O'BRIAN, Captain Geoffrey Stuart ‑ Mentioned for Valuable Services ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919.  Home in Toronto (student); served in Canadian Divisional Cycling Company; joined RFC, 16 August 1916 at Reading; to Oxford, 24 August 1916; to Central Flying School (date uncertain); to Reading, 6 November 1916; to No.15 RS, 15 January 1917; graded as Flying Officer, 23 January 1917; instructed at Central Flying School; ferry pilot, 29 April 1917 to 17 September 1917; to Canada (Leaside), 1 October 1917; served with No.88 Canadian Training Squadron; squadron commander at Deseronto in 1918; to Headquarters, No.42 Wing, Canada, 30 December 1918.  Struck off strength of RAF, 15 April 1919.  Claimed to have flown Caudron, Avro, five types of BE, Martinside Beardmore, RE.8, SE.5 and SE.5A, DH.5, DH.6, Camel, Sopwith two‑seater, and Curtiss JN‑4.

 

O'BRIAN, Captain Geoffrey Stuart ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distingished services rendered during the war".

 

      * * * * *

 

*O'BRIEN, Lieutenant Patrick Alan ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 December 1919.  Home appears to have been in Momence, Illinois, but in 1925 his mother wrote to Ottawa asking his whereabouts; trained in Canada with RFC (No.81 CTS, Camp Borden); left Canada in May 1917, returning (presumably on leave) in January 1918; believed when query lodged to be still in RAF.  Served with No.66 Squadron; reported missing and POW, 17 August 1917.  Escaped as of December 1917; decorated for this.  This may be the film actor, Pat O'Brien; see his book, Outwitting the Hun and Sir Gordon Taylor, Sopwith Scout 7309 (pp.107‑108).

 

In recognition of gallantry in escaping from captivity while prisoner of war.

 

      * * * * *

 

O'CALLAGHAN, Lieutenant Maurice Alexander ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Born in London, England, 28 December 1894; joined CEF in New Westminster, April 1915; overseas with 30th Battalion, 1915; commissioned in British Territorials (North Somerset Yeomanry) in August 1915; seconded to RFC, October 1917; wounded 8 October 1918 (attacked by seven Pfalz scouts, one of which was shot down, but they were forced to alight in No Man's Land, crawling into a ditch; pilot to 2nd Lieutenant J. Graham, No.7 Squadron; to Canada in November 1919.

 

This officer has been conspicuous for his excellent work on contact and photographic patrols.  Subjected frequently to heavy hostile fire, and handicapped by adverse weather conditions, his reports have invariably been accurate and of great value.  On October 8th, when on photographic duty, he was attacked by seven scouts.  In the combat that ensued he crashed one of these, but the remainder, pressing home their attack, forced his machine down to crash in "No Man's Land: Lieutenant O'Callaghan being wounded.  He and his observer made their way to our lines after dark.

NOTE: S.F. Wise, Canadian Airmen in the First World War, identifies him as a pilot (as does the citation to his DFC), but the evidence is that he was observer.  Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded from 2nd Brigade to Headquarters, 14 October 1918:

 

25 September 1918:  He took 72 oblique photographs from a height of 1,200 feet well over the enemy's line.  These photographs were specially taken for the offensive on 28th September.  During this flight he engaged enemy posts with machine gun fire from a height of 100/500 feet.

 

28 September 1918: Under very bad weather conditions in a high wind and rain he carried out an excellent contact patrol ‑ height between 100/1,000 feet, bringing back very good information on the location of our troops.

 

Later in the day he carried out a second Contact Patrol bringing back locations of our own troops from between 500/1,1000 feet.  He took a fleeting opportunity in the weather and exposed 54 plates.  These were the only plates exposed in the Wing on this day.

 

1 October 1918: Excellent Counter Attack Patrol from between 200/1,100 feet bringing back accurate locations of our own and enemy troops, and engaged enemy troops from 200/500 feet with machine gun fire causing several casualties.  Machine was subjected to heavy and accurate machine gun fire.

 

1 October 1918:  Excellent Contact Patrol bringing back accurate locations of our troops in several places.  Enemy troops in Ledeghem attacked with bombs and machine gun fire from 200 feet.  His machine was subjected to very heavy machine gun fire.

 

2 October 1918:  Good Contact Patrol bringing back positions of our own troops from 500/800 feet.  Also attacked and drove off an enemy contact machine.

 

3 October 1918:  Good Contact Patrol from 500/1,000 feet bringing back an accurate report on positions of our own and enemy troops.

 

8 October 1918:  When on photography near Moorseele attacked by seven Pfalz Scouts, one of which Lieutenant O'Callaghan shot down and was seen to crash into the ground by the infantry.  The other enemy aeroplanes continued to attack, his machine was badly shot about, controls shot away and Lieutenant O'Callaghan was wounded.  The machine crashed in No Mans Land.  Pilot and Observer returned after dark.

 

On 2 November 1918, Headquarters 2nd Brigade forwarded to RAF Headquarters a recommendation for a DFC for 2nd Lieutenant James Graham, 7th Reserve of Cavalry (Dragoon Guards), attached to RAF and No,7 Squadron.  This was awarded on the same day as O'Callaghan's decoration.  To round out the record, the recommendation for Graham read as follows:

31 October 1918: In spite of bad visibility, smoke and mist, located our troops at five positions on the second objective, flying at 600 to 1,000 feet, and dropped messages at Divisions and Corps.  Seeing our troops still advancing and the situation at Castor and Anseghem still obscure, Lieutenant Graham remained on the line and after an hour, when our troops were digging in, located them in nine places ‑ twice establishing a continuous line along the whole Corps front.  The locations at Caster and Anseghem were obtained in spite of heavy machine gun fire.

 

27 October 1918: Located our troops from Ingoyghem to Avelghem in nine places.  On this reconnaissance Lieutenant Graham also located three enemy machine gun emplacements from 1,000 feet and under.

 

8 October 1918: While attempting to get some photographs urgently required by II Corps near Moorseele, then some distance from the line, was attacked by seven Pfalz Scouts.  One Scout was shot down but the Observer was wounded in the foot and Lieutenant Graham in the face.  In spite of this, he succeeded in bringing the machine back, but all the controls being shot away, he crashed in "No Man's Land" and was not able to get into our lines until dark.

 

5 October 1918: On patrol with Lieutenant O'Callaghan was twice attacked by and once attacked enemy aircraft (one machine on each occasion), driving them off all three times.  He then attacked machine gun positions in farm houses near the Menin‑Roulers Railway, firing 400 rounds from the forward gun at 200 feet.  These farms were 2,000 yards beyond our front line.

 

4 October 1918:  Carried out a good reconnaissance of the flooded areas on the Corps front in the Ledeghem area and attacked machine gun positions from a low altitude.  His machine being badly shot up on this occasion.  Height 400/2,500 feet.

 

3 October 1918:  Carried out a successful reconnaissance of the Corps front in spite of persistent enemy aircraft activity.  The situation at Gheluwe was then obscure and this report was of very considerable value.

 

2 October 1918:  On contact patrol located our troops in seven places and reported strong positions of the enemy in two farms.  Attacked and drove off a hostile contact machine which was endeavouring to locate our front line.  Height 500/800 feet.

 

1 October 1918: In the afternoon made an excellent reconnaissance of the situation at Ledeghem, locating our troops in many places ‑ height 200/1,000 feet.  During the attack, 100 enemy troops were sen and engaged with machine gun fire (pilot and observer firing 400 rounds each) from 200 to 500 feet, and casualties were inflicted; these troops being too near our line to sent a C.F. call.

 

This reconnaissance and attack was carried out in face of heavy fire and some interference from enemy aeroplanes.

 

In the evening on Contact Patrol, located our front line alone the whole of the Corps front, and attacked troops in Ledeghem with bombs and machine gun fire from 200 feet.

 

      * * * * *

 

 

O'LEARY, Lieutenant Edward Launce ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918.  Home in Richibucto, New Brunswick; Private, Canadian Field Artillery, February 1915; to France, commissioned January 1916; to RFC as observer on probation, 31 August 1917; served in No.53 Squadron, 20 November 1917 to 30 May 1918 when sent to UK; to Canada, 12 November 1918; struck off strength 18 March 1919.  Served as Administration Officer in RCAF in Second World War.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  When on bombing duty, he successfully drove off three enemy aeroplanes, and when on escort duty, and attacked by six enemy aeroplanes, he brought down one out of control.  He made twelve successful reconnaissance flights during a fortnight of bad weather conditions at low altitude, his machine being hit in many places.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation which was forwarded to RAF Headquarters in the Field on 8 May 1918, annotated "Certified that this officer's name has not been put forward in connection with the King's Birthday Honours Gazette.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, during the period 21 March 1918 to 24 March 1918.

 

On 22 March 1918 this officer when on bombing with Lieutenant Quinn as pilot, successfully drove off a determined attack by three enemy aircraft, and on 23 March 1918 when on escort duty with the same pilot, being attacked by six enemy aircraft, he brought one down out of control, the machine being seen and pinpointed on the ground.

 

During the period 10 April 1918 to 30 April 1918, this officer, with Captain Napier as pilot, carried out twelve reconnaissances on the enemy's lines at a low altitude under very trying weather conditions.

 

He brought back much valuable information, noticeably from the 11th, 15th, 16th and 30th ultimo, when he accurately located enemy's positions by flying at a low altitude, under heavy machine gun fire from the ground, on the 30th ultimo his machine being hit in many places.

 

His Canadian pilot, Kenneth Russell Napier, also received a Military Cross (which see for supplementary details).

 

      * * * * *

 

O'LOUGHLIN, Lieutenant Harry Merrick ‑ Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service ‑ Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  Home in St.Catharines, Ontario (banker); transferred from CEF to RNAS, 9 June 1917; trained as a pilot; with No.246 Squadron, Seaton Carew, September 1918 onwards.

 

      * * * * *

 

O'REILLY, Major Breney Rolph (or Brefney Ralph; Jackson List) ‑ Officer, Order of the British Empire ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 March 1919. Home in Toronto; physician, Canadian Army Medical Corps.  Graduated from Trinity College, 1903; Lieutenant, Military District No.2, December 1915; attached to RFC Canada Headquarters, July 1917; to Texas, November 1917; to RFC Headquarters as Senior Medical Officer, February 1918; promoted Major, June 1918; to France, April 1919 (special mission, medicine and aeronautics).  University of Toronto Roll of Service incorrectly dates award as 1 January 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war."  However, minutes of Meeting No.10 of the Canadian Air Board (21 June 1920, found in RCAF file 866‑1‑27, National Archives of Canada, RG.24, Volume 3510) noted the following:

 

Hon. Group Captain B.R. O'Reilly, OBE ‑ The Vice‑Chairman reported that Squadron Leader B.R. O'Reilly, OBE, who was the Principal Medical Officer for the Royal Air Force in Canada and is now practising in Toronto, has been good enough to offer his services, without pay, to assist in the organization of the medical services of the Canadian Air Force.  The Vice‑Chairman, at the request of the AOC, CAF, recommended that this offer be accepted, and that Flying Officer O'Reilly be granted in the Canadian Air Force the honorary rank of Group Captain as from the date of his reporting for duty.

 

This proposal was approved.  It is puzzling that the minutes refereed to his rank as Squadron in one part and Flying Officer in another.

 

      * * * * *

 

OAKS, Lieutenant Harold Anthony ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Home in Preston, Ontario; formerly in 1st Division Signals Company, CEF; taken on RFC strength, 8 August 1917; served in No.48 Squadron, 26 March to 20 September 1918; wounded on duty, 24 August 1918.  Struck off strength, 14 April 1919.  "Doc" Oaks, famous bush pilot; Member, Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame.  Died in Toronto on 21 July 1968; see obituary in Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society (Summer 1968).  No published citation.  Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has the following recommendation which gives his rank as Captain:

A Flight Commander of magnificent spirit who has always shown a total disregard of danger.  He has personally destroyed five enemy aircraft.

 

      * * * * *

 

OCCOMORE, 2nd Lieutenant Frank Samuel ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Born in Madoc, Ontario, 24 January 1890; home in Peterborough (student); joined CEF in Edmonton; with Canadian Army Medical Corps, 8 March 1916; taken on RFC strength, 14 November 1917; with No.52 Squadron, 6 June to 1 October 1918 (killed in action).  Seems to be a pilot from citation, but not certain.

 

On 31st August this officer carried out a most successful contact patrol over the front of two Divisions.  The area was twice covered at an altitude varying from 150 to 300 feet, and most valuable information was obtained.  During these operations, the machine was subjected to very heavy machine gun fire, being hit in twenty places, and it was also attacked by an enemy aeroplane.  On other occasions 2nd Lieutenant Occomore has displayed the same courage and determination in carrying out reconnaissances, invariably bringing back valuable and reliable reports.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1255/204/8/39 has the recommendation as it existed with No.1 Wing Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 26 May 1918; it had originally been drafted by Major A.W. Morison, Commanding Officer, No.52 Squadron.  Although the information is basically the same as that already cited, comparison of texts demonstrates the degree to which these submissions were edited as they progressed through command levels:

 

On 31 August 1918 he carried out a Contact Patrol over the front of the 51st and 11th Divisions from Gavrelle to Jigsaw Wood at a height varying from 150 to 300 feet. The area was covered twice and most valuable information obtained.

 

An enemy machine was driven off after attempting to interfere, and during the flight the machine was subjected to very heavy machine gun fire from the ground, being hit in nearly twenty places.

 

On previous occasions Lieutenant Occomore has brought back most useful reports obtained without regard for danger, notably on August 27th and August 28th he obtained detailed information on the enemy's whereabouts on Greenland Hill, by reconnaissance from 200 feet and under fire.

 

      * * * * *

 

OLDFIELD, Lieutenant Kenneth John ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Born 24 July 1893 in Norfolk, England; builder's apprentice at Newmarket, 1909‑1913; migrated to Canada; joined Canadian Army Medical Corps and went overseas; to RFC, 22 August 1917; to Middle East, 14 October 1917; training at Helipolis, November 1917; scout pilot training, Suez and Heliopolis, December 1917 to March 1918; with "X" Flight, No.14 Squadron in Arabia and then No.31 Squadron, India until 1919; to Independent Brigade, 15 October 1918; with No.114 Squadron, 13 February 1919.  Returned to Canada, 1919, settling on Vancouver Island.  No published citation other than "in recognition of distingished services rendered during the war".  Public Record Office Air 1/1667/204/100/16 has undated recommendation which lists his service as follows: Salonika (17 October 1915 to 1 October 1917, apparently with a period in Italy, 10 September 1916 to April 1917), and Hedjaz, 26 January 1918 to 15 October 1919 (possibly with operations commencing 1 April 1918).  It further states he flown approximately 200 days in the year prior to recommendation.  Specific sybmission as follows:

 

This officer has done continuous hard and reliable work in the Hedjaz in reconnaissance, bombing and fighting.  He has shot down one enemy aeroplane from a Nieuport and on another occasion attacked and dispersed a hostile formation of two bombers and one scout.  His work in this connection, with that of another officer, completely restored the confidence of the Arab army which was previously considered disturbed by enemy bombing.  Throughout the period his work has been willingly and efficiently performed.

 

Another document in the same file referred to Lieutenant Hugh Robert Junor and Oldfield, reading part:

 

2nd Lieutenant Kenneth John Oldfield has worked exceptionally hard and has throughout been absolute reliable and fearless.  These two officers have been the backbone of the Flight for over six months.

 

OLDFIELD, Lieutenant Kenneth John ‑ Order of the Nahda, 4th Class (Hedjaz) (Saudi Arabia) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1921.

 

      * * * * *

 

OSENTON, Lieutenant Charles ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Born in England, 24 September 1897; home in Armstrong, British Columbia (rancher); served in 3rd Battalion, Canadian Mounted Rifles; overseas on 12 June 1915; to France, September 1915; to UK for commission, April 1917.  To RFC, 10 September 1917; graded as Flying Officer, 25 December 1917; with No.50 Squadron, 27 December 1917 to 14 February 1918 (under instruction); to No.143 Squadron, 14 February 1918 (with them at Detling, October 1918; No.152 Squadron, 5 October 1918 to 29 January 1919; relinquished commission 6 February 1919.  Flew Avro, BE.2c, Armstrong‑Whitworth types, Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter, BE.12, SE.5.

 

      * * * * *

 

*OWEN, Lieutenant Edward Rosser ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.  Civil servant from Hampstead; appointed Probationary Observer Officer with RNAS, 8 September 1917; to Cattewater, 13 February 1918 and still there as of 18 June 1918 and 18 September 1918.  To unemployed list, 12 March 1919.  Not clear why he is in Canadian cards.

 

      * * * * *

 

OWEN, 2nd Lieutenant James ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Born 1893; died 1978.  Served in 29th Battalion, CEF, winning MM.  Joined RFC 16 November 1917 and to No.6 Squadron, 17 July 1918.  Cited with Lieutenant Robert Sterling.

 

On October 1, when on contact patrol, these officers displayed marked gallantry and endurance. Flying at altitudes from 500 to 1,000 feet for three hours, they successfully located the enemy defence lines. Frequently attacked by machine‑gun fire from the ground, they never refused to be engaged. Having obtained the information required, they attacked enemy transport that was crowded along a certian road, continuing the attack as far as 7,000 yards behind the enemy lines.

 

      * * * * *

 

OWEN, Lieutenant James Collins Farrish ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 June 1917.  Home in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia; commissioned in Canadian Army Service Corps; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 29 June 1916; received Royal Aero Club certificate No.3429, 23 August 1916; graded as Flying Officer, 6 September 1916 and sent to No.48 Squadron that day.  To No.17 Squadron, 13 September 1916.  Missing (prisoner of war), 18 February 1917 on Bulgarian front when his flight commander crossed enemy lines to induce hostile machines to fight; Owen's aircraft hit in vital parts and he was last seen going down, holding enemy at bay with a revolver.  He destroyed his own machine; had previously "fought and forced an enemy machine to come down within our lines".  Repatriated 16 October 1918; to Salonika Base Depot, 11 December 1918.  NOTE: The cards for him are very confusing, suggesting a Bar to his MC (4 June 1917) and possible escape or repatriation from Bulgaria as early as October 1917.

 

OWEN, Lieutenant James Collins Farrish ‑ Mentioned in Despatches for Gallantry When Taken Prisoner ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 April 1917.

 

OWEN, Captain James Collins Farrish ‑ Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919. Award one of many "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

      * * * * *

 

PACE, Lieutenant William John ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Born in Vancouver.  Home in Edmonton (civil engineer); commissioned in Canadian Militia, 22 September 1914; Lieutenant, 9th Battalion, CEF, 23 September 1914; embarked from Quebec, 3 October 1914; to 4th Battalion, CEF; to UK, 16 January 1916 (bronchiectasis) for medical boarding; to Canada, 21 August 1916; discharged medically unfit; as a pilot, 2nd Lieutenant, sailed from Canada with RFC draft, 19 November 1917; taken on strength of RFC (UK), 14 December 1917; served with No.55 Squadron, 11 March to 3 December 1918; sent to Home Establishment; killed 27 April 1919 in motor accident.

 

Since this officer joined his squadron in March last he has carried out five photographic reconnaissances and taken part in thirty‑two bombing raids.  His work has been distinguished throughout by keenness, efficiency and determination.  When attacked by hostile planes he has invariably shown coolness and initiative, never hesitating to assist weaker pilots in critical situations.  On photographic reconnaissances he has rendered most valuable service.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 8th Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force (no date).  The sortie list is out of sequence in the original and is thus transcribed out of sequence here.

 

For exceptional determination, gallantry and skill as a pilot on long distance day bomb raids and photographic reconnaissances, notably on the following occasions:

 

      14 August 1918 ‑ Area East of Mohrange

 

On this date Lieutenant Pace carried out an exceedingly difficult and extremely successful photographic reconnaissance of this area.  Owing to the hot weather it took him two hours to gain the necessary height on this side, and he was away altogether five hours 20 minutes, and only returned owing to his machine running out of petrol.  He obtained photographs of thirteen different hostile aerodromes, several of which had never been previously photographed, and the information thus obtained was of the greatest possible value.  He had a new Observer with him and the credit for the excellence of the photographs is undeniably his, as he instructed his Observer when to take each photograph.

 

      16 August 1918 ‑ Special Reconnaissance of Hostile Aerodromes

 

Lieutenant Pace carried out a completely successful photographic reconnaissance on this date, when he succeeded in locating and photographing two new and hitherto unphotographed hostile aerodromes, and in obtaining other photographs of very great value.  The time occupied by this reconnaissance was five hours.

 

      21 August 1918 ‑ Special Reconnaissance

 

The weather had been unfavourable until late in the afternoon.  Lieutenant Pace was then ordered to make an attempt at a visual reconnaissance if photographs were impossible.  Realizing that if he took ordinary time in obtaining his height he would be too late to get photographs, he crossed the lines at a low altitude and was thus enabled to obtain excellent photographs of all the objectives given him in the Boulay Lorquin area before the light failed.

      27 August 1918 ‑ Conflans

 

The weather was again very bad on this day but in the evening a clear gap made an attempt at a short raid possible.  Lieutenant Pace was therefore given the leadership of a DH.4 formation and sent out.  However, by the time the formation had reached the necessary height a thick bank of cloud was encountered, and Lieutenant Pace was forced to turn back.  On his way back he found a gap near Nancy which he followed up and by going down to 10,000 fet, below the clouds, was able successfully to bomb the railway junction at Conflans.

 

In addition he has taken part in the following long distance bomb raids and photographic reconnaissances:‑

 

11 April 1918   ‑ Luxembourg

12 April 1918   ‑ Metz

15 May 1918               ‑ Thionville

16 May 1918               ‑ Saarbrucken

17 May 1918               ‑ Metz

18 May 1918               ‑ Metz

20 May 1918               ‑ Landau

21 May 1918               ‑ Namur

22 May 1918               ‑ Liege

3 June 1918                 ‑ Luxembourg

4 June 1918                 ‑ Treves

6 June 1918                 ‑ Coblenz

7 June 1918                 ‑ Conz

8 June 1918                 ‑ Thionville

13 June 1918               ‑ Treves (Deputy Leader)

8 July 1918                  ‑ Luxembourg

11 July 1918                ‑ Offenburg

6 July 1918                  ‑ Metz

12 July 1918                ‑ Saarburg

15 July 1918                ‑ Offenburg (Deputy Leader)

17 July 1918                ‑ Thionville (Deputy Leader)

19 July 1918                ‑ Oberndorf

20 July 1918                ‑ Oberndorf (Deputy Leader)

22 July 1918                ‑ Rottweil (Deputy Leader)

31 July 1918                ‑ Mannheim, Photo Reconnaissance

1 August 1918  ‑ Duren (Leader, 2nd Formation)

10 August 1918            ‑ Saarburg and Longuin (Photo Recon)

11 August 1918            ‑ Metz‑Sablon

11 August 1918            ‑ Buhl Aerodrome

13 August 1918            ‑ Buhl Aerodrome

22 August 1918            ‑ Coblenz  

5 August 1918  ‑ Hostile aerodromes reconnaissance

 

Lieutenant Pace joined No.55 Squadron 12 March 1918, and has carried out five Photographic Reconnaissances and taken part in 32 bomb raids, on five of which he has acted as Deputy Leader, and one as Leader.

 

He has throughout shown the utmost keenness in his work, the value of which has been enhanced by his remarkable efficiency and determination.  On numerous occasions in the course of operations on which his machine has been attacked by enemy aeroplanes he has shown great coolness and has displayed considerable initiative and undeniable courage in helping weaker pilots out of critical positions on several occasions.  The value of the example set by him in action has helped to maintain the morale of the squadron at a very high standard.

 

      * * * * *

 

PALMER, 2nd Lieutenant (Acting Lieutenant) Frank Bacon ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 November 1918.  Joined Fort Garry Horse as a Private, 25 September 1914; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 13 November 1916 for duty with RFC; appointed Flying Officer (Observer), 14 March 1917 with seniority from 13 November 1916.  The incident described was raid by five German aircraft on Bertangles, 24/25 August 1918 when RAF lost eleven aircraft destroyed and three damaged (see War in the Air, Volume VI, p.161).

 

On the night of August 24, 1918, this officer performed very gallant and meritorious service.  In an attack on one of our aerodromes by hostile aircraft a hangar full of machines was set on fire, illuminating the whole camp, making the aerodrome an easy mark for the raiders, who continued dropping bombs for 15 minutes.  Great confusion ensued, and 20 officers and men were wounded.  Lieutenant Palmer was blown over by the explosion of a bomb, and although badly shaken, he exhibited coolness and courage of a high order, and by his promptitude succeeded in collecting the wounded, placing them in comparative safety, and also managed to remove the machines and transport from the burning hangaars and shelters, notwithstanding the continual dropping of the enemy's bombs in the area.

 

      * * * * *

 

PALMER, 2nd Lieutenant Herbert Harland ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1919. Born in Richmond Hill, Ontario, 4 June 1891; lived in Markham from 1909 onwards.  Joined Canadian Army Service Corpps, September 1915; overseas November 1915; to RFC, 23 September 1917; commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 20 January 1918.  Served in No.211 Squadron, 1 April 1918 to March 1919 (wounded 14 July 1918 but returned to unit next day). On unemployed list, 12 March 1919.  He made some extravagant claims about his work (one enemy cruiser sunk, "about ten enemy aircraft" accounted for, and knocked out Big Bertha !).

 

      * * * * *

 

PARKER, 2nd Lieutenant Charles Bemister ‑ Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service ‑ Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  Home in Toronto; member, Canadian Army Medical Corps, attached to RFC Canada, June 1917; posted overseas in August 1918; recogntion for services in Canada.

 

      * * * * *

 

*PARR, Major Sydney Charles ‑ Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada.  Born 6 May 1880 in Kent, England; to Egypt, as Engineer Officer, 21 December 1914; later served in Mesopotania.  To Canada (as Engine Repair Park Commander), 13 April 1917.  Not Canadian; Toronto address was for RFC/RAF services only.

 

*PARR, Major Sydney Charles ‑ Officer, Order of the British Empire ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June  1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

      * * * * *

 

 

PARSONS, Captain Harold Stuart ‑ Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada.  Home in Toronto (grocer); served in 58th Battalion; to RAF, 7 June 1918 (Adjutant, No.42 Wing, Deseronto); Headquarters, RAF Canada, 26 December 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

PAULL, Lieutenant Joseph Albert ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919 and Canada Gazette dated 5 Jult 1919.  Home in Vancouver; joined RFC in Canada, going overseas 16 November 1916. To Nos.28 Squadron, 12 May 1917 (from Pool); in No.101 Squadron, 12 October 1917 to 31 May 1918; to Home Establishment, 31 May 1918, presumably for instructional duties; at No.13 TDS as of 7 November 1918.  Killed in a flying accident, 12 June 1919 at Worcester. The Aeroplane of 18 June 1919 reported that he had been "giving an exhibition flight in connection with the Peace Carnival" and attributed it to "the high wind". The machine fell 100 feet; a passenger, air mechanic Ackroyd Bentley, was slightly injured.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

NOTE:  Some peculiar correspondence about his AFC is in the National Archives of Canada (Record Group 7, Governor Generals' Correspondence, Sub‑Group 21, Volume 552, dealing with "Decorations").  On 12 January, 1920, a letter to the Governor General reported that several decorations had been sent to Canada for presentation to recipients or next‑of‑kin.  Among these was the Air Force Cross that Paull had earned, to be given to his widow, Charlotte Paull, then living in Vancouver. However, another letter (March 2, 1920) stated that presentation of the AFC had been held up because of a dispute between Paull's widow and his mother; the latter was claiming that Charlotte Paull had been unable to produce proof of a marriage, and probate of Lieutenant Paull's will was also being disputed. 

 

It is not apparent how this was resolved.  However, through work done by James Routledge (Northumberland) and his grand‑daughter, looking at the Worcester Daily Times (12 June 1919) provided more information on Paulle's death.  Contrary to expectations, the "Peace Carnival" was not a travelling show celebrating the Armistice.  Rather, appears to be have been organized locally, borrowing from military units close by.  Three aircraft had participated in the Peace Carnival (two arriving on the 7th, one on the 9th). The newspaper went into much detail about previous flights:

 

Nightly the ill‑fated officer had been giving amazing exhibitions of craftsmanship in the air, looping the loop and nose diving being only two of the many sensations with which he had thrilled thousands of spectators.  In F 8785 [an Avro 504K] he had done very thrilling work, and on Wednesday evening [the 11th] he took up, one after another, several Worcestershire soldiers who were acting as guard to the machines.

 

About 11.00 a.m. on 12 June he had gone up with Bentley, performing a loop plus other unspecified aerobatics.  One witness reported that the engine seemed to falter after the loop.  Paull flew towards the town, losing height.  However, the aircraft "wobbled" (perhaps a gust of wind) and crashed.  A detailed map of Worcester would be needed to pinpoint the exact spot, but Paull seems to have been attempting a side‑slip when impact occurred.

 

The Worcester Daily Times graphically described both the wreckage and injuries sustained; no modern newspaper would go into such detail. The account concluded with a summary of remarks by the Mayor:

 

He had met many gallant officers during the war, but had not met one who was more patriotic and gallant. Only the previous week he had received the highest honour a flying man could receive ‑ the Air Force Cross.  The honour was bestowed upon him for having flown over the enemy's lines for over 400 hours.  He was sure it would be...the wish of all citizens of Worcester, for him to convey to the unfortunate officer's wife ‑ an English girl ‑ the deepest feelings of condolence and sympathy in her great loss.

 

The Mayor was a bit off in some respects ‑ Paull more likely received his AFC for work as an instructor than for previous service in France.  On the other hand the reference to Paull's widow as being "an English girl" may be related to the subsequent hostility of his mother to the younger woman.

 

      * * * * *

 

PEACE, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Albert Grounds ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ Air Ministry list of 11 January 1919 or 22 January 1919.  Born 16 July 1891; home in Leicester, England; enlisted in Toronto in 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles, 11 November 1914; overseas, July 1915; to France, October 1915; commissioned June 1916; attached to RFC, 15 September 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club certificate No.4262 on 21 February 1917.  To No.56 RS, 29 April 1917; to Expeditionary Force, 9 May 1917; No.1 AD, 11 May 1917; to No.2 AD, 31 May 1917; with No.9 Squadron, 8 June to 27 November 1917 (hospitalized 18‑30 June 1917; with No.27 Squadron, 3‑12 July 1917); to England, 26 November 1917; to No.16 TS as instructor (date not given); to No.33 Wing, 5 May 1918 (Deputy Wing Examiner and Wing Examiner); to Headquarters, No.4 Wing, 15 May 1918 (Wing Examiner; still there on 7 November 1918; with No.8 TDS, 12 May 1919.  Remained in RAF after the war; killed 13 January 1922 at Hinaidi, Iraq, in a mid‑air collision while serving with No.8 Squadron.

 

PEACE, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Albert Grounds ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

      * * * * *

 

PEACE, Lieutenant William James ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 14 August 1893; home in Hamilton (civil engineer); attending McGill when appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 April 1917; sailed to UK about 23 April 1917; joined Manstone flying school immediately on arrival in England, 21 May 1917; to Cranwell, 5 August 1917; to Manstone Handley‑Page Squadron, 21 September 1917; served in No.7 (N) Squadron (later No.207 Squadron), 27 October 1917; with No.58 Squadron, 9 September 1918 until 28 December 1918.  Hospitalized 30 December 1918; to unemployed list, 28 February 1919.  Confirmed as Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, 5 September 1917; Captain, 9 September 1918 (suggesting the DFC was for work with No.207 rather than No.58 Squadron).

 

On the night previous to one of our attacks this officer was detailed for a very important duty, which entailed the patrol of a section of our lines.  The weather conditions were most adverse, but after two attempts this officer started in dense clouds and rain.  Flying by compass he reached his objective, and for three hours patrolled the line.  A very fine performance, calling for high courage and perseverance, in face of the difficulties due to weather conditions.

 

      * * * * *

 

PEACOCK, Lieutenant Ernest Frederick W. ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Home in Montreal (engineer); formerly with 26th Battalion, CEF; taken on strength of RFC, 4 August 1917; to Expeditionary Force, No.1 ASD, 14 November 1917; served with No.65 Squadron, 16 November 1917 to 18 August 1918; to No.3 Flying School, 29 August 1918; seriously injured in aeroplane  accident, 5 September 1918; to unemployed list, 17 April 1919.  Captain with effect from 23 May 1918.  Name is variously spelled Frederic and Frederick.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty while on fighting patrols.  He showed great determination and courage in attacking superior numbers of enemy aircraft, and carried out fine work in engaging enemy troops and transport on the ground with machine‑gun fire.

 

      * * * * *

 

*PEARCE, Captain Arthur Henry ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918.  Born 21 February 1886 in Southampton, England; educated there; forestry official in Burma, 1910.  Moved to Kelowna, British Columbia (1913) and worked in a garage.  Accepted as RNAS candidate, 27 August 1915 (accounbtant in Vancouver); attended Wright School, Dayton, Ohio; passed tests at Augusta, Georgia, 5 February 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant that date; sailed on Baltic, 9 February 1916.  Training at Calshot; at Killingholme, December 1916 to spring 1918; at Westgate, June to December 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

*PEARSON, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) James William ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  American (Nutley, New Jersey); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 27 November 1917; taken on strength in UK, 7 January 1918; with No.23 Squadron, 6 April to 27 August 1918 (hospitalized) and again 7‑18 January 1919 (hospitalized again).

 

On 26th October, while leading a patrol, this officer observed a formation of enemy scouts.  Diving to the attack, he engaged one and drove it down out of control.  He then attacked a second, which he drove down to crash.  In all he has accounted for seven enemy aircraft, setting at all times a fine example of skill and courageous determination.

 

      * * * * *

 

PHILLIPS, Lieutenant Alan MacMillan ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Born 24 January 1898; home in Toronto (although father working in Kingston);joined RNAS (according to University of Toronto Roll of Service); trained at No.78 Canadian Training Squadron; graded as Flying Officer and confirmed, 17 November 1917; served in No.107 Squadron (dates not known) and No.98 Squadron (23 March to 30 May 1918).  Joined No.217 Squadron, 31 May 1918 (with 300 flying hours).

 

A very gallant pilot, who displays great determination.  During the past month he attacked, with one other machine, ten enemy seaplanes and destroyed one of them making four in all since joining his present squadron in June 1918.  On numerous occasions he has descended to very low altitudes to bomb enemy shipping, and on four occasions he obtained direct hits. Recently he set out to attack a strongly defended enemy post, and, notwithstanding fierce firing from anti‑aircraft guns, he set fire to a block of sheds and an enemy coastal motor boat.

 

      * * * * *

 

PHILLIPS, 2nd Lieutenant George Hector Reid ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 17 August 1893; home in Laurel, Ontario.  Specialist in Colt, Lewis and Vickers machine guns (may not be aircrew). With Home Establishment (on transfer from Canadian Engineers), 11 July 1918; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 9 August 1918; to RAF Eastchurch, 177 August 1918; to WTS, 17 October 1918; graded as 2nd Lieutenant (Observer), 24 October 1918; to Independant Force, 1 November 1918; to Midland Area, 26 November 1918; to Canada, 9 December 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

PHILLIPS, 2nd Lieutenant Harley ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Enlisted in RFC in Montreal although DHist cards say his father was living in United Kingdom.  Sailed for overseas, 5 April 1918. Creagen Papers (National Aviation Museum) refer to Canada dated 15 February 1919 (page 205) and also give his home as Montreal; theatre of operations cited as France.

 

An officer of marked courage and perseverance who invariably completes the task allotted him however difficult. He has displayed conspicuous bravery in carrying out photographic and other reconnaissances and in attacking ground targets in face of severe hostile fire.

 

      * * * * *

 

PICKERING, Lieutenant Albert Edward ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1917.  Born 19 June 1892 in Lancaster, England.  Next‑of‑kin there. Enlisted in 7th Battalion, CEF, Dauphin, Manitoba, 24 September 1914 (bank employee in Gradvview, Manioba).  Overseas with First Contingent; to France, May 1915; commissioned July 1915; Captain  as of 14 April 1917.  Attached to RFC on probation, 4 March 1917; to UK for Observer Course, 8 March 1917; appointed Flying Officer (Observer), 18 May 1917 with senuority from 7 March 1917.  To France, 5 April 1917; with No.43 Squadron, 7 April to 24 August 1917; to Home Establishment, 24 August 1917; graded Flying Officer (Pilot), 25 February 1918; retained in UK on instructional duties; retired in UK, 10 June 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when acting as observer, in making reconnaissances at very low altitudes, and attacking hostile infantry, transport and machines with great courage and determination.  In conjunction with his pilot, he was instrumental in destroying several hostile machines, and rendering valuable information to our artillery.

 

      * * * * *

 

*PINEAU, Lieutenant Cleo Francis ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.  American; home in Alburquerque, New Mexico; joined RFC in Canada; as 2nd Lieutenant sailed from Halifax, 12 January 1918; served in No.210 Squadron, 2 June to 8 October 1918 (prisoner of war); repatriated 5 December 1918; postwar in Pennsylvania.

 

An officer of exceptional merit, who sets a very high example of courage and devotion to duty to other pilots.  He has destroyed four enemy machines and driven down two out of control.  After one of these combats, on 8th October, in which he destroyed a Fokker biplane, he was reported missing.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1696/204/122/13 has text of recommendaton. He apparently joined the RFC (or was commmissioned in that force) on 8 August 1917 and had been overseas approximately 200 days.

 

In a general engagement on 8 October 1918 he attacked and destroyed a Fokker biplane.  In addition to the above, he has destroyed three enemy machine and driven down two others out of control.

 

      * * * * *

 

PLUMMER, Lieutenant Stephen Beecher ‑ Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service ‑ Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  Born 26 March 1894; home in Vancouver.  Enlisted in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry as a Private; commissioned November 1916.  Wounded at Ypres (2 June 1916) and Vimy (9 April 1917).  To RFC, 5 June 1917; appears to have been an instructor in England for most of the war, including Gosport from 5 November 1917 onwards.

 

      * * * * *

 

POTTER, Lieutenant Ernest Coombe ‑ Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 August 1918.  However, a letter found in Public Record Office Air 1/113/15/39/36 and dated 12 May 1917 states that the Croix de Guerre "awarded to you February last" was being held for presentation upon his return from Canada. Born 2 January 1892 in Britain; educated there to 1907; accountant in Winnipeg to a piano‑makering firm. Accepted as RNAS candidate in Canada, 25 June 1915; trained at Curtiss School and obtained Aoyal Aero Club Certificate No.1723, 3 September 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant that day; sailed on Corinthian, 19 September 1915.  At Detling, January 1916; flew with No.3 (N) Wing on bombing raids to March 1917.  On leave in Canada, May 1917.  Discharged from RNAS (medically unfit), 10 July 1917; re‑engaged as Observer Sub‑Lieutenant, 5 September 1917, serving subsequently at Eastchurch, HMS Engadine, and Cattewater.  No published citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".  However, Air 1/113/15/39/36 has the following text:

 

_ ex_cut_, _ la tete de son escadrille, sept exp_ditions de bombardement importante en territoire ennemi.

 

      * * * * *

 

PRIME, Lieutenant Frederick Horace ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919 and Canada Gazette dated 5 July 1919.  Born in Toronto, 27 September 1888 (commercial traveller); obtained ACA certificate No.481 at Stinson School, 10 May 1916 (flew tests on 20 April 1916); appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 1 May 1916; at Cranwell, 18 September 1916; at Felixstowe, under instruction, 18 December 1916; still at Felixstowe (operational) on 18 March 1917; at Cattewater, 18 June 1917 (still there 18 September 1917); reported at Scilly, 18 December 1917 and regularly until 18 December 1918.  In 1971 he said he was with No.236 Squadron, likely his last posting before repatriation.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

      * * * * *

 

PRITCHARD, 2nd Lieutenant Thomas Bradley ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1917.  From CEF to RFC, 28 April 1917; graded 2nd Lieutenant, 30 May 1917; to No.39 (Home Defence) Squadron (or No.29 Squadron ?), date uncertain; injured 19 October 1917; died of pneumonia, 5 December 1917.  On night in question he found Zeppelin L.45 just south of mouth of Medway; he was in a BE.2c at 13,000 feet and L.45 was 2,000 feet higher.  He opened fire and it changed course and climbed rapidly.  It went out to sea near Hastings with Pritchard in vain pursuit until he lost sight of it over the Channel.  Short of fuel, he crash‑landed near Bexhill and was injured.

 

In recognition of gallant and distinguished service in connection with anti‑aircraft service in the United Kingdom.

 

      * * * * *

 

PROUT, Lieutenant Harold Oliver ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Home in Croydon, England (contractor) but served in CEF; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), 13 April 1917; to No.19 TS, 13 September 1917; to Northeast Area, 29 March 1918; with No.252 Squadron, 18 September 1918; with No.18 Group as of 11 April 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of valuable flying services".

 

      * * * * *

 

PUGH, Lieutenant John Edwardes ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917.  Home in Stoney Plain, Alberta; formerly in CEF (Alberta regiment); to RFC, Reading, 16 April 1917; to No.46 TS, 4 July 1917; served with No.25 Squadron, 29 September (or 2 October) 1917 to 12 June 1918; to Home Establishment, 12 June 1918; to Midlands Area, 13 July 1918 (DH.4 pilot); to Air Ministry, 3 October 1918; served with No.210 Squadron, 13 October to 9 December 1918; relinquished commission, 9 December 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He carried out twenty successful bombing raids and fifteen long‑distance photographic reconnaissances, showing great determination in carrying out his work, in spite of strong opposition by enemy aircraft.  In two days he took 108 photographs in course of long‑distance flights.  During a period of five days he dropped three‑quarters of a ton of bombs on enemy troops and transport, and engaged ground targets with machine gun fire from a low altitude.  On one occasion whilst on a bombing raid he was attacked by five enemy machines, one of which he destroyed.  He set a splendid example of skill and resource.

 

      * * * * *

 

QUIGLEY, 2nd Lieutenant Frank Granger ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 February 1918.  Born 10 July 1884.  Home in Toronto (student, Queen's University); enlisted as sapper in 6th Field Company, Canadian Engineers, 16 December 1914; arrived in England, 25 April 1915; to France, 16 September 1915;  to General List, Canadian Training Division, 31 January 1917; to RFC, Farnborough, same date; to CE Regimental Depot, 10 March 1917; joined RFC, 4 April or 9 May 1917; 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 10 May 1917; served with No.70 Squadron, 12 September 1917 to 27 March 1918 (wounded, ankle shattered by enemy bullet); invalided to England, 29 March 1918; to Headquarters, 21 September 1918; died in Liverpool General Hospital, 18 October 1918 (influenza).

 

QUIGLEY, 2nd Lieutenant Frank Granger ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 February 1918.  Citation expanded on in London Gazette of 18 July 1918 (given below).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when engaging hostile aircraft.  On one occasion, while on patrol, he attacked an enemy two‑seater which, after close fighting and skilful maneouvering, he crashed to the ground.  He has within a short period destroyed or driven down out of control, seven other enemy machines, and on all occasions has displayed high courage and a fine fighting spirit.

 

QUIGLEY, Captain Frank Granger ‑ Bar to Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in aerial combats.  He destroyed five enemy machines and one balloon, and drove down four enemy machines out of control.  He showed splendid courage and initiative.

 

QUIGLEY, Captain Frank Granger ‑ Distinguished Service Order ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  While leading an offensive patrol he attacked a very large number of enemy aeroplanes, destroyed one of them and drove another down out of control.  On the following day, while on a low‑flying patrol, he was attacked by several enemy scouts, one of which dived at him.  He out‑manoeuvred this machine and fired on it at very close range.  He followed it down to 500 feet, firing on it, and it spiralled very steeply to the ground in a cloud of black smoke.  During the three following days, while employed in low‑flying work, he showed the greatest skill and determination.  He fired 3,000 rounds and dropped 30 bombs during this period, inflicting heavy casualties on enemy infantry, artillery and transport.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has the recommendation as passe from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 5 April 1918.

For the greatest determination, gallantry and devotion to duty during the battle, March 21st to March 31st, 1918.

 

On March 22nd, 1918, when leading an offensive patrol, this officer attacked a very large number of enemy aeroplanes.  Singling out an Albatros Scout he engaged in head‑on at very close range. The enemy aeroplane dropped one wing, and then dived into the ground, where it crashed between Inchy and Bourlon.  A few minutes later Captain Quigley attacked a Triplane.  This machine went down out of control.  On the same patrol he engaged no less than seven other enemy aircraft.

 

Again, on March 23rd, 1918, when on a low flying patrol he was attacked by several Pfalz Scouts, one of which dived at him.  He outmanoeuvred this machine and fired a burst at very close range on its tail. He followed ir down, firing to 500 feet, when the enemy aeroplane emitted a cloud of black smoke and spiralled very steeply into the ground near Morchies.

 

From March 24th to March 27th, 1918, Captain Quigley was employed on low flying work. He showed the greatest determination and gallantry, and caused considerable casualties to enemy infantry, artillery and transport.  On several occasions he came back with his machine dangerously shot about.  In three days he fired upwards of 3,000 rounds and dropped 30 bombs.

 

This officer has now destroyed sixteen enemy aircraft and one balloon, and has driven down eight other enemy aircraft out of control.

 

Captain Quigley is now in hospital from a wound received in action on 27th March 1918.

 

He was posted to No.70 Squadron on 12 September 1917, and was awarded the Military Cross in January last, and the Bar thereto on 15 March 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

QUIGLEY, Captain Harry Stephen ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.  Home in Toronto (surveyor).  Overseas as private in First Contingent; commissioned in CEF, September 1915; awarded DCM and MC with CEF.  Attached as observer to RFC, 30 October 1916; to UK for Observer Course, 19 January 1917; graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 1 May 1917; to France, March or May 1917; joined with No.9 Squadron, March 1917; hospitalized, 20 May 1917; to England, 11 August 1917; to Reading, 28 August 1917; to No.24 TS, 2 October 1917; to No.79 Squadron, 29 November 1917; to No.3 School of Fighting and Gunnery, 14 May 1918; later with No.70 TS (instructor); to No.241 Squadron, 11 October 1918; to No.1 Training Group, 20 May 1919.  For "Coast Patrol"

 

      * * * * *

 

QUINN, Lieutenant James John ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918.  Home in Ottawa; joined RFC in Canada; embarked from Halifax, 24 January 1917; taken on strength, 13 April 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), 24 May 1917; to No.53 Squadron, 6 October 1917; to No.1 School of Special Flying, 28 June 1918; to No.11 TDS, 7 November 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He carried out five low reconnaissances over the enemy's lines, bringing back valuable information, his machine on three occasions being badly shot about by machine gun fire from the ground. He carried out one offensive patrol and one escort, attacking with bombs and machine gun fire from a low altitude.  On both occasions he was attacked by enemy aeroplane formations, his observer driving one down out of control and hos own machine being much shot about.

 

      * * * * *

 

QUINN, 2nd Lieutenant James ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Born 21 November 1893; home in Mount Lehman, British Columbia (engine apprentice); joined CEF, 12 November 1914; to France, September 1915 (awarded Military Medal); to RFC, 16 November 1918; to No.6 Squadron, 17 July 1918.  NOTE: although the award is not gazetted until February 1919, RAF communique dated 20 October 1918 reports it.  Cited with Lieutenant Robert Sterling; is this man an observer or pilot ?

 

On October 1 [1918], when on contact patrol, these officers displayed marked gallantry and endurance.  Flying at altitudes from 500 to 1,000 feet for three hours, they successfully located the enemy ground defence lines.  Frequently attacked by machine guns from the ground, they never refsued to engage.  Having obtained the information required, they attacked enemy transport that was crowded along a certain road, continuing the attack as far as 7,000 yards behind the enemy lines.

 

      * * * * *

 

RANEY, Lieutenant Herman Grant ‑ Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Italy) ‑ awarded effective 5 April 1919.  Born in Robinson, Quebec, 12 March 1897; home in Ottawa; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS, 19 April 1917; joined RNAS in UK, 21 May 1917; confirmed as Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, 3 September 1917; to Manston, 20 October 1917; to No.66 Wing (date uncertain); invalided to England, 11 October 1918; to No.13 TS, 24 April 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

      * * * * *

 

RATH, 2nd Lieutenant Henry Coyle ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Home in Tweed, Ontario (harware clerk); joined RFC in Canada; sailed for overseas, 26 February 1918; served with No.29 Squadron, 5 June to 26 October 1918 (killed in action).

A bold and resolute fighter in the air who has six enemy aeroplanes to his credit.  On 14th October he, with three other machines, engaged a large number of enemy scouts; five were shot down, Lieutenant Rath destroying two.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation submitted by Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, Royal Air Force on 16 October 1918.

 

On the 8th August 1918, when on offensive patrol over Erquinghem, Lieutenant Rath show down a DFW two‑seater.

 

On the 14th August 1918, when on Wireless Interception duty north of Bailleul, Lieutenant Rath shot down a Hannoveraner two‑seater.

 

On the 17th August 1918, when on line patrol near Armentieres, Lieutenant Rath destroyed an Albatross two‑seater.

 

On the 18th August 1918, when on offensive patrol east of Bailleul with four other machines, a fight took place with a large enemy formation. Of the five enemy machines destroyed, Lieutenant Rath shot down one.

 

On the 14th October 1918, when on offensive patrol between Roulers and Ingelmunster with three other machines, an engagement took place with a large number of hostile scouts.  Five were shot down, Lieutenant Rath destroying two.

 

      * * * * * *

 

RAY, Lieutenant Lewis Hector ‑ Order of Michael the Brave (Roumania) ‑ on Air Ministry List of 15 July 1919.  Home in Toronto; joined and trained in Canada; proceeded overseas 16 December 1917; on RFC strength in UK, 15 January 1918; served in No.19 Squadron, 91st (A) Wing, 29 March to 8 November 1918; invalided to England, 7 December 1918; to Southeast area, 30 March 1919.  No published citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."  Public Record Office Air 1/1479/204/36/131 has recommendation passed from Headquarters, 1st Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 10 January 1919.

 

This officer carried out over seven months active service flying with this squadron [No.19] and has always shown the utmost dash and courage during combats and the greatest keenness to destroy enemy aircraft.

 

On 27 September 1918 this oficer, with great gallantry, by himself attacked three Fokker biplanes at a comparatively low altitude.  The first he destroyed; the remaining two he sent down completely out of control and it was only due to ground mist and shell smoke that he did not see them crash.  As he was climbing up again, he observed a hosile balloon coming up which he immediatly destroyed in flames.

 

Altogethr this officer accounted for the following enemy aircraft:‑

 

31 May 1918   ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout out of control, Armentieres

31 July 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout destroyed, south of Douai

16 September 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout out of conrol, south of Lille.

27 September 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout destroyed, northeast of Cambrai.

27 September 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout out of control, ditto.

27 September 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout out of control, ditto.

27 September 1918 ‑ one enemy balloon destroyed in flames, ditto.

4 October 1918 ‑ one enemy aircraft Scout driven down ‑ seen to land east of                          Cambrai.

 

      * * * * *

 

REDPATH, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Ronald Francis ‑ Croix de Guerre (France) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1917 (listed in Aeroplane of 2 January 1918, although Collishaw's award was supposedly in same batch, and his is dated 21 April 1917).  Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo dated 14 April 1917 stating he had been invested with the award that day by General Nollet, commanding 36th French Army Corps.  Born in Montreal, 7 July 1888; home there (merchant); joined RNAS as Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, 22 November 1915 in Ottawa; to England, 1 December 1915; at Chingford (under instruction), 20 December 1915; at Eastchurch (under instruction), 1 May 1916; with No.3 (Naval) Wing, Manstone, 7 August 1916 (subsequent moves to Luxeuil and Ochy); with No.11 (N) Squadron, 7 March 1917; with No.6 (N) Squadron, 22 April 1917; with No.11 (N) Squadron, 15 August 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 2 September 1917; to No.10 (N) Squadron, 25 September 1917; to Headquarters, No.4 Wing, 3 December 1917; to Cranwell, 27 December 1917; to Redcar, 10 June 1918; to Cranwell, 22 June 1918; to No.209 Squadron, November 1918; to Cranwell, 9 March 1919; to unemployed list, 24 April 1919.  Postwar Director, CAF; died 11 January 1970.  No published citation other than "for distinguished services rendered during the war."  Public Records Office Air 1/74 has communication dated 5 March 1917 from Grand Quartier Generale, Service Aeronautique noting several RNAS personnel cited in Orders of 4 Groupe de Bombardement (the French formation operating with No.3 Wing); citation repeated in Air 1/113/15/39/36; for Redpath it reads:

 

A fait preuve, dans la conduite de son Escadrille, au cours de bombardement _ grande distance, de beaucoup de courage et d_habilit_.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/113/15/39/36 has a recommendation dated 20 March 1917 for a Distinguished Service Cross (not awarded) related to his services with No.3 Wing.

 

For devotion to duty in successfully leading the Flight in every raid far into enemy territory.  It has been Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Redpath's duty to find his way to the objective, in which he has been consistently successful.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1476/204/36/113 has a recommendation from the Officer Commanding, No.91 Wing for an OBE for Captain (Acting Major) Ronald Francis Redpath, No.209 Squadron, dated 1 January 1919.  Although evidently not approved, the text of this is worth noting:

 

This officer had done extremely good work since he took over command of No.209 Squadron on 18 November 1918.  By his personal energy and ability he has greatly improved the efficiency of the squadron.  He has had considerable previous service overseas, and to my personal knowledge did very good work on Home Establishment.

 

      * * * * *

 

*REECE, 2nd Lieutenant Robert Henry. ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918 ‑ American (born in Boston, Massachusetts, 30 August 1888); sailed from United States, 15 August 1916; joined Cadet Training Corps at Denham, 8 October 1916; graded as Flying Officer, 27 February 1917.  Posted to No.100 Squadron, Royal Flying Corps, Ayre, 4 August 1917; posted to "A" Naval Squadron (which became No.16 Naval Squadron and then No.216 Squadron) on 17 Novmber 1917; wrote Night Bombing with the Bedouins.  Died in Boston, 14 April 1960.  No clear Canadian connection and not sure how he came to be in DHist cards.  New England Aviators, 1914‑1918 (Boston, 1920), Vol.2, p.76 does not make the connection either, although it says he "received his aviation training in England".

 

As an observer to Captain R. Halley in a long distance night bombing raid this officer rendered very valuable service in dropping bombs on a great enemy war factory (which caused explosions therein), being exposed to very intense anti‑aircraft fire from the enemy's guns.  Lieutenant Reece has been engaged in 29 raids, and has displayed marked efficiency in this work.

 

Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has considerable documentation respecting this award, notably a recommendation passed from Headquarters, 8th Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force.

 

For consistent good work, skill and gallantry as an Observer whilst on long distance bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:

 

      Night 29/30th June, 1918 ‑ Mannheim

 

On the occasion of the above raid this officer acted as observer to Captain R. Halley. The course had to be set and kept entirely by compass, as the sky was covered by dense clouds throughout the night, and low clouds and heavy mist were encountered when over the lines.  Notwithstanding these disadvantages, the objective ‑ Badische Anilin und Soda Fabrik ‑ was successfully picked out and in spite of heavy anti‑aircraft fire bombs were dropped when the machine was well over the objective and explosions were seen.  Owing to bad visibility it was found impossible to pick up the lighthouses on the return journey, but after a flight of eight hours a safe landing was made at Chougny.

 

In addition, this officer has taken part in the following raids ‑ those from 15/16th August 1917 to 24/25th October 1917 having been carried out with No.100 Squadron; those from 6 January 1918 to 29 June 1918 with No.216 Squadron:‑

 

Date                                   Objective

 

15/16th Aug 1917                          Roulers Station      

16/17th Aug 1917                          Wercicq

16/17th Aug 1917                          Gheovoult

20/21st Aug 1917                          Lezennes

21/22nd Aug 1917                         Menin Factory

25/26th Aug 1917                          Lezennes

31st Aug/1st Sept 1917                  Lezennes

31st Aug/1st Sept 1917                  Lezennes

19/20th Sept 1917                         Reumbeke

20/21st Sept 1917                          Ghelurve

21/22nd Sept 1917                        Menin Station

21/22nd Sept 1917                        Ghelvelt Road

22/23rd Sept 1917                         Wervicq Station

25/26th Sept 1917                         Menin

25/26th Sept 1917                         Wervicq‑Ghelvelt Road

27/28th Sept 1917                         Ledeghem

28/29th Sept 1917                         Ledeghem

29/30th Sept 1917                         Courtrai

29/30th Sept 1917                         Airship Shed, St.Denis Western

30th Sept/1st Oct 1917                  Ghontroed

24/25th Oct 1917                           St.Avord

      * * * * *

6th Jan 1918                                  Courcelles

20th May 1918                              Metz

21st May 1918                         Mannheim

22nd May 1918                             Mannheim

27th May 1918                              Mannheim

30th May 1918                              Konz

5th June 1918                           Thionville

6th June 1918                           Thionville

 

This officer has on four occasions successfully bombed the factories at Mannheim and has always displayed the utmost keenness and efficiency in his work.

 

A memo dated 5 July 1918, from Major H.A. Buss (Commanding Officer, No.216 Squadron) to Officer Commanding, No.83 Wing, deals further with Lieutenant R.H. Reece (Observer):

 

The above mentioned officer is specially recommended for award in recognition of his services in carrying out long distant [sic] night bombing raids, and in particular for his services on the night of 29th‑30th June when, acting as Observer in Handley Page 3138, he succeeded in reaching and successfully bombing the Badische Anilin and Soda Fabrik under the most difficult weather conditions (Copy of Report Attached).

 

This was the only machine, out of six detailed, to reach Mannheim; on that night the pilot and observer did so almost entirely by compass, as the sky was covered by high clouds throughout the night and low clouds and mist were encountered over the lines.  Owing to being unable to pick up the lighthouses on the return journey, the machine was safely landed at Chougny, after a flight of eight hours.

 

This is the fourth occasion on which this officer has successfully bombed the factories at Mannheim.

 

Lieutenant Reece carried out about 35 night raids as Observer on FE's previous to joining this squadron; a list of his raids while with 216 Squadron is attached.

 

The special report on the raid of 29/30 June 1918 (mentioned in the above note) reads as follows:

 

Obtained height and started for "B" Lighthouse at 9.30 p.m.

 

"Z" Lighthouse not going.

 

"A" Lighthouse arrived at 9.42 p.m.

 

"B" Lighthouse arrived at 9.52 p.m.

 

"D" Lighthouse not going.

 

Direct compass course to Mannheim from "B" Lighthouse allowing for drift. Fifteen minutes after leaving "B" Lighthouse the ground became extinct [sic] owing to dense mist and clouds. Carried on compass course until 11.45 p.m. at which time dense clouds had given way to thinner clouds.  Rhine River became visible south of Mannheim.  Carried on down Rhine round the large bend at Mannheim, and Ludwigshaven became visible.  Lights at Mannheim, searchlights and intense A.A.  Although the river showed up well, darkness prevented the town itself from showing up at all well.  Bombs were dropped and explosions seen. Course taken from northwest and southeast over objective.  Exact results of bombs dropped impossible to tell on account of poor visibility.  Anti‑aircraft [fire] very severe. After dropping bombs, return compass course was taken, climbing as rapidly through the clouds as possible, until 9,000 feet was reached.  Flew on compass course for one hour 15 minutes above thick clouds after which clouds gave way.  The dense mist prevented visibility as regards roads, railways and so forth but through lighthouses should have shown.  No lighthouses fro this time on being visible, we carried on compass course, realizing that this would carry us well within the boundaries of our own lines, until dawn at which time we landed at Petit Masse, four miles from Chougny and about 20 miles from Chateau Chinon in the Neivre District, at 4.50 a.m.

 

The list of his sorties with No.216 Squadron (6 January to 29 June 1918) adds little to above information other than to state that on all such raids he carried the same load ‑ twelve 112‑pound bombs.

 

      * * * * *

 

REID, Captain Alexander Daniel ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Born in Manitoba, 18 October 1889; home in Winnipeg (structural and mechanical engineer, following graduation from McGill University, 1910); attended Toronto Curtiss School and obtained Royal Aero Club certificate No.3384, 1 August 1916; appointed probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 2 August 1916; in UK, 27 November 1916; to Cranwell, 6 January 1917; to Dover, 8 May 1917; listed there continuous as a seaplane pilot until 18 December 1918; struck off strength, 17 March 1919.  NOTE: There is some confusion in the records as to his Christian names, owing to the presence of a Lieutenant Allan Douglas Reid in the CEF,

 

REID, Captain Alexander Daniel ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.

 

      * * * * *

 

REID, 2nd Lieutenant Allan Douglas ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Home in Toronto.  Enlisted in CEF, sailing with 3rd Battalion; to France, February 1915; commissioned February 1917; to RFC, 17 April 1917; with No.57 Squadron, 28 June to 31 July 1917.  NOTE: Records indicate two men named A.D. Reid ‑ Allan Douglas and Alexander Daniel; may have returned to CEF unit in August 1917, but is shown as receiving an AFC for instructional duties at Vendome.

 

      * * * * *

 

REID, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Ellis Vair ‑ Distinguished Service Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1917. Born in Belleville, Ontario, 31 October 1889; home in Toronto; attended University of Toronto, 1908‑1912 and was an architect.  Appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, Ottawa, 10 January 1916; sailed on Adriatic from New York, 12 January 1916; served in No.3 (N) Wing and then No.10 (N) Squadron (Collishaw's "Black Flight").  Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo dated 18 July 1917 indicating that news of his award had been communicated to him (as well as those to Collishaw and Sharman) that day.  Killed in action, 28 July 1917.

 

In recognition of his services on the following occasions:

 

On the 6th June 1917 he attacked and drove down one of four hostile scouts.  This machine dived nose first into the ground and was destroyed.

On the afternoon of the 15th June 1917 he was leading a patrol of three scouts and encountered a formation of ten enemy machines.  During the combat which ensued he forced one machine down completely out of control.  Next he attacked at a range of about 30 yards another hostile scout.  The pilot of this machine was killed, and it went down completely out of control.

 

This officer has at all times shown the greatest bravery and determination.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo from Senior Officer, RNAS Dunkirk to Vice Admiral, Dover Patrol dated 17 July 1917.  It recommends several officers for awards (Reid and Chadwick included), and lists them in order of merit (see Breadner).  The text for Reid differs markedly from that which was published in the London Gazette:

 

This officer joined my command from. No.3 Wing on April 27th, 1917 and was appointed to Naval Squadron No.10, now in the field.  Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid has shown the greatest pluck and unhesitating gallantry, in many cases against great odds.  On 6th July, with only three other machines and showing complete disregard for numbers, he attacked a formation of 15 German aeroplanes with fifteen others in sight on a slightly higher level.  In this brilliant engagement, the enemy formation was broken up, for H.A's [hostile aircraft] being driven down by out pilots, two of which fell to Flight Sub‑Lieutenant E.V. Reid.

 

Folios 179‑180 of Air 1/74 (date uncertain, circa mid‑July 1917) has an even more detailed recommendation from A.C. Bell, Commanding Officer of No.10 (N) Squadron for an unspecified award, laid out in an Order, CW.67782 dated 29 June 1917.

 

While on active service with this unit, he has maintained a consistent record of achievement, involving in several instances, the most unhesitating gallantry in the face of very heavy odds against him.  In little more than a month he has accounted for nine enemy aircraft and the details of the more conspicuous of these engagements are appended:‑

 

1.         On 15th June, with other machines of his flight, he attacked without hesitation a greatly superior number of enemy aircraft, including several two‑seaters and from 10‑15 Halberstadt and Albatross Scouts.  The scene of this engagement was near Moorslede.  Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid went into the midst of the enemy machines, and immediately drove one down completely out of control, this result being noted by Flight Lieutenant Collishaw.

 

Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid was now in the thick of a large number of enemy aircraft attacking from all sides.  After two indecisive engagements, he obtained a favourable position behind a Halberstadt Scout which was attacking another machine, and shot the pilot, the enemy aircraft then going down entirely out of control.

 

In the course of this engagement, five enemy machines were brought down, without any casualties on our side, and the remainder broke off the fight and fled, although outnumbering our pilots by about three to one.  To this result Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid brilliantly contributed.

 

2.         Near Deulemont, between Warneton and Quesnoy, on 6th July, with only three other machines, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid again exhibited complete disregard of very heavy odds. A formation of fifteen Albatross Scouts ere encountered, with fifteen others in sight above them at a higher level.

 

These were immediately attacked by our small patrol and Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid drove one down completely out of control and in all probability a second one, though he was prevented from observing it for any length of time by continual attack from numerous other enemy scouts.

 

In this brilliant engagement at least four enemy machines were disposed of and their formation again broken up and driven in by a patrol which they outnumbered by nearly four to one.

 

3.         On June 6th, two of our patrols, numbering 13 machines in all, centralized east of Ypres and engaged a very large number of enemy Scouts and two‑seaters near the Polygon Woods.  In the course of this engagement, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid being isolated from his patrol at the time, was attacked simultaneously by four Halberstadt Scouts.  He fought them all down, from 15,000 to 5,000 feet, drove one down which was seen to crash on the ground, and attacked and scattered the remainder.

 

In this general engagement ten enemy machines were set on fire, crashed or driven down out of control, without loss to our side, and again Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid took a conspicuous part in securing this result.

 

In addition to these achievements, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Reid has destroyed two two‑seater machines, one on 1st June, killing pilot and observer, and one on 7th June, when pilot was again shot and machine crashed.

 

He also drove down one of five Albatross Scouts on 3rd June, this machine being observed to crash in a small field, and shot the pilot of a Halberstadt Scout on 17th June, machine going down out of control.

 

Throughout his service with this squadron, he has rendered steady, consistent and brilliant service, showing at all times a complete disregard of odds against him, and I consider him in every way qualified to receive one of the decorations referred to in this order.

 

REID, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Ellis Vair ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1917.

      * * * * *

 

REID, Temporary Captain George Thomas ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 16 October 1893; home in Toronto (lumber dealer); commissioned Lieutenant in 109th Regiment, Canadian Militia, September 1915; Captain, 242nd Battalion (Forestry Corps), January 1916; overseas November 1916; to France, January 1917.  Attached to RFC as Observer on Probation, 14 October 1917.  To No.1 School of Aerial Gunnery, 17 December 1917; to No.1 School of N and BD [Navigation and Bomb Dropping ?], 13 February 1918; served with No.97 Squadron, 14 May 1918 to 11 January 1919 (to France, 29 July 1918).  Relinquished commission, 13 January 1919.

 

A very competent and gallant observer in long‑distance bombing raids, in thirteen of which he has been successfully engaged.  Captain Reid displays great skill in selecting the correct altitude for unloading his bombs, and his determination is most marked in all his work.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has a letter dated 17 September 1918 from the Commanding Officer, No.97 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.83 Wing, Royal Air Force:

 

I have the honour to bring to your notice the excellent work carried out by Lieutenant J.A. Stewart, Flying Officer, and Captain G.T. Reid, Flying Officer Observer, since this squadron arrived in this country [France].

 

They have always flown together and their work has been most consistent. They have now carried out 13 successful raids and in spite of adverse weather conditions at times they have never yet failed to reach their objective, which shows great determination.  Their bombing has been consistently good and they have excellent judgment as to when to bomb low and when to bomb at an average altitude.  Their bombing range has varied from 4,000 feet to 700 feet. They materially helped to demolish Folperweller Aerodrome on the 22nd August, obtaining several direct hits.

 

At Buhl on the 2nd September they bombed the aerodrome from 700 feet and started eight fires which were confirmed by other pilots.

 

They also started a large fire at Metz Sablon on the 12th instant.

 

They have been very modest in their claims for although they have usually got close to their target, they have claimed few direct hits although the amount of damage caused must have been considerable.

 

On several occasions they have made two trips a night.

 

On the last three raids, 14th, 15th, 16th of September, they have successfully bombed Kaiserlautern, Mainz and Frankfort.

By careful study of their route and good use of their navigation instruments they have accomplished excellent times to Mainz and Frankfurt, namely 4 3/4 hours and 5 3/4 hours respectively.

 

I consider they have shown great courage, perseverance and determination in all their work.

 

The same file has the formal recommendation sent on 22 September 1918 from Headquarters, 8th Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force.  Some of the place names are spelled differently from the above letter (which itself cannot agree on the spelling of Frankfort/Frankfurt).

 

For consistent good work, gallantry and skill as an Observer on night bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:‑

 

      Night 22 August 1918 ‑ Folperweiler Aerodrome

 

On the occasion of this raid Captain Reid was Lieutenant Stewart's Observer. In spite of a very hostile anti‑aircraft barrage they came down to 700 feet over the objective and obtained several direct hits on the hangars and sheds on Folperweiler Aerodrome, causing material damage.

 

      Night 1/2 September 1918 ‑ Buhl Aerodrome

 

With Lieutenant Stewart as Pilot, Captain Reid came down to 700 feet over the objective and in the course of several runs up and down was successful in starting eight fires, thereby causing a considerable amount of damage.  The fires were seen and confirmed by other pilots.

 

      Night 12 September 1918 ‑ Metz Sablon

 

Captain Reid with Lieutenant Stewart as Pilot carried out a very successful raid on this objective, excellent shooting being made and a large fire, which could be seen from a considerable distance, being started.

 

In addition, he has taken part in the following raids:

 

19 August 1918            ‑ Metz Sablon

20 August 1918            ‑ Buhl Aerodrome

21 August 1918            ‑ Mohrange Aerodrome

25 August 1918            ‑ Boulay Aerodrome

30 August 1918            ‑ Boulay Aerodrome

3 September 1918        ‑ Boulay Aerodrome

6 September 1918        ‑ Lorquin Aerodrome

14 September 1918      ‑ Kaiserlautern

15 September 1918      ‑ Mainz

16 September 1918      ‑ Frankfort

Captain Reid has always flown with Lieutenant J.A. Stewart, and their work together has been most consistent.

 

Captain Reid has carried out thirteen successful raids, and in spite of very adverse weather conditions on several occasions, has never yet failed to reach his objective.  His bombing has been consistently good, and he has shown throughout excellent judgement in deciding when it was advisable to bomb low and when at an average altitude.  His bombing range has varied from 4,000 to 700 feet.

 

On the last three raids undertaken, viz., 14th, 15th and 16th September, Captain Reid successfully bombed Kaiserlautern, Mainz and Frankfort.  By carefully studying the route and making the best use of his navigation instruments the raids to Mainz and Frankfort were carried out in the excellent time of 4 3/4 and 5 3/4 hours respectively.  On September 16th the wind was very strong and Captain Reid's machine was the only one 14 which started for the long objective which bombed its target and returned.

 

Captain Reid has throughout shown the greatest courage, perseverance and determination in all his work.

 

The same file has a list of sorties similar to those shown, but indicating that he was engaged in two raids on 2 September 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

REID, 2nd Lieutenant James ‑ Croix de Guerre with Silver Star (France) ‑ effective 8 February 1919.  Born in Scotland, 30 November 1890; home in Newark, New Jersey (aero engine tester); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 28 February 1918 while on strength of CEF.  Served in No.65 Squadron, 1 July to 4 November 1918 (killed in action).  No published citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."  Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation sent by Headquarters, Secod Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 4 November 1918.

 

Has carried out 64 offensive patrols, and has destroyed two enemy aeroplanes and had a number of other combats.  He was very successful in low bombing on the 28th ultimo, and has altogether proved a very brave pilot and leader.

 

      * * * * *

 

REID, Lieutenant Robert Gillespie ‑ Croce di Guerra (Italian War Cross) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Home in St.John's, Newfoundland (student); commissioned in RFC, 22 September 1917; trained in Canada, sailing overseas 29 October 1917; appointed Flying Officer, 20 November 1917; to Italy, 1 March 1916; to No.66 Squadron, 8 March 1918; to England, 5 December 1918; to unemployed list, 14 January 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

      * * * * *

 

REILLY, Captain J.R. ‑ Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service ‑ Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  Reported as being "Canadian Infantry" and for services in Canada (Adjutant, Aerial Fighting Squadron No.3, Beamsville).  No DHist card for this man.  Militia List 1918 has a Captain J.R. Reilly (seniority from 9 March 1914), 44th Lincoln and Welland Regiment.

 

      * * * * *

 

*REILLY, 2nd Lieutenant Sidney George ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1919.  Home given as being in New York; on roster of RFC Canada, 16 November 1917; proceeded overseas 16 December 1917.  No citation other than "for distinguished services rendered in connection with military operations in the field."  The circumstances of an MC being awarded so late and to such a junior officer are unusual; the DHist card suggests he might be the Reilly featured in R.B. Lockhart's Ace of Spies (very unlikely !).

 

      * * * * *

 

REKOFSKY, Lieutenant Stanislas Thomas ‑ Croix de Guerre (France) ‑ awarded as per 2 November 1918.  Home in Kitchener, Ontario (engineer); taken on strength from CEF, 31 August 1917; with No.10 Squadron, 28 January to 29 April 1918; with No.82 Squadron, 30 April to 24 July 1918 (wounded); to No.48 Squadron, 12 March 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered".

 

      * * * * *

 

RICHARDSON, Lieutenant Bert Vershoyle ‑ Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada.  Home in Winnipeg (barrister); commissioned Lieutenant, 106th Regiment (Winnipeg Light Infantry), 29 December 1915; appointed Flying Officer, 31 August 1917; with No.87 Canadian Training Squadron; to Headquarters, RAF Canada, 15 December 1918.

 

      * * * * *

 

RICHARDSON, Lieutenant Robert Reginald ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November, 1918.  Born 24 February 1895.  Home in Guelph (architectural draughtsman); served in 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles and Lieutenant, 71st Battalion, CEF; overseas, April 1916; in France, June 1916; wounded, October 1916; to Central Ontario Regimental Depot, 21 May 1917; to RNAS, 15 July 1917; to Cranwell, 12 September 1917; to Calshot, 29 October 1917; with No.246 Squadron as of 7 November 1918.  To No.123 Squadron (No.2 Squadron CAF), 26 February to 2 April 1919.  NOTE: Air 1/465/15/312/149 (MG.40 D.1 Vol.9) has several reports of Lieutenant R.R. Richardson based at Seaton Carew making attacks on submarines ‑ 8 June 1919 (Aircraft 9972, observer Lt. Hurst) sighted U‑Boat on surface, 56‑43 N 0‑42 W periscope still visible when he reached it; dropped two 230‑lb bombs which reportedly brought up oil and bubbles; 13 June 1918, aircraft 9972 (on special patrol responding to reports of submarines, saw perisocope of one on north, 54‑48N 1‑1.30 W. Attacked with a 230‑lb bomb that exploded in wash, then a second bomb.  Oil and bubble seen; drifter patrol vessel came up and dropped two depth charges.  On 28 July 1918, Kangaroo 9975, sighted a submarine 54‑45 N 0‑20 W.  Dropped two bombs where periscope vanished; failed to explode. A patrol vessel summoned but its search was fruitless.  File Air 1/457/15/312/65 has report of another attack by him in same aircraft, 1410 hours 54‑39 N 0‑55 W, 26 July 1918. Another flying boat had bombed a submarine and summoned him.  He dropped one bomb from 500 feet ahead of previous bombing (to allow for movement of submarine), and another from 700 feet, three minutes later.  Other ships came up to search and depth‑charge while he returned to base "to replenish with bombs".  Public Records Office file Air 1/456/15/312/51 (copy held in National Archives of Canada, MG.40 D.1 Volume 9) has report of another attack in Kangaroo 9975, 3 September 1918, in 495 Flight, 68 Wing, 5438N 0‑52W, dropping two 230‑lb bombs; reported seeing tip of conning tower and was not seen by enemy on approach.  First bomb detonated 15 yards asern of conning tower.  Circled and dropped another bomb 20 yards ahead; no patrol vessels to help.  No citation other than "in recognition of valuable flying services".

 

      * * * * *

 

RICHARDSON, 2nd Lieutenant Walter Bryan ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1918 for services in Egypt (not clear how he came to be connected with that area, and this may be a case mistaken identity).  Born 19 August 1892 in Winnipeg; educated there; enlisted in Canadian Army Service Corps, September 1915; to France, January 1916; to RFC, 20 October 1917; with No.3 Squadron July to November 1918 (but also reported as joining No.2 Squadron, 4 October 1918).

 

      * * * * *

 

RIDLEY, Lieutenant Walter ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.  Born 23 September 1893; home in Redhill, Surrey (England) where he was a farmer, but enlisted as Private, 12th Battalion, CEF, September 1914.  Overseas with First Contingent; to France, March 1915; wounded April 1915; commissioned February 1917; to RFC, 30 June 1917; graded as Flying Officer, 16 March 1917; to Salonika, 30 January 1918; with No.47 Squadron as of 1 April 1918; to No.150 Squadron, 3 June 1918; ceased to be attached to RAF, 25 March 1919.  Described as formerly in Canadian Engineers.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

RIDLEY, Lieutenant Walter ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1919.

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBERTS, Sergeant Charles Joseph ‑ Meritorious Service Medal ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Described as Canadian Forestry Corps.  Sometimes erroneously credited with Air Force Medal.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBERTSON, Lieutenant John Gordon ‑ Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919. Home given variously as Wimbledon, London England and Vermillion, Alberta; overseas in June 1915 with 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles; to France, September 1915; appointed 2nd Lieutenant in RFC, 9 April 1916 and posted to No.7 Squadron.  Attached to No.4 Squadron when he was reported missing, 25 July 1916. Repatriated 22 November 1918.  Award one of many "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBINSON, Captain Frederick Vernon ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.  Born 21 October 1896; home in Winnipeg, Manitoba (student); Lieutenant, Manitoba Contingent, COTC, 1 June 1915; Lieutenant in 61st Battalion, CEF, 1 June 1915; embarked from Canada, 2 April 1916; joined 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles, France, 18 June 1916; wounded 1 October 1916; invalided to UK, 8 October 1916; struck off strength to Saskatchewan Regimental Depot, 16 May 1917; seconded to RFC as Flying Officer, 10 October 1917; on strength of No.19 TS, 10 October 1917; to Bland Force, 28 May 1918; to HMS Elope, 1 September 1918.  Seems to have been with North Russian Expeditionary Force.  Captain, 1 October 1918; to Southwest Area, 27 January 1919; relinquished commission (or secondment to RAF ceases), 28 February 1919. Seconded to Canadian Air Force, 15 May to 6 June 1919; to Canada, 2 July 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBINSON, Flight Lieutenant John ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ effective 8 February 1917.  Born 27 February 1887 in London, Ontario; home in Toronto; attended Curtiss School, Toronto and obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1856 dated 30 September 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 30 September 1915; sailed from Montreal on Athenia, 5 October 1915; at Eastbourne, 25 October 1915; at Eastchurch, 6 December 1915; in East Africa, 5 January 1916; to Hyacinthe, 7 April 1916; at Eastbourne, 18 April 1917; at Dover, 23 April 1917; to No.2 (N) Squadron, 13 May 1917; wounded 14 November 1917 and given sick leave in Canada, early 1918; to Dunkirk, 10 April 1918; with No.202 Squadron, 7 November 1918 to 20 May 1919 (to unemployed list).

 

ROBINSON, Flight Lieutenant, John ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ effective 15 June 1917.

 

ROBINSON, Captain John ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918.  Not citation.  However, AIR 1/102/15/9/271 (h) has the following:

 

On April 25, 1918, with Lieutenant Russell, carried out photo recce of Bruges and Zeebrugge.  Exposed 11 plates over Bruges docks and five plates over Zeebrugge Harbour and Mole.  Three enemy aircraft observed off Ostend which made towards convoy but turned away on our machines turning to attack.  Heavy and accurate AA was experienced, machine being hit in several places, main spar of lower starboard plane being badly shattered and also rear flying wire; a piece of shrapnel entered pilot's view finder, smashing watch on dash‑board and scratching pilot's face, nevertheless the machine carried on and took photographs of Zeebrugge.  Height 19,500 feet, visibility good.

 

ROBINSON, Captain John ‑ Croix de Guerre with Palm (France) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

ROBINSON, Captain John ‑ Chevalier, Order of Leopold (Belgium) ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war."  Public Record Office Air 1/107/15/9/287 has citation as published in General Order 580, Armee francais de Belgique (date not shown on copy received from London); unit identified as No.202 Squadron:

 

Charg_ de missions photographiques, a fourni, au cours de l'offensive alli_ dans les Flandres,  un travail consid_rable, souvent _ tr_s grande distance en arri_re des lignes ennemies.  A rapport_ dans des conditions souvent d_favorable, des renseignemnts d'une grand valeur pour le Commandement.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/74 has a report dated 28 October 1918 from the Brigadier Commanding 5 Group, Royal Air Force.  Although it cannot be connected to any specific award, it is significant as indicating the value placed in him.

 

This officer joined the Dunkerque Command in April 1917, and has been engaged in Spotting and Reconnaissance work since that time.

 

He is a most gallant and able Flight Commander, with an exceptionally good command combined with a through knowledge of the working of a squadron.  He is in every way fitted, and is strongly recommended for the command of an active service reconnaissance squadron.

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBINSON, Lieutenant John Beverley ‑ Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity ‑ effective 18 December 1919.  Attended University of Toronto (Trinity College, 1906); overseas April 1915; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1217, 6 May 1915 at Brooklands; he was then with Governor General's Body Guard; 2nd Lieutenant with RFC, July 1915; to France, September 1915 with No.12 Squadron.  Missing (POW), 2 November 1915; escaped 16/17 April 1918.  Arrived in Canada on leave, July 1918.  Award one of many "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

      * * * * *

 

ROBINSON, Captain William Edgar ‑ Croix de Guerre (France) ‑ effective 29 August 1917; authority not given on DHist card.  Born 8 December 1888 in Selkirk, Manitoba; home in Winnipeg (lumbering and fishing); obtained ACA Certificate No.367 at Wright School, Dayton, 7 December 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS at Ottawa, 28 December 1915; sailed from New York on Adriatic, 12 January 1916.  On 8 July 1917 left Malta on patrol but ran short of fuel; landed on coast of Tripoli, thinking he was in Italian‑occupied territory but taken prisoner by Turks.

 

      * * * * *

 

ROGERS, Lieutenant George Clarence ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1917.  Born 182. Home in Lethbridge, Alberta.  Proceeded overseas with a western Canadian infantry battalion; served at Ypres; commissioned February 1916.  At Oxford, 31 July 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 13 September 1916; to No.52 Squadron, 4 October 1916; wounded 27 October 1917; died of wounds 30 October 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on several occasions.  He has rendered valuable service to the artillery in ranging them on hostile batteries.  In order to carry out the shoots successfully he has flown long distances over the line under very heavy anti‑aircraft fire, returning in nearly every case with his machine badly damaged by pieces of shell, and although frequently attacked by hostile aircraft, he engaged and drove the off with scarcely any interruption of the shoot.

 

      * * * * *

 

ROGERS, 2nd Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) William Wendell ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 February with effect from 2 December 1917; citation published in ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 July 1918.  Born 10 November 1896.  Home in Alberton, Prince Edward Island (student); joined RFC in Canada, being appointed 2nd Lieutenant on Probation, 19 December 1916; with No.1 Squadron, 18 May 1917 to 4 January 1918 when posted to Home Establishment; to No.92 CTS, 22 March 1918; commanding that unit at Camp Borden as of August 1918.  Operated car business between wars; Squadron Leader in RCAF during Second World War; died 11 January 1967.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in shooting down seven enemy aeroplanes, and on two occasions attacking enemy troops with machine gun fire from very low altitudes.  He proved himself a daring patrol leader.

 

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*ROLFE, Captain Tenison Alan Bellingham ‑ Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada.

 

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*ROSE, Lieutenant Oren John ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. American (Kansas City, auditor), joined RFC in Canada in 1917; in UK as of 14 February 1918 and posted to No.92 Squadron; at Repatriation Camp as of 4 April 1919; may have served in North Russia; see H.H. Russell history of unit in Cross and Cockade, Spring 1966.

 

A very gallant officer who has accounted for nine enemy aeroplanes.  On 29th September he observed an enemy scout attacking some of our machines; engaging it, he drove it down from 15,000 feet to 6,000 feet, when it fell in flames.  On his return journey he attacked and destroyed an enemy two‑seater.

 

*ROSE, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Oren John, Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

A brilliant and fearless leader who, since 9th October, has destroyed seven enemy aeroplanes. His personal example of skill and determination in aerial combats and in attacking troops and transport on the ground is of the greatest value in maintaining the high standard of efficiency in his squadron.

 

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ROSEVEAR, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Stanley Wallace ‑ Distinguished Service Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1917.  Born 9 March 1896 at Walkerton, Bruce County, Ontario; educated in Port Arthur and Lindsay; attended University of Toronto (School of Practical Science), 1915‑1916; officer in COTC; appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, 19 January 1917.  At Redcar, 10 March 1917; at Cranwell, 6 May 1917; at Frieston, 10 June 1917; at Dover, 22 June 1917; with No.12 (N) Squadron, 6 July 1917; joined No.1 (N) Squadron, 11 July 1917; killed in action, 25 April 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has destroyed several hostile machines, and has also attacked and scattered parties of enemy infantry from low altitudes, on one occasion from a height of only 100 feet.

 

ROSEVEAR, Flight Lieutenant Stanley Wallace ‑ Bar to Distinguished Service Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1918.

 

For the skill and gallantry displayed by him on the 15th March 1918, when he attacked a formation of eight enemy aircraft, destroying two of the enemy machines.  This officer has destroyed numerous enemy machines and is a very skilful and dashing fighting pilot.

 

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ROSS, 2nd Lieutenant Alex ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ effective 1 January 1919 (authority not given on DHist card).  Home in Toronto (stenographer); served in CEF; joined RNAS, 15 December 1917; with No.5 Balloon Base (Gibraltar), 28 June 1918.

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ROSS, Flight Sub‑Lieutenant Gordon Fraser ‑ Mention in Despatches ‑ effective 28 August 1918 (authority not given on DHist card).  Home in Toronto; attended Wright School at Dayton and received ACA Certificate No.347.  Appointed Probationary Flight Sub‑Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, 31 October 1915; resigned commission, 25 August 1916.  Killed in action 10 May 1918 with Motor Patrol Service during raid on Ostend (presumably with naval surface forces by then).

 

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ROSS, Lieutenant James Hector ‑ Military Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 August 1916.  Home in Montreal and London, Ontario (son of Senator J.H. Ross); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC in Ottawa, 20 November 1915.  With No.4 Squadron, 4 May to 7 July 1916 (wounded, arm broken); his observer was another Canadian, Lieutenant George Ernest Sutton.  Returned to Canada, December 1917; demobilized soon after 6 January 1918.

 

On two occasions he carried out reconnaissances at a very low altitude to determine the general situation.  His machine was repeatedly hit by rifle fire, and he was severely wounded in the arm.  His reports were most valuable.

 

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ROUGH, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Herbert Leonard ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918,  Born 22 October 1893 in Tunbridge Wells, Kent; home in Victoria; with 48th Battalion, March 1915.  Taken on strength of RFC, 12 April 1917; Acting Captain, 19 May 1918.  Served with No.49 Squadron, 9 November 1917 to 9 June 1918 (wounded).  Invalided to UK, 19 June 1918.

 

A keen and gallant officer possessing great skill and judgement.  He has carried out twenty‑six successful bombing raids and five photographic long distance flights.  On a recent occasion, when low bombing, having obtained a direct hit on a limber, he dived to seven hundred feet and by skilful manoeuvering three enemy aeroplanes on the ground were set on fire, one by a direct hit with a bomb, and two by observer;s fire.  During the whole time his machine was subjected to heavy machine‑gun fire.  With the assistance of his observer, he brought his machine safely back, though he was shot through the leg.

 

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RUSSELL, 2nd Lieutenant John Bernard ‑ Distinguished Flying Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 5 June 1894; home in Ottawa;  from 6th Field Company, Canadian Engineers, he joined RFC in the field, 22 August 1917.  Appointed Observer (on probation), 12 December 1917. Served in No.103 Squadron, 12 April to 27 September 1918 (wounded in hand by anti‑aircraft fire).  Principally observer to Captain J.A. Sparks, although he sometimes flew as observer to Roy E. Dodds.  Died 1960.

One evening Captain Stubbs with Lieutenant Russell as observer, in company with another machine, encountered ten enemy aeroplanes.  Regardless of their superiority in numbers, he at once attacked and shot down one.  By skilful maneouvering he then enable his observer to bring down another; the remainder of the enemy were driven down to their lines; he then completed his reconnaissance and returned home.  Leaving the other machine behind, he again crossed the enemy lines; he bombed a train and attacked some mechanical transport at 1,000 feet altitude.  This particular exploit is high creditable to both these officers, the machine in which they flew being unsuitable for low bombing attacks; moreover, they were subjected to very heavy anti‑aircraft and machine‑gun fire.

 

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RUTLEDGE, Lieutenant Wilfred Lloyd ‑ Air Force Cross ‑ awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Born 17 May 1893; home in Fort William (real estate agent); served with 28th Battalion, CEF (awarded Military Medal, 10 August 1916, Bar to MM, 9 December 1916); to Home Establishment, 23 April 1917; to Reading, 1 May 1917; to No.1 School of Aerial Gunnery, 4 May 1917; (transfer to RFC, 1 May 1917 as observer); to Expeditionary Force, 30 May 1917; with No.48 Squadron, 31 May to 19 June 1917 (or 2 July 1917); to Home Establishment, 2 July 1917; to Reading, 25 October 1917; to No.5 TS, 16 January 1918 (graded Flying Officer, 30 March 1918); still there on 2 April 1918; at No.5 TDS, 30 April 1918 (assistant instructor); to No.119 Squadron, 4 May 1918 (assistant instructor); to Upper Heyford, 28 November 1918; with No.1 (Canadian) Squadron, 28 November 1918 to 7 July 1919.  No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

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RYRIE, Lieutenant James Grant ‑ Mentioned for Valuable Services ‑ award effective 22 January 1919.  Home in Toronto; taken on strength of RFC, 13 January 1917; to Expeditionary Force, 2 April 1917; to No.11 RS, 19 May 1917; to Canada, 1 September 1918.  No details.  Shown as being in Technical Branch as of 1 April 1918.  Cadet Wing Review shows him as Adjutant, Recruits' Depot, Toronto.