MacDONALD, Lieutenant Archibald Duncan - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 December 1918 with effect from Sir Douglas Haig's Despatch of 8 October 1918. Born 11 February 1899; home in Cobalt, Ontario (mining engineer); served in Canadian Engineer Training Depot, CEF; commissioned, July 1916. Attached to RFC in June 1917; No.1 School of Aeronautics, 10 June 1917; No.26 TS, 18 November 1917 (No.109 Squadron same date ?); to No.99 Squadron, 3 January 1918; to 7th Brigade, Italy, 6 February 1918; to No.51 Wing, 12 February 1918; to No.42 Squadron, 25 July 1918 (but dates also given with No.42 Squadron as 11 February to 12 December, 1918 when injured accidentally); hospitalized 6 January 1919. Public Record Office Air 1/1157 has recommendation for Mention in Despatches submitted by Headquarters, 10th Brigade, Royal Air Force on 30 September 1918.

 

For consistent good work and perseverance as a pilot in a Corps squadron.

 

MacDONALD, Lieutenant Archibald Duncan - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war." DHist 181.002 D.100 has report dated 5 December 1918 saying as follows:

 

Has, during the month of October, done several reconnaissances, of which five were excellent, locating the line and reporting the positions of enemy trenches. In one instance all four occupants of an advanced enemy post were killed by fire from his Vickers gun.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1841 has recommendation for DFC submitted by No.42 Squadron which is very detailed. The last two sentences appear to have been added to a text already drafted.

 

For continuous good work from 11 February 1918 to 23 December 1918. Since 20 February 1918 this officer has done 48 successful shoots on hostile batteries, destroying many of them. He has also carried out many other registrations and shoots on strong points. He has, in addition, carried out many excellent reconnaissances, reporting many active hostile batteries. On 24 October 1918 he carried out a low reconnaissance from 500 feet to 1,000 feet under heavy machine gun and rifle fire, and brought back an excellent report respecting trenches, floods, etc., having drawn on a map the whole system of enemy trenches. On 25 October 1918 he did another very good low reconnaissance from a height of 100 to 800 feet, bringing back valuable information, reporting on dugouts and saps in the enemy's forward system. 300 rounds S.A.A. were fired into trenches, at one time killing a group of four of the enemy. This officer has done 350 hours in eight months. His work is outstanding in its thoroughness, and he has set a wonderful example of courage, energy and persistence to the rest of the squadron. On 30 October 1918 he took 49 photographs of enemy territory, persisting in spite of heavy anti-aircraft fire. He then came down low and reported three new bridges in Tournai.


Additional notes indicate that the sortie of 30 October 1918 was between 1105 and 1355 hours. The same file has a recommendation dated 30 December 1918 for appointment as Chevalier of the Order of Michael the Brave, 3rd Class; the citation reads:

 

This officer has done excellent work from 11 February 1918 to 23 December 1918 and has consistently set a worthy example to all other officers.

 

* * * * *

 

MacDONALD, Private Edward Richard - Medaille Militaire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 November 1918. Home in Matheson, Ontario. Served with No.98 Squadron on DH.9s. POW, 9 August 1918. See Communique Extract of 8 May 1918 for C.C. MacDonald. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

MacDONALD, Sergeant-Mechanic Edward Richard - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

MacDONALD, Lieutenant Hubert Orr - Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity - authority uncertain. Born in Ottawa; educated in Switzerland and Germany; father was in Russia as branch manager, Massey-Harris Company. Commissioned in Finch Township Militia, December 1915; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC in Canada, 21 November 1916 (confirmed in rank, 27 April 1917); at Reading, 22 November 1916; to No.70 Squadron, 24 July 1917; missing, POW, 29 July 1917; repatriated 22 January 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

MacDONALD, Second Lieutenant John Alexander - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - date uncertain and may be a case of mistaken identity. DHist card concerning this man gives home as Ripley, Ontario (dental student); to No.2 Officer Cadet Wing, 22 October 1917; to No.2 School of Military Aeronautics, 4 January 1918; to No.10 TS, 13 April 1918; to No.2 Flying School [or Fighting School ?], 28 September 1918; served with No.3 Squadron, 24 September 1918 to 1 November 1918 (missing; no explanation as to overlap of dates); with No.25 Squadron, 24 Febrary to 11 March 1919; died in Shorncliffe Military Hospital, 13 March 1919. Possibly confused with a Lieutenant J. McDonald, DFC, awarded Belgian Croix de Guerre, London Gazette dated 15 July 1919. On the other hand, this officer's name and award appear in a National Archives list of Canadians decorated for services in the RFC/RNAS/RAF (RG.9 III C-14 Vol.4608).

 

* * * * *

 


MacDONALD, Lieutenant William Myron - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Vancouver (marine motor engineer); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 26 August 1917; to No.1 TDS, 31 August 1917; to No.94 Squadron, 23 October 1917; with No.66 Squadron, 10 March to 5 December 1918 (in Italy from 10 May onwards); to Home Establishment, 5 December 1918.

 

A very gallant and determined officer, who never hesitates to attack the enemy however superior in number the latter may be. On a recent occasion he engaged, single handed, five scouts, destroying two, both of which crashed. In all he has accounted for seven [enemy] machines.

 

* * * * *

 

MacDOUGALL, Captain Dugald - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 31 May 1896; home in Lockport, Manitoba (railway mail clerk); joined CEF in Winnipeg, 1 June 1916; overseas 31 October 1916, serving with 184th Battalion and then Canadian Postal Corps. Private, struck off strength to RNAS, 3 December 1917; appointed Temporary Probationary Flight Officer, 4 December 1917 and posted to Greenwich; to Vendome (No.205 Training Depot Station), 25 February 1918; to Calshot (no date), under instruction; to SE Area for No.4 Group, 3 June 1918; to HMS Nairana, 3 July 1918; to Base Depot, North Russia, no date; to Dvina Wing, North Russia, 18 June 1919; killed with HMS Pegasus, 25 August 1919 (at Bereznik, when ammunition barge blew up alongside HMS Glowworm, killing 20 or more officers and men. DFC won in North Russia, possibly for work during capture of Archangel in early August 1918. Mentioned in letters of Frank J. Shrive.

No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service."

 

MacDOUGALL, Captain Dugald - Order of St.Stanislas, 3rd Class, with Swords - date unknown but Air Ministry confirms.

 

MacDOUGALL, Captain Dugald - Order of St.Anne, 3rd Class, with Swords - date unknown but Air Ministry confirms.

 

* * * * *

 

MacGREGOR, 2nd Lieutenant Douglas Urquhart - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1917. Home in Waterdown, Ontario (student); commissioned in Hamilton militia, January 1916; from Canada to UK on Corsican, 25 September 1916 as accepted RFC candidate; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 6 October or 10 October 1916; graded as Flying Officer, 28 February 1917; joined RFC in the field, April 1917; to Headquarters, RAF Canada, 23 September 1918 (Major); to Headquarters, 16 December 1918. Citation published in January 1917 and copied from Flight, 17 January 1917. Believed to be No.23 Squadron.

 


For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading patrols against hostile formations. He has attacked and driven down enemy aircraft on several occasions, in spire of their being in superior numbers, displaying in every instance splendid dash and determination to get to close range.

 

* * * * *

 

MacKAY, Captain George Chisholm - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. Born in Sunderland, Ontario, 17 May 1898; home in Mimico Beach (Toronto) where he was a student. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 14 March 1917; to Crystal Palace, 19 April 1917; to Eastbourne, 30 April 1917; to Cranwell, 7 July 1917; to Freiston, 17 September 1917; to Manstone, 29 September 1917; to No.13 (N) Squadron (first operational posting), 22 October 1917 with which he served until 15 September 1918 (wounded); invalided to England, 28 September 1918; to No.5 Group for No.213 Squadron, 29 October 1918; to unemployed list, 20 May 1919. No citation, but reported to have taken part in naval raids on Ostende and Zeebruge, "and has brought down ten German machines."

 

MacKAY, Captain George Chisholm - Croix de Guerre with Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

MacKAY, Captain George Chisholm - Chevalier, Order of Leopold (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Public Record Office Air 1/107/15/9/297 has citation as published in General Order 580, Armee francais de Belgique (date not shown on copy received from London); unit identified as No.213 Squadron:

 

Commandant d'unit de grand valour, ayant dj personnellement abattu sept appareils ennemies et coopr la destruction de sept autres. Au cours de l'offensive alli dans les Flandres, a conduit avec une rare nrgie et un rare talent, son unit, qui a abattu deux avions ennemis, et un troisime hors de controle.

 

MacKAY, Captain George Chisholm - Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

MacKAY, Lieutenant John Macleod - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born 27 December 1889; home in Vancouver (general contractor); served in 1st Quebec Regiment; overseas with CEF, May 1916; to France, September 1916 with 60th Battalion; wounded 9 December 1916; seconded to RFC, 7 September 1917; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 12 September 1917; to No.39 TS, 23 October 1917; to Headquarters, No.23 Wing, 13 December 1917; to No.60 TS, 5 January 1918; to Expeditionary Force, P.P. Range [?], 20 April 1918; with No.201 Squadron, 27 April 1918 to 15 February 1919; to Air Ministry, 17 February 1919; to Canadian Headquarters, 14 March 1919. DFC announcement says he was ex-87th Canadian Infantry Battalion. See Toronto Telegram, 10 February 1919.


Since April this officer has carried out over 130 patrols, and has been conspicuous for his gallantry and devotion to duty, both in attacking ground targets and in aerial combats. In the latter he has accounted for two enemy machines.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1511 has a recommendation dated 12 November 1918 from the Officer Commanding, No.13 Wing, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force:

 

I beg to bring the name of the above mentioned officer to your notice for such award as you may think fit.

 

This pilot has carried out some particularly fine work during the low flying operations, showing the greatest determination. On many occasions he has attacked enemy troops and transport from very low altitudes causing many casualties and great confusion.

 

On the 28th September 1918 while on a low flying patrol he dropped his bombs on the junction of the Cambrai-Arras and Cambrai-Bapaume roads. He was then fired at by a Hannoveraner two-seater which he at once attacked, firing 300 rounds and driving it down almost to the ground. On turning he was hotly fired at from a wood, whereupon he swept it with machine gun fire from a very low altitude several times.

 

On 1st October 1918 he dropped four bombs on a balloon winch from a height of 300 feet. He then dived and fired a total of 400 rounds at separate convoys of enemy transport which were proceeding along a main road.

 

On 8th August 1918 during a low flying patrol he dropped four bombs on his objective and while shooting up enemy troops he saw a Fokker biplane above him. This at once he proceeded to attack, firing a long burst at moderate range. He was then attacked from behind by four other Fokker biplanes. His machine was riddled with bullets, and the engine being also hit, he was forced to land 300 yards behind the enemy's lines. He then made a dash for it amidst a fusillade of machine gun and rifle bullets until he met one of our advancing tanks (Jellicoe) into which he climbed, but learning it was proceeding into action, he got out and made another dash for it, coming under heavy fire from enemy aeroplanes and from the ground. He escaped being hit and made his way back to our lines. On reaching the aerodrome he gave in his report and immediately volunteered to go up in another machine.

 

On 16th September last, together with his Flight Commander, he attacked an LVG two-seater at 2,000 feet. He fired three bursts from close range. The enemy machine dived vertically and both pilot and observer jumped out with parachutes. The enemy aircraft then commenced to burn and crashed to the earth.


On 29th October he shot down an Albatross two-seater completely out of control, following it down to within a few hundred feet of the ground, and later engaged two others indecisively.

 

On 9th November he engaged one of a large formation of Fokker biplanes, which he crashed in flames, making his aggregate one and one-half enemy aircraft destroyed and one out of control.

 

Lieutenant MacKay has been on Active Service with No.201 Squadron since 20 April 1918 and has carried out 120 Offensive Patrols and thirteen Special Missions. He is a most resourceful pilot and has always displayed the greatest courage and devotion to duty. I cannot speak too highly of this officer's work.

 

* * * * *

 

MacKENZIE, Lieutenant William George - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Home in Vancouver (student); with No.82 Squadron, 14 September 1917 to 20 July 1918 (to France, 29 November 1917); to Home Establishment, 20 July 1918; to No.12 Group, 22 August 1918; to No.44 TS, 77 November 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While on a contact patrol, he saw the enemy launch an attack in force. He dropped bombs on the enemy reserves, causing many casualties. He then attacked the advancing enemy, flying just above their heads and killing a large number of them. When his ammunition was exhausted he returned and made a valuable report. He showed magnificent courage and determination throughout the operations.

 

* * * * *

 

MacKENZIE, Major William Herbert - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Home in Victoria (contractor and builder); appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant with RNAS, Ottawa, 11 December 1915; to Felixstowe, 11 December 1915; "Special Service", 13 February 1917; to Calshot, 26 February 1917; to Torpedo School, 18 February 1918; Instructional Duties, 25 March 1918; to No.185 Squadron, 7 November 1918; to HMS Argus, 1 February 1919; to No.185 Training squadron, 10 February 1919; to Air Ministry, 1 April 1919; to No.185 Squadron, 4 April 1919. distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 


MACKENZIE, Captain William John - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 9 January 1894; home in Port Robinson, Ontario (draughtsman); appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 April 1917; to Manston, 21 May 1917; to Cranwell, 4 August 1917; to Manston, 20 September 1917; to Dunkirk, 30 November 1917; with Dunkirk Seaplane Defence Squadron - later No.213 Squadron - 1 December 1917 to 1 March 1918; with No.209 Squadron, 1 or 14 March to 1 September 1918; (wounded 21 April 1918); to No.213 Squadron, 8 October 1918 to March 1919; to unemployed list, 20 May 1919. No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war." Public Record Office Air 1/10715/9/287 has recommendation dated 29 January 1919 from No.213 Squadron; had flown 150 hours in previous year, 250 operational hours in total:

 

Captain W.J. Mackenzie joined this squadron on 1st December 1917 and was employed in the Belgian Coast Patrol, where he distinguished himself by keen powers of observation and great enthusiasm for his work.

 

At the end of March 1918 he was transferred to a squadron operating further south and personally succeeded in destroying one Fokker triplane, one Fokker biplane, one Phalz and one LVG two-seater (all confirmed) and also assisted in bringing down one LVF two-seater.

 

He was wounded in the fight when Richtofen was killed, and was given charge of a Flight.

 

He returned to this squadron in October 1918 for the last push and displayed great gallantry and leadership in the many low bombing raids against enemy troops, etc. which were undertaken in conjunction with the advancing Belgian Army.

 

During this period he shot down and destroyed one Fokker biplane and shot down out of control a second, while he assisted in the destruction of one LVG two-seater.

 

Altogether Captain MacKenzie has flown over the lines for upwards of 250 hours and is still one of the keenest pilots in the service.

 

MACKENZIE, Captain William John - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919, previously listed in Belgian Army Daily Orders of 21 May 1919 (Public Record Office Air 1/1839/204/208/20), for services in No.213 Squadron. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

* * * * *

 


MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Born in Ottawa, 8 May 1893; attended McGill University. Home in Vancouver (student surveyor); appointed 2nd Lieutenant with RFC, 19 August 1917. To Expeditionary Force, No.2 Air Stores Depot, 21 November 1917; with No.46 Squadron, 26 November 1917 to 6 November 1918; invalided to England, 6 November 1918; to No.81 Squadron, 30 December 1918. Promoted to Lieutenant, 1 April 1918; to Captain, 6 April 1918. Joined CAF and then went into commercial aviation.; executive assistant to President, TCA. Retired 1958 and became President, Air Cadet League of Canada. Died 4 July 1989. Medals held by Canadian War Museum.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, when on low bombing work, he bombed a long-range enemy gun 9,000 yards behind the lines, obtaining from a height of 200 feet two direct hits on the gun truck and two on the railway track alongside. When returning to our lines he encountered a hostile two-seater machine, which he shot down crashing to earth. He then attacked a balloon, which burst into flames, and finally, observing another enemy two-seater plane, he engaged it and eventually succeeded in crashing it to earth. He has set an excellent example of gallantry and skill to his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation forwarded by Headquarters, 3 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 24 March 1918.

 

By his conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty this officer has at all times set an excellent example to the younger officers of his squadron.

 

Notably, on the 21st March 1918, when on low bombing work, this officer, accompanied by seven other pilots, bombed a large enemy gun position which was mounted on a railway track some 9,000 yards behind the lines, east of Brebieres, 2nd Lieutenant MacLaren dived from 1,000 to 200 feet, dropping four 25-pound bombs from the latter altitude. He obtained two direct hits on the gun track, considerably damaging it, and two on the railway track along side the truck. Having exhausted his supply of bombs, he was returning to the lines at 1,000 feet when he encountered an LVG two-seater which he attacked, the enemy aeroplane going into a spin and crashing on the west corner of Douai. He then attacked a balloon at Blache St. Vaast which burst into flames. He then turned south and went over Graincourt where he observed another LVG two-seater which he attacked, the enemy aeroplane turning east, going down under control. 2nd Lieutenant MacLaren pursued him and after diving three or four times finally crashed [the] enemy aeroplane east of Marquion.

 

To date this officer has accounted for three and one-half enemy aeroplanes, two crashed and one shared with another officer, and one out of control.

 

MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a fighting pilot. He has recently destroyed no less than nine enemy machines, and proved himself a brilliant fighting pilot against enemy aircraft often far superior in number. He has done magnificent service, and set a splendid example to his patrol.


NOTE: The genesis of this award is a submission dated 19 May 1918 from Headquarters, First Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force:

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has proved himself to be a brilliant fighting pilot and when engaged with enemy aircraft, often far superior in numbers, his determination and tenacity has set a fine example to the patrol he has been leading. Since the award of the Military Cross and in a period covering approximately one month, he has destroyed no less than nine enemy machines as under:-

 

On 15 May 1918 the patrol led by Captain MacLaren met 11 enemy scouts over Armentieres. He dived on a Pfalz Scout and fired 50 rounds at point blank range. He then turned and fired 50 rounds into another enemy machine, almost colliding with it. Both these enemy aircraft went down completely out of control.

 

On 9 May 1918, when on offensive patrol, several enemy scouts were seen over Laventie. Captain MacLaren dived on one and fired two short bursts at 20 to 30 yards range. Tracers were seen to enter the pilot's cockpit. The enemy machine rolled on its back and fell in a very flat spin completely out of control.

 

On 8 May 1918, when on offensive patrol, five Albatross Scouts were seen flying north-west over Laventie. He fired a short burst into one at point-blank range. Enemy aeroplane turned on its back and fell completely out of control falling in all directions.

 

On 6 May 1918, when on offensive patrol, an enemy two-seater was seen flying east from Aire to St.Venant. With another pilot he attacked this machine. After the last attack by Captain MacLaren the enemy aeroplane stalled, fell on its back, emitted volumes of black smoke and crashed west of St.Venant.

 

To this was appended a list of his victories:

 

1. 6 March 1918 Hannoveraner Completely out of control

2. 10 March 1918 Albatross Scout Destroyed

3. 21 March 1918 two-seater Destroyed

4. 21 March 1918 two-seater Destroyed

21 March 1918 Kite Balloon In flames

5. 22 March 1918 two-seater Destroyed

6. 22 March 1918 two-seater Smoking and out of control (with another pilot)

7. 23 March 1918 Albatross two-seater Smoking and out of control

8. 23 March 1918 Albatross two-seater Out of control

9. 23 March 1918 Albatross two-seater Destroyed

24 March 1918 Kite Balloon In flames

10. 25 March 1918 LVG two-seater Destroyed


11. 27 March 1918 Junkers two-seater Completely out of control

12. 1 April 1918 Albatross Scout Out of control

13. 2 April 1918 Albatross two-seater Destroyed with four other pilots.

3 April 1918 Kite Balloon Destroyed

14. 21 April 1918 Albatross Scout Smoking and completely out of control.

15. 3 May 1918 LVG two-seater In flames.

16. 3 May 1918 two-seater Crashed

17. 4 May 1918 Albatross Scout Completely out of control.

18, 6 May 1918 DFW Crashed this side of lines (with another pilot).

19. 8 May 1918 Albatross Scout Completely out of control

20. 9 May 1918 Pfalz Scout Completely out of control

21. 15 May 1918 Pfalz Scout Completely out of control

22. 15 May 1918 Pfalz Scout Completely out of control

23. 20 May 1918 DFW two-seater In flames (with another pilot).

20 May 1918 Two Kite Balloons In flames.

20 May 1918 Kite Balloon In flames.

24. 23 May 1918 Pfalz Scout Out of control

25. 26 May 1918 Albatross two-seater Destroyed

26. 28 May 1918 Albatross two-seater Out of control

27. 30 May 1918 Albatross Scout Completely out of control

28. 31 May 1918 Albatross Scout Completely out of control

29. 1 June 1918 Albatross Scout Completely out of control

30. 7 June 1918 Pfalz Scout Crashed

31. 15 June 1918 Albatross two-seater Out of control

 

MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

Accompanied by two other pilots, this officer attacked four enemy aeroplanes; all of these were destroyed; he himself fought two down to within 200 feet of the ground, destroying both. The two pilots who were with him each accounted for one of the remaining two. It was a well-conceived maneouvre ably carried out, reflecting credit on all concerned. This officer has in four and a hahlf months accounted for 37 hostile aircraft and six balloons, displaying great resolution and exceptional tactical ability.

 

NOTE: The genesis of this award is a letter from the Major and Commanding Officer, No.46 Squadron, to Headquarters, 80 Wing, Royal Air Force, dated 23 July 1918 (Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127), recommending him "for such award as you may think fit".

 


Captain D.R. MacLaren has shown magnificent bravery and absolute fearlessness in attacking enemy aircraft. On the 22nd instant, he led his patrol against a formation of four enemy aeroplanes. He himself fought two of the enemy machines down to within 200 feet of the ground and destroyed both. Another pilot of his patrol brought down another completely out of control, and the fourth enemy aeroplane was destroyed by a machine of another patrol. Thus not a single member of the enemy formation escaped and this was entirely due to his splendid leadership.

 

Altogether this pilot has accounted for 37 enemy aeroplanes destroyed and out of control, also six kite balloons, all within four and a half moths. He has set a magnificent example to his flight and to the squadron.

 

MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

Bold in attack and skilful in manoeuvre, Captain MacLaren is conspicuous in his success in aerial combats. On the 24th September he and his patrol of three machines attacked a formation of six enemy scouts, although the later were protected by sixteen other enemy aircraft at a higher altitude. Firing a burst at point-blank range, this officer show down one in flames. In all he has accounted for 48 enemy machines and six kite balloons.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation submitted by Major A. O'Hara Wood, Commanding Officer, No.46 Squadron, dated 22 September 1918 to Headquarters, No.22 Wing:

 

I wish to bring to your notice for such award as you may think fit, the undermentioned officer:

 

Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Donald Roderick MacLaren, MC, DFC

 

Captain MacLaren has now accounted for 41 enemy aircraft destroyed or out of control, and in addition to this, six kite balloons in flames.

 

His leading of his patrol and his aerial tactics are excellent. His fearlessness in attacking enemy aircraft and his keenness and enthusiasm for his work set a magnificent example to the squadron.

 

The same file (Air 1/204/36/127) has recommendation submitted by Major G. Allen, Commanding Officer of No.46 Squadron, to Headquarters, 22 Wing (date not shown on photocopy from Public Record Office):

 


This officer has been nearly eleven months in this squadron. During that period he has brought down 48 enemy aeroplanes and six balloons. He has displayed great dash and judgement as a patrol leader, and has set a very fine example to the squadron.

 

I therefore beg to submit his name for a further decoration, as his magnificent record is deserving of it. He had brought down 13 enemy aeroplanes and two balloons before he got the Military Cross, 13 enemy aeroplanes and three more balloons before he got a Bar to his Military Cross, 12 more enemy aeroplanes and one more balloon before he got the Distinguished Flying Cross. Since then he has brought down ten more enemy aeroplanes.

 

This steady and successful work is, in my opinion, well worth a Distinguished Service Order.

 

This did not appear to have the desired effect, so on 15 October 1918 Major Allen sent another report to Headquarters, 22 Wing. The portion in bold was run through with a pen or pencil - whether by Allen or an officer at Wing level is unknown.

 

I beg to recommend the above named officer for the immediate award of the Distinguished Service Order.

 

On 24 August 1918 Captain MacLaren whilst on a special mission attacked a D.F.W. over Bray at 1,500 feet. He fired 60 rounds at point-blank range and the enemy aeroplane half-rolled to the left and went down in a slow spin out of control. Captain MacLaren was unable to see the machine crash owing to thick mist and smoke near the ground.

 

On 25 August 1918 on low bombing Captain MacLaren attacked a D.F.W. over Albert, firing 25 rounds at 50 yards range. The enemy aeroplane's observer was then seen hanging over the fuselage. Lieutenant Paton and Captain MacLaren dived on enemy aeroplane again, firing 100 rounds, causing enemy aeroplane to try to land east of Delville Wood, but it crashed in the shell holes and burst into flames.

 

On 27 August 1918 Captain MacLaren, with his patrol, attacked eight Fokker biplanes over Hendecourt. He picked out one and fired about 100 rounds at 200 to 100 yards range. The Fokker turned on its back and spun down out of control. Lieutenants Viall and Buchanan, of his patrol, saw a wing fall off as it went down.

 


On 15 September 1918 Captain MacLaren, flying alone, saw a British balloon in flames west of Havrincourt Wood. He dived down and found six Fokkers round it. Although one of his guns was out of order he continued to dive at them and attacked one at about 100 yards range. The enemy aeroplane spun out of control from 3,000 feet north of Gouzeacourt. Captain MacLaren was unable to watch it crash as five of the Fokker biplanes then attacked him and he had much difficulty in escaping.

 

On 16 September 1918 Captain MacLaren while on patrol with four other was attacked from above by ten Fokker biplanes. Captain MacLaren, Lieutenant Sawyer and Lieutenant Viall all fired at one of them, which went down in flames.

 

On 24 September 1918 Captain MacLaren, on patrol with three others, attacked six Fokkers on his own level, although there were 16 more enemy aeroplanes higher up a little further north. Captain MacLaren fired a burst of about 20 rounds at point blank range at one, which caught fire and crashed near Havrincourt village.

 

On 29 September 1918 Captain MacLaren on patrol with three others attacked four Fokkers at 3,500 feet. Captain MacLaren fired about 50 rounds into one at 100 yards range. Enemy aeroplane half rolled and settled in a spin. It was last seen, still spinning down, but could not be observed actually crashing, as the fight with the other enemy aeroplanes was still in progress.

 

On 2 October 1918 Captain MacLaren, on patrol with three others, attacked four Fokkers at 12,000 feet. Captain MacLaren fired 50 rounds at one at about 50 yards range. This enemy aeroplane passed him and was fired on by two other pilots at more distant ranges. It could not be observed to crash as ten more Fokkers had attacked the patrol in the meantime and the engagement became general.

 

On 9 October 1918 Captain MacLaren, on low bombing, joined an SE.5 and attacked a two-seater Hannoveraner. he fired 100 rounds at 50 yards range, and the enemy aeroplane spun and crashed at Ricqueval.

 

Captain D.R. MacLaren is a patrol leader of the greatest dash and judgement. He has been nearly eleven months in this squadron, and has brought down 48 enemy aeroplanes and six balloons in that period, making a total of 54. The above nine were brought down since he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. His total of 54 places him in the six most successful pilots the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force have ever known. In spite of the numerous and heavy fights he has taken part in, he has almost always brought his patrol home. Also, I wish to emphasise that, in his many engagements with Fokker biplanes, he is up against a machine which is far superior to his own in performance, and has therefore been at a great disadvantage. This makes his record absolutely marvellous.

 

In addition to his fights he has led many low bombing expeditions with the greatest dash.


Altogether his exploits have set a magnificent example to this squadron, especially as he has had very few experienced pilots to back him up, owing to the casualties sustained.

 

MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919.

 

MacLAREN, Captain Donald Roderick - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has two other statements bearing on his career. The first originates from No.46 Squadron, bears a date stamp of 31 March 1918 and refers to 2nd Lieutenant Donald Roderick MacLaren - one of four officers being brought to the attention of Headquarters, 13 Wing for services in actions near Bapaume.

 

2nd Lieutenant D.R. MacLaren has shown magnificent bravery and devotion to duty during the battle. In six days he has shot down nine enemy machines, of which six were destroyed and three completely out of control. He has also brought down two enemy balloons in flames during the same period. This officer has now eleven machines and two balloons in flames to his credit.

 

When on low reconnaissance he never failed to bring back reliable information concerning the movements of the enemy troops.

 

This is one of the officers whom I have relied on for information concerning the enemy's movements.

 

This does not appear to have led directly to any award. However, another statement from Major Allen, dated 31 October 1918 to Headquarters, 22 Wing which may have a bearing upon one of his French awards:

 

Reference your A.B.892 dated 2 October 1918, the following is the only deed worthy of special mention for the month ending 31 October 1918:

 

Whilst on low bombing, Captain D.R. MacLaren, MC and Bar, DFC, Royal Air Force. observed an Hannoveraner two-seater which was crossing the lines south of Bohain. He therefore attacked it, in conjunction with an SE.5 and fired 100 rounds at it from 50 yards range. The enemy aeroplane turned, commenced to spin and finally crashed. This success brought Captain MacLaren's record up to 54, i.e. 48 enemy aircraft and six kite balloons destroyed.

 

* * * * *

 


MacLAURIN, Flight Lieutenant Claire - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1917. Born 31 August 1889 in East Templeton, Quebec; educated in Ottawa, 1896 to 1907 and Montreal Technical High School, 1912-1913; home in Lachine. Passed tests at Toronto Curtiss School; granted Royal Aero Club certificate No.1526, 20 July 1915; apppointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 21 July 1915. Served at Bembridge (18 March 1916 to 17 June 1917), Calsot (18 June to 17 December 1917), Bembridge again (18 December 1917) and possibly at Felixstowe and Houton Bay in UK; went from UK to US in 1918 and at Cull's request was brought to Canada for RCNAS duties. Arrived in Ottawa from Washington, 15 October 1918. Demobilized as a Major, 10 December 1919 and hired by Canadian Air Board. Flight Lieutenant, 30 June 1916; Flight Commander, 30 June 1917. No citation.

 

* * * * *

 

MacLENNAN, Flight Lieutenant George Gordon - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - with effect from 2 April 1917; authority uncertain. Born in Owen Sound, 26 January 1886; home in Eugenia, Ontario (civil engineer; attended University of Toronto, 1907-1912). Attended Curtiss Flying School, Toronto, and granted Royal Aero Club Certificate No.2058, 8 November 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 11 November 1915; with No.3 (N) Wing, 14 August 1916; to No.11 (N) Squadron, 7 March 1917; with No.6 (N) Squadron, 7 May to 30 July 1917 (killed in action). Award for work with No.3 Wing. Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a document dated 18 March 1917 indicating he was cited in French Army Order 4632D.

 

* * * * *

 

MacLENNAN, Lieutenant John McMillan - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, 15 May 1896. Home in Whitehouse, Yukon (student, UBC); sent direct to UK from Halifax, 24 January 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant on Probation, RFC, 24 May 1917; to No.24 TS, 25 May 1917; to No.10 TS, 28 August 1917; to Group Pool, 5 September 1917; to No.84 CTS (date not known); to Expeditionary Force, 30 March 1918; served with No.65 Squadron, 1 April to 28 September 1918 (missing, POW); repatriated, 13 December 1918. Stock clerk, 1923-1930; settled in Okanagan, operating orchards near Kelowna. Joined RCAF 31 May 1940 (C.1973) and attended Administraion Course, Trenton. Posted overseas, August 1941 (promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 August 1941). Reported to No.406 Squadron as Intelligence Officer, 22 October 1941; to Station Digby, 30 December 1942; to Headquarters, No.83 Group, 30 August 1943;promoted to Squadron Leader, 23 October 1943; promoted Wing Commander, 1 May 1944; repatriated 21 October 1945; released 7 December 1945. PR Release 906 dated 22 October 1942 said most of his wartime flying was trench straffing and attacks on forward troops; shot down on beach near Ostend when fuel tank holed.

 


During the recent operations this officer has rendered brilliant service and set a most inspiring example. In one attack his petrol tank was shot through and his machine was badly damaged; he nevertheless continued his offensive against troops on a main road, inflicting many casualties.

 

NOTE: On 21 January 1921 he applied for a Commercial Flying License and gave his experience as follows:

 

Maurice Farmans (10 hours 20 minutes, Netheravon, 1917)

 

Avro (41 hours 30 minutes, Lilbourn [Warwick] and Shawbury [Shropshire], 1917-1918.

 

Sopwith Pup (8 hours 20 minute, Shawbury)

 

BE,2c (25 minutes, Turnbury, Scotland, 1918)

 

BE.2e (35 minutes, Turnbury, Scotland, 1918)

 

Sopwith Camel (300 hours, Shawbury and No.65 Squadron, 1918)

 

He took a refreser flying course at Camp Borden, 3 January to 12 February 1921 (the examining officer was J.A. LeRoyer).

 

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MAGOR, Flight Lieutenant Norman Ashley - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917. Born 26 January 1891 in Montreal; home there (importing merchant). Attended Wright School at Dayton, moving to Augusta, receiving ACA Certificate No.402, 2 Februray 1916. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 12 February 1916. At Talbot Works, 27 March 1916 to April 1916; at Calshot, April to 11 July 1916; Felixstowe (North Sea patrols), 11 July 1916; Dunkirk Seaplane Station, 11 July to 7 November 1917; 15 September 19122 his H.12 attacked by two enemy seaplanes while on anti-submarine patrol; one shot down in flames after having been fired on by H.12 and attacked by the escort. On 22 September 1917 he dropped two 230-lb bombs on submarine, exploding just behind conning tower; vessel submerged leaving quantity of wreckage on water; on 29 September 1917 he dropped two 230-lb bombs that fell wide of submarine. Accidentally killed in France, 25 April 1918; see Story of a North Sea Air Station, pp.383-384. Cross and Cockade, Spring 1970, page 24 has account of his death, saying he was on H.12 (N8677) when shot down by one of a force of five German seaplanes. Citation given in two versions:

 

For services in action with enemy submarines (London Gazette)

 

Destroyed an enemy submarine 8 1/2 miles northeast of East Hinder Bank (29 miles north by west of Ostend) (Jackson List).

 


MAGOR, Flight Lieutenant Norman Ashley - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

*MAGOUN, Lieutenant Francis Peabody - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Born 6 January 1895 in New York; home in Cambridge, Massachusetts; served in France with American Ambulance Field Service, 1916; returned to US, then back to England. Enlisted in RFC in London, March 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 5 July 1917; served in No.1 Squadron, 14 November 1917 to 10 April 1918 and 9 October 1918 to 6 January 1919; to be demobilized January 1919 but was still at RAF Blandford awaiting repatriation as of May 1919. He appears in Jackson List and records of Overseas Militia Forces of Canada, although he seems never to have passed through or trained in Canada.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devvotion to duty. When engaged on bombing work he attacked and shot down an enemy machine, with the result that it crashed to earth. He has also engaged massed enemy troops and transport with machine gun fire from low altitudes, throwing the enemy into the utmost confusion and inflicting heavy casualties. His work has been carried out with consistent keenness and tenacity.

 

* * * * *

 

MAIN, Captain Gladstone Lowell - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 March 1918. Home in Galt, Ontario (lumbering); taken on strength of RFC in Canada, 1 January 1916 as 2nd Lieutenant (Observer) on Probation; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 13 January 1916; received Royal Aero Club certificate No.2960, 19 May 1916; to No.45 Squadron, 27 June 1916; wounded at home, 20 July 1916; No.7 Wing Headquarters, 15 November 1916 (confirmed as 2nd Lieutenant same day); Lieutenant, 1 February 1917; to Headquarters, Eastern Group, 31 June 1917; to NEP, 9 March 1918; to Reception Depot, 23 May 1918; removed from the service, 3 June 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

MAITLAND, Captain James Steel - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 27 August 1887 in Scotland; to Canada about 1910 (architect in Montreal); attended Thomas Morse School, Ithaca, but no certificate; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant in Ottawa, 16 December 1915; sailed on Philadelphia, 18 December 1915; at Calshot, 18 September 1916 throughout the war (detached to Lee-on-Solent from about 18 September 1918 onwards); Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 18 December 1916, Acting Flight Lieutenant, 8 March 1918; Flight Lieutenant, 1 October 1917. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services".

 

* * * * *

 


MAKEPACE, 2nd Lieutenant Reginald M. - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1917. Home in Montreal; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), RFC, 17 November 1916; serving in No.20 Squadron as on 29 June and 17 October 1917 (mentioned in communiques). Not shown in 1918 RAF List. Award not shown on cards; name appears in Dodds lists and in Creagen Papers (National Aviation Museum). Aeroplane, 16 January 1918 has the following citation:

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty whilst on an offensive patrol. He and his gunner shot down three enemy aircraft in quick succession, having attacked a large hostile formation, about 20 in number, with great dash and determination.

 

* * * * *

 

MALCOLM, Lieutenant Reginald George - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 July 1917. Home in Grimsby, Ontario (clerk and department manager); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC in Canada, 24 February 1917; joined No.25 SSquadron in March 1917; to Home Establishment, 18 June 1917; to Canada, 1 July 1918 (Captain same day); Officer Commanding, Aerial Fighting Squadron No.2 (Beamsville), 1918; to Headquarters, 16 December 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has shown exceptional skill and courage in aerial fighting. He has several times been attacked by superior numbers, on on each occasion has accounted for more than one of the hostile machines and effected a safe landing himself.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent on 4 May 1917 from Headquarters, 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, which has more detail:

 

For exceptional skill and courage in aerial fighting on many occasions, particularly the following:-

 

On 1st May 1917 he was one of a formation of six which was attacked by 15 hostile scouts. He attacked one which he shot down and destroyed near Izel. A little later he was attacked by five scouts, one of which he drove down damaged. This machine was seen to land just west of Lens. Again, on the same patrol, he drove off two scouts which were attacking one of our artillery machines. Later in the same day, whilst on a bomb raid, he was attacked by a red scout, which damaged his engine. He immediately dived, and his observer shot down the hostile machine, which fell in flames in Bois Bernard. 2nd Lieutenant Malcolm managed to land on our side of the lines.

 

On other occasions he has done exceptionally fine work, and has destroyed in all six hostile machines.


* * * *

 

MALONE, Flight Sub-Lieutenant John Joseph - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1917. Born 21 December 1893 in Caledon, Ontario; home in Regina (farmer's son). he claime to have first taken flying training, April 1914 and claimed 500 hours when interviewed by Kingsmill; 16 months at Janney Flying School but not completed ! Attended Curtiss School, Toronto and received Royal Aero Club certificate No.3376 dated 15 July 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant same date. At Crystal Palace, 27 August 1916; at Chingford, 30 September 1916; to Cranwell, 13 November 1916; to No.3 Wing, 4 December 1916; to Dunkirk (No.3 Squadron), 1 February 1917; killed in action, 30 April 1917.

 

For successfully attacking and bringing down hostile aircraft on numerous occasions. At about 6.30 a.m. on 23 April, 1917, while on patrol, he attacked a hostile scout and drove it down under control. He then attacked a second scout which, after the pilot had been hit, turned over on its back and went down through the clouds. A third scout, attacked by him from a distance of about twenty yards, descended immediately out of control. While engaging a fourth machine he ran out of ammunition, so returned to the advanced flying ground, replenished his supply, and at once returned and attacked another hostile formation, one of which he forced down out of control. On the afternoon of 24 April, 1917, he engaged a hostile two-seater and, after badly wounding the observer, forced it to land on our side of the lines.

 

MALONE, Flight Lieutenant John Joseph - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 December 1917. Effective 7 November 1917; not citation other than "distinguished and gallant services and devotion to duty.""

 

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MANUEL, Flight Sub-Lieutenant John Gerald - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917. Home in Edmonton; overseas as Gunner, Canadian Field Artillery, June 1915; to France, January 1916; wounded 5 October 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, 4 March 1917; to Crystal Palace, 7 March 1917; to Eastchurch, 7 April 1917; to Cranwell, 11 June 1917; to Freiston, 12 July 1917; to Dover, 21 July 1917; to No.12 (N) Squadron, 9 August 1917; to No.10 (N) Squadron, 12 August 1917. Hospitalized in France, 5 April 1918; wounded in France, 8 May 1918; discharged to duty, 29 May 1918, rejoining No.210 Squadron; killed in action 10 June 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in air fights and bombing raids, particularly on the 26th September 1917, when he attacked alone the Abeele Aerodrome, dropping his bombs from about 1,500 feet, with good results. A machine gun then opened fire on him, but he dived down low and silenced it by firing 50 rounds from his machine gun.


MANUEL, Captain John Gerald - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. The genesis of this award is probably found in a letter dated 17 April 1918 from the Commanding Officer, No.210 Squadron, to the Officer Commanding, 10th Wing, Royal Air Force, found in Public Record Office Air 1/1696/204/122/13:

 

I wish to bring to your notice the name of Acting Flight Lieutenant John Gerald Manuel, DSC, as suitable for recommendation for Bar to Distinguished Service Cross, in recognition of his excellent work and good leadership.

 

He has accounted for eight hostile machines in the last eight months. he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross in November 1917, since when he has destroyed four enemy machines and driven another down out of control. He has also carried out a considerable amount of low flying.

 

A list of the most outstanding of his achievements is appended.

 

The list mentioned reads as follows:

 

1918

 

February 18th. In a general engagement over Menin with five enemy aircraft scouts, attacked one, firing 100 rounds at very close range. Enemy aircraft went down out of control and crashed just south of Menin.

 

February 19th. East of Roulers, attacked one of four enemy aircraft scouts, and fired 400 round s at 150-100 yards range. Enemy aircraft went down in a vertical dive out of control and was followed by pilot for 7,000 feet. Combat began at 13,000 feet. Last seen, still diving vertically with full engine on.

 

March 10th. Attacked one of six Albatross scouts southeast of Dixmude, firing 200 rounds at 150-20 yards. Enemy aircraft side-slipped, nose-dived and crashed into the ground.

 

April 11th. While diving to attack enemy troops near Fleurbaix, observed a two-seater enemy aircraft at 800 feet and fired 150 rounds from 50 yards. Enemy aircraft nose-dived into ground and crashed.

 

April 11th. Immediately after above, climbed through mist and observed three Albatross scouts. Attacked one, firing 200 rounds from 150-75 yards, following him down to 300 feet. Enemy aircraft side-slipped with engine on and crashed.

 


April 14th. Together with Flight Commander A.W. Carter, DSC, carried out Special Reconnaissance of trenches. He went along the front line at 50 feet from the ground and reported the positions of our forward troops and reserves. His information was afterwards found to have been approximately correct. Machine gun fire from the ground was heavy and his machine was hit in many places.

 

From 9th to 17th April he dropped 32 bombs and fired 3,550 rounds from low altitudes on enemy troops and transport and other ground targets.

 

The same file has an unsigned and undated recommendation for a DFC which reads:

 

This officer was a most intrepid and capable pilot and Flight Commander. While serving with this squadron he by himself destroyed eight enemy machines and drove three others down out of control, one of these with the pilot shot. He also destroyed a further enemy aeroplane in conjunction with other pilots.

 

He was reported missing on 10 June 1918 and is believed to have been killed as the result of a collision in the air, being run into by another pilot who had only just joined the squadron.

 

Given that neither a Bar to the DSC nor a DFC could not be awarded posthumously, there is a good chance that these recommendations became the basis for his Mention in Despatches.

 

* * * * *

 

MANVILLE, Lieutenant Frederick George Herbert - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 January 1917. Born 22 March 1893 in Canada; home in Leask, Saskatchewan (rancher; although next-of-kin listed in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan). Formerly in 28th Battalion, CEF; detached to RFC, 2 March 1916; to Reading, 21 May 1917; appointed Flying Officer on Probation (Observer), 16 July 1916; served in No.15 Squadron, 16 March to 17 November 1916; to CFS, 25 November 1916; confirmed as Flying Officer, 1 October 1917; to Reading, 21 May 1917; to No.4 RS, 25 June 1917; dates uncertain for postings to No.42 RS, School of Bombing, London Stores Disposal Park, No.36 Wing; to No.2 SN and GD, 23 June 1918; attached Technical Section, CAF, 17 March 1919; Captain (Administration), 15 May 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry in action. He has done exceptionally brilliant work, often under most difficult conditions. On one occasion he flew for three hours at a low altitude far over the lines ranging on active enemy batteries.

 

* * * * *

 


MANZER, Lieutenant Roy - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. Home in Oshawa, Ontario (articling as barrister); RFC Cadet in Canada, June 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, October 1917; sailed from Canada, 29 October 1917; to France, February 1918; to Expeditionary Force, 16 March 1918; with No.84 Squadron, 19 March 1918; missing (POW), 8 August 1918; repatriated, 13 December 1918; to unemployed list, 12 March 1919.

 

While carrying out a solitary patrol he observed a two-seater below him; diving on it he opened fire, and following it down to 1,000 feet, caused it yo land outside the aerodrome. During his return to our lines he saw a hostile kite balloon; attacking it as it was being hauled down he closed to point-blank range at 300 feet altitude; on reaching the ground, the balloon burst into flames. In addition to the above, this officer has accounted for seven enemy machines, four of which were destroyed and three driven down out of control.

 

* * * * *

 

MARSHALL, Lieutenant Keith Douglas - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Tara, Ontario (grain buyer); 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 23 July 1917; taken on strength of CFS, Upavon, 14 August 1917; to No.108 Squadron, 17 December 1917; to No.99 Squadron, 3 January to 4 October 1918 (another entry suggests posting to Expeditionary Force on 24 April 1918 and he joined No.99 on 30 April 1918; probably joined unit in January and went to France in April). Hospitalized, Italy, 12-23 August 1918 (flu). To Home Establishment, 4 October 1918; to No.123 (Canadian) Squadron, 11 March 1919.

 

A very skilful, gallant and determined air fighter who has been engaged in 27 successful bombing operations since the 1st of May 1918. Lieutenant Marshall was the leader of a formation recently detailed to attack an enemy aerodrome, which resulted in the destruction of three enemy machines and eight hangars; no casualies were sustained by his party. This officer was engaged a few days later in a combined attack on a great enemy war factory. Just as the bombs were falling an enemy formation of fifteen machines appeared, and Lieutenant Marshall, as leader, turned quickly in their direction, which disconcerted the enemy so completely that they at once scattered and were unable to reform. During the progress of this bombing expedition 32 enemy machines were encountered.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has recommendation passed from Headquarters, 9th Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force (date unknown) which gives much more detail:

 

For conspicuous gallantry, skill and determination on day bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:-

 

2 September 1918 - Buhl Aerodrome (twice)

3 September 1918 - Morhange

4 September 1918 - Morhange


Lieutenant Marshall was the leader of the second formation of the four very effective raids carried out on these hostile aerodromes. In the course of these raids three enemy aeroplanes were destroyed by bombs and eight hangars were destroyed, set on fir or damaged, without the loss of a single one of our machines. Marshall showed a leadership and judgement of a very high order.

 

7 September 1918 - Ludwigshafen

 

On this combined raid Lieutenant Marshall was flying No.2 in the leading formation of No.99 Squadron. When over Saarburg and again over Hagenau on the way out, two formation of six and ten enemy aeroplanes respectively attacked but were successfully repelled. The objective was reached, and the whole town and surroundings were found to be covered with a thick smoke screen which made it very difficult to observe bursts. Notwithstanding this, direct hits with heavy bombs were observed on the Baditche Anilin un Soda Frabrik. A strong formation of 15 enemy aeroplanes attacked from above over the objective just as the bombs were falling. This attack was made from the southeast and the leader was able to turn towards the enemy aeroplanes after bombing. This appeared to disconcert the hostile formation which was so broken up and scattered by the dash and drive of the combined DH.9 formations that they were unable to reform and make any concerted attack.

 

On the return journey enemy aeroplanes continued to attack until the lines were reached but their attacks were consistently repelled.

 

To Lieutenant Marshall's steadiness and quick interpretation of the leader's signals is largely due the fact that the formations were so good, and that in spite of the determined and repeated hostile attacks (32 enemy aeroplanes being engaged altogether) the operation was successfully carried out.

 

In addition Lieutenant Marshall has taken part in the following raids:-

 

21 May 1918 - Metz-Sablon.

22 May 1918 - do.

24 May 1918 - Hagondange

28 May 1918 - Bensdorf

29 May 1918 - Metz-Sablon

31 May 1918 - do.

1 June 1918 - do.

6 June 1918 - Thionville

8 June 1918 - Hagondange

9 June 1918 - Dillingen

23 June 1918 - Metz-Sablon

25 June 1918 - Offenburg

26 June 1918 - Karlsruhe


27 June 1918 - Thionville

30 June 1918 - Hagenau Aerodrome

1 July 1918 - Karthaus Junction

2 July 1918 - Treves

6 July 1918 - Saarbrucken

15 July 1918 - Buhl aerodrome

16 July 1918 - Thionville

27 August 1918 - Buhl aerodrome

30 August 1918 - Conflans

 

Lieutenant Marshall joined No.99 Squadron on 1 May 1918, and since that date he has taken part in 27 successful operations, and has done consistently sound work, the excellence of his formation flying having been particularly noticeable. His courage and coolness in action have rendered him an exceedingly valuable member to his squadron.

 

Air 1/1650 has another document, this one dated 9 September 1918, sent by the Commanding Officer, No.41 Wing to Headquarters, 8th Brigade, Royal Air Force. It repeats much of the above, but adds other details and is transcribed here for the record:

 

I have the honour to bring to your notice the name of Temporary Lieutenant Keith Douglas Marshall, pilot, No.99 Squadron.

 

This officer joined No.99 Squadron on 1 May 1918. Since then he has taken part in 27 successful operations, the most noticeable one of which is perhaps the raid undertaken on Ludwigshafen on September 7th. He was flying No.2 in the leading formation of No.99 Squadron, and it largely due to his great steadiness and to his quick interpretation of the leader's signals that the formations were so good and that in spite of an attack delivered by 32 enemy aeroplanes, only one machine was forced down with a damaged engine.

 

His formation flying is excellent and as deputy leader he is hard to beat, and he shows great promise of making a first-rate leader.

 

On July 1st, with five other DH.9s he bombed Karteaus Junction. During this raid the formation was attacked almost continuously, but due to compact formation no casualties were sustained.

 

On July 2nd he was on a raid on Treves with five other machines. On this occasion twelve enemy aeroplanes attacked over the objective, two of which were driven down, the DH.9 formation returning intact.

 

On July 6th, in the course of the raid on Saarbrucken with five other DH.9s, eight enemy aeroplanes attacked, one of which was shot down out of control by Lieutenant Marshall's observer, all DH.9s returning safely.


On September 2nd, 3rd and 4th he was leader of the second formation of the for very effective raids carried out on Buel and Monrange. In the course of these raids three enemy aeroplanes were destroyed by bombs and eight hangars were destroyed, set on fire or seen to be damaged. All DH.9s again returned safely.

 

The above remarks bring out the excellence of this officer's formation flying, which is obviously exceedingly valuable to his squadron and well above the average.

 

* * * * *

 

MARTIN, 2nd Lieutenant Peter Clifford Campbell - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 December 1919. Listed as 2nd Lieutenant (Observer), 1 April 1918. Award for "gallantry in escaping while a prisoner of war". Was likely won in CEF before joining RFC, as he was formerly Canadian Field Artillery.

 

* * * * *

 

MARTIN, Captain William Gerald Blythe - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1918. Born in Toronto, 17 August 1892; home there. Commissioned in Edmonton Militia, September 1915; overseas as Lieutenant, CEF, April 1916; with 49th Battalion in France; awarded MC, 26 July 1917. Attached to RFC as observer, 24 June 1917; Acting Captain, 16 June 1917; Temporary Captain, 29 August 1917; formally seconded to RFC, 29 August or 24 September 1917; to Reading, 3 July 1917; to No.113 Squadron, 24 September 1917; to No.195 TS, 2 July 1918; to School of Aerial Gunnery, 13 August 1918; to AFS, 28 August 1918; to No.19 TDS, 25 September 1918. Award for work in Palestine (see Flight, 20 June 1918). Major W.G.B. Martin died in Edmonton, 4 May 1957, aged 65.

 

* * * * *

 

MASON, Lieutenant James Arthur Ryerson - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in Stratford, Ontario (law student). Attended University of Toronto (BA, 1914) and served in COTC; in 58th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery; to RFC in September 1917; at No.2 School of Aeronautics, 2 November 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 20 December 1917; with No.252 Squadron, Tynmouth, as of 18 September 1918; to Killingholme, 20 December 1918. On anti-submarine patrols during the war. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

 


*MASON, Flying Officer Lloyd Wesley - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 November 1919. Home in Detroit, Michigan; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC (Canada), 13 August 1917; with "D" Squadron, Upavon, 15 December 1917; No.2 AASD, 3-9 March, 1918 when hospitalized; invalided to UK, 30 March 1918; to No.95 Squaron, 1 October 1918; died in Phoenix, Alizona, 22 December 1971. Award won in Russia.

 

This officer has shown great dash and courage whilst flying a Snipe at extremely low altitudes. He has taken part in operations throughout the summer both on the Dwina and Railway Fronts, and has attacked many targets with his machine guns, dispersing troops and breaking up counter-attacks. In an attack on Puchega Aerodrome he descended very near the ground in an endeavour to silence machine-guns which were concentrated on his Squadron Commander's machine.

 

* * * * *

 

MASSEY, Captain Arnold Bonnell - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Toronto, 26 July 1897; home there (student, University of Toronto; prominent athlete); appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 14 March 1917; Royal Aero Club Certificate No.4941, 28 June 1917; Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 25 July, 1917. At Eastbourne, 29 April 1917; at Cranwell, 9 June 1917; to Kellinghome, 27 July 1917 (under instruction); to Calshot, 10 September 1917; to Kellingholme, 15 October 1917; to Houton Bay, 16 May 1918; to Air Ministry (Marine Experimental Station, Grain), 7 November 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services".

 

* * * * *

 

MATHESON, 2nd Lieutenant William Drummond - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 May 1917. Home in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia (mechanical engineer); joined RFC as an Air Mechanic in Canada, 14 March 1916; sailed on Corinthian, from Saint John, 27 March 1916. To Expeditionary Force, 6 September 1916 and may have joined No.25 Squadron about that date; promoted from Sergeant to 2nd Lieutenant (on Probation), 12 November 1916; continued serving with No.25 Squadron, 12 November 1916 to 16 March 1917 (wounded by machine gun fire, left foot amputated); hospitalized in Canada; to School of Special Flying, 2 October 1918; to Headquarters, 19 December 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in leading a formation of eight machines against sixteen of the enemy. He drove down one hostile machine and eventually succeeded in landing his machine safely in spite of being attacked by several enemy machines. On other occasions he has brought down four hostile machines.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/12/127 has recommendation sent on 21 March 1917 from 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps:

 

For gallantry and skill, particularly on the following occasions:-

 


On March 16th, 1917 he led a formation of six FEs and two Sopwiths against 16 German machines near Neuvireuil. He drove down one but was attacked by three others simultaneously. He put up a good fight against these until he and his observer were both seriously wounded, and the engine damaged. He managed to land his machine in our lines.

 

On March 4th, 1917, with two other machines, he drove down and crashed an LVG near Courrieres.

 

On January 24th, 1917, near Mericourt he drove down and crashed a hostile scout.

 

On November 22nd, 1916, near Arras, and on October 22nd, 1916, near Seclin, he drove down hostile machines out of control.

 

MATHESON, Captain William Drummond - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). For services in Canada.

 

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MAUND, Major Arthur Charles - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1918. Born 30 July 1891 in England; came to Canada before the war; enlisted as Private, 32nd Battalion (Manitoba Rifles), February 1915; to 8th Battalion, CEF in France, May 1915; commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, December 1915; to RAF, 28 March 1916; served with No.8 Squadron, 30-31 March 1916 (observer) and No.13 Squadron (31 March to 19 July 1916 (observer); to Oxford, 29 July 1916; graded as Flying Officer, 22 September 1916 with seniority from 31 May 1916; to Reading, 29 September 1916; on staff of No.7 RS, September 1916 to March 1917; Captain, 1 February 1917; Flight Commander and Major, 1 June 1917; Lieutenant-Colonel, 23 October 1917 to Russian Mission, 28 March 1917; Special Duty, 29 May 1918. Also awarded Russian Order of Vladimir with Swords and Ribbon (4th Class); commanded RAF Mission in North Russia, 1918; with RAF Mission in South Mission with General Denikin, 1919; served in India, 1922-23; RAF Staff College, Andover, 1924-25; Air Staff of Air Ministry, 1930-1933; sommanded Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, 1933-37; Air Officer Aministration, Fighter Command, 1937; died 13 December 1942. No citation other than "for distinguished services in the field".

 

MAUND, Major Arthur Charles - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1918, "for valuable services in connection with the war" up to 31 December 1917.

 

MAUND, Major Arthur Charles - Croix de Guerre with Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services in connection with the war". NOTE: It would appear he was awarded an ordinary Croix de Guerre earlier "for distinguished services rendered during the course of the campaign"; see London Gazette dated 18 April 1918 and Flight of 25 April 1918


MAUND, Major Arthur Charles - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1919 for services in Russia.

 

MAUND, Squadron Leader (Acting Wing Commander) Arthur Charles, DSO - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 July 1920 for services in South Russia.

 

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MAWDSLEY, Captain James Buckland - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Transferred from PPCLI to RFC, 4 January 1916; graded as Flying Officer (Observer); served in No.1 Squadron (wounded 22 July 1917; to No.1 Aircraft Depot, January 1918. Award not noted on cards; listed by Dodds. See Flight of 12 June 1919. London Gazette refers to him as "Can F.C." (Canadian Forestry Corps ?) and gives rank as Lieutenant; may have been decorated for airfield construction. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

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MAXWELL, Sergeant-Major Walter Robert - Meritorious Service Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No cards for this man at DHist. London Gazette gave home as Sidney Meres, Nova Scotia (more likely Sydney Mines) and stated service was in France. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

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MAY, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Wilfred Reid - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Born in Carberry, Manitoba, 1896; family moved to Edmonton in 1902; home there (motor demonstrator); to RFC Denham, 13 August 1917; to No.6 Squadron (6 TS), 8 September 1917; to No.94 Squadron, 14 December 1917; to Expeditionary Force, 3 April 1918; No.1 ASD, 5-10 April 1918; No.209 Squadron, 10 April to 12 November 1918 (wounded 8 August 1918); No.14 General Hospital, 12 November 1918; invalided to England, 19 November 1918. Later bush pilot, famous as "Wop" May; Member, Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame; awarded OBE (Civil) as per Canada Gazette dated 26 January 1935; American Medal of Freedom, 1947.

 

This officer has carried out numerous offensive and low bombing patrols, proving himself on all occasions a bold and daring pilot. He has accounted for seven enemy machines; two of these he destroyed in one flight. His keenness and disregard of personal danger is worthy of the highest praise.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation for Distinguished Flying Cross sent from Headquarters, 1st Brigade, Royal Air Force on 13 September 1918:


For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has carried out numerous offensive and low bombing patrols, and on all occasions has shown himself to be a brilliant fighting pilot. He has consistently engaged the enemy with marked determination, and by his keenness, dash and absolute fearlessness has set a fin example to other pilots in his squadron.

 

Personally he has accounted for enemy aircraft as follows:-

 

On 27 August 1918, when on Special Mission over Monchy he was attacked at 2,000 feet by a Halberstadt two-seater. He fired 250 rounds into the enemy machine which fell out of control and was seen by observers of "K" Battery to crash.

 

Later he attacked a Hannoveraner into which he fired 250 rounds. At 2,000 feet, this enemy aeroplane broke up and fell in the woods east of Remy.

 

On 25 August 1918, while on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Buissy, a formation of seven Fokker biplanes was attacked. He got on the tail of one and fired 300 rounds, closing to very short range. The enemy machine went down, spinning and diving, out of control, and was sen by Captain Luke to crash between Buissy and railway.

 

On 1 August 1918, when on offensive patrol, three Fokker biplanes were attacked north of Bailleul. He got on the tail of one which he followed down to 2,000 feet, firing bursts. Enemy aeroplane then went down and crashed. Confirmed by two other pilots on patrol.

 

On 5 June 1918, when on wireless patrol, he observed two LVGs south of Rosiers. He obtained a position on the tail of one and fired two bursts at close range. The enemy machine burst into flames, broke up near the ground, and the wreckage fell in a wood southeast of Villers Bretonneux.

 

In addition to the above, this officer has destroyed one enemy machine and brought down one out of control.

 

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McCALL, Lieutenant Frederick Robert - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 March 1918 (citation published in London Gazette dated 16 August 1918). Born 14 December 1895; home in Calgary (electrician); served in 21st Reserve Battalion, CEF; to No.68 TS, 16 June 1917; to No.36 TS (8 Wing), 4 July 1917; to Special Flying School, Gosport, 15 August 1917; to CFS, Upavon, 20 August 1917; to Brigade Pool, 19 September 1917; to No.17 TS, 9 November 1917; to A and I Co-Op School, 29 November 1917; with No.13 Squadron, 6 December 1917 to uncertain date; with No.41 Squadron, 5 May to 20 August 1918 (invalided to England). Served in RCAF, Second World War (Squadron Leader); member, Canadian Aviation Hall of Fame; Calgary International Airport is known as McCall Field in his honour.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While observing artillery fire he attacked an enemy scout and destroyed it. He has set a fine example of courage and determination on all occasions.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent by Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 18 January 1918, citing good work with No.13 Squadron.

 

For gallantry and good service.

 

On January 6th, 1918 over Jig Saw Wood, Lieutenant McCall while observing for artillery fire 3,000 yards behind the enemy lines was attacked by an enemy scout. He attacked the scout which, after a burst had been fired into it at close range, went down in a steep glide with its propeller stopped and finally crashing in the German wire. This was confirmed by anti-aircraft and ground observer.

 

Lieutenant McCall then continued his shoot and did not return until forced to do so half an hour later owing to his machine being damaged by anti-aircraft fire.

 

He is an excellent artillery pilot, and in addition he set an exceptionally fine example of courage and determination in carrying out his work, frequently carrying out shoots while flying from 2,000 to 3,000 yards behind the enemy's lines under heavy anti-aircraft fire in order to accomplish his tasks.

 

McCALL, Lieutenant Frederick Robert - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Whilst engaged on photographic work he observed a hostile scout, on which he dived and fired a burst from his machine gun. The enemy machine went down in a steep dive out of control. On a later occasion he engaged two hostile two-seater planes, which immediately turned east. Though a steady rate of fire was kept up against him, he continued the attack, during which the observer of one of the hostile machines collapsed in the cockpit, other observers reporting that this machine crashed to earth in the enemy lines. He has always displayed the greatest gallantry and determination in carrying out his work, and has set a very high example to his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent by Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 3 April 1918, citing continued good work with No.13 Squadron.

 


For gallantry and continued good service during the battle, March 21st to March 31st, 1918.

 

On March 6th, 1918 whilst engaged on photography over Monch-le-Preux, with 2nd Lieutenant Farrington as observer, Lieutenant McCall observed a hostile scout. He dived on the machine using his front gun. The enemy aeroplane turned over the RE.8, allowing the observer o get in a burst with his gun. The enemy aeroplane went down, as if hit, in a steep dive, with smoke issuing from the engine. Lieutenant McCall and his observer followed the enemy aeroplane down to 4,000 feet firing from front gun. Anti-aircraft confirm the fact that this hostile machine went down out of control.

 

On March 27th, 1918, while patrolling our lines at 3,000 feet, Lieutenant McCall, with his observer, saw two Rumpler two-seaters crossing our lines and flying low towards Arras. He immediately dived on the leading machine. Both enemy aircraft turned east and Lieutenant McCall continued diving on the rear machine. The observer in the enemy aeroplane replied with his machine gun, and the observer of the second enemy machine also kept up a steady fire as he was flying east to his own lines. In spite of this double fire, Lieutenant McCall continued his attack, and fired 200 rounds at 100 yards range until he saw the observer in the enemy aeroplane collapse in his cockpit. By this time the enemy aeroplane was so low that he could not dive away any further. The infantry in the front line have reported that they saw the enemy observer hanging over the side of the machine as the enemy aeroplane crossed the lines. "K" Battery Anti-Aircraft have reported that the machine crashed in its own lines near Guemappe.

 

Since this officer was awarded the Military Cross on 20 January 1918 he has continued to display the greatest gallantry and determination in carrying out his work, he has set a very high example to his squadron, and the work which he has done has been of the very highest character.

 

McCALL, Lieutenant Frederick Robert - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918.

 

This officer has driven down four enemy machines which were seen to crash, and two others out of control. His determination and tenacity in attack is remarkable. On one occasion whilst acting as escort to reconnaissance machines he shot down an enemy machine which attempted to interrupt their work; he was then attacked by three enemy scouts which, however, he skilfully managed to elude.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1592 has the original recommendation for this award, prepared on 26 June 1918 by Major Bowman.

 


I wish to recommend the above-mentioned officer for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

Since being awarded a Bar to his Military Cross (4 March 1918) he has accounted for six enemy aircraft. [The date may that when the earlier award was recommended rather than when gazetted].

 

On 25 May 1918 he drove an enemy aircraft, two-seater, down completely out of control south of Estaires.

 

On 29 May 1918 he brought down an enemy aircraft, two-seater D.F.W., in flames between Estaires and La Gorgue, which was observed to be burning on the ground. This was confirmed by "B" Battery, A.A. [In the context, this may be either "anti-aircraft" or "Australian artillery"].

 

On 30 May 1918 he drove an enemy aircraft, two-seater, down out of control over Beauchamp.

 

On 9 June 1918 he destroyed an enemy aircraft, two-seater D.F.W., which crashed at Mezieres. During this combat his machine was badly shot about and the engine had two cylinders blown off, but he managed to land five kilometres behind the French lines near Berny. This was confirmed by the British Liaison Officer with the French Army.

 

On 12 June 1918 he drove an enemy aircraft, Albatross Scout, down, following it down to 1,000 feet, and forced it to land in a field near Lignieres. This machine stopped very suddenly on hitting the ground, but remained the right side up so could not be claimed as crashed. Later during the same patrol he dived from the clouds onto an enemy aircraft, two-seater D.F.W., unobserved, and firing all his remaining ammunition, the enemy aircraft went down very steeply, Lieutenant McCall circling above and following him, finally flattening out in a field near Lamotte. Enemy aircraft appeared to be running into a hedge but managed to zoom up and land in an adjoining field; this enemy aircraft also could not be claimed as crashed as it remained the right side up.

 

On 13 June 1918 he destroyed an enemy aircraft, two-seater D.F.W., following it down to 200 feet, observing pieces flying from it in all directions till it finally crashed in a wood near Orvillers.

 

On 16 June 1918 he destroyed an enemy aircraft, Fokker biplane, whilst acting as escort to RE.8s. Enemy aircraft attempted to attack RE.8s, Lieutenant McCall got on its tail and drove it down, finally observing it to crash southwest of Combles. He was then attacked by three other enemy aircraft biplanes but managed to reach our lines although his machine was badly shot about.

 


Lieutenant McCall has always shown the greatest determination in his aerial fighting, invariably following his adversary down to low altitude unless it is obviously out of control.

 

5th Brigade Headquarters edited this on 29 June 1918, although even their version was longer than that eventually published:

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill in attacking hostile aircraft.

 

On June 16th, 1918, while acting as escort to reconnaissance machines, he attacked an enemy scout which was attempting to interrupt their work. After a short engagement he shot this machine down so that it crashed near Combles. He in his turn was then attacked by three enemy scouts, which, however, he eventually, with difficulty, managed to elude.

 

On June 13th, 1918, he attacked an enemy two-seater, firing at it until he was within 2,000 feet of the ground. He then observed it dive vertically into a wood near Orvillers.

 

He has since March 4th, 1918 driven down four enemy machines, which were observed to crash, and two others completely out of control. His determination and tenacity in attacking his enemies is remarkable.

 

McCALL, Lieutenant Frederick Robert - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918.

 

A brilliant and gallant officer who has accounted for fourteen enemy machines. On a recent date he destroyed four during a patrol in the morning and another in the evening, in each case closing to point-blank range with his opponent. His courage and offensive spirit has inspired all who serve with him.

 

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McCALLUM, 2nd Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Kenneth Campbell - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 July 1917. Home in Vancouver; served in Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 23 January 1917; Lieutenant, 1 July 1917; at Reading, 21 April 1916; to No.9 RS, 29 May 1916: with No.23 Squadron, 18 November 1916 to 22 April 1917 (wounded); to DPD attached AAP, 16 May 1918.

 

When engaged in escorting a formation of bombing machines he attacked four hostile aircraft, bringing down two of them. While fighting these he was attacked by a large hostile formation, which completely surrounded him. Although badly wounded in the feet he succeeded in effecting a safe landing behind our own lines.

 


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McCLURG, Captain Frank Stephenson - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. American citizen; born in Olympia, Washington; home in Portland, Oregon; enlisted in 143rd Battalion, CEF, Victoria, October 1916; to RFC, 25 January 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 19 May 1917; served in No.7 Squadron, 28 April 1917 to 8 June 1918. No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

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McCONKEY, Lieutenant Thomas William - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1917. Born in Canada; home in Bradford [?], Ontario (bank clerk). Commissioned in 10oth Winnipeg Grenadiers, July 1915. Served overseas in 11th Reserve Battalion, CEF. To RFC, Reading, 15 February 1917; to Brooklands, 16 February 1917; graded Lieutenant, RFC, 20 March 1917. Served in No.59 Squadron, 20 March to 11 May 1917 (wounded) and again 11 July to 17 July 1917. To UK, 11 September 1917; to No.39 TDS, 17 October 1917; to No.92 Squadron, 9 November 1917; to School of Special Flying, 4 February 1918; to No.3 TDS, 7 November 1918; ceases to be seconded to RAF, 17 January 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He was attacked by several hostile machine and was wounded in three places. He continued to work his machine gun, driving off the hostile machines. His courage and determination undoubtedly saved his pilot and machine.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent on 14 May 1917 from 3rd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps and includes more details:

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

On the 11th May while on photographic patrol near Dury his machine was attacked by several hostile aircraft and he was at once wounded in three places, his gun mounting being shot away. Although in great pain he continued to work his machine gun, driving off the hostile machines after firing 300 rounds. His courage and determination undoubtedly saved his pilot and machine from destruction.

 

On four previous occasions he has succeeded in driving down hostile machines which attacked his machine while on reconnaissance duty, enabling important work to be completed. He has done consistently fine work as an observer and has proved an excellent example to the other observers of his squadron.

 

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McCONNELL, Lieutenant Roy Kirkwood - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Home in Victoria (student); taken on strength at No.34 TS, 14 September 1917; to No.1 ASD, 2 November 1917; with No.46 Squadron, 11 November 1917 to 16 September 1918 when sent to Home Establishment; to No.1 Fighting School, 18 October 1918; to No.2 CW, 3 January 1919; to Canada, 27 February 1919.

 

This officer has accounted for five enemy machines, destroying two and driving down three out of control, proving himself a gallant fighting airman. He has also shown conspicuous bravery in attacking troops and transport.

 

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McDIARMID, Lieutenant Harry de Cew - Croce di Guerra (Italian Croix de Guerre) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born in Lindsay, Ontario, 28 September 1898. Home in Victoria (student, UBC, 1915-1916 and 1919-1920; COTC, 1915-1916); enlisted Canadian Field Artillery, 29 April 1916.; to 60th Battery, CFA, August 1916; to England, September 1916. To 1 OCW, 8 March 1917; to No.27 TS, 21 July 1917. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 19 July 1917; to No.49 Squadron, 10 September 1917; to No.94 Squadron, 23 September 1917; to No.40 TS, 16 December 1917; to No.14 Wing, date uncertain; with No.66 Squadron, 15 May to 15 November 1918; discharged Match 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

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McDONNELL, 2nd Lieutenant James - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per Air Ministry, 15 July 1919. Home in Alexandria, Ontario; for services with Elope Force (South Russia). No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

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McELROY, Lieutenant Victor Henry - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 December 1918. Home in Richmond West, Ontario (engineering student); from Canadian Engineers to No.1 School of Military Aeronautics, 9 August 1917; to No.29 TS, 10 October 1917; to No.34 TS, 7 November 1917; to No.2 Advanced School of Aerial Gunnery, 19 January 1918; to No.3 Squadron, 9 February 1918; to No.3 Canadian General Hospital, 18 November 1918; with No.3 Squadron, 24 April to 2 September 1918 (killed in action). NOTE: See Air 1/163/15/142/7 in MG.40 D.1, Volume 5 for text of detailed recommendation dated 1 September which is truly impressive.

 


This officer has been conspicuous for his courage and determination in attacking enemy troops, transport, huts, etc., on bombing raids. Carrying out this service at low altitudes his successhas been marked, and he has inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy, his machine being frequently badly shot about owing to the heavy hostile fire which he has encountered.

 

The original recommendation (submitted to Officer Commanding No.13 Wing, RAF) reads as follows:

 

I beg to commend the above-named officer for such award as you may think fit.

 

On the 1st August 1918 this officer took a prominent part in the daylight raid on Epinoy aerodrome, which he attacked from a height of 200 feet downwards, doing a large amount of damage with his bombs to the sheds and personnel, and attacking an enemy machine on the ground with his machine guns, which burst into flames.

 

On the 21st August 1918 at 2.50 p.m., when employed on low flying this officer attacked enemy troops at Favreuil with bombs and machine gun fire from very low altitude with good effect, causing several casualties. He also engaged an enemy kite balloon south of Thilloy under heavy machine gun fire from the ground and drove it down. On returning to the aerodrome his machine was found to have been shot in several places.

 

Again, on the evening of the same day he went out and attacked a dump at Sailly-Saillisel, dropping four bombs and obtaining two direct hits which caused large explosions in the dump. On the way home he again engaged enemy troops from a low height..

 

On the 22nd August, when employed on low flying he attacked troops and transport on the Bapaume-Biefvillers road with bombs and machine gun fire, obtaining a direct hit on one wagon and causing many casualties.

 

On the 27th August Lieutenant McElroy attacked enemy troops and huts just east of Ginchy from low height, causing many casualties and obtaining two direct hits on the huts, and one bomb within 20 yards. He also fired 700 rounds on transport on the Les Boeufs-Le Transloy road, killing six or seven horses and at least ten men.

 

On 28th August this officer was again employed on low flying and engaged transport on the Riencourt-Cagnicourt road with bombs and machine gun fire, obtaining two hits on the road and knocking out one complete four-horse team and causing casualties. He also dropped one bomb on a dump at Sailly-Saillisel causing a fire and large volumes of smoke.

 

On the 26th August, when in company with Lieutenant Hughes, this officer saw a an enemy aircraft two seater at 600 feet southwest of Bapaume. He attacked it, and after firing a short burst enemy aircraft dived towards the ground. Lieutenant McElroy followed it to 200 feet, and saw it crash north of Beaumetz.


During the recent operations, in the absence of the Flight Commander, this officer has been in charge of the Flight, and has led them continually on low bombing with great dash and determination, showing a splendid example of courage and leadership to all pilots, and on many occasions returning with his machine badly shot about.

 

Lieutenant McElroy has been with the squadron since 18th February 1918, and during the German offensive of 21st March to April 1918 took an active part in a large number of low bombing patrols.

 

Enemy aircraft accounted for: Crashed, 1 Out of Control, 1

 

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McEWEN, Lieutenant Clifford McKay - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Born 2 July 1897 in Griswold, Manitoba; educated at Moose Jaw, Saskatoon and University of Saskatchewan; home in Radisson, Saskatchewan; served in 196th and 15th Reserve Battalion, CEF. To RFC, 28 April 1917. Taken on strength of RFC at Reading, 18 June 1917; to No.26 TS, 31 July 1917; to No.18 TS (dates not known); to No.80 Squadron, 19 October 1917; to Expeditionary Force, 25 October 1917; served with No.28 Squadron, 27 October 1917 to 25 March 1919 when sent to Home Establishment; to SE Area, 1 May 1919. In overseas CAF and postwar CAF/Air Board/RCAF. Active on early aerial surveys; attended RAF Staff School, 1930. Early in Second World War commanded No.1 Training Command (Toronto), No.3 Training Command (Montreal), and No.1 Group (St.John's). To England, 1942, and AOC No.6 Group, February 1944-45. Designated commander of bomber group in Tiger Force (war ended before it took shape); retired 27 April 1946; died 6 August 1967. See RCAF Second World War data base for awards, 1944-1945.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in destroying six enemy aeroplanes. A most gallant pilot and patrol leader.

 

McEWEN, Lieutenant Clifford McKay - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918; citation in London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

A skilful and fearless officer who in three weeks destroyed five enemy aeroplanes.

 

McEWEN, Lieutenant Clifford McKay - Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered."

 

McEWEN, Lieutenant Clifford McKay - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.

 


A brilliant and courageous pilot who has personally destroyed twenty enemy machines. Exhibiting entire disregard of personal danger, he never hesitates to engage the enemy, however superior in numbers, and never fails to inflict serious casualties. His fine fighting spirit and skilful leadership inspired all who served with him.

 

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McGOUN, Captain David MacKay - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918. Home in Westmount, Quebec; formerly in 24th Battalion, CEF; 2nd Lieutenant (on probation) with RFC, 27 February 1917 (although may have been with RFC since 8 October 1916); to No.11 TS, 11 July 1917; served with No.20 Squadron, 22 or 28 September 1917 to 10 March 1918; with No.22 Squadron, 10 March to 29 May 1918; to SE Area, 21 Wing, 21 August 1918; to No.44 TDS, 6 December 1918; to unemployed list, 1 May 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a leader of offensive patrols. It is entirely due to his determination and skill that his patrol has destroyed many enemy machines. His consistent keenness, his gallantry and untiring energy have at all times set a magnificent example to all the pilots and observers in his squadron. He has personally destroyed many hostile machines, never hesitating to attack, and on all occasions displaying a fighting spirit which has earned the admiration of all in contact with him.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 folio 359 has recommendation forwarded from 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 19 April 1918; name spelled Davis MacKay McGoun.

 

For conspicuous determination and skill with which e has led many offensive patrols. It is entirely due to his skill as a leader that his patrol has destroyed many enemy machines. His consistent keenness and untiring energy has at all times set a magnificent example to all pilots and observers in his squadron.

 

On 12 April 1918, when on offensive patrol, he dived on a two-seater enemy aeroplane between Sailly-sur-la-Lys and Laventie. He fired over 100 rounds and the enemy machine fell completely out of control and crashed amongst the buildings of a small village.

 

On 25 March 1918, when on offensive patrol, six enemy aeroplanes were attacked over St.Leger. He fired 100 rounds into one which went down in a spiral nose dive out of control and was seen to crash east of St.Leger.

 


On 30 January 1918, when on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Gristeliers he attacked one of two Albatross scouts. After 300 rounds had been fired, enemy aeroplane fell completely out of control and was seen to crash in the wood just west of Zendelghem.

 

On 25 January 1918, on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Stadenburg, five Albatross Scouts were attacked. He singled out one of the enemy aeroplanes and opened fire at close range. Enemy aeroplane fell out of control and was observed to crash near Costnieuwkerke.

 

In addition to the above, this officer has brought down two enemy machines out of control.

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MacGREGOR, Lieutenant Norman Sinclair - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Home in Hamilton, Ontario (student). Served in Canadian Seige Corps; to No.82 Training Squadron, 14 September 1917; served with No.82 Squadron, 28 September 1917 to 20 July 1918 (to France, 22 November 1917); to Home Establishment, 20 July 1918; to No.12 Group, 22 August 1918; to Unemployed List, 1 February 1919. No citation. Served in RCAF during Second World War and Mentioned in Despatches (see awards data base for that conflict). No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war." Public Record Officer Air 1/1580 has recommendation for this award:

 

Has shown marked determination and gallantry during eight months he served in No.82 Squadron. He was very successful as a Contact Patrol pilot and when engaged on these missions has always shown the greatest fearlessness. Has taken part in some 45 bomb raids and on no single occasion did he fail to reach his objective.

 

(1) On the 19th April 1918 at 8 a.m. he dropped eight bombs on enemy troops east of Bray (9,000 yards over the lines) from a height of 2,000 feet and in very bad weather. The journey to and from Bray was made through clouds and unaccompanied.

 

(2) 4th May 1918 - 5.45 p.m. Although his machine was going badly from the time he left his aerodrome, he persisted until he reached his target where he dropped two 112-pound bombs and was forced, owing to engine trouble, to land on the return journey.

 

(3) 8th May 1918 - 4.50 p.m. Dropped two 112-pound bombs alone on Chipilly from just over 2,000 feet. His engine was going so badly that he could not keep up with the formation nor gain any greater height than this.

 


(4) 25th May 1918 - 7.30 p.m. Having to return from a formation owing to engine trouble, he took up a fresh machine and proceeded to bomb his target (Becourt Wood) in spite of the fact that he was unable to overtake the formation and large numbers of enemy machines were encountered. On the return journey he engaged and shot down one enemy aircraft.

 

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McILRAITH, Captain Earle Fraser - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 14 April 1894; home in Lanark, Ontario (school teacher). Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 19 April 1917; at Manstone Flying School, 21 May 1917; to Cranwell, 9 August 1917; to Freiston, 12 September 1917; to War Flight, Manstone, 29 September 1917; at Manstone H.P. [?], 19-28 October 1917; to Slough Compass Observatory, 28 October 1917; to Manstone, H.P. [?], 12 November 1917; to Dunkirkm 14 January 1918; with No.14 (N) Squadron (later No.214 Squadron, RAF), 16 January 1918 to 19 February 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service."

 

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McKAY, 2nd Lieutenant Evans Alexander - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 August 1917. Born 3 May 1896; home in Toronto (student); accepted for RFC in Canada and appointed Probationary 2nd Lieutenant, 1 January 1916; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 13 January 1916; graded Flying Officer, 21 June 1916; confirmed as 2nd Lieutenant, 24 June 1916; Lieutenant, 1 September 1917; Captain, 1 April 1918; ferry pilot at Farnborough, 1 June to 14 December 1916 (flew a Mr. Willison, a Toronto journalist, across Channel in November 1916; also flew London to Glasgow - 450 miles - in four hours 20 minutes, returning in four hours ten minutes); with No.6 Squadron, 19 December 1916 to 14 March 1917; with No.42 Squadron, 24 June to 15 October 1917; with No.104 Squadron, 19 May to 22 August 1918 (POW); repatriated, 9 December 1918; to unemployed list, 9 March 1919. See Toronto Daily Star, 28 August 1918 for photograph and details.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in making valuable photographic reconnaissances under heavy hostile fire. His work whilst engaged on reconnaissance and patrolling has at all times shown a fine offensive spirit, notably in flying at low altitudes and engaging hostile troops with his machine gun.

 

McKAY, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Evans Alexander - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

This officer led a raid on an important railway station; during this operation, which was most successful, 24 hostile aircraft attacked his formation. In the engagement he displayed fine leadership and skill. Three of the hostile machines were destroyed and one driven down. He is an exceptionally good formation leader, and his determination to reach his objective is only equalled by his coolness and courage when attacked.

 


* * * * *

 

McKEEVER, 2nd Lieutenant Andrew Edward - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 September 1917. Born 21 August 1894; home in Listowel, Ontario (student, Central College, Toronto and then an accountant); Served in Queen's Own Rifles of Canada; direct entrant to RFC in Canada, 10 November 1916; sailed on Grampion, 25 November 1916; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 6 December 1916; to No.4 TS, 13 February 1917; with No.11 Squadron, 16 May 1917 to 26 January 1918; to Home Establishment, 26 January 1918; to Headquarters, WG Command, 26 February 1918; to Midlands Area, 30 September 1918; to No.4 TS, 1 October 1918; to Air Ministry, 23 October 1918; to Southeast Area, 25 October 1918; to No.81 Squadron (CAF), 26 November 1918; relinquished RAF commission, 21 January 1919; seconed to Canadian Air Force, 22 January 1919; to be Major, 4 March 1919; ceases secondment, 16 August 1919; struck off strength of CEF on demobilization, 28 August 1919; died in Canada following motor accident, 26 December 1919. Ranks and promotions as follows: 2nd Lieutenant on Probation, 5 December 1916; graded as Flying Officer, 19 April 1917; confirmed in rank, 10 May 1917; Flight Commander, 26 October 1917; Captain, 1 April 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, particularly when on offensive patrol. He attacked eight enemy aircraft single-handed at close range, and by his splendid dash and determination destroyed one and drove five down completely out of control. He had previously shown exceptional fearlessness in attacking the enemy when in superior numbers, and in the space of three weeks he destroyed eight hostile machines, setting a fine example to his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation forwarded from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 19 July 1917:

 

For skill and gallantry. While on offensive patrol on the 7th July, when separated from his formation during a combat, this officer dived on eight enemy aircraft east of Vitry, engaging them at close range. One of these was immediately sent to the ground and seen to be destroyed just south of Vitry. He then engaged two more hostile machines, both of which fell completely out of control. He was then attacked by three more, all of which were engaged and driven down damaged.

 

Previously, on the 26th June, this pilot and his patrol engaged ten enemy aircraft east of Cambrai, this officer himself crashing one and bringing down another completely out of control.

 

This officer during the last three weeks has destroyed eight hostile machines and set an excellent example to the other pilots of his squadron by his courage and dash.

 

McKEEVER, 2nd Lieutenant Andrew Edward - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 October 1917; citation in issue of 18 March 1918.


For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in aerial combats. He has recently destroyed five enemy aeroplanes and driven down six out of control. On one occasion he encountered five enemy scouts and drove down two out of control. Later, while leading a patrol, he engaged nine enemy scouts. He destroyed two, drove down one out of control, and dispersed the remainder. His dash and determination have been a fine example to his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has a recommendation for a DSO, passed by Headquarters, 3 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 2 October 1917. It would appear that this was downgraded from a DSO to a Bar to his MC:

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

On 28th September whilst leading a patrol near Eterpigny, nine Albatros Scouts were encountered. Lieutenant McKeever dived on one enemy aeroplane, firing 25 rounds from 50 yards range. The enemy aeroplane wet down absolutely out of control. He then dived on another enemy aeroplane which spun and on returning to the combat was shot down by his observer and was seen to crash on the ground. He then dived at another enemy aeroplane and fired 25 rounds at 25 yards. The enemy aeroplane went down in flames. Lieutenant McKeever dived on enemy aeroplanes twice more during this combat, in each case driving them away.

 

Previously, on 23rd September, whilst leading his patrol over Vitry, five Albatros Scouts were encountered. This officer dived on one and fired 75 rounds at a range of 35 yards. The enemy aeroplane went down absolutely out of control into a cloud several thousand feet below. He then dived on another enemy aeroplane and fired 50 rounds at 50 yards range. The enemy aeroplane dived and went into a spin absolutely out of control and disappeared in a cloud. One of these enemy aeroplanes was confirmed by No.41 Squadron.

 

Since this officer was awarded the Military Cross on 26 July 1917 he has crashed five and driven down out of control, six enemy machines.

 

His dash and determination has been a fine example to his squadron and is largely responsible for the high morale which it enjoys.

 

McKEEVER, Captain Andrew Edward - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 February 1918. Citation published in London Gazette dated 5 July 1918.

 


For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. While on patrol by himself over the enemy's lines in very bad weather he encountered two enemy two-seater machines and seven scouts. By skilful maneouvering he engaged one and destroyed it. As he turned to get back to the lines five of the enemy dived on his tail and his observer engaged and destroyed two of them. After an indecisive combat with two others he attacked and destroyed one of the enemy which had overshot him. He continued the fight with the remainder until he was within twenty feet of the ground, when the enemy machines climbed and left him. He has recently destroyed ten enemy machines and has shown great courage and initiative.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has the successful recommendation for his DSO, passed by Headquarters, 3 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 3 December 1917:

 

On 30 November 1917 while on patrol in very bad weather, the clouds being at about 1,000 feet, Captain McKeever went a short distance over the lines by himself to investigate a fire which he saw near Proville, flying in a northerly direction. Nine enemy aeroplanes consisting of two two-seaters and seven Albatross scouts appeared suddenly out of the mist on his right. With great presence of mind, Captain McKeever made a sharp turn east to get under them, and engaged one enemy aeroplane at 15 yards rage, firing about ten rounds. The enemy aeroplane crashed on the ground and burst into flames. As he turned to get back to the lines, five enemy aeroplanes dived on his tail. The observer, 2nd Lieutenant L.A. Powell, fired at one at 20 yards range, and this enemy aeroplane crashed on the ground. He then engaged another enemy aeroplane which also crashed on the ground. Afterwards he engaged two other enemy aeroplanes with indecisive results. Captain McKeever then engaged another enemy aeroplane which had overshot him, and fired 25 rounds at 25 yards range. The enemy aeroplane fluttered down and crashed on the ground. He then engaged two other enemy aeroplanes with indecisive results. The observer's gun had by this time stopped, but Captain McKeever still fought the enemy aeroplanes. When at 100 feet from the ground two enemy aeroplanes were still left firing at him, so Captain McKeever side-slipped to within 20 feet of the ground and the enemy aeroplanes, evidently thinking they had got him, commenced to climb. Captain McKeever then managed to get away, crossing the lines at about 20 feet.

 

Since this pilot's name was last brought to the Army Commander's notice on 2 October 1917 he has destroyed ten enemy machines. In all he has accounted for 29 machines.

 

McKEEVER, Captain Andrew Edward - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 May 1918.

 


FURTHER NOTE: Between 2 October and 3 December 1917 (when McKeever was recommended for awards) his observer, 2nd Lieutenant Leslie Archibald Powell, MC was recommended for a Bar to the MC. The document was passed from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 3 November 1917 (Public Record Office Air 1/1515) and to the extent that it sheds further light on McKeever's adventures it is worth quoting:

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

While flying with Lieutenant Mckeever as his pilot, eleven enemy aeroplanes were engaged on 31 October 1917 during a patrol over Fressie, his pilot bringing one down completely out of control. 2nd Lieutenant Powell fired 100 rounds at one enemy aeroplane at 75 yards range; the enemy aeroplane stalled, nose-dived and burst into flames. He immediately turned his gun on another enemy aeroplane which went into a spin and then turned over and over completely out of control, but was not seen to crash owing to thick clouds.

 

Previously, on 16 October 1917 near Brebieres, six Albatros Scouts and two two-seaters were encountered. 2nd Lieutenant Powell's machine was attacked from the rear. He fired 50 rounds at 50 yards range and the enemy aeroplane fluttered down and was seen to crash. On this occasion his pilot attacked another enemy aeroplane which was crashed. Three other enemy aeroplanes were also attacked with indecisive results.

 

Since this officer's name was last brought to the notice of the Army Commander he has destroyed eight hostile machines of which two were in flames and two crashed. His pluck and determination has been a fine example to his squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

McKINNON, Captain Hector Brown - Mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig's Despatch - authority dated 8 November 1918. Home in Toronto; served in 110th Canadian Infantry Battalion. To No.11 TS, 11 June 1917; to Expeditionary Force, No.1 SAD, 7 November 1917; No.57 Squadron, 13 November 1917 to 26 January 1918 (wounded 10 December, rejoined 12 December); to hospital, 26 January 1918; to Expeditionary Force (No.1 Aeroplane Supply Depot), 19 March 1918; to Home Establishment, 10 January 1919; relinquished RAF Commission, 11 January 1919. Public Record Office Air 1/1160/204/5/2505 has recommendation for an award (whether a Mention in Despatches or another is not clear); it identifies his unit as Repair Park, No.1 Aeroplane Supply Depot.

 

This officer has been performing the duties of Administrative Officer at Repair Park. His work has been extremely heavy and onerous. He has carried out his duties in a highly efficient manner, and has been of great assistance to his Park Commander in the administration of the Park.

 

* * * * *

 


McLAREN, Lieutenant Archibald Lorne - Croce di Guerra (Italian War Cross) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Home in Montreal (underwear manufacting); sailed from Canada as 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 26 November 1917; to No.59 TS, 13 December 1917; to No.14 Wing, 16 June 1918; to Italy and No.34 Squadron, 20 June to 2 July 1918; with No.139 Squadron, 3 July to 30 November 1918; to Home Establishment, 30 November 1918; to No.20 group, 3 January 1919; to Shrorncliffe Repatriation Centre, 29 March 1919. No citation other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

* * * * *

 

McLEAN, Flight Lieutenant Harry Logan Fraser - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1917. Born 10 July 1896 in Toronto; home there (bank clerk); attended Thomas White School in winter quarters at St.Augustine, Florida (with A.W. Carter and T.R. Sheraer) but no certificate; appointed Probatuonary Flight Sub-Lieutenant in Ottawa, 7 June 1916. To Crystal Palace, 25 June 1916; to Chingford, 15 July 1916; to Cranwell, 18 December 1916; to East Fortune, 31 January 1917; wounded 17 May 1917; given leave in Canada; to No.44 Wing, 4 March 1918; to No.79 Canadian Training Squadron, 12 Septeber 1918 (Adjutant); to No.42 Wing, 17 September 1918; to No.30 TDS, 20 March 1919.

 

For services on patrol duties and submarine searching in Home Waters.

 

* * * * *

 

McLEAN, 2nd Lieutenant Robert Knox - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in Calgary; engineer officer. No details. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

* * * * *

 

McLELLAN, Lieutenant Frank Melville - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. On Dodds list and stated to be from Springhill, Nova Scotia. This is confirmed by Canada, 1 March 1919, giving his home as Springhill, Nova Scotia. No.55 Squadron. There is no DHist card to confirm. Name spelled "McLennan" in Creagen Papers.

 

* * * * *

 


McLENNAN, Captain John Lawrence - Military Cross (Serbia). Home in Montreal (army officer); graduated from Royal Military College, 1911. Served in No.150 Squadron, 13 December 1918 to 15 January 1919; served in No.17 Squadron, 16 January 1919 to uncertain date. Killed by ground fire in South Russia, 28 August 1919, with No.47 Squadron; see Over the Balkans and South Russia. An observer; his aircraft was attacking an enemy captive balloon position. Was the MC a British award ? The card states that, in casualty lists, he was recorded as Captain J.L. McLennan, MC". A National Archives list of Canadians decorated for services in the RFC/RNAS/RAF (RG.9 III C-14 Vol.4608) suggests that he has MC plus Sebian awards, and the Jackson List similarly suggests a British award of the MC,

 

McLENNAN, Captain John Lawrence - White Eagle of Serbia, 5th Class

 

McLENNAN, Captain John Lawrence - Mentions in Serbia Army Orders (twice).

 

* * * * *

 

McLEOD, Lieutenant Alan Arnett - Victoria Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 May 1918. Born 20 Aprl 1899. Home in Stonewall, Manitoba; to No.82 Squadron, 29 September 1917; to Expeditionary Force, 24 November 1917; to No.2 Squadron, 29 November 1917; wounded, 27 March 1918; to England, 31 March 1918; died in Winnipeg, 6 November 1918.

 

Whilst flying with his observer (Lieutenant A.W. Hammond, MC), attacking hostile formations by bombs and machine gun fire, he was assailed at a height of 5,000 feet by eight enemy triplanes which dived at him from all directions, firing from their front guns. By skilful maneovering he enabled his observer to fire bursts at each machine in turn, shooting three of them down out of control. By this time Lieutenant McLeod had received five wounds, and whilst continuing the engagement a bullet penetrated his petrol tank and set the machine on fire. He then climbed out on to the left bottom plane, controlling his machine from the side of the fuselage, and by side-slipping steeply kept the flames to one side, thus enabling the observer to continue firing until the ground was reached. The observer had been wounded six times when the machine crashed in No Man's Land, and 2nd Lieutenant McLeod, notwithstanding his own wounds, dragged him away from the burning wreckage at great personal risk from heavy machine-gun fire from the enemy's lines. This very gallant pilot was again wounded by a bomb whilst engaged in this act of rescue, but he persevered until he had placed Lieutenant Hammond in comparative safety, before falling himself from exhaustion and loss of blood.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1255/204/8/39 has a letter dated 14 January 1918 from the Major (looks like "Snow") commanding No.2 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, No.1 Wing:

 

I would like to bring to your notice the gallantry and devotion to duty displayed by 2nd Lieutenant A.A. McLeod, General List and Royal Flying Corps, of this squadron.

 

This officer on the 12th instant attacked and dispersed with machine gun fire from 800 feet the crew of a very troublesome anti-aircraft battery at La Bassee.

 


This afternoon, while on artillery patrol, he attacked a hostile balloon near Bauvin. This appeared to collapse and was seen to fall rapidly.

 

2nd Lieutenant McLeod joined the squadron on 29th November 1917. He has shown keenness in his work, and I regard him as a most capable and reliable artillery pilot.

 

On 16 January 1918 the Lieutenant-Colonel commanding No.1 Wing, Royal Flying Corps (signature looks like "Gossage") wrote to Headquarters, 1st Brigade. Text in square brackets was run through with a pencil.

 

I desire to submit the name of the undermentioned officer for the immediate award of the Military Cross, for consistent gallantry and devotion to duty.

 

Temporary 2nd Lieutenant Alan Arnett McLeod, General List

No.2 Squadron, 1st Wing, Royal Flying Corps

 

On the 3rd January 1918, this officer flew over the lines and fired 100 rounds down the main street of La Bassee.

 

On the 14th January 1918 he crossed the lines, and diving through the clouds, attacked a hostile balloon near Bauvin. He fired 100 rounds into the balloon, which collapsed and fell to the ground [and the balloon near Courrieres was at once hauled down].

 

On the 16th January 1918, 2nd Lieutenant McLeod crossed the lines at La Bassee, and observing a group of men round an anti-aircraft gun, descended to within 50 feet from the ground and fired 150 rounds; one man standing near the gun fell, and the other men took cover.

 

Officer Commanding, No.2 Squadron, reports that 2nd Lieutenant McLeod has always shown great devotion to duty, and exceptional capabilities as an artillery pilot, ever since he joined the squadron on 29th November 1917, and has deservedly earned a high reputation in his squadron for pluck and perseverance.

 

Two slightly different copies are on file; on one the word "Cancelled" is scribbled. It is not clear why this MC submission, submitted two months before his VC action, was cancelled. It may be that it was down-graded to a Mention in Despatches and then scrubbed when the VC action occurred (see texts below).

 

FURTHER NOTE: The same file has the original text of his Victoria Cross nomination (dated 3 April 1918, which adds some detail to this story:

 


For the most conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary coolness in aerial fighting against greatly superior numbers, utter disregard of personal safety in rescuing his observer from fire and heated bombs, under heavy enemy fire, and for most valuable work on many other occasions, particularly as follows:-

 

On 27th March 1918, whilst flying with his observer, Lieutenant A.W. Hammond, MC, east of Albert, attacking hostile formations with and machine gun fire and bombs, he was attacked at 5,000 feet by eight enemy scouts (Triplanes) which dived from all directions, firing their front guns. By great skill and coolness in flying, 2nd Lieutenant McLeod enabled Lieutenant Hammond to fire bursts at each machine in turn, shooting down three of them out of control. Up to this time 2nd Lieutenant McLeod had received five wounds. He was continuing the engagement when a bullet penetrated the petrol tank of his machine, which caught fire. He managed, however, to climb out onto the left bottom plane, controlling his machine from the side of the fuselage, side-slipping steeply, keeping the flames to one side and enabling the observer to continue firing until the machine reached the ground

 

Lieutenant Hammond had been wounded six times. Machine crashed in "No Man's Land". 2nd Lieutenant McLeod, despite his wounds and under very heavy machine gun fire from the enemy lines, dragged Lieutenant Hammond, who was more seriously hit than himself, away from the burning wreckage and the bombs on the machine. 2nd Lieutenant McLeod was again wounded by the explosion of one of the bombs while doing this. He managed to get Lieutenant Hammond to comparative safely before he himself fell, through exhaustion and loss of bloods.

 

Both officers were eventually rescued by our infantry, still under very heavy fire from the enemy lines. By his great coolness, 2nd Lieutenant McLeod undoubtedly saved his observer from certain death.

 

On 16th January 1918 2nd Lieutenant McLeod crossed the lines near La Bassee ad descending to within 50 feet of the ground, effectively silenced an anti-aircraft battery with machine gun fire, firing 150 rounds.

 

On 14th January 1918, diving through the clouds, this officer attacked a hostile balloon near Bauvin, firing 100 rounds. The balloon collapsed and fell to the ground.

 

On the 3rd January 1918 he flee over the lines and fired 100 rounds down the main street of La Bassee.

 

2nd Lieutenant McLeod has always set a most magnificent example to the other officers of his squadron, and has proved himself a most valuable artillery pilot.

 

Recommended for "Mention in Despatches" in Birthday Honours Gazette.

 


The full story of this action would be incomplete without the citation to the Bar to the Military Cross awarded to Lieutenant Arthur William Hammond, MC (recommendation also in Air 1/1255/204/8/39). This is clearly counter-signed by Major W.R. Snow, DSO, MC (Commanding No.2 Squadron) and by Lieutenant-Colonel E.L. Gossage, MC (1st Wing).

 

For most conspicuous gallantry and coolness in aerial fighting against greatly superior numbers.

 

On 27th March 1918 whilst flying with his pilot, 2nd Lieutenant A.A. McLeod, east of Albert, attacking hostile troops and transport with machine gun fire and bombs from 5,000 feet, he was attacked by eight enemy scouts (Triplanes) which dived from all directions firing their front gun. Lieutenant Hammond fired bursts at each machine in turn, shooting three of them down out of control.

 

During this engagement he was wounded six times. He was continuing firing on the hostile machines when a bullet penetrated the petrol tank, setting the machine on fire. The pilot, 2nd Lieutenant McLeod, although wounded five times, with great skill and coolness, managed to climb onto the left hand bottom plane an controlled the machine from the side of the fuselage, sideslipping to the ground. Lieutenant Hammond, despite his wounds and surrounded by flames, continued fire upon the enemy machines whilst descending. The machine crashed in "No Man's Land". 2nd Lieutenant McLeod managed to extricate Lieutenant Hammond from the flames and heated bombs, and dragged him to a shell hole, from which they were subsequently rescued by our infantry, under heavy fire from the enemy infantry.

 

Lieutenant Hammond has now accounted for five enemy machines. On this occasion he undoubtedly saved the life of his pilot by his great coolness.

 

This officer has always set a most magnificent example to the other observers of his squadron.

 

This officer was awarded the Military Cross on 2nd March 1918.

 

To complete Hammond's story, the following text (folio 430, Air 1/204/36/127) deals with his original Military Cross (recommended 22 February 1918):

 

For his particularly gallant and skilful conduct.

 

On 18 February 1918, as observer to Captain Allport, he was engaged on photographic duty over Wingles, he was attacked by six enemy scouts. With great coolness he shot down two of the enemy machines, one in flames and the other fell to pieces in the air, both being confirmed by ground observers.

 

On 16 February 1918, again as observer to Captain Allport, during a flight of four hours, 17 hostile batteries were successfully photographed stereoscopically without an escort, some of the photographs taken being 7,000 yards over the line. A long range battery was also calibrated with success on a target 9,000 yards over the lines during this trip.


On 21 February 1918, as observer in an exceptional flight of four hours and a half, a battery of long range guns was successfully calibrated on a target 7,000 yards behind the enemy's lines. Two active hostile batteries were also engaged an successfully silenced.

 

This officer has always shown the greatest keenness and devotion to duty, and has at all times carried out his work in a pluck and conscientious manner.

 

MEMORIAL NOTE: Aeroplane, 6 February 1924, reported the following:

 

A memorial tablet to the late Lieutenant A.A. McLeod, VC, RAF, was unveiled in the Highlanders' Memorial Church, Glasgow, on January 27, by Colonel Sir John Lorne McLeod, ex-Lord Provost of Edinburgh. A detachment of the Royal Air Force from Leuchars under command of Flight Lieutenant McKeever was present, and all the McLeods of the Highland Light Infantry and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

 

* * * * *

 

McLEOD, Lieutenant George Donald - Mentioned for Valuable Services in Captivity - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919. Home in Westmount; B.Architecture, McGill, 1916. Joined No.34 TS, 30 October 1917; to Expeditionary Force, No.4 Wing, 19 January 1918; to No.28 Squadron, 23 January 1918; with that unit to Italy, 11 April 1918. Shot down, POW, 8 June 1918; repatriated 21 November 1918; died 22 January 1919. Award one of many "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

* * * * *

 


McLEOD, Lieutenant Malcolm Plaw - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 24 January 1897 in Arnprior, Ontario; home in Toronto (student) when he enlisted, although father living in Winnipeg. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 13 August 1917; to Headquarters, TD, 28 February 1918; to Manston, 17 July 1918; to BEF, France, 13 August 1918; joined No.41 Squadron, 17 August 1918 and still there when Armistice signed. Attended University of Toronto, 1919-1921 and then became a stockbroker. Joined RCAF, 4 April 1941 in Flying Control Branch (commissioned); after a course at Rockcliffe served at No.4 Bombing and Gunnery School, 18 April 1941 to 1 May 1943; No.19 SFTS, 2 May 1943 to 13 April 1945; No.1 SFTS, 8 May to September 1945; promoted Flight Lieutenant 15 January 1942; released 20 September 1945. On his RCAF application form he stated that he had flown 98 hours when training in Canada (JN-4s) and 183 hours overseas (Avro, Pup, Camel, Dolphin, Spad, Fokker, SE.5). The Canadian Forces have a photo of him as a civilian in 1941 (RE-24049). Following victories recorded with No.41 Squadron: 30 August 1918, one Fokker biplane out of control south of Armentieres; 7 October 1918, one Fokker biplane out of control south of Lille; 30 October 1918, one Halberstadt two-seater crashed near Barisoeuil plus one Fokker biplane crashed north of Beclers; 4 November 1918, one enemy kite balloon in flames at Baugnies and one enemy kite balloon in flames at Gallaix; 9 November 1918, one Fokker biplane out of control, Renaix. Recommended for an award by Major Bowman, 17 November 1918 (Air Ministry file 204/153/17). No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war." Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has the following recommendation:

 

This officer has destroyed in all four enemy aircraft, two of which were hostile kite balloons which by great determination he destroyed on the same patrol, an example to the whole squadron.

 

McLEOD, Lieutenant Malcolm Plaw - Croix de Guerre (Belgian) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919; previously listed in Belgian Army Daily Orders of 21 May 1919 (Public Record Office Air 1/1839/204/208/20).

 

* * * * *

 

McNEANEY, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) John Harry - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born in Jarvis, Ontario, 30 May 1897; home in Hamilton (fashion artist); appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC in Canada, 21 August 1917; injured in Canada, 19 December 1917; injured in UK, 9 April 1918. At TD in England, 14 February 1918; No.2 School of Fighting and Gunnery, 4 June 1918; with No.79 Squadron, 4 July 1918 to 6 Janaury 1919; invalided to England, sick, 26 January 1919; died 1 March 1919.

 

A gallant and courageous airman who has accounted for five enemy aeroplanes, displaying at all times marked skill and devotion to duty. On 28th September, in company with two other machines, he engaged about ten Fokkers; four of these were destroyed, two by Lieutenant McNeaney.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, Royal Air Force on 16 October 1918.

 

On the 16th September 1918 when on high patrol over Lille, Lieutenant McNeaney dived on two Fokker biplanes and shot down one of them.

 

On the 28th September 1918, when on line patrol near Roulers, Lieutenant McNeaney, in company with two other machines, engaged about ten Fokkers. Four were destroyed, Lieutenant McNeaney accounting for two of them.

 

On the 2nd October 1918, when on low line patrol southeast of Roulers, Lieutenant McNeaney shot down a Halberstadt two-seater.

 

On the 14th October 1918, when on offensive patrol north of Roulers, Lieutenant McNeaney shot down in flames a Fokker biplane.

 


* * * * *

 

McNEIL, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Percy Gordon - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1917. Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo dated 14 April 1917 stating that General Nollet, commanding 36 French Army Corps, has presented awards to several members of No.3 (Naval) Squadron; in this instance the intended recipient was unable to attend. Born in Ontario, 19 October 1893; home in Toronto; attended Toronto Curtiss School in 1915 (no certificate); appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 30 December 1915. At Eastbourne, 19 January to 15 June 1916; at Cranwell for examination (dates uncertain); Eastchurch Gunnery School, 18 June to 3 July 1916; No.3 Wing (Manston), 4 July 1916; No.3 Wing (Luxeuil), 10 August 1916 to 31 January 1917; No.3 (N) Squadron, 1 February 1917; to No.9 (N) Squadron, 5 May 1917; to No.10 (N) Squadron, 9 May 1917. Killed in action 3 June 1917. Public Records Office Air 1/74 also has communication dated 5 March 1917 from Grand Quartier Generale, Service Aeronautique noting several RNAS personnel cited in Orders of 4 Groupe de Bombardement (the French formation operating with No.3 Wing); citation repeated in Air 1/113/15/39/36; for McNeil it reads:

 

A pris part a cinq bombardementd a grande distance, au cours desquels il a donne des preuves a adresse et de courage.

 

McNEIL, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Percy Gordon - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 December 1917

 

* * * * *

 

McNICOLL, Flight Lieutenant Charles - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917. Born in Westmount, 27 January 1896; home there (student, McGill University; father had retired as a CPR Vice-President). Attended Wright School, Augusta, Georgia and obtained ACA Certificate No.398, 26 January 1916. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 12 February 1916; confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 30 June 1917. At Talbot, 27 March 1916; to Calshot, 10 July 1916; to Dundee, 11 September 1916; to HMS Pegasus, 14 August 1917; to Grain, 1 October 1917; to Felixstowe, 7 November 1917; to SW Area (Calshot), 14 August 1918; to No.210 TDS, 7 November 1918. No citation. However, Air 1/659/17/122/607 (MG.40 D.1 Volume 14) has long account of attack he made on submarine (seaplane 8645), 12 March 1917.

 

* * * * *

 


MacPHERSON, Major Osborne Cluny - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada. Home in Capetown, South Africa; graduated from Royal Military College (1891); served in South African War; 25 years experience in railroading and other forms of engineering, described as knowledgeable in requirements of aerodrome sites, buildings; Lieutenant, Canadian Engineers to Canadian Engineers Training Depot, 5 June 1916; to War Office with rank of Major, 29 December 1916. With RFC in Canada as of June 1917 (Major) as OC Royal Engineer Section, RAF (Canada) Headquarters; still there, 9 April 1918; to Headquarters, 1 February 1919; to Home Establishment, 8 March 1919; relinquished commission 23 April 1919.

 

MacPHERSON, Major Osborne Cluny - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). For services in Canada.

 

MacPHERSON, Major Osborne Cluny - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919. No citation published other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

* * * * *

 

McRAE, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Finlay - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada. Born Wyvale, Ontario; home in Saskatoon (bank clerk and manager); commisioned in 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada; attached to 23rd Alberta Rangers; detached to RFC Canada, 28 March 1917 as Engineer Officer; with Stores Depot, Canada, 16 September 1918; to Headquarters, RAF Canada, 5 February 1919. On Air Ministry List of those "mentioned for valuable services in connection with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

*METFORD, Captain Lionel Seymour - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada (Commandant, Armament School, Hamilton).

 

* * * * *

 

MIDDLETON, 2nd Lieutenant Alfred Saunders - Mention in Despatches - London Gazette authority not given on card. Home in Urquhart, Scotland; joined Canadian Scottish in Victoria, 6 August 1914; proceeded to Valcartier and went overseas with First Contingent. Taken on strength of RFC at Winchester, 29 August 1917; to BEF, 21 August 1918; with No.2 ASD, 21 August to 21 September 1918; with No.56 Squadron, 21 September to 25 October 1918; died of wounds 26 October 1918.

 

* * * * *

 


*MILLER, Lieutenant Harvey Allan - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - Air Ministry, 15 July 1919. Possibly an American (Idaho); Public Records Office Air 76 file says he is an American but also states he is "Canadian General List"; appointed 2nd Lieutenant in RFC, 16 June 1917; taken on strength, Reading, 20 July 1917; to No.81 Squadron, 25 July 1917; injured in aeroplane accident, 20 August 1917; to Expeditionary Force and No.79 Squadron, 30 March 1918; hospitalized, 20 May 1918; to Brandford RD, 9 September 1918; to North Russian Expeditionary Force, 2 October 1918; Commanding Officer, "A" Flight, from November 1918 onwards. To RAF Headquarters, 16 April 1919; to Unemployed List, 15 August 1919, "ill health". Listed 13 July 1919 as having flown Camel, Snipe, Sopwith Scout, Dolphin, SE.5.

 

*MILLER, Lieutenant Harvey Allan - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

MILLMAN, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Norman Craig - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Home in Toronto; registered at Curtiss School, Toronto, 1915; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation) with RFC, 7 December 1915; obtained Royal Aero Club certificate No.2392, 27 January 1916; confirmed as 2nd Lieutenant, 27 May 1916 when graded as Flying Officer; Lieutenant, 1 January 1917; Captain, 1 April 1918. Served in No.48 Squadron (dates not known); not known where he served for AFC award.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Whilst on an offensive patrol, he encountered a hostile formation of twelve machines. He led his patrol in such brilliant fashion that five of the enemy machines were shot down either in flames or out of control, two of these being accounted for by himself and his observer. Previous to this, he had carried out voluntarily a reconnaissance, from which he succeeded in returning with most valuable information, despite the fact that he had been heavily engaged by machine-gun fire during the greater part of the flight. Later, he commanded a formation on one flank of the attack during a daylight bombing raid on a hostile aerodrome, and carried out his task in a most dashing and successful manner. He has at all times displayed powers of leadership of the highest order.

 

MILLMAN, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Norman Craig - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

MILLS, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Frederick Stanley - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1917. Born 12 February 1893 in Toronto; home there (salesman). Well known as a lacrosse and rugby player; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant in Ottawa, 30 December 1915 and assigned to Eastchurch; sailed on New Years Day 1916; at Eastbourne, (under training), 18 March 1916; at Westgate, 18 June 1916; to No.2 Wing, 25 July 1916; with No.2 Wing (Roumanian Flight), 18 December 1916; to Eastbourne, 11 May 1917; to SE Area for No.206 TDS, 1 May 1918. Reported to have been with King Ferdinand's army during Roumanian retreat from Bucharest, having left the city one day ahead of the enemy.


MILLS, Flight Lieutenant Frederick Stanley - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 May 1918.

 

For zeal and devotion to duty during the period from July 1st to December 31st, 1917.

 

* * * * *

 

MILNE, Captain William - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1916. Home in Chamadaska, British Columbia; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1735 dated 11 September 1915; appointed Flying Officer, Temporary Captain, 15 November 1915; flew as pilot with No.25 Squadron, early 1916; wounded in air combat, 17 May 1916. RFC Communique No.32 (2 April 1916) says that with observer, Lieutenant Gilbert, he attacked one Albatross over German lines, going in to very close quarters; hit German machine but own petrol tank holed and engine stopped. RFC Communique No.35 for 27 April 1916 says that with three other FE.2bs of No.25 Squadron he engaged eight Aviatiks; Communique No.36 for 17 May 1916 describes him as being wounded in hand and nose grazed by a bullet. Major, November 1916; accidentally killed, Berwickshire, 13 April 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill. When attacked by two hostile aeroplanes he drove off one, and, though slightly wounded in the face, drove the other vertically to the ground. He then at once attacked another and drove it down, being this time shot through the hand. In spite of his wounds he landed his machine safely in his own aerodrome.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation for Military Cross dated 18 May 1916 and submitted by Brigadier D. le G. Pitcher, Commanding 1st Brigade, Royal Flying Corps.

 

On 17th May 1916, Captain Milne whilst on patrol saw two hostile machines between La Bassee and Hulluch. One made off but he engaged the other at very close range and although slightly wounded in the face, caused it to dive vertically to the ground. He then at once went after another machine he saw, engaged it and drove it down, being shot this time through the hand. In spite of these two wounds, he landed his machine successfully on his own aerodrome.

 

* * * * *

 


MINCHIN, Captain Frederick Frank Reilly - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1916. Short biography in Aeroplane, 14 September 1927. Born in India (his father served in Indian Army); in Connaught Rangers in 1913; learned to fly at Eastbourne ( Royal Aero Club Certificate No.419 dated 18February 1913); enlisted in PPCLI in August 1914, commissioned 22 September 1914; sailed with First Contingent; joined RFC 10 March 1915. With No.1 Squadron, 3 August 1915; No.14 Squadron (uncertain); Commanding Officer of No.47 Squadron, 1 January 1917 to 13 May 1918 (another source says until 31 March 1919). Joined the staff of Imperial Airways, 1924 and was engaged on surveying air route to India. In June and July1926 he piloted a Bristol Bloodhound from Croydon to Cairo. Lost on trans-Atlantic attempt with F/O Leslie Hamilton and the Princess Lowenstein, 31 August 1927. C.G. Grey wrote, Aeroplane, Everybody like Squadron Leader Minchin, he had much personal charm and a kindly nature. He was admired for his skill and courage as a pilot. And during the War 1914-18 he proved himself to be a very good commanding officer. But somehow, in civil life, he seemed to fail to find a job worthy of his war record or of his social position. Personally he struck one as a man possessed by some constant sadness, so perhaps hs end has been welcomed by him. At any rate he died in the course of a great adventure, which - as those who knew him well will agree - neither vanity nor the desire for gain had any part. Not considered Canadian by most sources.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill on many occasions, notably when leading a successful bomb and machine-guns raid on a force of the enemy which he had located overnight. Next day, he took part in two other raids. During these operations, he flew for thirteen hours over enemy country.

 

MINCHIN, Captain Frederick Frank Reilly - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 November 1916.

 

For conspicuous gallantry in action. He flew 150 miles at night to bomb an enemy aerodrome, descending from 500 feet, and doing serious damage. On another occasion, he landed 45 miles from our line to pick up the pilot of a damaged machine in a hostile country.

 

MINCHIN, Lieutenant (Acting Major) Frederick Frank Reilly - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 October 1917, for services in Salonika.

 

MINCHIN, Major Frederick Frank Reilly - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1918. No citation other than "for distinguished services in the field".

 

MINCHIN, Lieutenant-Colonel Frederick Frank Reilly - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 July 1920.

 

* * * * *

 

MITCHELL, Sergeant Mechanic H. (3266) - Air Force Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918 - described in Aeroplane of 6 November 1918 as being from Renfrew, New Brunswick. No card in Directorate of History.

 

* * * * *

 


MITCHELL, Captain (Acting Major) John Mitchell - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919. See Flight, 16 October 1919. May have been for work in RAF (Canada) scheme. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

* * * * *

 

MITCHELL, Lieutenant Lawrence Newton - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. Born 19 October 1896; home in Liverpool, Nova Scotia. Served in Canadian Army Medical Corps. Taken on strength of Station Denham, 16 November 1916; to Oxford, 26 January 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 17 March 1917; to No.48 TS, December 1916; to No.43 RS, January to May 1917; No.2 AAP, Hendon, May 1917 to June 1918 (test pilot); No.43 Squadron, overseas, June 1918 to May 1919; Hendon, May 1919 to January 1920 (express and despatch carriage).

 

* * * * *

 

MOLONEY, 2nd Lieutenant Peter Joseph - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1918 (citation in issue of 25 April 1918). Home in Peterborough, Ontario; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), 5 December 1916 (confirmed 7 May 1917); with RFC, Oxford, 17 December 1916; with No.84 Squadron, 7 May 1917 although service also listed as 22 September to 22 November 1917 (wounded); to RFC Canada.

 

When on patrol he was attacked by six hostile aeroplanes, which dived at him out of the clouds. In the first burst of fire he received a severe wound, his control wires were very badly cut, and several of his flying wires were shot away. Despite this, he attacked four of the enemy aeroplanes, one of which disappeared, another crashing down out of control. Feeling very faint from loss of blood, he then made for our lines through the nearest clouds. Though the fog was very thick, he succeeded in landing his machine undamaged behind our lines. On another occasion, when on patrol, he engaged the leader of a hostile formation and drove him down. Though he suffered from engine trouble, he finally succeeded in driving off another enemy scout which had attacked him. This officer's tenacity and pluck are worthy of the highest praise.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 3 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 2 December 1917.

 

For skill and gallantry.

 


On November 22nd, 1917, 2nd Lieutenant Maloney was on a patrol near Cambrai. He lost the rest of the formation owing to the thick clouds and mist that prevailed. When east of Cambrai six German scouts suddenly dived on him from the clouds. In the first burst from their guns 2nd Lieutenant Maloney received a severe wound in the back. His machine was riddled with bullets, several of his flying wires were shot away, and his lateral control wires cut so as to render his right aileron useless. In spite of this, 2nd Lieutenant Maloney turned on the six enemy aeroplanes. He attacked four enemy aeroplanes in turn, giving each a burst from his guns. The first he attacked disappeared,and did not again attack him. Whether they were shot down or not it is impossible to say. The fourth enemy aeroplane attacked by 2nd Lieutenant Maloney stalled, spun, and crashed to earth out of control. There now remained only two of the enemy scouts. 2nd Lieutenant Maloney was now feeling very faint from loss of blood and pain. He therefor made for the nearest clouds, pursued by two hostile enemy aeroplanes, who continued firing at him until he had hidden himself in the clouds. On coming out of the clouds the enemy had disappeared. 2nd Lieutenant Maloney then made for our lines, and despite his condition continued to make observations as to the movements of enemy troops and enemy ground signals, which he reported on landing. The fog was now very thick, yet he succeeded in landing his machine near Bus without causing any damage whatsoever, although the machine was so shot about as to render it almost useless.

 

Previously, on October 31st, 1917, 2nd Lieutenant Maloney was on patrol with five other of our machines near Menin. The formation attacked eight German scouts. 2nd Lieutenant Maloney dived on the leader of the German formation, a red Albatross, and emptied a drum at him from his Lewis gun. The enemy aeroplane dived vertically but what became of him is not known as 2nd Lieutenant Maloney was himself attacked immediately by another enemy scout. His engine was now going very badly. In spite of this he continued to engage the German machine which he finally succeeded in driving east. Not until then did he return to our lines.

 

This officer's tenacity and pluck is worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

MOLYNEAUX, Lieutenant Harold Arthur Sydney - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Born 14 March 1896; home in Toronto; formerly in 75th Battalion, CEF. Taken on strength, Reading, 24 June 1917; to CFS, 30 July 1917; to No.88 Squadron, 31 October 1917 (Flying Officer); to Expeditionary Force with No.60 Squadron, 27 February 1918 (served 5 March to 30 March 1918); hospitalized, 23 March 1918; to No.56 Squadron (28 April to 11 November 1918). Served in RCAF in Second World War.

 

During the August operations this officer rendered conspicuous good service on low flying patrols, causing much damage and inflicting heavy casualties, showing brilliant dash and resolution. He is a bold fighter in the air, and has accounted for two enemy aeroplanes.

 

* * * * *

 

MOORE, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Guy Borthwick - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918. Born in Mattawa, Ontario, 28 May 1895; home in Vancouver; attended UBC (Arts, 1913-16; member of Vancouver Rowing Club and university rugby team); qualified as Lieutenant, Irish Fusiliers of Canada, 1916; joined RFC as Cadet, December 1916; to England, January 1917; Oxford, 23 March 1917; obtained wings, August 1917 with commission as 2nd Lieutenant effective from 26 April 1917 (Flying Officer, 8 June 1917). Served in No.1 Squadron, 16 August 1917 to 7 April 1918 (killed in action).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led a patrol to attack hostile balloons. The patrol drove down three balloons in a collapsed condition, one of which he accounted for himself. He has also destroyed three enemy aeroplanes and driven down three others out of control. He has always shown splendid courage and resource.

 

* * * * *

 

MOORE, Lieutenant-Colonel Harold Arthur - Commander, Order of the British Empire awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 19 June 1880 in Toronto; won MC and was three times Mentioned in Despatches before attachment to RFC, 1 April 1918; Staff Officer in Director of Air Organization, Air Ministry. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered in connection with the war".

 

* * * * *

 

MORRISON, 2nd Lieutenant Robert George Kerr - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1919. Born 19 August 1919 in Chesterville, Ontario; home there (student); appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 8 December 1917; on command to Greenwich as of that date; to Chingford, 9 March 1918; to Vendome, 19 March 1918; to Composite Park, 20 October 1918; to No.63 Wing, Mudros, 21 October 1918; listed in RN Aegean Group, 18 December 1918; to No.62 Wing, February 1919. On seaplane patrol and bombing, Turkish and Bulgarian front; to South Russia in February 1919; as of May 1919 at Petrovsk, attached HMS Alleydor Yussenoff.

 

NOTE: Creagen Papers (National Aviation Museum) say he was Mentioned in Despatches as per London Gazette dated 9 October 1919 (Flight, 16 October 1919) and states that it was for a bombing raid on Russian flotilla at Alexandrovsk, 21 May 1919; refers to The Times of 10 October 1919 (page 5). The despatch in question (written by Rear Admiral M. Seymour, Black Sea) says, in part:

 

I have the honour to call particular attention to the services rendered by the following officers of the Royal Air Force who between them carried out five raids in one seaplane on the same day, with excellent results, and attempted a sixth, and also the services of Lieutenant Chilton, RNR, commanding "A. Yousanoff" for his able handling of the ship and organization which allowed this to be done.

 

Pilots

 

2nd Lieutenant Howard Grant Thompson

Captain John Archer Sadler

2nd Lieutenant Robert George Kear Morrison

Observers

 

Lieutenant Frank Russel Bicknell

2nd Lieutenant Frank Leslie Kingham

2nd Lieutenant Henry Godwin Pratt

 

* * * * *

 

MORROW, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Ernest Thomas - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born in Waubaushene; home in Toronto (accountant); enlisted May 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 22 September 1917; to Headquarters, Training Depot, 29 October 1917; to No.62 Squadron, 30 October 1917 (proceeded to France with unit); hospitalized 29 June 1918; wounded 22 August 1918 (gunshots in leg) and invalided to England on 5 September 1918.

 

On the 22nd August, whilst leading an offensive patrol, this officer attacked ten Fokker biplanes and Pfalz scouts, driving down one in flames. In the engagement he was wounded and became unconscious; regaining consciousness, he found that his machine had got into a spin and was on fire. With a supreme effort, although very weak, he succeeded in landing within our lines, where he was with great difficulty extricated from the burning machine. A bold and determined officer, who has destroyed four enemy aeroplanes and driven down two out of control.

 

* * * * *

 

MULOCK, Flight Lieutenant Redford Henry - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1916. Born 11 August 1888. Home in Winnipeg (electrical engineer); taken on strength at Eastchurch, 20 January 1915; to Westgate (submarine and Zeppelin patrols), April 1915; to No.1 Squadron, 8 July 1915; to Dunkirk Headquarters, 21 May 1916; to Air Ministry, 19 July 1918; to Independent Force, 29 August 1918, to command No.82 Group; to Air Ministry and No.27 Group, 25 October 1918; to Headquarters, Northern Area, 26 January 1919; Colonel as of 29 August 1918. His exploits included pursuit of a German bomber (16 April 1915); pursuit of a Zeppelin from Ramsgate to Belgian coast while it fired on him (17 May 1915), bombing Brussells Zeppelin sheds in daylight despite enemy fire and rain (8 July 1915). Active in aircraft industry and RCAF Auciliary postwar; died in Montreal, 23 January 1961.

 

In recognition of his services as a pilot as Dunkirk. This officer has been constantly employed at Dunkirk since July 1915 and has displayed indefatigable zeal and energy. He has on several occasions engaged hostile aeroplanes and seaplanes, and attacked submarines, and has carried out attacks on enemy air stations, and made long distance reconnaissances.

 

MULOCK, Wing Commander Redford Henry - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1917. Public Records Office Air/74 has a letter from the Admiralty to Vice-Admiral, Dover Patrol, Dover, dated 6 August 1917 (signature illegible):

I am commanded by My Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to acquaint you that they note with pleasure the letter from General Trenchard testifying to the very fine work performed by all ranks of Number 3 Squadron of the Royal Naval Air Service during their four months' service with the 5th Brigade of the Royal Flying Corps.

 

I am to request that you will convey to Squadron Commander Mulock, and the Officers and men of this Squadron, Their Lordships' high appreciation of their good service.

 

Squadron Commander Mulock's name will be "mentioned" in the "Gazette".

 

NOTE: The following extract from Routine Orders of 4th Army (General Sir H.S. Rawlinson), 28 August 1917 was thought to have been related to this MiD award; he was then in command of No.3 (N) Squadron. Although not directly bearing on his MiD, it illustrates his overall leadership qualities.

 

The Army Commander wishes to express his appreciation of the courage and devotion to duty displayed by the following officer in rescuing the wounded and salving ammunition under shell fire at an ammunition railhead on July 10, 1917 -Squadron Commander R.H. Mulock, DSO, RN.

 

Folio 187 of Air 1/74 has a related letter (referring to a missing document), from Senior Officer, RNAS Dunkirk to Commodore, Dunkirk, dated 27 July 1917:

 

The Naval Officer referred to is undoubtedly Squadron Commander Redford Henry Mulock, DSO.

 

He proceeded to the vicinity of the ammunition train accompanied by Surgeon Arthur Edward Panter, RN, and the following mechanics:-

 

L.M. "D" H.G. Larter O.N. F.5996

AM2 "SD" A.F. Walker O.N. F.19380

AM2 "SD" J.T.P. Wilson O.N. F.19382

 

Surgeon Panter and one Driver took the first wounded man they found away in an ambulance, and after this I was unable to get any definite statements, as Squadron Commander Mulock is very reticent on the subject. I gather from the remaining drivers, however, that he went alone and searched the Dump for wounded and would not allow the drivers to accompany him.

 

MULOCK, Wing Commander Redford Henry - Chevalier, Legion of Honour (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1917. NOTE: Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a recommendation sent 24 March 1917 by the Senior Air Officer, Dunkirk to Commodore Exelmans, "Capitaine de Vaisseaux", in Dunkirk, which is almost certainly resulted in this award:

Has been in command of the Escort Squadron at St.Pol for a year and is a conspicuously gallant and expert pilot.

 

MULOCK, Wing Commander Redford Henry - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1918.

 

MULOCK, Wing Commander Redford Henry - Bar to Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 April 1918. NOTE: although this DSO citation was only one line, it would appear he was recommended for a DSC as follows: "For untiring energy and power of command. He has brought his squadron to a very high pitch of efficiency. He is mainly responsible by his spirit and personality for its great success as a fighting unit." See AIR 1/1155/204/5/2441 (MG.40 D.1 Volume 20).

 

In recognition of services as Dunkirk.

 

MULOCK, Wing Commander Redford Henry - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 June 1918.

 

MULOCK, Colonel Redford Henry - Commander, Order of the British Empire - - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

* * * * *

 

MUNN, 2nd Lieutenant James Alexander - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in Hensall, Ontario (student); Sergeant, Canadian Army Dental Corps, February 1917; overseas in April 1917; with RNAS at Greenwich, 27 November 1917; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.6925, 27 March 1918; to Calshot, 6 April 1918; graded as 2nd Lieutenant (Seaplanes), 24 May 1918; to Malta Seaplane Base (date uncertain); to UK, 13 January 1919; to unemployed list, 20 February 1919.

 

MUNN, 2nd Lieutenant James Alexander - Croce di Guerra (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 April 1919.

 

MUNN, 2nd Lieutenant James Alexander - Libyan Medal (Italy) - awarded as per Air Ministry List of 15 July 1919, "for services rendered in connection with the Italian forces at Misurata."

 

* * * * *

 

MURRAY, Captain David Fraser - Distinguished Flying Cross - 1 January 1919. Born 18 November 1893 in Nova Scotia; home in Victoria; attended Toronto Curtiss School in 1916 but did not receive certificate; appointed Probationary Flight Officer, Ottawa, 17 November 1916; to Crystal Palace, 17 December 1916; to Killingholme, 2 July 1917; to Calshot, 3 July 1917; for disposal to 2 Wing, 2 October 1917; at Thasos, 18 December 1917; at Imbros, 18 June 1918; at Thermi-Mitylene as of 18 September and 18 December 1918; to Headquarters, 24 December 1918; to Malta, 10 January 1919; at Repatriation Camp, 9 April 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

* * * * *

NAPIER, Captain Kenneth Russel - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Born in England, 15 November 1893; educated there; next-of-kin in Berkshire; living in Gleichen, Alberta before the war; sailed overseas with First Canadian Contingent (Lord Strathcona's Horse); as a Private he transferred to RFC, 14 October 1916 (2nd Lieutenant); with No.4 Squadron as Observer, 1 September to 24 October 1916; with No.3 Squadron as Observer, 1 November 1916 to 25 May 1917; graded as Flying Officer (Observer), March 1917; graded as Flying Officer, October 1917; with No.53 Squadron, 1 November 1917 to 31 July 1918 (pilot); School of Special Flying, 12 August to 18 September 1918; at No.33 TDS as of 7 November 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during recent operations. He carried out several successful reconnaissances under heavy machine-gun fire from the ground, dropping bombs on troops and machine-gunning them, while attacked himself by enemy aircraft. Under very trying weather conditions he has brought back most valuable information. He did very fine work.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 2nd Brigade to Royal Air Force Headquarters on 8 May 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty, during the period 21 March 1918 to 24 March 1918 and 10 April 1918 to 30 April 1918.

 

During the period 21 March 1918 to 24 March 1918 he carried out on the 24th a special reconnaissance of the bridges at Peronne under heavy machine gun fire from the ground, dropping four bombs on troops in Peronne, and on 21st, 22nd, 23rd he bombed and machine gunned the enemy from low altitudes, although on each occasion he was attacked by enemy aeroplanes.

 

During the period 10 April 1918 to 30 April 1918, this officer, with Captain O'Leary as observer, carried out twelve reconnaissances on the enemy's lines at a low altitude under very trying weather conditions. He brought back much valuable information, noticeably from the 11th, 15th, 16th and 30th ultimo, when he accurately located enemy's positions by flying at a low altitude, under heavy machine gun fire from the ground, his machine being hit in many places.

 

See also award to his fellow Canadian, E.L. O'Leary, who also received the Military Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

NELLES, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Douglas Alexander Hardy - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 May 1917. Born 23 August 1892; home in Simcoe, Ontario (law student, University of Toronto). Attended Curtiss School in Toronto; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.2008, 15 October 1915. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant in Ottawa 15 November 1915. Posted from Chingford to Dover Air Station, 10 January 1916; to Redcar, 23 May 1916; to Dover Air Station, 28 May 1916; to Coudekerque (No.5 Wing), 4 July 1916; missing from raid against St.Denis Westrem aerodrome, 22 April 1917 (interned in Holland); released from internment, 26 April 1918 and given a months' leave in Canada to visit father but to return to Holland. The following is from Canada, 19 May 1917 and may not be official citation.

 

For conspicuously good work as a pilot of a bombing machine. He has taken part in 17 raids, and has also done a large amount of fighter patrol work.

 

* * * * *

 

*NESTER, 2nd Lieutenant Harold Aurelius - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. American from Geneva, New York; 2nd Lieutenant (Aeroplanes and Seaplanes), 1 April 1918; included in RAF Canada List of Officers going overseas, 9 April 1918. At Headquarters, Training Depot, 6 May 1918; No.253 Squadron, 14 October 1919; to No.11 TDS, 7 November 1918; struck off strength, 24 February 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of valuable services."

 

* * * * *

 

NORTHOVER, Major Harry Robert - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 31 December 1982. Home in Winnipeg (rifle maker and inventor, 1911 onwards); sailed with First Contingent as a Sergeant, 8th Canadian Infantry Battalion; commissioned Lieutenant, Ordnance Corps, CEF, 18 September 1915; to France, March 1916 as Armourer Officer, Canadian Ordnance Corps; awarded Military Cross with CEF, 14 January 1917; seconded to War Office (O/C Gadgets and Tests at RFC Armament School), 30 December 1917; ceased RAF secondment, 30 January 1919. In February 1919 he applied for CAF service. He was then OC Gun Testing Section, RAF, and wrote that he had "tested and modified 30,000 machine guns for the RAF." National Archives of Canada RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 states he was "Armourer Officer and machine gun inspector in 1st Canadian Division - (Great Britain) inventor of various machine gun improvements (adopted) and machine gun expertenances [sic] - Inspector of machine guns, Canadian Local Forces - Since joining RFC, filing above duties in RAF Armament School."

 

* * * * *

 

NUNAN, 2nd Lieutenant Noel Daniel - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per Air Ministry List of 7 July 1919 and London Gazette dated 10 July 1919. Born at Woodville Blarney, Cork, Ireland; parents residing there. He was living at Grande Prairie, Alberta when he joined 194th Battalion, CEF, March 1916; proceeded overseas; to RFC, 5 March 1918; 2nd Lieutenant, 28 June 1918; to North Russian Expeditionary Force, Archangel, 2 November 1918. On 24 February 1919 his Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter (pilot Lieutenant P.Kravetz, SBAC) failed to return from recce of Onega region; shot down; crew put up fight; Kravetz killed and Nunan died of wounds three days later.

 

* * * * *

 

NUNN, Flight Lieutenant Harry Lawrence - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1918. No details on cards and though listed as a Canadian, this may be an error.

 

For services in action with enemy submarines.

 

NUNN, Flight Lieutenant Harry Lawrence - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.

 

NUNN, Flight Lieutenant Harry Lawrence - Silver Medal for Military Valour (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919.

 

* * * * *