutenant on 31 December 1916, Acting Flight Commander 27 February 1917, and confirmed as Flight Commander, 1 January 1918. Postwar prospector; drowned when canoe upset in Peace River rapids, 1924. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

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THOMAS, Captain Alan Miller - Mention in Despatches (Press Despatch) - awarded effective 22 January 1919 (see PRO Air 76 record). No record in DHist cards; London Gazette entry for MBE says he was Canadian Field Artillery, and award for services in France and Canada. Public Records Office Air 76 records give date of birth as 14 April 1894 and home in Toronto; had studied engineering at University of Toronto, 1910-1914 and was employed nine months in 1914 by Ford Motors as a construction engineer. He had attended a School of Musketry in 1914 and held a Wireless Operator's License from the Department of Naval Services. There is no record of CFA experience; instead, he is gazetted as a Second Lieutenant on Probation, RFC (London Gazette of 22 December 1915 with effect from 20 November 1915); graded as Flying Officer, 12 May 1916; confirmed in rank, 19 June 1916; confirmed as Lieutenant, 1 July 1917; appointed Acting Captain (Administration), as per London Gazette dated 21 February 1919 with effect from 1 July 1918; to No.28 Squadron, 25 April 1916; to No.22 Squadron, 11 May 1916; to Home Establishment, 16 November 1916. On the latter date he was certified "Unfit any service 6 months, with permission to go to Canada." Certified 16 February 1917 as "Fit Light Duties in Canada; fit to travel"; sick leave extended, 20 May to 20 June 1917; retained on light duties in Canada, effective 25 May 1917; graded fit for general service flying, 29 June 1917. Appears to have been employed in Records or Pay Office; demobilized 13 February 1920. Note on file (probably mid- to late-1918) says he had flown Maurice Farman Shorthorn and Longhorn aircraft, Avro, BE.2c, Armstrong-Whitworths, BE.8a [?], FE.2d, Sopwith and Curtiss.

 

THOMAS, Captain Alan Miller - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1919.

 

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THOMPSON, 2nd Lieutenant Howard Grant - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 October 1919. Home in Belmont, Ontario (student, Mechanical Engineering, University of Toronto); enlisted as Private, 135th Battalion, CEF, December 1915; overseas with that unit, August 1916; to 134th Battalion, October 1916. Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, 28 November 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RAF, 5 July 1918; to No.63 Wing, 15 October 1918; to No.62 Wing, 19 February 1919 until 19 October 1919; served eleven months with No.266 Squadron (Transport Officer, 21 December 1918 to 19 July 1919; Adjutant, 19 February to 15 June 1919). Claimed 68 hours service flying in Greece and South Russia on Short 260-hp seaplanes. Also reported as being at Calshot on anti-submarine patrols, Mudros (September 1918), Caspian Sea (February 1919, with No.266 Squadron); wounded in Caspian, 28 June 1919; reputedly for bombing raid on Russian flotilla at Alexandrovsk, 21 May 1919, as pilot (see The Times, 10 October 1919, page 15).

 

THOMPSON, 2nd Lieutenant Howard Grant - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1919. DFC for services at Alexandrovsk, 21 May 1919 although no citation or other confirmation of this. Only citation reads, "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war and since the closing of hostilities".

 

* * * * *

 

THOMSON, Lieutenant George - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. Home in Celista, British Columbia; served in King's Scottish Borderers (commissioned with them, 29 January 1917); joined No.22 Squadron 20 March 1918 as Observer on Probation. RCAF Squadron Leader in Second World War.

 

A brilliant and intrepid observer in whom his pilot places implicit confidence when engaged in action. He has personally accounted for nine enemy machines. On one raid, when acting as escort, fifteen enemy aeroplanes were encountered; of these this officer shot down two, which crashed, and one out of control.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent on 25 July 1918 from 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has carried out numerous Offensive Patrols and on all occasions has shown marked keenness and a total disregard of personal danger. Entirely owing to the confidence placed in him by his pilot when in combat, many enemy machines have been accounted for.

 

Personally he has accounted for nine enemy machines as follows:

 

On 20 July 1918, when escorting DH.4s on bomb raid, 15 enemy aeroplanes were encountered south of Lille. The enemy machines wee engaged and he shot down two which were seen to crash, and a third completely out of control. Owing to the proximity of other enemy aeroplanes it was not possible to see the latter crash.

 

On 10 July 1918, when on Offensive Patrol, near Lille, five enemy Triplanes were encountered. After he had fired a drum into one it went down in a vertical dive and crashed in a field southeast of Lille. He then fired about two drums into another enemy aeroplane which went down completely out of control, zooming on its back and falling sideways. It was not observed to crash owing to the proximity of other enemy machines.

 

On 8 May 1918, when on patrol in the vicinity of La Bassee, five Pfalz scouts were attacked at 8,000 feet. He fired four drums into different enemy aeroplanes in turn and one was seen to fall out of control and crash by the pilot.

 

On 28 May 1918, when flying along the line from La Bassee to Merville, ten enemy machines (small two-seaters) were encountered and engaged. He fired two drums into one which went down and crashed near Rue du Bois. The enemy machine was seen on the ground after the combat.

 

On 26 May 1918, when flying in the vicinity Lille-Amentieres, 20 enemy aeroplanes were engaged. He fired a drum into a Pfalz scout which fell in a spinning nose dive completely out of control. Lieutenant Thomson is certain the pilot was killed and the machine destroyed, but owing to the nature of the fight it was not seen to crash.

 

On 15 May 1918, when over La Bassee, two DFWs were attacked, one of which he shot down completely out of control; it was not seen to crash wing to clouds.

 

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THOMSON, Lieutenant William McKenzie - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Born 15 September 1898. Home in Toronto (student); trained with RFC in Canada; on sailing list for 19 November 1917; to No.104 Squadron, 13 December 1917; served with No.20 Squadron, 28 March to 24 September 1918 when hospitalized; invalided to England, 26 September 1918. Served in RCAF, Second World War (C1922) and on to 1954; died 9 July 1987.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on offensive patrols. In five days he destroyed as many enemy machines. He showed fine determination to close with the enemy, and set a splendid example of enterprise and gallantry.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has communication from the Commanding Officer, No.20 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.11 Wing dated 27 May 1918. It is clear that the reference to having, in five days, "destroyed as many enemy machines", is at variance with the facts, for the five victories described were spread over thirteen days.

 

This officer has at all times shown great gallantry and determination whilst taking part in offensive patrols. He has shown much initiative in his work.

 

Although very junior in the squadron, he has shown sufficient good judgement and skill to be made a leader and has acquitted himself as such with distinction.

 

Within a fortnight, he has destroyed five enemy aeroplanes and brought down three others out of control. The details are as follows:-

 

5 May 1918: One Albatross Scout crashed between Comines and Wervicq.

14 May 1918: One Albatross Scout crashed near Comines, Sheep 28.P.29.

17 May 1918: One Albatross Scout crashed north of Armentieres.

19 May 1918: One Pfalz Scout crashed into a house near Estaires.

21 May 1918: One Albatross Scout in flames near Warneton.

1 May 1918: One Albatross Scout completely out of control south of Merville

17 May 1918 One Albatross Scout completely out of control near Armentieres.

22 May 1918 One Albatross Scout completely out of control at Warneton.

 

The same file has a recommendation sent from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 29 May 1918:

 

On the 9 May 1918, Lieutenant Thomson, in company with other machines, was on offensive patrol near Comines when they engaged seven Albatross Scouts. Lieutenant Thomson shot one down, which fell between Comines and Wervicq.

 

On the 14 May 1918, when on offensive patrol near Zillebeke Lake, eight hostile scouts were attacked. Lieutenant Thomson followed one down to 4,000 feet and destroyed it.

 

On the 17 May 1918, seven Albatross Scouts were engaged by a patrol of which Lieutenant Thomson was a member; this officer shot down one which fell between Armentieres and Lille.

 

On the 19 May, when over Nieppe Forest, eleven Pfalz scouts were engaged by our patrol. Lieutenant Thomson dived on one and it crashed into a house near Estaires.

 

On the 21 May 1918, when between Warneton and Comines, our Offensive Patrol engaged seven Albatross scouts. Lieutenant Thomson got within 100 yards of one and shot it down in flames near Warneton.

 

This officer has a fine determination to close with the enemy, and sets a noticeable example.

 

THOMSON, Lieutenant William McKenzie - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.

 

This officer has destroyed thirteen enemy machines, invariably displaying courage, determination and skill. Disparity in numbers never daunts him. On a recent occasion, in company with eight other machines, his formation was attacked by twenty-five scouts; he shot one down. On another occasion his formation of ten machines engaged between twenty and thirty Fokkers; in the combat that ensued this officer shot down one out of the four that were destroyed.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, Second Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 17 August 1918.

 

On the 31 May 1918 when on offensive patrol with eight other machines, our formation was attacked by 25 hostile scouts. Lieutenant Thomson shot down one which fell at Bois Grenier.

 

On the 1 June 1918 when on a similar duty near Comines, our formation dived on eight Pfalz Scouts. Lieutenant Thomson shot down one at 50 yards range, his observer being killed in the fight.

 

On the 9 June 1918, an offensive patrol of eight machines engaged sixteen hostile scouts near Menin. Lieutenant Thomson shot down one near Houthem.

 

On the 19 July 1918, Lieutenant Thomson was attacked by four Fokkers; he shot one down which fell south of Gheluvelt.

 

On the 25 July 1918, an offensive patrol of ten machines encountered between twenty and thirty Fokkers over Comines. In the ensuing combat Lieutenant Thomson shot down one of the four enemy machines destroyed.

 

On the 14 August 1918, an offensive patrol of ten machines engaged 15 Fokkers and Pfalz Scouts between Courtrai and Dadizeele. Lieutenant Thomson shown down on which fell near Dadizeele.

 

On the 15 August 1918 when one of a patrol of nine machines, a fight took place near Gheluvelt with seven Fokkers. Lieutenant Thomson destroyed one which fell near Becelaere.

 

Lieutenant Thomson has now destroyed thirteen enemy machines since 9 May 1918 and has set a fine example to his squadron.

 

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TIDEY, Captain Aubrey Mansfield - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 3 April 1891. Home in Vancouver (shipping agent, 1912-1915); appointed Sub-Lieutenant, RNVR (for RNAS), 27 December 1915; retained for Observer duties at Dunkirk. Probationary Flight Officer, 27 January 1917; Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 2 April 1917 (backdated to 29 July 1916); Flight Lieutenant, 31 December 1917. As of 18 March 1916 at Clement, Talbot Works (Observers); 18 June 1916 at Dover; to Dunkirk (seaplanes), 18 September 1916; to Cranwell, 18 March 1917; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.4708, 27 February 1917; to Calshot (under instruction), 18 June 1917; still there (no longer under instruction), 18 Septmber 1917; on Bembridge Patrol, 18 December 1917; at Calshot, 18 June 1918; on Cherbourg Patrol, 18 September 1918. With No.243 Squadron as of 7 November 1918. Transferred to unemployed List, 29 June 1919; discharged in England, 22 July 1919. Public Records Office Air 76 file has notation, "Since joining RNAS - machines flown usual instructional machines. Patrol duties on Short Seaplanes. Served as Observer at Dunkerque before transferring as pilot - Observer December 1915 to January 1917, Pilot Qualified, April 1917. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

TOY, Captain M.H. - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). Captain, Canadian Field Artillery; to No.43 Wing (RFC/RAF Canada Training Program), 1 April 1918 (Assistant Adjutant, 43 Wing, North Toronto); to Headquarters, RAF Canada, 22 February 1919.

 

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TRAPP, Flight Sub-Lieutenant George Leonard - Mention in Despatches (Haig despatch dated 20 May 1918). Born in New Westminster, British Columbia, 1 July 1894; home there, although attending McGill (mechanical engineering), 1912-1916. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 January 1917; at Chingford, 14 March 1917; at Cranwell, 19 May 1917; at Freiston, 18 June 1917; at Dover, 3 July 1917. Served with No.10 (Naval) Squadron from 2 July 1917 onwards; killed in action, 12 November 1917. He had three brothers in the service; Flight Sub-Lieutenant Stanley Valentine Trapp was killed on a test flight with No.8 (N) Squadron, 10 December 1916; Lieutenant Donovan Joseph Trapp, was killed in action with No.85 Squadron, 19 July 1918; a sister married Raymond Collishaw.

 

* * * * *

 

TREDCROFT, Lieutenant Ernest Henry - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. Private in 1st Canadian Pioneers, 5 November 1915; 2nd Lieutenant, Queen's Royal West Surreys, 25 April 1917; to RFC as Observer, October 1917; to No.49 Squadron, 21 November 1917, serving until he was wounded 16 July 1918; relinquished commission, 22 February 1919. Living in Kamloops after the war.

 

A cool and courageous observer with marked initiative. He has taken part in 41 successful bomb raids and seven photographic reconnaissances. On one raid, having dropped his bombs on a bridge, he attacked and dispersed with gun fire a number of the enemy on the bank of the river although he had received two severe wounds. On the return journey his machine was attacked by five enemy aeroplanes; with great gallantry he drove them off by his fire. He became exhausted by the exertion and severity of his wounds, which caused him to collapse in his machine.

 

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*TUDHOPE, Captain John Henry - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 March 1918 (citation published in issue of 24 August 1918). Not Canadian at the time (born in Johannesburg, South Africa, 1891) but was in Canada after the war and very influential in aviation. Member, Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed splendid offensive spirit in continually attacking enemy aeroplanes. He has destroyed three enemy machines and has driven others down out of control, and always set a splendid example of courage and initiative.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent on 2 February 1918 from Headquarters, 1st Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps:

 

For skill and courage in leading offensive patrols. During the time that this officer has been a Flight Commander, he has done much to maintain the offensive spirit of his squadron.

 

On 13 January 1918, when on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Hulluch he attacked a D.F.W., firing about 120 rounds at 100 yards range. Enemy aeroplane dived steeply out of control and was lost to view over Pont a Vendin. Confirmed by "C" Battery, Anti-Aircraft, to have gone down and lost to view behind some houses.

 

On 19 December 1917, when on offensive patrol, observed four Albatross Scouts over Lens. He gave chase and caught up over Pont a Vendin. After he had fired a burst from Vickers and one drum from Lewis gun, enemy aeroplane went down in a step dive apparently out of control and was lost in the haze.

 

On 15 December 1917, when on offensive patrol, observed four Albatross Scouts over Douai. He attacked and got in short bursts at very close range. Confirmed by two other pilots to go down apparently out of control.

 

On 27 September 1917, when operating from the Advanced Landing Ground at Mazingarbe, he observed an enemy aeroplane attacking one of our balloons. Captain Tudhope immediately went up to attack it. After firing three bursts at very close range, enemy aeroplane went straight down and crashed alongside the light railway station at Souchez.

 

On 22 September 1917, when on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Pont a Vendin, he attacked an Albatross Scout into which he fired about 50 rounds at 30 yards range. enemy aeroplane fell over on one side and went down in a series of stalls, dives and spins, eventually crashing juts east of Pont a Vendin.

 

On 20 September 1917 when on offensive patrol he observed a two-seater enemy aeroplane. He attacked and fired 60 rounds at very close range. enemy aeroplane went down in a nose dive, emitting volumes of black smoke until within a short distance from the ground. Confirmed by three other pilots who were, however, unable to see enemy aeroplane crash.

 

*TUDHOPE, Captain John Henry - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918 (citation published in issue of 24 August 1918).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in fighting with exceptional dash and skill over a period of nine months, when he carried out numerous reconnaissances, flying low and engaging with bombs and machine-gun fire enemy troops, guns and transport. He obtained many direct hits and inflicted heavy casualties, often flying under very difficult weather conditions. He has crashed three enemy aeroplanes and shot down two others out of control. His determination and courage have been a brilliant example to the pilots of the flight he has been leading.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent on 14 April 1918 from Headquarters, 1st Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force.

 

For great bravery and devotion to duty in the face of the enemy. For a period of over nine months he has fought with exceptional dash and skill, and his gallantry and determination has been a brilliant example to the pilots of the flight he has been leading. During the recent battles on 3rd and 5th and north of First Army fronts, he has carried out numerous reconnaissances, low flying and bombing patrols, engaging with bombs and machine gun fire enemy troops, guns , transport, etc. Many direct hits have been obtained and heavy casualties inflicted. On several occasions these patrols have been carried out under very difficult weather conditions.

 

In addition he has, since the award of the Military Cross, destroyed five enemy machines as under:-

 

On 11 April 1918 he shot down a Fokker Triplane which crashed near Wingles.

 

On 10 April 1918 he shot down an Albatross Scout out of control near Neuve Chapelle.

 

On 23 March 1918 he engaged a D.F.W. at a height of 1,500 feet near Cherisy. After a short engagement he shot this machine down and it was seen to crash.

 

On 9 March 1918 he shot down an Albatross Scout which crashed and burst into flames near Meurcrin.

 

On 6 March 1918 he shot down an Albatross Scout completely out of control over Lorgies. This was confirmed by three other pilots.

 

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*TUDOR-HART, Lieutenant William Owen Tudor - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 July 1916. Fred Hitchins wrote that he was a Canadian (Cross and Cockade, Winter 1965, p.60) although information is lacking and he was attached to RFC from Northumberland Fusiliers. Graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 10 April 1915; transferred to General List, 25 June 1916. See Air 1/1220/204/5/2634/22 for No.22 Squadron Combat Reports, 25 June to 27 September 1916. Missing (prisoner of war), 1 July 1916. Often flew with Captain W.A. Summers (see citation) but was with Captain G.W. Webb (killed) when shot down.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill. Captain Summers, as pilot, and Lieutenant Tudor-Hart, as observer, attacked a flight of ten enemy aeroplanes, completely breaking up their formation. They were quite unsupported, but only broke off the engagement when all their ammunition was expended many miles over the enemy's lines. Their machine was under constant heavy fire from as many as four hostile machines at once, and was badly damaged.

 

* * * * *

 

*TULLY, Lieutenant Terence Bernard - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. Although well-known in Canada as a pilot for Ontario Provincial Air Service, he was Irish and did not come to Canada until after the war. Lost in "The Sir John Carling" attempting to fly Atlantic, September 1927. Copy of logbook held by National Aviation Museum. See Fall 1977 issue of Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society for account of 1927 Atlantic flight attempts. No citation other than "for distinguished service".

 

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TURNBULL, Captain George Mark - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 April 1918. Born 19 April 1887 in Pembroke, Prince Edward Island; home in Mannville, Alberta; obtained ACA Certificate No.510 at Stinson School, San Antonio, Texas, 28 June 1916; taken on strength of RFC in Canada, 4 July 1916; sailed for UK, 8 July 1916; promoted from 1st Class Air Mechanic to Temporary 2nd Lieutenant, 10 August 1916; graded Flying Officer, 25 November 1916; to No.36 (HD) Squadron, 8 January 1917; No.100 Squadron, 31 May 1917 to 29 January 1918; with No.33 Squadron, 19 April 1918 (appointed CO, 6 June 1918) and with that unit until 2 July 1919. Public Records Office Air 1/1169/204/5/2592 has recommendation dated 21 December 1917.

 

This officer is one of the most efficient Flight Commanders in No.100 Squadron. He joined on 31 May 1917 and has participated in 45 night bombing raids and has dropped upwards of five tons of bombs. On the night of September 28th he came down to 700 feet to bomb Controde Airship shed and obtained a direct hit. He has at all times shown a cheerful devotion to duty and set a fine example to the rest of the squadron.

 

TURNBULL, Captain George Mark - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

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TYLEE, Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Kellum - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Lennoxville, Quebec, 24 April 1887. Liven on farm to age 11; family moved to Boston. Graduated from Massachutsetts Institute of Technology, 1907. American heavy machinery agent, opening Montreal office in 1913. Appointed a 2nd Lieutenant in Canadian Militia and attended Curtiss School, Toronto, 1915 (no certificate). Taken on strength of RFC in Canada, 7 December 1915. May have served in No.1 Squadron during 1916 while M.M. Bell-Irving on strength. Appointed Flying Officer, 14 March 1916; flying instructor in November 1916. Returned to Canada in February 1917 with RFC Canada scheme. Commanded No.81 CTS, Camp Borden for some months and then took command of the Camp Borden Wing (September 1917). From April to June 1918 he commanded No.42 Wing, Deseronto; appointed Inspector of RAF training camps in Canada and promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel; acting commander of RAF in Canada for some weeks early in 1919. Demobilized in May 1919; appointed Director, CAF on its formation, 17 May 1920. Died 13 August 1961. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war." See New England Aviators, 1914-1918 (Boston, 1920), Volume 2, page 108.

 

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