GAGE, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) William Cecil - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 25 December 1891; home in Ancaster, Ontario; appointed Lieutenant in Canadian Militia and RFC in Canada, 20 November 1915; graded as Flying Officer, 14 March 1916; served in No.88 Squadron from 4 August 1918 to unknown date. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war". The following from Air Ministry indicates nature of his work.

 

No.88 Squadron - has done photography and many reconnaissances and offensive patrols. He has brought back much valuable information, in order to obtain which, on many occasions when the weather was bad, he descended to heights of 1,000 to 3,000 feet.

 

NOTE: His observer, a Canadian (2nd Lieutenant J.L. Marshall) was cited for having made many reconnaissances "and has returned with much valuable information".

 

* * * * *

 

GALBRAITH, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Charles Franklin - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Burnside, Manitoba (student at law); served in CEF; to RFC, 16 April 1917; served in No.5 Squadron, 13 January to 15 September 1918; died of wounds 16 September 1918.

 

Throughout the recent operations this officer has carried out work of outtstanding merit in attacking enemy troops on the ground and in obtaining information as to the position of our infantry and cavalry and those of the enemy. He has also taken photographs from very low altitudes, and which were urgently required.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation for a Military Cross to 2nd Lieutenant Edwin Gordon Whitaker Coward (Royal Artillery and RAF Special Reserve), sent on 30 September 1918 from 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force. It is not known if any award was granted to him, but the text bears upon Galbraith's death:

 

For conspicuous gallantry whilst acting as Observer to Captain Galbraith, DFC, on 15th September 1918. Captain Galbraith, his pilot, was severely wounded in combat with enemy machines whilst flying over Palluel and forced to land 200 yards in front of our lines. With wonderful promptitude and absolute disregard of danger or his own safety, 2nd Lieutenant Coward extricated his pilot in the face of heavy shell fire which was opened on the machine immediately it landed, and assisted him to our lines. An infantry officer who came to the assistance of them both was himself wounded.

 

* * * * *

 


GALBRAITH, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Daniel Murray Bayne - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 October 1916. Born 27 April 1895 in Carleton Place, Ontario (student in Toronto). Attended Wright School in Dayton, Ohio; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa; to Chingford, 15 November 1915; to Cranwell, 1 April 1916; to Eastchurch, 20 June 1916; to Dover, 29 May 1916; original member of No.8 (N) Squadron, 25 October 1916; invalided 7 December 1916; to Air Department, MAD, 7 March 1917; to Manston, 26 June 1917; to Redcar, as instructor, 22 April 1918; to Eastchurch, 6 May 1918; to Air Ministry, 30 August 1918; to 11 (Irish) Group for 55 Wing, 25 September 1918. Joined Canadian Air Force after the war; killed in a motor vehicle accident near Camp Borden, 29 March 1921.

 

In recognition of his services in attacking a large enemy two-seater seaplane on the 28th September, 1916. Flight Sub-Lieutenant Galbraith's machine was severely damaged by gun fire from the enemy machine, which finally blew up in the air.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 1/74 has recommendation submitted 28 Septenber 1916 from Headquarters, RNAS Dunkirk, which renders his name as "David M.B. Galbraith".

 

On September 28th, 1916, this officer, whilst patrolling the sea, sighted a large enemy two-seater seaplane. The enemy machine blew up in the air, probably caused by his bombs having been struck and exploded. From the position, it appears probable that this machine was on its way to attack the doutheast coast of England. Flight Sub-Lieutenant Galbraith's machine was severely damaged by gunfire from the enemy, his windscreen and gun sight being shot away in the ealy part of the encounter, but the pilot continued his attack.

 

This encounter was witnessed by the pilot and observer of a French seaplane.

 

In addition to the above, on July 21st, this officer encountered a hostile seaplane off Ostend, and the enemy machine gained the advantage of position. Flight Sub-Lieutenant Galbraith looped his machine over the German, thus gaining the desired position behind. The German pilot was seen to be hit, and the machine fell in a vertical dive and broke into flames. This officer is an extremely plucky pilot, and has rendered consistently good service since June 12th, 1916.

 

GALBRAITH, Flight Lieutenant Daniel Murray Bayne - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry. On 23rd November 1916 he attacked single handed a formation of six hostile aircraft, no other allid machines being in the vicinity. One hostile machine was shot down, a second was driven down under control, and the remaining four machines then gave up the fight and landed.

 

In several other combats in the air Flight Lieutenant Galbraith has displayed exceptional gallantry, particularly on the 10th and 16th November, 1916, on each of which days he successfully engaged and shot down an enemy machine.

 

GALBRAITH, Flight Lieutenant Daniel Murray Bayne - Croix de Guerre France) - This award not finally gazetted until London Gazette dated 28 February 1922, when it was noted that it had been conferred in 1916; DHist cards suggested November 1917. However, Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo dated 20 October 1916 stating that Colonel Barres (Commanding French air forces) had conferred the award on Galbraith, effective that day. The same file carries a copy of No.36 Army Corps, General Order No.30, dated 8 October 1916, citing Sub-Lieutenant S.J. Goble, Sub-Lieutenant E.R. Grange, and Sub-Lieutenant M.B. Galbraith. That for Galbraith read:

 

Le 27 septembre 1916, est parti la recherche d'une appareil signal. A livr, 10 milles en mer un combat un hydavion ennemi sur lequel il a ouvert le feu trs courte distance. A abbatu cet avion qui s'est bris en morceux au cours de sa chute. A eu son appareil gravement endommag par le feu de l'ennemi.

 

* * * * *

 

GALPIN, Flight Lieutenant Joseph Osborne - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1917. Born 17 October 1889; home in Ottawa. Obtained ACA Certificate No.354 at Wright School, Dayton, Ohio, 8 December 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, with effect from 26 November 1915. Few details of postings.

 

For services in action with enemy submarines.

 

GALPIN, Flight Lieutenant Joseph Osborne - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1917.

 

For services on patrol duties and submarine searching in Home Waters.

 

GALPIN, Captain Joseph Osborne - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918.

 

GALPIN, Captain Joseph Osborne - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

A skilful and gallant pilot, who has performed valluable services in attacks on enemy aircraft

 

* * * * *

 

GARRATT, Captain (Acting Major) Frank George - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. Born in Northampton, England, 5 November 1894; home in Montreal (mining engineer); appointed 2nd Class Air Mechanic in RFC, Canada, 12 May 1916; appointed 2nd Lieutenant on Probation, 17 June 1916; obtained ACA Certificate No.487 at Wright School, Augusta, Georgia, 10 May 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 13 August 1916. Served in No.1 Squadron, 30 Septembet to 21 November 1916 and No.45 Squadron, 21 November 1916 to 1 May 1917. To Ferry Pilot Detachment, 14 May 1917; to Canada, 7 December 1917; with RFC in Texas, 1917-1918 (listed as a 2nd Lieutenant, instructor, Aerial Gunnery Squadron, Texas); Officer Commanding, Aerial Fighting Squadron No.3, Beamsville, 1918; to Southeast Area, England, 28 January 1919; injured 10 February 1919. No details.

 

GARRATT, Major Frank George - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

GARRATT, Captain Philip Clarke - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Home in Toronto; joined RFC in Canada, 1 January 1916. Attained Royal Aeronautical Certificate No.2868, 28 April 1916 while a 2nd Lieutenant. Served in No.70 Squadron, 5 July to 21 October 1916 (wounded); Administration Wing, Farnborough, 16 January to 8 March 1917; Eastern Group Command, RCF, 8 March to 10 May 1917; No.40 Training Squadron, Croydon, 12 January to 2 March 1918; No.129 Squadron, Duxford, 2 March to 10 May 1918; No.2 Training Squadron and No.30 TDS, Northolt, 11 May 1918 to 13 June 1919 when repatriated. Postwar in DeHavilland of Canada; awarded Order of Canada (Service Medal), which was converted to Officer, Order of Canada, June 1972.

 

* * * * *

 

GIBSON, 2nd Lieutenant Campbell Blakeley - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Home in Welland, Ontario; joined 6 May 1918; to No.252 Squadron, 7 November 1918. May have served in No.25 Squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

**GIBSON, Lieutenant Herbert John - Croix de Guerre with Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919. Name provided by Blatherwick; no card at DHist to establish Canadian background.

 

* * * * *

 

GILLANDERS, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) John Gordon - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Highgate, Ontario; student at University of Toronto; joined RFC in Canada, 17 August 1917; sailed as 2nd Lieutenant, 19 November 1917. With No.18 Squadron, 14 March 1918 to 10 June 1919; appointed Captain, 15 August 1918.

 

This officer has carried out twenty-nine successful bombing raids, sixteen photographic flights and thirty-six reconnaissance, and his work had beenn admirable, characterized by marked ability. In the course of these numerous flights he has never hesitated to engage enemy aircraft, thereby on many occasions materially assisting his formation.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent by 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 13 August 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has carried out 29 successful bombing raids, 16 successful photographic flights and 36 reconnaissances, many of which have been at very low altitudes. He has taken part in numerous encounters with enemy aircraft and by his dash and fearlessness has materially assisted his formation in dealing with hostile attacks. He has carried out his work in a most admirable and conscientious manner and during the five months he has served with No.18 Squadron has set a fine example to other pilots by his keenness and great devotion to duty.

 

On 22 July 1918, whilst flying in formation, he observed an enemy machine which was a two-seater. He left the formation, attacked and destroyed the enemy aeroplane. He then rejoined his formation, bombed the objective and when returning was attacked by four hostile aeroplanes. He singled out one which was shot down out of control and eventually crashed.

 

On 24 July 1918 he carried out a successful photographic flight under very difficult circumstances, exposing 33 plates through gaps in the clouds and obtaining all pin points.

 

On 16 July 1918 during a flight of two hours 35 minutes he took 30 exposures with an E.B. [or F.B.] camera of villages and hostile aerodromes in the vicinity of Orchins, obtaining all the pinpoints.

 

In addition to the above he took part in a bomb raid which was attacked by 40 to 50 enemy aeroplanes. During the combat which ensued four enemy aeroplanes were crashed and seven shot down out of control.

 

GILLANDERS, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) John Gordon - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 December 1918.

 

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GILLESPIE, Lieutenant William John - Croix de Guerre with Palm (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 August 1919. Born 20 March 1897. Home in Daysland, Alberta (student); served in 7th Reserve Battalion, CEF; joined RFC, 10 June 1917; to Vendome, 31 July 1917; to TB [?], 12 September 1917; to Central Flying School, Upavon, 22 September 1917; to No.1 ASD, 5 December 1917; with No.41 Squadron, 12 December 1917 to 18 August 1918 (hospitalized). Granted leave in Canada, 24 August 1918 where he was presumably demobilized. RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 lists typoes flown as Caudron, Curtiss, Avro, BE2, Morane biplane, and SE.5a.

 

* * * * *

 

*GILLETT, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Frederick Warrington - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 1896 in Baltimore, Maryland (mining engineer); attended University of Virginia. Entered U.S. Aviation Service, Newport News, 1 April 1917. Assigned to Royal Flying Corps in Canada and completed training here. Sailed December 1917. With No.79 Squadron, 29 March to 29 November 1918. Returned to United States after the war and died in Baltimore, 21 December 1969. See Cross and Cockade Journal, Summer 1964 and Spring 1970.

 

When attacking a kite balloon a two-seater guarding it advanced to engage him; Lieutenant Gillett shot the machine down, and turning to the balloon, which was being rapidly hauled down, he dropped two bombs at the winch and fired a drum into the balloon, which deflated but did not catch fire. In addition to this two-seater, this officer has accounted for two other machines and a kite balloon.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded on 6 September 1918 from Second Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force:

 

On the 3 August 1918 Lieutenant Gillett shot down in flames a kite balloon over Le Pont Mortier.

 

On the 18 August 1918 when attacking a kite balloon over Estaires, he was attacked by a Fokker biplane; getting on to his opponent's tail he fired 100 rounds into him at very short range; the Fokker crashed one-half mile south of Croix di Bac.

 

On the 24 August 1918 when on offensive patrol east of Bailleul, Lieutenant Gillett attacked and shot down a DFW two-seater which fell two miles east of Bailleul.

 

On the 1 September 1918, Lieutenant Gillett attacked a kite balloon northeast of Armentieres; a LVG two-seater guarding the balloon approached and was shot down. Lieutenant Gillett then turned to the balloon which was being rapidly hauled down. He dropped two bombs at the winch and fired a drum into the balloon which visibly deflated but did not catch fire.

 

*GILLETT, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Frederick Warrington - Bar to Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

A pilot of great dash and skill who, since 3rd August has destroyed twelve hostile aircraft. On 29th September, when on low line patrol, he attacked three Fokkers, driving down one, which fell in flames.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded on 8 October 1918 from Second Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force.

 

On the 5 September 1918 when on offensive patrol east of Armentieres, Lieutenant Gillett shot down a Fokker scout.

 

On the 21 September 1918 when on balloon patrol between Maubourdin and Wavrin, Lieutenant Gillett attacked and destroyed a Fokker whose port wing broke up in the air.

 

On the 28 September 1918 when on line patrol near Bousbecque, Lieutenant Gillett shot down a two-seater Albatross. Later in the day when on offensive patrol with two other machines, they joined in a big fight between Passchendaele and Roulers. Lieutenant Gillett's patrol destroyed four Fokkers of which he accounted for one.

 

On the 29 September 1918 when on low line patrol west of Roulers, Lieutenant Gillett attacked three Fokkers; one fell in flames on the Menin-Roulers road.

 

On the 2 October 1918 when on a similar duty four miles east of Roulers, Lieutenant Gillett destroyed a balloon which went down in flames.

 

On the 5 October 1918 when on offensive patrol near Courtrai, some Fokkers were seen attacking our bombing machines. Lieutenant Gillett shot down one of the enemy scours.

 

A pilot of great dash and skill who has destroyed twelve enemy aircraft since the 3rd August.

 

*GILLETT, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Frederick Warrington - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1919.

 

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GILLIS, 2nd Lieutenant (Honorary Captain) Gordon Henry - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Born 4 December 1892; home in Halifax (accountant); served in 43rd Battalion, CEF; to RAF Home Estabishment, 18 April 1918; to Reading, 14 May 1918; to Eastchurch, 18 May 1918; with No.98 Squadron, 8 July 1918 to 4 February 1919 (wounded 23 October 1918); observer. Relinquished commission 5 June 1919.

 

This officer has carried out eighteen successful bombing raids, showing at all times complete fearlessness and disregard of danger, notably on August 30th, October 9th, and October 14th, when he rendered conspicuous service, causing heavy material damage to the enemy and bringing back calculable information.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation passed on 31 October 1918 from 1st Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force; this gives his name as Gorden Harvey (as does the London Gazette):

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Captain Gillis has carried out 18 successful bomb raids and has always shown complete fearlessness and disregard for danger. The following bomb raids are particularly worthy of notice.

 

On 30 August 1918 when on bomb raid to Valenciennes this officer did excellent work and shot down one enemy machine out of control.

 

On 9 October 1918, when on bomb raid to Mons Railway Station, and on 14 October 1918 when on bomb raid to Audenarde Railway Junction he again did excellent work and brought back much valuable information.

 

In addition to the above Captain Gillis has brought down one other enemy machine in flames.

 

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GLEN, Lieutenant David Kenneth - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per awarded as per London Gazette dated dated 1 January 1919. Born 21 September 1892 in Boissevain, Manitoba. Home in Enderby, British Columbia (farmer); brother of James A. Glen. Overseas with CEF, August 1915; to France, September 1915; to UK, September 1916. Taken on strength of RNAS, 15 April 1917; to Calshot, 7 February 1918; to No.209 TDS, 7 November 1918; to CFS, 25 March 1919

 

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GLEN, Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 April 1918. Born 23 June 1890 on farm near Turtle Mountain, Manitoba; father a farmer; attended High School in Enderby, British Columbia. Went to Curtiss School, 1915 but did not graduate. Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 16 December 1915. At CFS, 21 December 1915; to Eastchurch, 9 April 1916; to Dunkirk, 1 February 1917; with No.10 (N) Squadron, 26 April 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 28 April 1917. Hospitalized (sick or wounded), 12 August 1917. Given Canadian leave. To No.3 (N) Squadron, 3 January 1918; to No.253 Squadron, 8 November 1918; to No.123 Squadron, 28 April 1919. No citation found at DHist; the following citation located in Harry Creagen papers (National Aviation Museum):

 

For exceptional gallantry and skill as a fighting pilot and flight leader. On July 7th, 1917, he attacked two seaplanes off Ostend. In conjuction with other pilots he shot down one which crashed into the sea. The second he attacked himself, and after a short combat it also crashed into the sea, sinking immediately. He has destroyed and driven down out of control many enemy machines.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent on 22 March 1918 from Headquarters, 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force. This document has one error: the combat dated "27 July 1917" actually occurred on 26 July 1917.

 

For exceptional gallantry and skill as a Flight leader when engaging enemy aircraft. In addition to the combats enumerated below, this officer has destroyed two enemy aeroplanes and brought down two out of control.

 

On 16 March 1918, when on offensive patrol near Cavreele, three enemy aeroplanes were observed. He attacked one with two other pilots, and when he had closed to ten yards the enemy aeroplane went down in flames. Confirmed by whole patrol.

 

On 9 March 1918, when on offensive patrol, over Henin Leitard he attacked one of two D.F.Ws. He attacked head on and fired 300 rounds at close range. Enemy aeroplane dived steeply emitting smoke from side of fuselage and was followed down to 7,000 feet, when it burst into flames. Confirmed by Flight Sub-Lieutenant Adam on same patrol.

 

On 30 January 1918, when on offensive patrol in the vicinity of Greluvely, six enemy scouts were attacked. He singled out one which fell out of control.

 

On 7 July 1917, when on offensive patrol, he attacked two seaplanes off Ostende. In conjunction with other pilots he shot down one which crashed into the sea. The second he attacked himself, and after a short combat, it also crashed into the sea, sinking immediately.

 

On 27 June 1917, when on escort duty, numerous enemy aeroplanes attacked the formation. He attacked one, and when he had fired into it at point blank range, it went down and crashed near Court St.Quentin.

 

On 27 July 1917 [sic], when on patrol at sea he attacked four hostile torpedo carrying seaplanes, one of which was eventually destroyed.

 

There is also some curious correspondence about this award; for some reason his Commanding Officer (Collishaw) seemed to think it should be a Bar to the DSC. The relevant notes are in Public Record Office Air 1/1479/204/36/134). There is an Admiralty Letter dated 21 March 1918 (CW/12379/18) to Senior Officer RNAS, Dunkerque; a copy is sent to Commanding Officer, No.3 (Naval) Squadron on 28 March 1918

 

With reference to your submission of the 10th instant No.908/048 B.G. bringing to your notice the names of:-

 

Acting Flight Commander Leonard Horatio Rochford, RNAS and

 

Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus Glen, RNAS, for great skill and bravery as fighting pilots, I am to acquaint you that the King has been pleased to approve of the award of the Distinguished Service Cross to these officers for their services.

 

This is followed by a letter dated 1 April 1918 from Raymond Collishaw, Commanding Officer, No.3 (Naval) Squadron to the Commanding Officer, 10th Wing, Royal Flying Corps:

 

Herewith copy of Admiralty letter No. CW/12379/18 of 21st March with reference to Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus Glen, RN.

 

On three occasions this officer was recommended for his conspicuous work, the last recommendation being forwarded by Commanding Officer No.4 Wing, RNAS on 12th February 1918, the result of which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

 

With reference to the award by Commander in Chief of Distinguished Service Cross is it possible that this may mean a Bar to the Distinguished Service Cross considering this officer's conspicuous work since he was originally recommended for a decoration.

 

He was wounded by an enemy two-seater which was brought down this side of the lines but owing to shortage of experienced pilots in the squadron he continued flying in spite of his wound.

 

During the recent low flying operations this officer reported most of the useful reconnaissance which was forwarded to First Army Intelligence.

 

GLEN, Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 June 1918.

 

For exceptional gallantry and skill as a Flight Leader when engaging enemy aircraft. He has destroyed or driven down out of control many enemy machines.

 

GLEN, Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917. Public Records Office Air 1/74 has a memo dated 14 April 1917 stating that General Nollet, commanding 36 French Army Corps, has presented awards to several members of No.3 (Naval) Squadron; in this instance the intended recipient was unable to attend. Confirmed as listed in Aeroplane of 2 January 1918. Glen was stated to be receiving the award "with Palm.". The London Gazette of 23 August 1919 again listed him as having received the Croix de Guerre with Palme. Could it be possible that the award of 1919 was simply a re-gazetting of the 1917 award ? Public Records Office Air 1/74 also has a copy of Order No.4505D, signed by General R. Rivelle, which lists many RNAS officers of No.3 (N) Wing being cited; text also given in Public Record Office Air 1/113/15/39/36.

 

A excut, comme pilote, sept expditions de bombardement importantes en territoire ennemi.

 

GLEN, Flight Lieutenant James Alpheus - Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 August 1919. Reportedly for assisting the French Army at Verdun by bombing raids. See above entry.

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GODFREY, 2nd Lieutenant Albert Earl - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1917. Home in Vancouver; served in CEF. As Armourer Sergeant, 1st Canadian Pioneers he transferred to RFC, 28 August 1916 as 2nd Lieutenant; appointed Flying Officer (Observer), 28 October 1919. Served in No.10 Squadron and then No.25 Squadron (October through December with the latter). To Home Establishment, 2 January 1917. Trained as pilot; with No.40 Squadron, 2 May to 14 September 1917; with No.44 (Home Defence) Squadron, 27 September 1917 to 31 January 1918; with No.143 (Home Defence) Squadron, 1-14 February 1918; with No.78 (Home Defence) Squadron, 14 February to April 1918. To Canada, 20 April 1918; promoted to Major, 23 September 1918; to home Establishment, 27 January 1919; to No.123 Squadron, June 1919. Died in Kingston, Ontario, 1 January 1982. Very distinguished RCAF career including trans-continental flights, senior staff appointments, and being the most senior ranking RCAF officer ever to fire on the enemy during the Second World War. For recollections of McKee Flight (1926) see Fall 1976 issue of Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society. See obituary and brief biography in Spring 1982 issue, Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in consistently attacking hostile machines at close range, regardless of personal risk or of their being in superior numbers.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation forwarded by 1st Brigade, Royal Flying Corps on 12 June 1917:

 

For consistent devotion to duty and gallantry, particularly on the following occasions:-

 

On 7 June 1917 when on offensive patrol near Lille he saw a hostile machine diving to attack another Nieuport from behind. He immediately made for the enemy machine, fired into it at very close range, and brought it down completely out of control.

 

On 5 June 1917 near Vitry with other Nieuports, he attacked one of a formation of nine hostile machines, and brought it down apparently out of control.

 

On 3 June 1917 near Lens, he attacked three German machines in quick succession, and shot one down out of control.

 

On 1 June 1917, he had several combats in the vicinity of Lens, and in the course of one, drove a hostile machine down in a very steep dive.

 

On 28 May 1917, near Douai, he brought an enemy machine down completely out of control.

 

GODFREY, Captain (Acting Major) Albert Earl - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.

 

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GONYON, Captain Harold Harrison - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. Born in Chatham, 6 May 1896. Home in Wallaceburg, Ontario or Chatham, Ontario (electrical engineer); acquired ACA No.518, 28 June 1916 following trials at Curtiss School, Newport News, Virginia; joined Royal Naval Air Service in Ottawa, 30 June 1916 as Probationary Sub-Lieutenant. Dover Seaplane Station, 2 January 1917; to Dover Seaplane Station, 19 February 1917; to Dunkirk Seaplane Station, 14 July 1917; with No.217 Squadron, 18 January to 22 July 1918 (wounded 30 May 1918); to Home Establishment, 22 July 1918 and then to No.233 Squadron.

 

On 3 April 1918 he was on an anti-submarine patrol of DH.4s. Captain Gonyon and Lieutenant Brown on special mission, observed (at 1610 hours) enemy submarine with conning tower awash at position ten miles north of Dunkirk. Gonyon released one 230-pound bomb from 700 feet which hit just ahead of conning tower. Submarine disappeared and quantities of air bubbles and oil were observed. He dropped another 230-pound and Lieutenant Brown his 230-pound bombs on same position. Having rebombed their machines, they returned; where they had bombed they observed two large patches of oil and a floating spar. Four 230-pound bombs were dropped on the position by other machines. An RAF report stated that an enemy submarine had been destroyed - "There appears to be no doubt."

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/107/15/9/287 has a recommendation for an AFC drafted at No.233 Squadron, Dover and dated 1 February 1919. It misspells his name as "Gonyou", as does the London Gazette when reporting his DFC. The document gives his appointment as Officer Commanding, No.491 Flight and Adjutant of the station. The specific recommendation was as follows:

 

This officer returned from France on July 20th, 1918, and from then until the present day has been untiring in his efforts on submarine and mine patrols on DH.9 machines. Not only has he kept up his flying and shown a good example in the air but also does a great amount of work on the ground when he might [be] resting. His work at this station alone without counting the last 2 1/2 months in France is sufficient to warrant an award. He has always set a very good example to his fellow officers and as a Flight Commander and leader few equal him. His work in the air and on the ground always deserves the highest praise.

 

Public Record Office Air 1/74 has a report on him dated 23 August 1918:

 

This officer has been on active service since October 1917. He was attached to the Seaplane Stations at Dover and Dunkerque, and latterly has served with the De Havilland Anti-Submarine Squadron. He has continuously shown evidence of his courage as a fighting pilot, and his efficiency as an officer. He is thoroughly recommended to command a squadron.

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GOODERHAM, Flight Lieutenant Grant Armstrong - Mention in Despatches - awardedas per London Gazette dated 12 May 1917. Born in Toronto, 8 January 1892; home there (civil engineer); educated at University of Toronto passed tests at Toronto Curtiss School, 12 July 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, 13 July 1915. At Chingford, 8 August 1915; at Whitley Bay Air Station, 17 September 1915 (flew anti-submarine and airship patrols); to No.1 Wing, Dunkirk, 29 April 1916; to Dover, 7 June 1916; to Air Department, N.A.D., 17 March 1917; to No.55 TDS, 7 November 1918; to unemployed list, 9 April 1919; drowned in Toronto Bay, 2 May 1919. NOTE: All the awards credited him are also questioned, as he seems to have spent a great deal of time on sick leave; much of his time also seems to have been on instructional and technical work. Diligent search of London Gazettes for 1917-1919 confirms none of his awards. Nevertheless, a memo dated 25 April 1917 (found in Public Records Office Air 1/74) lists a number of awards (including the DSCs to P.S. Fisher and D.A.H. Nelles, gazetted 12 May 1917) and provides the following citation:

 

For consistently good work for the last ten months in carrying out coastal reconnaissances and fighter patrols, for our own and French machines.

 

GOODERHAM, Flight Lieutenant Grant Armstrong - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 November 1917.

 

GOODERHAM, Flight Lieutenant Grant Armstrong - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 March 1918.

 

GOODERHAM, Captain Grant Armstrong - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

GOODERHAM, Captain Grant Armstrong - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.

 

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GOODRICH, 2nd Lieutenant Frank Edward - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1916. Born in Hallowell, Maine, he served with 15th Battalion, CEF, and was gassed and shot, 23 April 1915. Recuperating, he attended Hall School at Hendon, gaining Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1623 on 20 August 1915. To be 2nd Lieutenant (on Probation) with RFC, 10 September 1915; graded Flying Officer, 7 December 1915. Appointed Flight Commander and Temporary Captain, 6 August 1916. Killed in action with No.60 Squadron, 12 September 1916. Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent from 1st Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, 10 March 1916.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill. He has shown exceptional keenness as a pilot from December 15th to March 1916. He did very well on February 21st when he succeeded in bringing his machine down safely, after both rudder and elevator controls had been shot away.

* * * * *

 

GORDON, F/L James Lindsay - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917. Born 11 December 1892; student at McGill when he applied for RNAS, August 1915. Attended Wright School, Dayton, and obtained ACA Certificate No.366, 8 December 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 18 January 1916; sailed on 18 January 1916; to Chingford, 3 February 1916; to Cranwell, 20 May 1916; to Felixstowe, 3 July 1916. Commanded No.232 Squadron, No.4 Group, Southeast Area, 1 June 1918 to 28 February 1919.

 

GORDON, F/L James Lindsay - Silver Medal for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea - awarded on the recommendation of the President of the Board of Trade, announced in The Aeroplane, 27 March 1918; with F/S/L George Ritchie Hodgson, Leading Mechanic (E) Sydney Framcis Anderson, and Wireless Telegraphist (A.M.II) Bertram Harley Millichamp, "in recognition of their services in rescuing two mem from an upturned float in the North Sea on May 29th last."

 

GORDON, Captain (Acting Major) James Linday - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. No citation, but C.A.P. says:

 

A pilot of great experience, initiative and skill. Has led formations over the seas and attacked with success enemy aircraft in their own area. Captain Gordon has been instrumental in saving life in disabled seaplanes on several occasions, and whenever any arduous duty has to be done, he is always to the fore to carry it out.

 

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GORDON, 2nd Lieutenant R.B. - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 April 1919. Home in Montreal; originally a Bombadier in CEF, Canadian Artillery, to RAF on 19 July 1918 as observer. To North Russia, 7 November 1918. Card says that he was with ELOPE with Shrive and refers one to "Shrive material". Cited with 2nd Lieutenant G.R. Moffoot (Murmansk).

 

These officers displayed conspicuous gallantry in a recent bombing raid. While so engaged their engine was hit, and the machine eventually crashed. Climbing out, they removed the Lewis gun and set fire to the machine. Before they could make sure that the machine was fully alight they heard parties of the enemy approaching, and they escaped into the woods. After wandering about for two days they met a friendly hunter, who conducted them to our outposts. On reaching our lines these officers had to be admitted to hospital suffering from frost-bitten feet. A fine example of courage and determination.

 

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GORDON, Captain Thomas Grove - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 December 1917. Born in UK and next-of-kin in Dorset. Railway surveyor in Canada before the war. Joined 31st Regiment, British Columbia Horse (Headquarters in Merritt, British Columbia), 15 August 1914; to Lord Strathcona Horse, while at Valcartier; sailed overseas, 7 October 1914; to France, May 1915; wounded 6 August 1915; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 2 February 1916; to UK, 16 November 1916; served in No.10 Squadron, 1 June 1916 to 7 November 1917; to No.6 AA Park, 7 November 1917 (Equipment Officer). In 1922 was a Squadron Leader in RAF at Lee-on-Solent.

 

GORDON, Captain Thomas Grove - Member, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. For services with Independent Force. A letter dated 1 July 1919 (Public Record Office Air 1/1839/204/208/20) states that he was at that date serving with 9th Aircraft Park, 9th Brigade. Public Record Office Air 1/1155/204/5/2441 (MG.40 D.1 Volume 20) has a recommendation (undated) describing him as Equipment Officer, Headquarters, 9th Wing; this might be for either the MiD or MBE:

 

For conspicuous keenness and devotion to duty. He has fully realized that the success of the squadrons in the Wing is largely dependant on the efficient supply of equipment material, and has spared himself nothing in his endeavours to satisfy their wants. No hours are too long for him and he is always ready to assist in any difficulties.

 

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GORRINGE, Captain Frank Clifton - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 March 1918. Home in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan; served in 5th Battalion, CEF. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 16 January 1917. Graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 26 May 1917. Served as observer in No.43 Squadron, early 1917, No.70 Squadron as pilot (1917-1918) and No.210 Squadron as pilot (late 1918).

 

GORRINGE, Captain Frank Clifton - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

During recent operations this officer was conspicuous for his gallantry and initiative in attacking enemy troops, transport, etc., notably on November 9th when, locating certain enemy troops dug in, he attacked them from 50 feet altitude, causing numerous casualties. He then landed close behind our infantry and informed them of the enemy's position.

 

Public Record Office Air 1/1696/204/122/13 has a document submitted on 9 November 1918 by the Commanding Officer, No.210 Squadron, to his superiors, recommending Gorringe "for such award as you may think fit". It is a remarkable description of his activities.

 

On 9th November 1918, while on offensive patrol, Captain Gorringe landed near Headquarters, 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery who asked him to ascertain the position of enemy troops and inform them. They also stated that they were very short of food and that they had had nothing to eat for 12 hours. Captain Gorringe then flew east and located the enemy dug in on the outskirts of Elesmes. Seeing infantry advancing south of Goegnies Chaussee, he landed just behind them but discovered that they were enemy troops. These opened fire on him with rifles and his machine was hit. He immediately took off again. Immediately afterwards he saw about 50 enemy infantry just outside Goegnies Chaussee and fired 200 rounds at them from 50 feet. The enemy scattered into the village. Several casualties were observed. A Camel of No.3 Squadron participated in this attack. Just after this, Captain Gorringe landed behind our advancing infantry and gave them the location of the enemy as above. Later in the day he landed again at 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery and informed them that the enemy were holding a line of rifle pits and machine gun posts on western outskirts of Grand Reng and north of that village. He also brought back the location of our own front line which was given him by Officer in Charge of some of our front line troops. When landing, he damaged his two lower planes by running into a hedge.

 

On 8th November 1918, whilst on Offensive Patrol, Captain Gorringe reported a large number of horse transport on main road running east at Sheet 51, Q.17 and 18 and R.13 central, at least 100 wagons. Also a large number of infantry, approximately 2,000, and horse transport on road running east from Maubeuge to Boussels. Also a large amount of transport and approximately 500 troops in village of Blaregnies and road at Sheet 51, D.16a. These were engaged with machine gun fire from about 30 feet, and a large number of casualties must have been caused. Captain Gorringe afterwards landed near the Guards Brigade Headquarters at approximately Sheet 51, P.1 and reported the approximate line and movement of enemy troops going east from Maubeuge. Later, he landed again at approximately Sheet 51, C.21 and reported the movement of enemy troops in Blaregnies to Headquarters, 59th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery who gave orders to open fire on the village. He also gave them the approximate line.

 

On 6th November 1918, while on Offensive Patrol, Captain Gorringe fired 400 rounds from 1,000 to 200 feet on a convoy of gun limbers going east on the Bavai-Mons road at Sheet 51, I.20a. Three teams were brought to a standstill and several horses were killed. The personnel took cover in ditches and some casualties were caused. The remainder of the convoy stampeded down the road.

 

On 4th November 1918, while on Offensive Patrol, Captain Gorringe fired 400 rounds from 1,000 to 500 feet on a battery seen retiring along the Wirgnise-St.Waast road at Sheet 51, H.21. Result unobserved. He also dropped four 25-pound bombs from 1,000 feet on horse transport along road at Sheet 51, H.26. One burst was observed within ten yards of a two-horse wagon, other bursts within 50 yards. The horses stampeded. He also fired 200 rounds from 800 feet on troops retiring along road east of Preux-au-Sar. The troops were seen to scatter into ditches.

 

Captain Gorringe previously served as a pilot with No.70 Squadron from 30 October 1917 to 28 February 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross in January 1918 after destroying eight enemy aircraft. Since then he has destroyed a further two enemy aircraft. His total record is:

Enemy aircraft driven down in flames 2

Enemy aircraft crashed, of which one was seen

to explode on reaching the ground 8

10

 

Captain Gorringe is a most keen and conscientious pilot. He has had little opportunity to engage enemy aircraft since coming to this squadron on 25 October 1918, as very few have been seen, but he has done exceptionally good work of a different nature and has shown the greatest initiative, courage and resource.

 

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GOUDIE, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Norman - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Kamloops, British Columbia (land surveyor); served in 28th (London) regiment. To RFC, 22 April 1916. Appointed Flying Officer (Observer), 22 August 1916. Served with No.34 Squadron (12-30 October 1916), No.21 Squadron (30 October 1916 to 24 July 1917). Trained as a pilot in England; served with No.4 Squadron (25 February to 14 April 1918) and No.5 Squadron (14 April to 13 September 1918. Posted to England; on Unemployed List as of 30 March 1919.

 

Thrice on one date Captain Goudie with another officer carried out at extremely low altitudes and in face of intense rifle and machine-gun fire reconnaissances, observing a party of the enemy holding our infantry, they dived on them and forced them to retire, and on another occasion they bombed a large party of the enemy, causing them to surrender to our infantry.

 

NOTE: Air 1/131/204/13/96 has a more detailed account of his work, as follows:

 

On August 9, 1918, Captain N. Goudie and his observer, 2nd Lieutenant R. McK. Jamison, DFC, at low altitudes observed about 300 infantry massed in a sunken road and offering a strong resistance to our advancing troops. By keeping them under continual machine gun fire, they succeeded in demoralizing the enemy, so much so that they held up a piece of white cloth as a sign of surrender. Captain Gouudie ceased fire but remained in the vicinity until our troops pushed forward and took the enemy prisoners.

 

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GOULDING, Lieutenant Acheson Gosford - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 November 1917. Born 16 May 1893; home in Holland, Manitoba (law student in Winnipeg on enlistment). Served in 17th Reserve Battalion, CEF. Joined RFC at Reading, 18 September 1916; to Egypt, 24 November 1916. Served in No.17 Squadron, 23 February 1917 to 26 April 1918. NOTE: another entry on DHist cards says No.16 Squadron; this should read No.16 Wing. Served in No.150 Squadron, 26 April to 15 November 1918, when posted to Home Establishement. Ceased to be attached to Royal Air Force, 9 April 1919. It is possible that he was twice Mentioned in Despatches about this time for services in Salonika - 25 October and 28 November 1917 - but the card is confusing. The book Over the Balkans and South Russia, p.105, says he took command of "B" Flight, No.150 Squadron, on its formation. No citation other than "for gallant conduct and distinguished services rendered during the past six months". RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 lists a variety of aircraft flown - Shorthorns, Be.2c, BE.2d, BE.2e, BE.12, BE.12a, Nieuport (all types), DH.2, Bistol Monoplane, Morane, Parasol, Camel, SE.5a.

 

GOULDING, Lieutenant Acheson Gosford - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 October 1917; citation published in London Gazette dated 18 March 1918.

 

For conspincous gallantry and devotion to duty. While escorting a bombing squadron, he attacked and drove down a hostile two-seater machine. He showed great determination and gallantry on many other occasions.

 

GOULDING, Captain Acheson Gosford - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service."

 

GOULDING, Captain Acheson Gosford - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918.

 

GOULDING, Captain Acheson Gosford - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1919.

 

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GRAHAM, Lieutenant Stuart - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Wolfville, Nova Scotia (electrician); formerly in CEF; joined RNAS, 14 October 1917. Served at Calshot (5 January 1918 onwards) and Catterwater (23 March 1918 onwards). On unemployed list as of 12 February 1919. Reportedly involved in attack on a submarine. Canada's first bush pilot (June 1919, Laurentide Paper Company). Died 17 July 1976 in Port Charlotte, Florida. See Fall 1976 issue of Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society for obituary/biography. Photocopy of logbook held by National Aviation Museum.

 

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GRAHAME, 2nd Lieutenant James Herbert - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919. Home in Stoney Mountain, Manitoba (student); served in Canadian Cyclists. Joined RFC 10 September 1917 (No.1 OCW); served with No.107 Squadron, 6 June 1918 to 9 March 1919. The following from Air Ministry is not a citation but suggests how he came to his honour: Came out with No.107 Squadron on the 6th of June, 1918, since when he has been engagedd in 25 raids and obtained many direct hits on his objectives. Especially on the 23rd October when on a raid to Hirson railway junction, although late in the afternoon with the visibility very poor through heavy ground mist, this officer obtained two direct hits on the railway, one of which caused a very large fire. Also on the 14th October when bombing Herseaux aerodrome, he obtained two direct hits on a hangar, completely demolishing it. Again on the 25th August, when bombing Somain railway junction, he obtained two direct hits causing considerable dislocation of traffic through Somain station.

 

This officer has taken part in 24 successful bombing raids, and has consistently carried out his duties with the greatest perseverance, courage and skill, obtaining a number of direct hits on the objectives, resulting in serious damge to enemy material.

 

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GRANGE, Flight Lieutenant Edward Rochfort - Croix de Guerre (France) - Public Records Office Air 1/74 states has a memo dated 20 October 1916 stating that Colonel Barres (Commanding French air forces) had conferred the award on Grange effective that day. However, this award not finally gazetted until London Gazette dated 28 February 1922. Born 11 January 1892 in United States; home in Toronto (engineering student at university); passed tests at Toronto Curtiss School, 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, in Ottawa, 30 September 1915; sailed on Athenia from Montreal, 5 October 1915. To No.1 (N) Wing, Dunkirk, January 1916; with No.8 (N) Squadron, attached to 22 Wing, RFC, October 1916; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, October 1916; to Eastbourne, August 1917; appointed Flight Commander, December 1917. Wounded at Bapaume, 7 January 1917. Possibly Mentioned in Despatches, August 1919. A Canadian Air Board examiner in 1921. Air 1/74 carries a copy of No.36 Army Corps, General Order No.30, dated 8 October 1916, citing Sub-Lieutenant S.J. Goble, Sub-Lieutenant E.R. Grange, and Sub-Lieutenant M.B. Galbraith. That for Grange read:

 

Charg le 25 september 1916 d'escorter un appareil au cours d'une mission photographique lointaine, a attaqu un hydravion ennemi au large des cotes. L'appareil ennemi est tomb en vrille dans la mer d'une hauteur de 2,000 mtres.

 

GRANGE, Flight Lieutenant Edward Rochfort - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill on several occasions in successfully attacking and bringing down hostile machines, particularly on the 4th January 1917, when during one flight he had three seperate engagements with hostile machines, all of which were driven down out of control.

 

On the 5th January, 1917, he attacked three hostile machines, one of which was driven down in a nose dive.

 

On the 7th January 1917, after having driven down one hostile machine, he observed two other enemy aircraft attacking one of our scouts. He was on the way to its assistance when he was attacked by a third hostile scout. He was hit in the shoulder by a bullet from this machine, but landed his aeroplane safely in an aerodrome on our side of the lines.

 

* * * * *

GRANT, Lieutenant Stanley A. - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born 28 March 1892; home in Montreal (bank teller). Appointed Probationary Flying Officer, RNAS in Ottawa, 14 March 1917; in England, 26 May 1917; at Calshot (under instruction) as of 18 September 1917; to Dundee, 30 October 1917; to No.2 Wing (Aegean), 1 April 1918; to Composite Park, 29 November 1918. Pilot to F.R. Bicknell when they crashed in Gulf of Xeros, 29 July 1918; note on card says to look at Bicknell file for account of this.

 

* * * * *

 

GRAY, Captain James - Croix de Guerre with Palm (France) - The book University of Toronto Roll of Service credits him with this award, but the DHist card gives no corroborative data. London Gazette dated 22 November 1918 lists a Lieutenant James Gray (West Surrey Regiment) receiving this award; the same man ? Public Record Office Air 1/1838/204/208/13 has a recommendation with identifies him with No.27 Squadron.

 

Cet officier a accompli 42 heures de vol dans zone Francaise prenant part a 13 bombardements et sept vols offensifs a faible altitude au cours de l'un desquel lui et son observateur ont abbattu un appareil ennemi. A toujours t chef de peleton dans toutes les expditions de bombardement.

 

This is accompanied by an English text which translates the above but adds more details:

 

This officer has completed 42 hours service flying in the French area and has taken part in 13 bomb raids and seven low strafs, and on one occasion he and his observer brought down an enemy aircraft our of control. He has obtained several direct hits, including one on the large bridge at Vincelles while artillery was crossing. In all the bomb raids he has been the leader.

 

* * * * *

 

GREEN, Lieutenant Charles Douglas Bremner - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Toronto, Ontario, 14 August 1897. Home in Oakville, Ontario; educated at Model Schools and University of Toronto (1908-1915). In CEF, 1915-1917; appointed Lieutenant, 164th Battalion, 18 January 1916; to England, 11 April 1917; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 15 August 1917; to Central Flying School, 25 September 1917; to No.9 Training Squadron, 24 October 1917; to Egypt and No.193 Training Squadron, 25 October 1917; to No.16 Wing, Salonika, 21 January 1918. Appears to have served with No.150 Squadron from about 1 April to 14 August 1918 (possibly injured); to Home Establishment, 14 August 1918; to No.6 Wing, 14 October 1918; to No.50 TDS, 17 October 1918; to No.2 Canadian Squadron, 29 November 1918; injured in crash, 13 January 1919 (foot injuries; hospitalized three months); to Southeast Area, 23 January 1919; ceases to be seconded to RAF, 15 May 1919. Relinquished commission, 16 May 1919. Married June 1923 and had two sons, one daughter. In business between wars ; joined RCAF, 15 September 1939 and immediately given rank of Flight Lieutenant; attended RCAF School of Administration, June 1940; to No.5 SFTS, Brantford, 10 November 1940; promoted to Squadron Leader 1 August 1941; to No.16 SFTS, Hagersville, 8 August 1941. Died 3 October 1941 following fall from a 2nd storey window, Toronto Military Hospital, where he was receiving treatment for his old food injury. When applying for RCAF he had listed his First World War flying as about 400 hours on "eight or ten types from Graham [sic] Whites to Nieports, Camels, SE.5As."

 

GREEN, Lieutenant Charles Douglas Bremner - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1919. No citation other than "For gallant conduct and distinguished services rendered during the period May 1 to October 1, 1918."

 

GREEN, Lieutenant Charles Douglas Bremner - Croix de Guerre with Palm (France) - awarded effective 10 October 1919. No citation other than "for valuable servuices rendered in connectio with the war."

 

* * * * *

 

GREENE, Captain John Edmund - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. Born 2 July 1892 in Winnipeg; passed tests at Curtiss School, Toronto, December 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, in Ottawa, 19 December 1916. In UK, 18 February 1917; at Cranwell, 9 June 1917; to Dover, 30 July 1917; to Dunkirk, 20 October 1917, joining No.12 (N) Squadron, 22 October 1917. Assigned in November 1917 to Seaplane Defence Squadron, redesignated No.13 (N) Squadron, 15 January 1918. Missing, believed killed, 14 October 1918.

 

GREENE, Captain John Edmund - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919.

 

NOTE: Reference Public Record Office Air 1/74. Although no recommendation has been found for his DFC, the Commanding Officer of No.213 Squadron filed a report on 21 August 1918 recommending him for promotion as follows:

 

This officer has great ability to command and is very trustworthy. He has complete command of his men and understands them thoroughly. In the air his abilities as a leader and fighter cannot be too highly praised. He has been in command of a flight for one month and carried out his duties with complete satisfaction. He is strongly recommended for promotion to the rank of Captain.

 

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GRIFFITH, Lieutenant John Sharpe - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. From Los Angeles, California, joined RFC and trained in Canada, going overseas in late 1917. Subsequently posted to ELOPE Squadron which left Britain for Archangel, September 1918, although he did not join until spring of 1919 (Frank J. Shrive recollections). Seems to have flown Camels in Russia, sometimes with a camera. A hisory of No.60 Squadron says he also received the Order of St.Vladimir, 4th Class. Served in American forces, Second World War, including a party that negotiated USAAF bombing bases in Russia. Died 14 October 1974 in Rivermead, California. For reports of balloon busting see Air 1/1552/204/79/58 in MG.40 D.1 Vol.27.

 

During the last few months this officer has destroyed three enemy aeroplanes and assisted in bringing down a fourth; he has, in addition, driven down two balloons and shot down two machines out of control. Whilst leading his patrol at 11,000 feet altitude he observed three enemy aeroplanes at 2,000 feet; he immediately dived and led his patrol to the attack, destroying two of the machines, one of which he accounted for himself. A gallant and determined officer.

 

GRIFFITH, Flying Officer John Sharpe - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 November 1919.

 

Between May 5th and July 24th, 1919, this officer carried out 40 bomb raids and reconnaissances, all with great success and generally from a low altitude. On June 3rd, 1919, he diven to within 100 feet of the ground and destroyed an enemy balloon, as well as several of its attendants. When a two-seater machine was not readily available he fitted a camera to his scout and although it is very difficult to take photographs from such machines (and, moreover, he was inexperienced in such work), he succeeded in taking a very good mosaic which proved of great utility to the Commander of the Vologda Force. Flying Officer Griffith is an intrepid pilot and a very skilful all-round officer.

 

* * * * *

 

GRIFFITHS, Captain Hugh Bradford - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada. Private, 6 Field Ambulance (Canadian Army Service Corps); to RFC Overseas, 24 October 1916; claimed to have served as a gunner with No.20 Squadron and commissioned after one months probation.

 

GRIFFITHS, Captain Hugh Bradford - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). For services in Canada; no additional details.

 

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GUILD, Lieutenant James Duff - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Manitoba, 10 February 1892. Home in Kemnay, Manitoba (farmer); appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 14 March 1917. In UK, 26 May 1917; to Dundee, 29 November 1917; to Felixstowe, 5 April 1918; to Houton Seaplane Station, 7 November 1918; to Repatriation Camp, 21 April 1919. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished service".

 

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HALLAM, Flight Lieutenant Theodore Douglas - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917. Home in Toronto; attended University of Toronto. Obtained pilot's ticket from Curtiss School, August 1914. Reported to have offered himself and an aircraft to the Admiralty but was refused. Private, Sifton Machine Gun Battery, September 1914; sailed that month with First Canadian Contingent, No.1 Auto Machine Gun Brigade. Attached to RNAS, November 1914 as Sub-Lieutenant, RNVR; to Gallipoli, April 1915, attached to Australians as machine gun officer; afterwards with 29th (British) Division. Wounded, 5 June 1915. Awarded Mention in Despatches, 18 July 1915; and again on 15 June 1916 (the first certainly and the latter probably for Gallipoli services; awarded Distinguished Service Cross, 15 December 1915, "in recognition of his services and signal gallantry in charge of machine guns in the Galipoli Peninsula". To Hendon, August or September 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate in Britain 31 August 1916; On 17 March 1917 he became Officer Commanding, War Flying, Felixstowe Air Station. Promoted to Squadron Commander, December 1917 or January 1918; to Slough, 11 February 1918; to Southeast Area, 25 May 1918; to command Experimental Station, Felixstowe, June 1918 with rank of Major; to No.70 Wing, 7 November 1918. Demobilized July 1919. See War in the Air, Volume 2, p.43. Possibly Mentioned in Despatches, 3 June 1918 (to check).

 

HALLAM, Flight Lieutenant Theodore Douglas - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 June 1917.

 

HALLAM, Flight Lieutenant Theodore Douglas - Second Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917. No citation other than "for services in action with enemy submarines."

 

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HALLONQUIST, Lieutenant (Honourary Captain) Joseph Eskel - Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 13 April 1895. Home in Mision City, British Columbia (CNR clerk in Montreal, July 1912 to December 1915). Served in 19th Reserve Battakion, CEF. To No.1 School of Aeronautics, 25 June 1917; to No.26 Training Squadron, 31 July 1917; to No.73 Squadron, 6 September 1917; to No.7 Brigade, Italy, 19 January 1918; served in No.28 Squadron, 23 January to 29 October 1918 (wounded); invalided to England, 24 November 1918. No citation other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered". RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 listed tyoes flown as Shorthorn, Avro, Sopwith Baby, Pup and Camel.

 

HALLONQUIST, Lieutenant (Honourary Captain) Joseph Eskel - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.

 

This officer at all times displays the highest skill and courage, setting a fine example to other pilots. He has accounted for five enemy machines, and during the rcecent operations, has led four successful bombing patrols at low altitudes.

 

* * * * *

 

HAMLEY, Lieutenant Norman Henry - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919 - Home in Red Deer, Alberta (clerk); served in 9th Canadian Reserve Battalion, CEF; served in No.28 Squadron, 22 April to 1 November 1918. Wounded on 20 August and 1 November 1918; invalided to England on 14 November 1918.

 

This officer is conspicuous for courage and determination. During the recent operations he has led five bombing patrols, attacking, his great success, retreating columns of hostile troops and transport from low altitudes. In addition, on October 29 [1918] he destroyed an enemy machine.

 

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HAND, Captain Earl McNabb - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette No.11259 dated 21 September 1918. Home in Sault Ste.Marie, Ontario. Joined No.71 Squadron, 15 August 1917; to No.73 Squadron, 25 September 1917; served with No.45 Squadron, 20 October 1917 to 30 May or 1 June 1918; possibly with No.28 Squadron from 31 May to 1 June 1918; on 1 June 1918 he was shot down, wounded, and taken prisoner; repatriated 17 November 1918. First president of Toronto Flying Club; recommended February 1934 for Trans-Canada Trophy (McKee Trophy) for work with National Air Transport Limited (see Department of Transport file 6606-3 held in National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Vol.1009); appointed a magistrate in Toronto, 1950.

 

HAND, Captain Earl McNabb - Distiguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "In recognition of distinguished service."

 

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HANNING, Lieutenant John Edward - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Home in Fredericton, New Brunswick; served with Canadian Engineers. To No.1 School of Military Aeroanutics, 16 July 1917; to Brooklands, 13 August 1917; to France, 9 September 1917; served with No.59 Squadron, 11 September 1917 to 11 April 1918. Returned to Britain; posted to Canada, 30 June 1918; served as instructor, No.4 School of Aeronautics.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When as observer on patrol he was endeavouring to shoot down a hostile balloon, he was at once attacked by a hostile scout. Althoiugh his machine-gun was on two occasions put out of action, and though he himself was wounded in the leg, he succeeded in firing a long burst into the enemy machine, the pilot of which collapsed in his seat, his machine spinning to the ground. The controls of his own machine were so badly damaged that his pilot could not fly it. He therefore fitted a dual control, and succeeded in bringing the machine back to our lines and landing it safely. His great courage, skill and determination unboubtedly saved his pilot's life.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has the recommendation as sent from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 31 March 1918.

 

For extreme gallantry and resourcefulness.

 

On 28th March 1918, while on patrol with 2nd Lieutenant Christian as pilot, he endeavoured to shoot down a hostile balloon over Miraumont. His machine was at once attacked by a hostile scout, and after firing 90 rounds his gun jammed. Although wounded in the leg by an explosive bullet, he rectified the trouble, and was about to fit a new drum on the gun when a bullet hit it and destroyed it. The enemy aircraft then dived underneath the tail, did a climbing turn, and again attacked. Lieutenant Hanning again repaired his gun and fired a long burst into the enemy scout. The enemy pilot collapsed in his seat and his machine spun to the ground. The controls of Lieutenant Hanning's machine were, by this time, so damaged that his pilot could not fly it. He, however, fitted the dual control and succeeded in bringing the machine back to our lines and landing it.

 

By his courage and determination, though wounded, Lieutenant Hanning undoubtedly saved the life of his pilot.

 

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HARDING, Lieutenent David Allen - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919 (possibly singled out by General Allenby). Born in Petrolia, Ontario; home in Sarnia; to Egypt, 13 October 1917; to No.195 Training Squadron, 25 April 1918; to No.58 Training Squadron, 27 September 1918; injured 4 October 1918. Later served in RCAF. Died about 13 January 1971 in Montreal; reported to have flown Lawrence of Arabia.

 

HARDING, Lieutenant David Allen - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.

 

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HARRISON, Captain William Leeming - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918. Home in Toronto; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation) with RFC in Canada, 21 November 1916. Trained in England. Served with No.40 Squadron, 15 July 1917 to 10 April 1918 and No.1 Squadron, 10-12 April 1918 when he was wounded. To England, 4 May 1918. DHist card mentions from his letters he reported his squadron had "changed completely three times" with only himself and the Equipment Officer remaining. "On one occasion his engine was shot through when 10,000 feet up. He has nine machines, seven double seaters and two scout planes to his credit, and on March 19th won the Military Cross. What he considers his best achievement was the bringing down of an enemy balloon two miles over the German lines. He is a St.Andrews College boy." Harry Creagen papers at National Aviation Museum give him rank of 2nd Lieutenant and provide the following citation:

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in aerial fighting. He destroyed two enemy machines and drove down others out of control. He always showed a splendid spirit of dash, keenness and tenacity, coupled with determination and skill in attacking enemy aircraft.

* * * * *

 

HARTNEY, Captain Harold Evans - Italian Silver Medal for Military Valour - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 May 1917. Born 19 April 1888 in Pakenham, Ontario; BA, University of Toronto, 1911. Lawyer in Saskatchewan. Briefly in 28th Battalion, CEF. Joined RFC, Norwich, 20 October 1915; No.12 Reserve Squadron, 24 November 1915; No.35 Squadron, 24 April 1916; No.20 Squadron, 15 June 1916 to 14 February 1917 (wounded); had been appointed Flying Officer, 13 June 1916. Transferred to American forces, 1 October 1917. Attached to U.S. Air Service, 1st Pursuit Group as Major, May 1918; Lieutenant-Colonel, Toul Sector, May-June 1918; Chateau Thierry Sector, June-September 1918; 27th Aero Squadron, September 1918; American Expeditionary Force Headquarters, Chaumont, November 1918. Returned to United States, February 1919; to Office of Chief of Air Service; held positions as Chief (Air Training), Acting Chief (Operations), Chief (Civil Affairs). Resigned, October 1921. Other honours reported in University of Toronto Roll of Service are as follows: Croix de Guerre avec Palme (France, 25 June 1918), Chevalier of the Legion of Honour (3 April 1918), Distinguished Service Cross (United States, Fismes, 13 August 1918), Valour Citation (United States, St.Michiel, 12 September 1918) and Meritorious Service Citation (United States, 19 April 1919). Author of memoires, Up and At 'Em. Died 5 October 1945. See Don Mockler, "Colonel Harold E. Hartney", in November 1945 issue of U.S. Air Services.

 

* * * * *

 

HASKELL, Lieutenant Meredith Ogden - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Home in Lachine, Quebec. Proceeded overseas as a gunner, CEF, eary 1915 (reinforcements for First Contingent); commissioned in Royal Field Artillery, 10 December 1915; spent one year with a British division in France; joined RFC as an observer; appointed Lieutenant, RFC, 1 July 1917; later became a pilot. Joined No.6 Squadron as observer on probation, 11 June 1917; joins same squadron (as a pilot ?) on 16 April 1918; joins No.12 Squadron, 1 August 1918.

 

During recent operations this officer has rendered most valuable service in bringing back accurate information as to the position of our lines. In this service he has displayed great keenness and disregard of danger, persevering in face of hostile attacks in the air and heavy fire from the ground.

 

* * * * *

 

HATTON, Honorary Captain and Acting Major A.E. - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). Described as Canadian Engineers. DHist card lists an Honorary Captain A.E. Hatton, Canadian Engineers, attached RAF; with Director of Construction, 29 June 1918 and subsequently with RAF Headquarters.

 

* * * * *

 

*HAWKSFORD, Captain (Acting Major) Francis Henry - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. British officer serving with RFC/RAF Training Program, Canada and Texas, 1917-1918. No citation other than "In recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

* * * * *

 

HEENEY, Pilot Officer Bernard Allen - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 November 1919. Born 13 March 1896; home in Calgary; to UK, March 1917; served in 21st Battalion, CEF; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (Observer), 11 September 1918. With North Russia Expeditionary Force at 7 November 1918. Bullet wounds to right arm and left leg, 20 June (or 20 July ?) 1919; hospitalized 35 days in Archangel and sent to London; returned to Canada by hospital ship, September 1919; as of January 1920 he was still on crutches and in a Calgary military hospital. Relinquished commission, 26 September 1919.

 

During the entire winter in North Russia this observer officer flew almost continuously over the enemy's lines on reconnaissance duties, under very arduous and dangerous circumstances. Pilot Officer Heeney was severely wounded on June 20th, 1919 whilst flying very low, assisting our Allied troops.

 

* * * * *

 

HELWIG, 2nd Lieutenant Norman William - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Born 22 December 1898; home in Hanover, Ontario (accountant, furniture company, 1911-1915); apparently commissioned in CEF, 18 November 1915; from CEF to RFC, Reading, 11 February 1918; to No.1 School of Aerial Gunnery, 25 February 1918; served in No.18 Squadron, 19 April to 27 September 1918 (missing, prisoner of war); repatriated 3 December 1918. RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 noted, "Since joining RFC flown DH,4, AW, Bristol Fighter and usual tests".

 

This officer has taken part in thirty-eight bomb raids , twelve photographic flights and nineteen reconnaissances. In all these his success has been marked, due to his keen power of observation and intense devotion to duty. He has on several occasions been specially recommended by the Army Intelligence Staff for his good photographic work and useful reconnaissance reports.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/204/36/127 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, First Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 19 August 1918.

 

For the most conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty which he has shown when taking part in 38 successful bomb raids, twelve successful photographic flights and 19 reconnaissances.

 

He is a most efficient and keen observer and is a splendid example to others. He has, on two or three occasions, been congratulated by Army Intelligence for his good photographic work and useful reconnaissance work.

On 1 July 1918 and 2 July 1918 in two flights of about three hours each he took successful photographs with a 20-inch camera of every hostile aerodrome in the Army area, the total number exceeding 40.

 

On 14 August 1918 he took part in the successful raid on Marqmain aerodrome, carrying out his work with determination and obtaining excellent results.

 

On 31 July 1918 during a flight lasting three and one-quarter hours he covered 25 pin points with 25 plates.

 

On 1 August 1918 he took part in a successful bomb raid on Marqmain aerodrome.

 

On 12 August 1918 he bombed Somain twice obtaining direct hits on the station on each occasion.

 

* * * * *

 

HENSHAW, Captain Albert Goodess - Air Force Cross - London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. Born 29 April 1894; home in England; educated at Blundell's School, Tiverton, Devon, 1908-1912; enlisted in CEF in Sarnia, 24 October 1914; with 18th Battalion, CEF as a Corporal sailed to England, 24 June 1915. To RFC, Reading, 8 February 1916; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.2781, 24 April 1916; to No.3 RS, 26 April 1916; to 40 Reserve Squadron, 24 May 1916; graded Flying Officer, 26 June 1916; to No.28 Squadron, 27 June 1916; to No.20 Squadron, 28 June 1916; to No.16 Squadron, 29 August 1916; hospitalized, 17 October 1916; to Home Administration Wing, 26 January 1917; to SARD, 3 February 1917; to Hendon, 9 July 1917; to Air Ministry (uncertain); at No.2 Aircraft Acceptance Park, 7 November 1918. National Archives of Canada RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 has notes. Many times ill from October 1916 to spring of 1918 and graded fit only for ground duties as of 14 May 1918. Described as having a "fair engineering knowledge" and to have flown "all tpes of machines, also German types."

 

* * * * *

 

HERVEY, Flight Commander Gerald Essex - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1917. Born 6 October 1891 in Stratford, Ontario; home in Calgary or Edmonton (accountant); began training at Carr Aviation School; when it folded he enrolled in Curtiss School, Toronto, 1915; passed tests in September 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 20 September 1915; booke to sail on Athenia from Montreal, 5 October 1915; No.1 Wing, Dunkirk, 15 February 1916; No.5 Wing, Coudekerque, 15 April 1916; served with No.8 (N) Squadron, 25 October 1916 to 5 March 1917; with No.9 (N) Squadron, 5 March to 30 June 1917; at Dover Aeroplane Station, 17 July 1917; at No.23 TDS, 27 November 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in air fights and bombing raids. On August 22, 1917, he attacked a formation of ten hostile aircraft engaged in a raid on England and brought one of them down into the sea.

* * * * *

 

HICKEY, Lieutenant Charles Robert Reeves - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918. Born in Nanaimo, British Columbia, 10 September 1897; home in Parksdale, British Columbia (student). Joined Canadian Mounted Rifles, 16 March 1916; overseas with 11th Canadian Mounted Rifles, June 1916; to RNAS, 4 February 1917; Vendome, 19 March to 23 May 1917; Cranwell, 28 May to 1 July 1917; Dover, 23 July 1917; with No.4 (Naval) Squadron, 30 July 1917 to 3 October 1918 (killed in flying accident).

 

He has been engaged in numerous air battles with marked success during a period of twelve months.

 

On a recent occasion he flew to the assistance of one of our machines which was being pressed by two enemy machines and succeeded in destroying one of them.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/109/15/9/294 has considerable documentation respecting this award. The first is a Combat Report for an action on 12 June 1918 (3.30 p.m., Camel C.74, escorting DH.4s, height from 14,000 down to 1,000 feet, in the areas of Coxyde and Nieuport). Enemy aircraft described as "Six Pfalz Scouts painted yellow fuselage, sky blue underside of planes. Armament two Spandua Maxims." His own narrative read:

 

While travelling towards Middelkerke from Ghistelees at 18,000 feet, we observed one enemy aeroplane off Middelkerke, three enemy aeroplanes higher up off Nieuport and two more attacking a DH.4 off Coxyde at about 14,000 feet. I turned left and dived towards the two latter enemy aeroplanes, opening fire at about 100 yards. Enemy aeroplane turned and dived towards Nieuport and I followed close on his tail. Enemy aeroplane apparently hit by my first burst as all he did to evade my fire was to side slip. I kept firing intermittent bursts taking careful aim each time. When at 1,000 feet off Nieuport Piers, I closed on enemy aeroplane and fired a long burst at very close range. Enemy aeroplane dropped vertically and caught fire on the right hand side of his cockpit. In a few seconds its fire had spread and machine fell into the sea. One plane floated for a few minutes but shortly nothing remained on the surface. Altogether I fired 450 rounds.

 

A form dated 15 June 1918 states he had been confirmed in rank as Lieutenant with effect from 19 June 1917, and that he had spent 10 months at Dunkirk. The recommendation read:

 

For courage and skill while on patrol near Middelkerke on 14th June 1918 when he attacked two enemy aeroplanes which were attacking a DH.4, one of which he shot down in flames. Since July 1917 he has certainly destroyed two other enemy machines and has driven down three others out of control.

 

Accompanying this is another statement dated 15 June 1918 (General Officer, 5th Group, Royal Air Force to Vice-Admiral, Dover Station):

 

In accordance with Admiralty letter M/07302/17 dated 2nd July 1917, Lieutenant Charles Robert Reeves Hickey is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

In addition to the incident mentioned, Lieutenant Hickey has done continual good work since 30th July 1917. On 21st April 1918, he shot down a two-seater hostile aeroplane at Wulpen. He landed alongside to prevent pilot from burning machine and was burnt when enemy aeroplane blew up as a result of a timed infernal machine. His first flight on return from hospital, he shot down another enemy aeroplane over Ostende which was confirmed by the remainder of the formation. In addition, he has shot down out of control three other enemy machines, besides participating in many decisive combats.

 

HICKEY, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Charles Robert Reeves - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.

 

A very determined air fighter who has destroyed seven enemy machines and brought down nine completely out of control during the past three months. His skill and initiative as a flight commander have made his flight very successful. Last month he destroyed two machines and brought down two more out of control in one day, and the remainder of his flight, at the same time succeeded in dispersing several more enemy aircraft without sustaining any casualties.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/74 has a report by Major E.W. Norton, Commanding Officer, No.204 Squadron. It is not dated but bears a 5 Group stamp dated 21 August 1918. It describes Hickey thus:

 

A fighting pilot with a very good record. Keen on his work and a very determined fighter. Good disciplinarian. Was in charge of Squadron Headquarters for three months and the production of work under his command was very satisfactory.

 

FURTHER NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/107/15/9/287 has recommendation dated 18 September 1918. This adds a few details to the published citation:

 

Since being recommended in June last for award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, this officer has destroyed seven enemy machines and driven nine down completely out of control and has been engaged in ten indecisive combats. His skill and devotion to duty have made his flight very successful. On 16 September 1918 while leading his flight he destroyed two and drove down two enemy machines, his flight getting several Huns down and sustaining no casualties.

 

* * * * *

 

HICKS, Lieutenant Ernest Dorland - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 September 1916. Home in Winnipeg (postal inspector); served at 2nd Lieutenant, 11th (Reserve) Canadian Infantry Battalion, CEF; appointed Flying Officer, 17 June 1916 (whether pilot or observer not clear); with No.23 Squadron, 25 June to 1 August 1916; with No.27 Squadron, 1 August to 8 September 1916 (wounded, petrol burns). To Headquarters, Brigade Wing, 31 May 1917; attachment to RFC terminated.

 

For conspicuous skill and gallantry. He brought down two enemy machines and attacked and drove back over their lines three others. On one occasion he came down to 800 feet and bombed trains. On another he came down to 300 feet and dropped bombs on a station.

 

* * * * *

 

HILBORN, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) William Carroll - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918. Home in Alexandia, Caribou District, British Columbia; to "B" Squadron, Central Flying School, 15 August 1917; to No.2 ASD, 4 November 1917; in No.66 Squadron, 10 November 1917 to 2 August 1918; No.28 Squadron, 2-13 August 1918; No.45 Squadron, 13-16 August 1918 (hospitalized); to No.24 SCS, France, 25 August 1918; died of wounded, 26 August 1918.

 

An excellent patrol leader who on all occasions displays courage, endurance and skill. He has accounted for six enemy aircraft.

 

* * * * *

 

HILTON, 2nd Lieutenant D'Arcy Fowlis - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 December 1917. Accepted as RFC candidate in Canada and appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), 21 November 1916. Served in No.29 Squadron, 7 July to 14 November 1917 (hospitalized and sent to Home Establishment); to No.42 Wing, 19 September 1918; to Headquarters, 20 December 1918; to Home Establishment, 27 January 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in attacking enemy aircraft and engaging troops on the ground. While on patrol he attacked single-handed six two-seater machines, forcing one down and driving the rest back. He has driven down five other machines.

 

HILTON, Lieutenant D'Arcy Fowlis - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 April 1918.

 

HILTON, Captain D'Arcy Fowlis - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919.

 

HILTON, Captain D'Arcy Fowlis - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

HINTON, Lieutenant Alfred Hyde - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919. Born 20 June 1896; home in Winnipeg (mechanical engineering student, McGill University, 1914-1915). Served in Canadian Field Artillery, CEF; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 15 March 1917; to Brooklands, 30 March 1917; overseas 27 April 1917; to 12 Squadron as Lieutenant (Observer), 28 April to 13 August 1917 when posted to Home Establishment; to Reading, 28 August 1917; to No.68 TS, 1 October 1917; to No.199 Depot Squadron, 13 October 1917; to No.76 Squadron, 24 December 1917; later in No.36 Squadron (no joining date); to No.200 (N) Training Squadron, 29 May 1919; to No.2 FS, 9 June 1919; to Headquarters, Overseas Military Forces of Canada, 27 June 1919; relinquished commission on 28 June 1919. Observer throughout his career; with experience on DH.1, DH.6, BE.2c, BE.12, FE.2b, FE.2d, Bristol Fighter, Armstrong Whitworth machines.

 

HINTON, Lieutenant Alfred Hyde - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.

 

* * * * *

*HOARE, Brigadier-General Cuthbert Gurney - Companion, Order of St.Michael and St.George - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1918. British officer, a pilot since 1911, commanding Royal Flying Corps (later Royal Air Force) Training Program in Canada and Texas, 1917-1918; see S.F. Wise, Canadian Airmen and the First World War.

 

*HOARE, Brigadier-General Cuthbert Gurney - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.

 

* * * * *

 

*HOARE, Major (Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Francis Richard Gurney - Commended by Major-General Salmond - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1918. Brother of Brigadier Cuthbert Hoare; responsible for technical and supply matters relating to establishment of RFC/RAF Training in Canada and Texas, 1917-1918 (see S.F. Wise, Canadian Airmen and the First World War). Ceased to be on strength of RAF/Canada, 21 July 1918. To Home Establishment, 3 February 1919.

 

*HOARE, Major (Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel) Francis Richard Gurney - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. No citation other than "In recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

*HOARE, Lieutenant-Colonel Franicis Richard Gurney - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). For services in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 

HOBBS, F/L Basil Deacon - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917. No citation. Born 20 December 1894; home in Sault Ste. Marie (electrician). Obtained ACA Certificate No.365 at Wright School, Dayton, Ohio, 8 December 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 27 December 1915. At Felixstowe in 1917. For details of his Schneider Cup flying, see Flight, 18 September 1919, page 1244. RCAF pioneer flier in 1924; Second World War Group Captain, awarded OBE.

 

HOBBS, F/L Basil Deacon - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917. No citation other than "For services in action with enemy submarines".

 

HOBBS, F/L Basil Deacon - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917. No citation.

 

HOBBS, F/L Basil Deacon - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1917.

 

HOBBS, F/L Basil Deacon - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917.

 

* * * * *

 

HOBBS, 2nd Lieutenant Thomas Godwin - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Born 18 September 1888 at Gosport, Hants. Educated at Oxford; took up farming in Canada, March 1909. Joined Winnipeg Rifles, October 1914; overseas as Private, February 1915. Contracted trench fever, malaria and rheumatism, spending much of his time in hospital from autumn 1915 onwards. To RFC as 2nd Lieutenant, 19 December 1917; qualified as pilot, May 1918; to front, 12 June 1918; died of wounds, 23 August 1918 (wounded by AA fire, he managed to force-land on of side of lines and save his observer, though he had use only of his left arm). Unit not given on cards.

 

A skilful and gallant officer. On 21st August this officer did six hours flying. He was twice attacked by large formations of enemy aeroplanes, but on each occasion, by skilful manoeuvre and resolute fighting he drove them off and continued his patrol, bringing back much valuable and accurate information. On the same day he attacked enemy transport, causing great confusion and inflicting heavy casualties.

 

* * * * *

 

HODGSON, Captain George Ritchie - Board of Trade Silver Medal for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea - awarded on the recommendation of the President of the Board of Trade, announced in The Aeroplane, 27 March 1918; with F/L James Lindsay Gordon, Leading Mechanic (E) Sydney Francis Anderson, and Wireless Telegraphist (A.M.II) Bertram Harley Millichamp, "in recognition of their services in rescuing two men from an upturned float in the North Sea on May 29th last." awarded effective 29 May 1917; presented at Buckingham Palace, 4 September 1918. Born 12 October 1893; home in Montreal (student). First Canadian to win two gold Olympic medals (400 metre and 1,500 metre swims, Stockholm, 1912). Awarded ACA Certificate No.32, 18 August 1915 (Thomas School); appointed Probational Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS, Ottawa, 18 January 1916. To Chingford, 18 January 1916; to Felixstowe, 16 June 1916; to Southeast Area, 1 June 1918; at Catforth Seaplane Station, 12 August 1918; to No.210 Training Depot Station, 2 October 1918; to Shorncliffe, 10 January 1919; on unemployed list, 22 January 1919. Died 1983.

 

HODGSON, Captain George Ritchie - Mention in Despatches - London Gazette dated 1 October 1917 for patrol duties in home waters.

 

HODGSON, Captain George Ritchie - Air Force Cross - London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.

 

* * * * *

 

HOIDGE, 2nd Lieutenant Reginald Theodore Carlos - Military Cross - London Gazette dated 18 July 1917. Born 1897. Home in Toronto (student, University of Toronto); commissioned in Royal Garrison Artillery, 1 January 1916; served to 14 August 1916 on Thames and Medway defences. To RFC, 14 August 1916; to No.43 Squadron in UK, 15 November 1916, as Flying Officer and 2nd Lieutenant (on probation); with No.56 Squadron, France, 5 January to 19 November 1917; to Home Establishment, 18 November 1917 as instructor of fighting; injured in aero accident, 19 February 1918; to France and No.1 Squadron, 25 September 1918 to 29 March 1919. To Dover, 29 March 1919; to Southeast Area for disposal pending rehabilitation, 4 April 1919.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On many occasions he has attacked and destroyed or driven down hostile machines, and has taken part in twenty-four offensive patrols. In all combats he bravery and skill have been most marked.

 

HOIDGE, 2nd Lieutenant Reginald Theodore Carlos - Bar to Military Cross - London Gazette dated 27 October 1917; citation published in London Gazette dated 18 March 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in shooting down fourteen enemy aircraft in three and a half months. After attacking a large formation of enemy aircraft, owing to engine trouble he was driven down to six hundred feet at least five miles from our lines, but managed to recross the lines at a height of five hundred feet, and so saved his machine.

 

* * * * *

 

HOLLAND, Lieutenant Hubert Lee - Military Cross - London Gazette dated 18 September 1918 - Home in Toronto; served in CEF (Canadian Reserve Cycling Company); Lieutenant, 13 July 1915; arrived in England, 27 May 1916; seconded to RFC as Lieutenant, 30 June 1917; promoted to Captain, 18 April 1918; reverted to Lieutenant, 1 April 1919; with Canadian Air Force, 28 November 1918 to 12 November 1919 and then 18 February 1920 onwards. Under training, 30 June 1917 to 19 January 1918 (No.31 TS, 14 August to 10 September 1917; No.62 TS, 11 September to 6 November 1917; No.16 TS, 7 November to 17 December 1917; Infantry and Artillery School, 18 December 1917 to 18 January 1918); to Italy, 19 January 1918; to No.51 Wing, No.34 Squadron, 23 January 1918 to 7 October 1918; to Home Establishment, 11 October 1918; to No.27 TDS, 12-27 November 1918; with No.123 Squadron RAF (No.2 Squadron, CAF), 28 November 1918 to 11 November 1919. National Archives of Canada RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 suggests a connection to P.B. Joubert de la Ferte, and that officer's memoires may provide some detail.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when working with artillery in carrying out six successful shoots whereby many enemy guns pits were destroyed and explosions caused. In one case he descended to 100 feet and found all pits totally destroyed. He carried out a good low reconnaissance of two suspected hostile batteries and also obtained other very useful information.

 

* * * * *

 

HOLLEY, Captain Thomas Gifford - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919. Born in Canada; home in Winnipeg; overseas with CEF, 1st Contingent; transferred from 13th Battalion to RFC, 15 January 1917; missing, POW, 2 February 1917; repatriated via Dover, 13 December 1918; returned to Canada and struck off strength, 9 January 1919. Award one of many "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

* * * * *

 

HOLLIDAY, Lieutenant Fred Parkinson - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1917. Born in Melbourne, Australia, 20 February 1888; educated at Brighton Grammar School and Brighton Technical College, England; moved to Canada before the war; electrical and mechanical engineer in Toronto, 1910-1914, employed by Swedish General Electric. Enlisted 23 September 1914 as sapper, 2nd Field Company, Canadian Engineers, Toronto; overseas with first contingent. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 28 November 1915; graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 10 March 1916; confirmed as Flying Officer (Observer), 29 November 1916 with seniority from 10 March 1916; to No.4 Squadron (observer on probation), 15 December 1915 to 3 August 1916 (confirmed qualified as observer, 28 January 1916); to Home Establishment, 3 August 1916; to Oxford, 7 August 1916; to No.7 Reserve Squadron for elementary instruction in flying, 22 September 1916; to No.38 Reserve Squadron for higher instruction, 21 October 1916; to No.48 Squadron (as Flying Officer), 29 November 1916 (proceeded to British Expeditionary Force, 17 March 1917); appointed Temporary Lieutenant "whilst serving with the Royal Flying Corps", 1 January 1917; graded as Flight Commander and promoted Temporary Captain "whilst so employed", 15 June 1917; to Home Establishment, 1 August 1917; with No.86 Squadron, 19 September 1917 to 8 January 1918; graded as Squadron Commander and to be Temporary Major "whilst so employed", 8 January 1918; to Headquarters, Western Group, 8 January 1918 "Special Appointment, Squadron Commander"; confirmed as Captain, Royal Air Force, 1 April 1918; to Headquarters, Midlands Area, 17 June 1918 as "Area Examining Officer"; to No.95 Squadron, 31 October to 23 November 1918. To School of Special Flying, Gosport, 23 November 1918 to 27 March 1919; sent to United States for duties in connection with Victory Loan drives; available for disposal, 7 August 1919; to unemployed list, 3 September 1919. Relinquished commission and permitted to retain rank of Major, 1 September 1921. He subsequently reported that he had flown 2,300 hours during the war and that his duties had included ferrying German aircraft from France to England after the Armistice. Public Records Office Air 76 indicate he was confirmed as Captain and Flight Commander, 9 July 1917 and as Temporary Major, 20 March 1918 (these dates are at variance with a Record of Service on his RCAF file). Undated note on record says, "Since joining RFC machine flown: Bristol Fighter, Sopwith Camel, Sopwith Scout, Sopwith Dolphin, Avro, BE.5, RE.8, DH.6, SE.5; Wireless Telephone Course, Gunnery." Returned to employ of Swedish General Electric Limited. Appointed to commission in RCAF, Non-Flying List (C1312), 18 September 1939 in Ottawa with immediate promotion to Flight Lieutenant; shortly afterwards promoted to Squadron Leader with seniority from 18 September 1939. Initially on strength of No.1 Training Command, Toronto; to No.12 Technical Detachment, Toronto, 14 March 1940; promoted Wing Commander, 1 November 1940; to Experimental Flight, Rockcliffe, 9 November 1940 (Officer Commanding of the Flight, subsequently renamed Test and Development Establishment)); to Station Gander, Newfoundland, 24 May 1941. Appointed to command No.10 Repair Depot, Calgary, 18 December 1941. Promoted Group Captain, 1 June 1942. Retired 13 March 1945.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. In company with another pilot he attacked five hostile aircraft, setting one on fire, driving down another out of control, and dispersing the remainder. He has previously done fine work, bringing down eight hostile machines in all.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent on 14 May 1917 from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, which has more detail:

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

On the 9th May, in company with his patrol, this officer with Captain Wall as observer, drove down and crashed, after descending to 1,500 feet, a hostile two-seater machine near Vitry.

 

Again, on the same day while leading a patrol of three Bristol Fighters, eight hostile aircraft, which were attacking one of our artillery machines, were attacked near Vitry, two being driven down apparently out of control. Anti-aircraft report that this officer's intervention undoubtedly saved the artillery machine.

 

Previously, on the 24th April, he dived down to 1,500 feet while over the enemy lines and destroyed a hostile two-seater machine on artillery cooperation.

 

Previously, on the 23rd April, in company with another Bristol Fighter, he attacked five hostile aircraft, setting one on fire and driving another down out of control, dispersing the rest of the hostile formation.

 

Previously, on the 13th April, he dived to 600 feet to rescue an F.E., the pilot of which was wounded, driving off the hostile machine which was attacking it and allowing it to recross our lines.

 

This officer has invariably set a very dashing ad inspiring example to the other pilots of this squadron. This officer with his observer has destroyed eight hostile machines.

 

HOLLIDAY, Lieutenant Fred Parkinson - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 August 1917. Citation identical to a Bar to MC citation to Temporary Captain A.H.W. Wall.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. By his initiative and skilful maneouvering he led six hostile machines to an encounter with our own formation, during which five of the six hostile machines were destroyed and driven down. He had been equally successful the day before in misleading hostile aircraft, and his originality and fearless example were of the greatest value to his squadron.

 

NOTE: Associated with this award was a Bar to the Military Cross granted to Captain Anthony Herbert William Wall (formerly 17th Middlesex Regiment). Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation by Brigadier J.F.A. Higgins, sent from 3rd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps, on 26 June 1917:

 

Skill and gallantry. On the 15th June Captain Wall was acting as observer to Lieutenant Holliday. These two officers went out alone a long way over the lines to endeavour to act as a decoy to any hostile patrol formation they might encounter and to lead them towards a formation of British machines which was working to the north, by previous arrangement. A formation of six hostile machines was encountered which immediately gave chase. Captain Wall pretended to be trying to adjust his machine gun and did not fire, although the machine was hit several times, until the enemy had been drawn right up to our formation. This latter took the enemy completely by surprise and the ensuing fight resulted in one hostile machine going down in flames, one being seen to crash, and three others going down completely out of control, one of these latter being shot down by Captain Wall. Five out of six German machines were thus accounted for.

 

Previously, on the 14th, Captain Wall while observer to Lieutenant Holliday assisted to crash one hostile machine and bring another down out of control near Arleux, working alone.

 

Since this officer was previously brought to notice of the Army Commander he has assisted Lieutenant Holliday to account for seven hostile machines. His example has been of the greatest value to his squadron.

 

HOLLIDAY, Captain Fred Parkinson - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 December 1917.

 

HOLLIDAY, Major Fred Parkinson - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919. No citation other than "In recognition of distinguished services rendered during the war."

 

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HOME-HAY, Captain Jeffrey Batters - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1917. Born in Alloa, Scotland, 31 January 1888. Educated in Scotland to 1904; apprentice engineer; to Canada about 1908 and farmed at Wadena, Saskatchewan; joined CEF in Winnipeg and went overseas with 1st Contingent as a private, Machine Gun Section, 32nd Battalion. In France with 2nd Battalion, April to 10 December 1915 when he returned to UK and was commissioned and 2nd Lieutenant, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders. To RFC, Reading, 16 May 1916; to 14 Reserve Squadron, 19 June 1916; to No.6 Reserve Squadron, date uncertain; obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate 3209, 10 July 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 30 July 1916; took instruction at Catterick; to No.53 Squadron in UK, August 1916; to France with the unit, 4 January 1917; appointed Flight Commander and Temporary Captain, 7 June 1917; with unit until 15 December 1917 when sent to Home Establishment. To No.105 Squadron, Andover, 4 January 1918; to No.104 Squadron, Azelot, 19 May to 22 August 1918 (shot down on raid and taken prisoner); repatriated 13 December 1918. To No.4 School of Navigation and Bomb Dropping, 20 January 1919; to No.1 School of Navigation and Bomb Dropping, 11 February 1919; also temporary squadron leader of No.106 Squadron (Andover). To Repatriation Camp, Upavon, 10 June 1919. Returned to Canada, June 1919. In 1920s and 1930s he farmed and did Prairie bush flying; also in CAF and RCAF Reserve.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He showed consistent ability and courage in observing for and ranging our artillery on enemy guns and trenches. His accurate information was of the greatest value to our batteries.

 

HOME-HAY, Captain Jeffrey Batters - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1918. Citation in The Aeroplane of 25 September 1918.

 

This officer displayed admirable coolness and resource while leading a raid on an enemy railroad station. His formation was heavily attacked by seven aeroplanes but, keeping it well in hand, he fought his way to his objective; proceeding well over the station, he successfully bombed it. In the course of the severe fighting two hostile machines were shot down out of control, one of which he himself brought down. He has taken part in eight other raids, and his consistent gallantry is a valuable asset in maintaining the morale of his new squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has a letter dated 25 July 1918 from the Lieutenant-Colonel commanding No.41 Wing, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, 8th Brigade, Royal Air Force.

 

I have the honour to bring to your notice the name of Captain Jeffery Batters Home-Hay, MC, 7th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, attached Royal Air Force, No.104 Squadron.

 

Captain Home-Hay, MC, has participated in ten out of 16 raids carried out by No.104 Squadron. On two occasions he has led formations to Karlsruhe and once to Landau, all of which were bombed with good effect and direct hits obtained on military objectives.

 

On July 6th, 1918, while leading a raid on the railway station at Metz-Sablon, the formation was heavily attacked by seven enemy aircraft, two of which were shot down out of control. Captain J.B. Home-May, MC, was instrumental in bringing down one of these enemy aircraft.

 

While the encounter with enemy aeroplanes was in progress at 14,000 feet over the objective. Captain J.B. Home-Hay saw a machine of another squadron which had lost its formation and was at a low altitude firing Very's lights for assistance as it was being attacked. Captain Home-Hay brought his formation down to 9,000 feet and picked this machine up in his formation, and escorted [it] to the lines. All machines returned safely.

 

On June 30th, 1918 while leading a raid on the barracks and railway station at Landau, Captain J.B. Home-Hay, MC was instrumental in driving down another enemy aircraft.

 

This officer is an excellent Flight Commander and would make a very good Squadron Commander. His work in this new squadron (No.104) has left nothing to be desired, and he is chiefly responsible for keeping up the morale of the squadron even when they have had severe losses.

 

The same file has a formal recommendation sent from Headquarters, 8th Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 27 July 1918. Note that the letter gave to date of one incident as 6 July 1918 but the submission has it under a heading of 6 June 1918. It is also difficult to reconcile the date given for his Military Cross.

 

For conspicuous determination, gallantry and skill as a leader of long distance bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:-

 

6th June 1918 - Metz Sablon

 

While leading this raid on the railway station at Metz Sablon the formation was heavily attacked by seven enemy aeroplanes. This officer displayed admirable coolness and resource, and keeping his formation well together and in hand fought his way through to his objective. He led his formation well over the target which was successfully bombed. In the course of the severe fighting which took place two enemy aeroplanes were shot down out of control and one of these this officer himself was instrumental in bringing down. While the fighting was in progress over the objective this officer saw a machine of another squadron which had lost its formation and was at a low altitude firing Very lights for assistance as it was being attacked. Captain Home-Hay brought his own formation, which was then at 14,000 feet, down to 9,000 feet and rescued this machine and brought it back to the lines with his own formation, all of whom returned safely.

 

30th June 1918 - Landau

 

In the course of this raid on the barracks and railway station at Landau this officer again succeeded in leading his formation through heavy fighting to the objective which was successfully bombed. He was further instrumental in driving down an enemy aeroplane.

 

In addition this officer has taken part in the following raids:-

 

7th June 1918 - Metz

12th June 1918 - Railway and factories, Hagendingen

13th June 1918 - Factories and station at Hagendingen

23rd June 1918 - Metz

25th June 1918 - Karlsruhe

26th June 1918 - Hostile aerodrome at Frescaty

8th July 1918 - Hostile aerodrome at Buhl

 

This officer's work in the new squadron has been of a most valuable and inspiring nature and has gone a long way to keeping up the morale of the squadron, even in the face of severe losses. He has proved himself to be possessed of exceptional gifts of leadership, and has the fortunate knack of always being able to keep his flight together, and thus enabling the best results to be obtained.

 

Captain Home-Hay was awarded the Military Cross on the 7th January 1917, for gallantry and devotion to duty.

 

In 1928 he estimated his flying (estimate because he had lost his logbook on capture). The types and figures were: Maurice Farmans (10), BE aircraft (120 in training and artillery observation), Bristol Scout (25, practice), Avros (145, instrction), RE.8s (800 - obviously an excessive number), DH.4 (60, instruction), DH.9 (250, bombing), DH.9a (200, bombing, cloud flying, instruction) and Snipe (100, experience).

 

On 7 April 1920 he applied to join the Canadian Air Force. On 24 August 1920 the Air Board wrote to him (the signature of the Wing Commander signing is not legible - it might be Leckie or someone else).

 

I had reference to a proposed transcontinental flight from Halifax to Vancouver, which has been approved by the Air Board, and will be carried out very shortly.

 

The Air Board will make a public notice in the press about this flight very soon, but till such publication is made, the whole matter is to be treated as confidential.

 

Owing to your ability and experience in flying, you are I think, as well fitted as anyone to carry out one stage of this flight at least, and if you can do so, please send me a night telegram, care of the Air Board, Ottawa, collect.

 

In all probability the flight will be as follows:- From Halifax to Winnipeg by large flying boat, under the direction of the Operation Department of the Air Board, under the supervision of Colonel Leckie; From Winnipeg to Vancouver by aeroplanes by the Canadian Air Fore under the direction of Air Commodore Tylee. This last section will be divided into three stages, Winnipeg to Moose Jaw; Moose Jaw to Morley, Sask [sic]; Morley to Vancouver. The machines used will be DH.9As and will carry as passenger Air Commodore Tylee.

 

It will probably be necessary to have one or two of these stages carried out at night. This should however be a fairly easy proposition, as we believe we can arrange with the C.P.R. to have bonfires or other lights lit at various stations on the route.

 

Three DH.9A machines with mechanics will arrive in Winnipeg about September 6th, where they will be erected, and there is now one machine at Morley.

 

If you are available for this flight, it might be advisable for you to come to Camp Borden immediately and do a bit of flying on Avros and DH.9s before starting on the transcontinental trip, or as a less desirable alternative, to do a bit of flying at Winnipeg on the machines we are sending out there.

 

For the duration of this special duty, a month or more, you would have the rank of Captain, and draw full pay and allowances approximately the same as those given the Royal Air Force.

 

I do sincerely hope that you will be able to undertake this work, for I believe that the success of the whole undertaking depends more than anything else upon the pilots, and if the flight is successful, it will be a great boost to the Canadian Air Force.

 

A reply was delayed because the Canadian Air Board had thought he was living in Kelvington rather than Waden, but Home-Hay accepted on 3 September. He duly proceeded to Camp Borden where he was issued a uniform. The Wing Commander in charge of No.1 Wing, Camp Borden (Joy ?), duly reported (30 September) that "this officer is a good pilot, very sound, keen and throughly reliable, further that Flight Lieutenant Home Hay would make an excellent Flying Instructor on two seater machines if given the necessary course." On 23 September 1920 returned to Winnipeg with Flight Sergeant Youung, 1st Air Mechanic McLaughlan, 1st Air Mechanic Rigny, and 2nd Air Mechanic Crowe "on completion of erecting machines today". On 25 September he cabled for leave "as brother who is in charge of farm is very ill and threshing is being done." This was granted on the 27th. Meanwhile the airmen went to St.Charles to keep the machine ready for the Trans-Canada flight. He returned to duty on 2 October, took part in the Trans-Canada Flight, and returned to Wadena on 23 October 1920.

 

As a Flight Lieutenant he took a refresher course at Camp Borden 20 June to 27 July 1921 to get a commercial ticket but apparently declined frther service with the CAF. From 1928 to 1929 he was with Commercial Airways (Regina), from 1929 to November 1930 with United Air Service (Saskatoon), and in December 1930 joined National Airways (Regina). In 1931 he was with Brooks Airways. He took a Navigation Course at Camp Borden, 4 January to 19 March 1932 at which time he was temporarily gazetted a Flight Lieutenant. He was appointed to the Reserve of Officers in that rank, 4 May 1933. As of 23 January 1934 he was with Arrow Airways and had (to date) 2,615 hours air time. In 1936 he was considered for command of the Auxiliary squadron in Regina but was passed over for R.A. Delhaye. On 15 September 1939 he applied to join the RCAF, describing himself as a Norseman pilot (he owned CF-BFU).

 

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HOOTON, Lieutenant Lionel Conrad - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1918. Joined Victoria Rifles, 4 January 1915; to 48th Battalion, 31 March 1915; overseas, 10 July 1915; to France, 9 March 1916; to RFC Cadet Wing, 7 April 1917; Imperial commission in RFC, 30 May 1917; to No.8 Squadron at uncertain date (MC awarded with that unit); with No.123 (Canadian) Squadron, 2 May 1919; in Russia, August 1919 with Lieutenant H.A. Marshall and R.W. Ryan. Citation to MC identical to one for MC to 2nd Lieutenant Harry Wisnekonitz in same gazette, and the citations to his two awards are confusing as to whether he is a pilot or observer (but see additional note after official citation).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion, during a very thick mist, he and his pilot, by flying very low, despite very heavy machine gun fire, succeeded in locating the enemy's position. Through their machine was hit in all the vital parts, it was flown back to the aerodrome in safety. On a later occasion, when on contact patrol during failing light, they succeeded in locating accurately the position of the enemy. They have shown the utmost gallantry and skill during recent operations, and have carried out their duties with the greatest courage and determination.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation sent from Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, Royal Air Force to Headquarters, Royal Air Force on 4 April 1918.

 

For gallantry and good service during the operations, March 21st to March 31st, 1918.

 

This officer, together with 2nd Lieutenant Wisnekonitz, as observer, has shown the utmost gallantry and skill throughout the recent operations, during which period they have been flying together. 2nd Lieutenant Hooton has been employed continuously on contact patrol work and he, together with 2nd Lieutenant Wisnekonitz, has brought back information of the greatest value, which had been gained at exceedingly low altitude under heavy machine gun fire.

 

On March 23rd there was a very thick mist which made observation almost impossible. By flying very low over Nerlu, Templeux, La Foose and Buire, in spite of very heavy machine gun fire from the ground, they were able to locate the enemy's position. 2nd Lieutenant Hooton managed to fly his machine back to the aerodrome, and on examination it was found to have been hit in all the vital parts, and had to be written off.

 

On March 27th they did the last contact patrol of the day. The light was so bad that they could not distinguish our infantry from the enemy, but managed to locate the enemy's position by the volume of fire directed at them from the ground. On this occasion also their machine was so riddled with bullets that it was necessary to return it to the Depot for repair.

 

These officers have always displayed the utmost courage and determination in carrying out their duties.

 

HOOTON, Captain Lionel Conrad - Bar to Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When flying at 1,000 feet his petrol tank was shot through and immediately afterwards his left aileron control shot away. He tried to turn his machine without success, and it was side-slipping down out of control into the enemy's lines. Realising the danger, his observer climbed out on the right wing, enabling him to turn and land just within our lines. It was owing to his extraordinary coolness that he was able to land the machine in safety. He has also done fine work on reconnaissance and in attacking enemy infantry.

 

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HOPKINS, Captain John Richard - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 July 1919. Home in Swift Current (student at law); enlisted in Royal Canadian Dragons, August 1914; proceeded to France with them; returned to England and on 28 December 1915 gazetted 2nd Lieutenant, 18th Battalion, the Royal Scots. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 4 September 1916; to No.4 Squadron, 28 December 1916; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 2 June 1917; to No.38 TS, 26 October 1917; in No.4 Squadron, 4 September 1916 to 18 May 1917; to Home Establishment, 19 May 1917 to train as pilot; served as an instructor; in No.21 Squadron, 19 May 1918 to 14 February 1919; to Home Establishment, 14 February 1919. Promoted to Captain, 10 July 1918. Returned to Canada, September 1919. Reported in May 1971 as living in Victoria, aged 84 (retired lawyer). No citation other than "In recognition of distinguished service." Public Record Office Air 1/1841 has a recommendation for a Mention in Despatches, emanating from No.21 Squadron and dated 15 January 1919, for "Continuous good work in carrying out artillery observation". Public Record Office Air 1/1157 has original recommendation for DFC submitted by Headquarters, 10th Brigade, Royal Air Force on 1 October 1918:

 

For thorough and consistent good work as a pilot in a Corps squadron. On 28 June 1918, when on reconnaissance, he attacked a hostile balloon in the vicinity of Lestrem and drove it down under very heavy fire from the ground. During this attack his machine was repeatedly hit, and his smoke bombs and Very's [sic] lights were set on fire. The fire was eventually extinguished by means of a fire extinguisher by his observer. On another occasion he observed for four successful shoots for the artillery in one flight. Such an officer is a great asset to any Corps squadron, and the amount of war flying which he has carried out during the last few months is most noteworthy.

 

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HOWELL, Lieutenant John Gwynne - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1916; mentioned in Canada, 9 September 1916 when described as a member of the RFA, attached to RFC, "a young Montreal officer"; London Gazette says RFA attached No.16 Squadron. Shown in RAF List, November 1918 as Captain (SO), Acting Major, appointment dated 1 April 1918. Canada, issued of 17 February 1917, notes him as "Temporary Lieutenant J.G. Howell, MC, RA and RFC, to be Adjutant."

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill. When the pilot of his machine was killed, he climbed into the pilot's seat and, standing in front of him, managed to land the machine within our lines.

 

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HOWSAM, Lieutenant George Robert - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 March 1918; citation in London Gazette dated 16 August 1918. From CEF; at No.34 TS, 14 September 1917; No.1 ASD, 2 November 1917; No.70 Squadron, 13 November 1917 to 24 March 1918 (wounded); No.43 Squadron, 23 October 1918 to 26 January 1919; to No.81 Squadron, 30 January 1919. Served in RCAF; see data base of Second World War awards for additional details.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in aerial combats. He has destroyed five enemy machines and driven down others out of control, showing splendid courage and initiative on all occasions.

 

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HOY, Lieutenant Ernest Charles - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918. Born in Dauphin, Manitoba, 6 May 1895; home in Vancouver (salesman). Joined CEF in Victoria; to RFC in 1917; No.2 School of Aeronautics, 13 July 1917; to No.1 TD, 28 August 1917; to No.86 Squadron, 3 October 1917; with No.29 Squadron, 20 January 1918 to 28 September 1918 (hospitalized 3 May 1918; shot down and made POW, 28 September 1918); repatriated 3 December 1918. First man to fly through Canadian Rockies (1919).

 

A bold and skilful airman who has accounted for four enemy machines and shot down a balloon in flames, displaying at all times a fine fighting spirit, disregarding adverse odds.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded by Second Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force; his rank was given as Temporary Captain.

 

On the 12 August 1919 when on offensive patrol with five others, a general engagement took place between Kemmel and Armentieres with a large formation of enemy scouts. Captain Hoy shot down one which fell near Comines.

 

On the 16 August 1918 when on a similar duty with one other machine east of Ypres, Captain Hoy engaged and shot down a Fokker biplane near Poelcappelle.

 

On the 23 August 1918 when flying between Ypres and Bailleul, Captain Hoy saw a DFW two-seater flying at 3,000 feet. Captain Hoy fired 100 rounds into it and the machine fell southeast of Kemmel.

 

On the 24 August 1918 when leading a patrol of five scouts, Captain Hoy attacked ten Fokkers over Warneton. Captain Hoy destroyed one which fell south of Comines.

 

On the 1 September 1919 Captain Hoy saw a balloon north of Armentieres; he dived and fired 150 rounds into it; the balloon went down in flames, the observer escaping in his parachute.

 

The same file has a recommendation for a Mention in Despatches (specifically in the "Peace Despatch") which does not appear to have been approved:

 

An excellent patrol leader. Has done much to promote a feeling of keenness and dash in the squadron, Has destroyed seven enemy aeroplanes and one balloon.

 

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HUBBARD, Captain William Henry - Distinguished Flying Cross awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 August 1918. Home in Toronto (practising civil engineer); joined RFC in Toronto, 9 August 1915; gazetted 2nd Lieutenant, 1 January 1916; served in No.7 Squadron, 16 June to 20 July 1916; served with No.5 Squadron, 20 July to 26 December 1916 (wounded); to No.2 School of Aeronautics, 13 July 1917; to No.65 TS, 15 August 1917; with No.73 Squadron, 30 March to 20 October 1918 (hospitalized); to UK, 18 November 1918; to No.5 TDS, 2 January 1919. At the end of the war he claimed to have flown about 1,200 hours "and done all classes of work carried out by the Flying Corps in France." RFC/RAF Communiques credit him with the following victories: 9 September 1916, one Fokker brought down and seen to crash by Lts. W.H. Hubbard and H.B. Rickards, near St.Julien; 11 April 1918, drove down an enemy machine out of control; 21 May 1918, brought down one enemy aircraft (Fokker Triplane painted black and white) while flying Camel D.1841 at 6.30 p.m. SW of Maubourdine on Offensive Patrol at 10,000 feet; sighted three enemy Triplanes at 8,000 feet and dived on them, firing from 100 yards (200 roundns); target spun out of control and crashed just north of canal; confirmed by another pilot; 11 June 1918, patrols of No.73 Squadron destroyed six enemy aircraft that day, one by him; 8 July 1918, brought down one enemy aircraft; 29 August 1918, brought down one enemy aircraft (fought ten minutes with several Fokker biplanes); 15 September 1918, brought down one enemy aircraft. Invested with DFC, 10 December 1919.

 

During recent operations he has repeatedly descended to low altitudes to release his bombs and to open machine gun fire on troops and transport. He has shown the greatest gallantry, judgement and presence of mind. On several occasions he has attacked and driven down out of control enemy aeroplanes.

 

HUBBARD, Captain William Henry - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.

 

This officer has shown great bravery and devotion to duty in destroying enemy aircraft - ten of which he has accounted for - and in silencing anti-tank guns. On 27th September, flying at altitudes between 200 and 1,500 feet, he engaged and silenced many anti-tank guns, thereby rendering valuable service. He at the same time completed a detailed and accurate reconnaissance of the area, locating the position of our troops.

 

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HUDSON, Lieutenant Harold Byrn - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 September 1918. Home in Victoria; sent directly to UK, sailing on the Halifax, 24 January 1917; appointed 2nd Lieutenant, RFC, 24 May 1917. With No.28 Squadron, 8 October 1917 to 30 May 1918; with No.45 Squadron, 30 May to 29 July 1918; with No.30 Squadron, 1 April 1919 onwards.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in destroying four enemy aeroplanes and shooting down two enemy kite balloons in flames.

 

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*HUDSON, Lieutenant Lionel Augustus Croucher - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1919 - Home in St.John's, Grenada, British West Indies (Canadian connection not clear other than being mixed into DHist cards); acountant and manager. Appointed 2nd Lieutenant in RFC, 19 December 1917; to No.6 TDS, 2 February 1918; to BEF, 18 July 1918. Served in No.18 Squadron, 18 July to uncertain date.

 

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HUDSON, Major V. - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919). For services in Canada; described as "Canadian Militia". However, Militia List for 1918 does not show him.

 

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HUETHER, Lieutenant Archibald Leslie - Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 April 1919. Home in Guelph, Ontario (student); appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 14 March 1917; at Vendome, 28 April 1917; Cranwell, 26 June 1917; Manston, 21 August 1917; No.6 Wing, 10 September 1917; No.66 Wing at unknown date; flew in Adriatic. Returned to University of Toronto to complete medical studies. No citation other than "For valuable services rendered in connection with the war".

 

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HUMPHREYS, Captain William Rowland Spottiswoode - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1918. Born in London, England, 9 January 1886. Commissioned in 5th Battalion, CEF, Valcartier, 18 September 1914 (previously in 1st Essex Regiment, London, England); attached to RFC, 5 August 1915; gained Royal Aero Club Certificate 1753 on 16 August 1915; appointed Flying Officer and seconded to RFC, 18 January 1916; joined No.14 Squadron, Egypt, 6 February 1916; hospitalized in Egypt following crash, 4 August 1916; to No.20 (R) Wing, Ismailia, 5 September 1916; to No.22 RS, Abiukier, same date; to No.37 (HD) Squadron, 16 March 1917; to No.38 (HD) Squadron, 4 June 1917; to Reading, 21 September 1917; attached No.7 Wing, Norwich, 26 September 1916; to No.35 Wing, 29 September 1917; Headquarters, S.T. Brigade, 1 October 1917; ARS 25 Wing, Castle Bromwich, 27 October 1917; ARS 27 Wing, Hucknall, 7 May 1918; No.24 Wing, 40 TDS, 11 October 1918; HD Southwest Area, 14 TDS, 13 December 1918; No.40 TDS, 23 December 1918; No.14 TDS, southeast area, 21 January 1919; HMS Elope, Archangel, 17 March 1919; RAF Depot, 2 Group, 10 January 1920; Headquarters, TA, 15 May 1920; RAF Depot, IA, 24 March 1921; School of Photography, 2 July 1921; No.207 Squadron, 16 September 1921; R and M Party, Bircham Newton, 25 September 1922; No.100 Squadron IA, 16 October 1922; Reserve, Class "A", 5 December 1922; School of Photography, 31 March 1925. Shown in RCAF List as a Technical Officer, Squadron Leader effective 4 September 1939 through most of the war.

 

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HUSTON, Lieutenant Victor Henry - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 June 1917. Born 13 October 1890 in Ireland; joined CEF (Canadian Army Service Corps) in Vancouver and went overseas with first contingent. To No.2 School of Aeronautics, 22 July 1916; to Bournemouth and No.27 RS at unknown dates; to Gosport, 6 September 1916; to No.28 Squadron, 8 December 1916; served in No.18 Squadron, 17 December 1916 to 8 July 1917; to Hendon AA Park, 15 August 1917; injured, 15 September 1917; to Norwich AA Park, 7 December 1917. Captain, 20 March 1918. Loaned in August 1918 to Chilean government to instruct and assist as Britain gave that country 14 seaplanes and 50 aeroplanes; see Flight, 9 January 1919; still in Chile at end of 1919 although he seems to have ceased secondment to RAF as of 30 September 1919. Wife in London as of 1920.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has rendered valuable service when on photographic reconnaissance. He has always shown the greatest skill and courage in leading attacks on hostile machines and thus enabling valuable photographs to be secured behind the lines.

 

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