EDWARDS, Flight Lieutenant Harold - Order of St.Anne (Russia) - date and authority uncertain; listed by Ray Brough, White Russian Awards to British and Commonwealth Servicemen During the Allied Intervention in Russia 1918-1920 (London, Tom Donovan Publishing, 1991) and mentioned in his RCAF documents.  Born in Chorley, England, 24 December 1892; home in New Aberdeen, Nova Scotia where his father was a miner and he also worked in pits.  Later on electric engines and power house.  Joined RNAS, 3 February 1916; to Victory, 27 February 1916; to White City, 17 April 1916; to Redcar, 25 April 1916; to Eastchurch, 13 August 1916; to No.3 (Naval) Wing, 29 August 1916; shot down and made prisoner of war, 14 April 1917 (Freiberg Raid); repatriated 14 January 1919.  Served in Russia.  Member of RCAF, awarded CB, 1 January 1943.  See RCAF awards data base.

 

EDWARDS, Flight Lieutenant Harold - Order of St.Anne Stanislaus (Russia) - date and authority uncertain; listed by Ray Brough, White Russian Awards to British and Commonwealth Servicemen During the Allied Intervention in Russia 1918-1920 (London, Tom Donovan Publishing, 1991) and mentioned in his RCAF documents.

 

EDWARDS, Flight Lieutenant Harold - Mention in Despatches) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1920.

 

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EDWARDS, 2nd Lieutenant Harold Leslie - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.  Home in Smiths Falls, Ontario (contractor); to BEF, 21 July 1918; with No.20 Squadron, 27 July to 21 October 1918.  There is some confusion about this man, owing to there being several Harold Edwards in the air forces.  This one may (or may not) have the MM.  DND file 745-E-41 contains correspondence re 2nd Lieutenant Harold Leslie Edwards, DFC, as Department wanted to deliver to him his DFC.  He was thought to be in Franktown, but the search appears to have been unsuccessful.  He flew in No.20 Squadron with two other Canadians - Captain H.P. Lale and Lieutenant W.M. Thomson; his name was given variously as H. Edwards and H.L. Edwards.  Hospitalized, 26 October 1918; to England, 31 October 1918.  787002 Corporal H.L. Edwards awarded MM, 28 May 1917; could this be the man ?  For long victory list see Air 1/168/15/156/6 in MG.40 D.1 Vol.5.

 

While on offensive patrol, during 16th September, this officer with nine other machines, engaged twelve enemy scouts.  In the combat that ensued he destroyed one, his pilot accounting for a second, and they took part in destroying a third.  In all, Second Lieutenant Edwards has accounted for nine enemy machines, setting an excellent example of gallantry worthy of high praise.

 

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EDWARDS, Flight Commander Stearne Tighe - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1917.  Born in Franktown, 13 February 1893; home in Carleton Place, Ontario (railway construction worker); attended Wright School, Dayton, Ohio and received ACA Certificate No.350 on 13 October 1915.  Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, Ottawa, 31 October 1915; at Eastchurch, 9 April 1916; with No.3 (N) Wing, 30 April 1916 to 9 March 1917; with No.11 (N) Squadron, 19 March to 22 April 1917; with No.6 (N) Squadron, 23 April to 18 July 1917; with No.9 (N) Squadron (No.209 Squadron after 1 April 1918), 10 August to 10 November 1917 and again from 29 January to 23 May 1918 (leave in Canada between these two postings).  At No.38 Training Depot Station, 16 October 1918; injured in flying accident, 12 November 1918; died of injuries 22 November 1918.

 

In recognition of his services on the following occasions:-

 

On the 3rd September 1917, with his flight he attacked a two-seater Aviatik.  The enemy machine was observed to go down in a vertical nose dive, and the enemy observer was seen to collapse in the cockpit.

 

On the 21st September 1917 he drove a two-seater enemy machine down out of control.

 

On the 23rd September 1917 he attacked an Albatross scout, which crashed into the sea.

 

On the same date he attacked three Albatross scouts.  One got on the tail of another officer's machine at very close range, shooting him up very badly.  Flight Commander Edwards attacked him from above, and the enemy machine turned on its back and went down in a vertical dive.  He followed the enemy machine down to 8,000 feet, when its wings came off, and it fell to the ground.

 

EDWARDS, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Stearne Tighe - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 June 1918.

 

For conspicuous bravery and most brilliant leadership of fighting patrols against enemy aircraft.  On the 2nd May, 1918, whilst leading a patrol of four scouts, he encountered a hostile formation of eight enemy scouts and drove down one enemy machine  completely out of control.  Soon afterwards he engaged another formation of six enemy scouts, driving down one to its destruction whilst his patrol accounted for another.  He only broke off the fight owing to lack of ammunition.  He has destroyed or driven down out of control many enemy machines since he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, and has at all times shown the greatest gallantry and a fine offensive spirit.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1859/204/214/17 (selected copies held by National Archives of Canada, MG.40 D.1 Vol.30) has reommendation by Major Butler, No.209 Squadron, 4 May 1918, to Commanding Officer, 22nd Wing, Royal Air Force.  Although detailed, it describes Edwards' exploits in reverse chronological sequence, including all major combats since award of DSC, quoting directly from his combat reports: 

 

I wish to recommend the undermentioned officer for immediate award for marked skill and gallantry in aerial fighting during the present operations, particularly on the occasions mentioned hereon and since the award of the DSC to this Officer:

                                                      Captain S.T. Edwards, DSC

 

May 2nd 1918 (a) "Whilst on H.O.P., observed 10 e.a. scouts flying east along the Grand-Prix Road.  I followed them as far as Brie on the Somme but was unable to gain much on them and could not get within effective range.  Had just turned east when I observed 8 Albatross Scouts below us at 12,000 feet over Brie.  I attacked with flight and followed them down to 8,000 feet.  I got a long burst at long range into one enemy aircraft and it immediately stalled and started a slow spin.  I was unable to watch it owing to the combat but Lieutenant Edwards saw it spin until under 1,000 feet where the haze was thick and he lost it.  As the first flight of enemy aircraft which I had followed east were now above us and had commenced to dive I broke off and flew west.

 

(b) I was flying west along the Grand-Prix Road when I observed 6 Albatross Scouts with bright red noses over Cayeux at 8,000 feet.  Attacked with flight and in the first dive I fired 100 rounds at very close range into the rear machine.  It went down in a turning dive and was seen to crash by Lieutenant's Siddall and Edwards.  The combat lasted about 10 minutes and I used all my ammunition without further result.  All the pilots of the flight (5) were attacking continuously and I observed one of them to go very close to an enemy aircraft and open fire.  The enemy aircraft went down in a turning vertical dive and appeared to be completely out of control.  Only four of the enemy aircraft were left when I broke off combat owing to lack of ammunition."

 

April 12th, 1918  "Whilst on Inner Offensive Patrol, we were over Villers-Brittoneux when I observed A.A. over Amiens and climbed in that direction.  Observed E.AS. coming directly towards me and at my height.  I got into position close under its tail and fired one long burst.  The enemy aircraft went into a spin and crashed at Sheet 62B N99." (Conformed in RAF communique No.2)  Crashed this side of lines.

 

April 2nd, 1918  "Whilst on Reserve Patrol south of Hallam I observed six enemy aircraft pass from beneath a cloud 300 feet directly under out formation.  I attacked and [word - maybe line - not copied clearly] stalled and dived vertically.  I followed for 3,000 feet and as enemy aircraft seemed to be regaining control, I opened fire again.  The enemy aircraft turned on its back and went into a vertical dive and immediately broke up, the pieces narrowly missing my machine.  I then attacked another enemy aircraft together with Lieutenant Siddall.  After a short combat the enemy aircraft turned on its back and went down completely out of control." (Conformed RAF Communique No.1).

 

October 27th, 1917  "Whilst on Hostile Artillery Aeroplane Emergency Patrol, observed nine enemy aircraft scouts diving on four Camels slightly above us over Slype.  Made for Camels as quickly as possible but had not quite reached them when enemy aircraft opened fire on them and one Camel went down in a vertical dive and was not seen to pull out.  I soon came within range of enemy aircraft and attacked.  One enemy aircraft went into a turning vertical dive and appeared to be completely out of control.  It fell into clouds at 2,000 feet and could not be observed further."

 

October 2nd, 1917  "When returning from Zeebrugge whilst on escort, I observed five two-seaters over Slype.  Attacked with flight at 50 yards range and saw the enemy aircraft at which I was firing stall and spin down on its back completely out of control.  The enemy aircraft was watched by two members of my flight until it reached a very low altitude and it was not seen to regain control." (Conformed by No.4 Wing Communique RNAS).

 

September 29th, 1917  "Whilst on escort, was returning from Zeebrugge with DH.4 bombers when I met three two-seater Albatross.  They immediately dived steeply and I followed to 2,000 feet over Middlekerke firing continuously when one enemy aircraft went into vertical dive and appeared to be out of control.  Owing to very heavy AA fire I did not attempt to watch the enemy aircraft but turned for the lines.  The remainder of my flight was above and saw two of the enemy aircraft flying east but lost sight of them.

 

September 28th, 1917  "Whilst on H.O.P, observed one Albatross scout just over our lines.  Attacked and followed the enemy aircraft down to 700 feet when it went down out of control and crashed in the floods opposite Pervyse."  (Confirmed by 4th Army Signals Station).

 

I wish to particularly recommend this officer as a Leader of great judgement and skill.  His flight has done very well.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

ELLIOTT, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) William Boyd - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Born 26 August 1898. Home in St.Catharines, Ontario (student, University of Toronto).  Applied to RNAS early in 1917; refused for lack of vacancies.  RFC Cadet, April 1917; 2nd Lieutenant, August 1917; with No.103 Squadron, 12 December 1917 to 3 April 1918; with No.205 Squadron, 6 April to 6 October 1918

 

This officer has taken part in one hundred bombing raids, in the majority of which he has been leader, a position for which he has the essential qualities in a marked degree, viz, courage, resolution, and resource.  While leading one bombing raid his formation was attacked by thirty hostile machines; ten of these were destroyed, the objective was successfully bombed, and the formation returned without the loss of a machine.  This brilliant success was mainly due to Captain Elliott's skilful leadership.

 

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EVANS, 2nd Lieutenant Henry Cope - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1916 - Born in England, 1879; next-of-kin shown as Camberley, Surrey; went to Ontario to learn fruit farming; served in South Africa with Canadian Artillery.  Home in Macleod, Alberta (ranching and government-appointed Range Rider; described as "a keen sportsman and fine horseman" as well as polo player); served in 19th Alberta Dragoons (joined day after war declared); went overseas with First Contingent (Divisional Cavalry); may have been a despatch rider; as a Sergeant he transferred to RFC, 13 September 1915 and appointed Temporary 2nd Lieutenant.  Graded as Flying Officer (Observer), 13 December 1915; to Home Establishment, 26 January 1916; Flying Officer, 15 May 1916.  Flew with No.24 Squadron.  Missing 3 September 1916 after aerial combat.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and skill on many occasions in attacking hostile  aircraft, frequently against large odds.  In one fortnight he brought down four enemy machines, returning on one occasion with his machine badly damaged.

 

EVANS, Lieutenant Henry Cope - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1917.

 

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EYRE, Lieutenant Robert Thornton - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  Born 16 May 1894; home in Toronto (electrical engineer).  Passed tests at Curtiss School, Toronto, 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Officer, 5 November 1916.  At Crystal Palace, 17 December 1916; at Chingford, 13 January 1917; at Cranwell, 21 April 1917; at Calshot, 19 July 1917; at Dundee, 7 November 1918.  No citation or details.

 

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FAIRBAIN, Lieutenant Arthur Reginald - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919; announced in Canada of 15 February 1919.  Believed to be from Brockville, Ontario.  There are no DHist cards for him, although there are cards for one Allyn Rupert Fairbain (whose service does not extend beyond Canada).  The London Gazette entry does not establish a Canadian connection.

 

During recent operations this officer's balloon was singled out for attack three times in two days. On the third day he was again attacked by six scouts when at a height of 1,500 feet. He behaved with the utmost coolness and gallantry in helping his fellow observer, who was inexperienced, out of the basket before parachuting himself. His determination in pushing his balloon forward during the recent advances has been most praiseworthy.

 

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FAIRCLOUGH, Lieutenant Arthur Bradfield - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918.  Born 25 July 1896; home in Toronto (clerk for Wood Gundy financiers).  Listed as early as 27 October 1915 as accepted as ab RFC candidate from Canada, akthough nothing appears to have come from this.  A list of RFC awards for 1918, published in Aeroplane, 8 January 1919, lists him as being Canadian Machine Gun Corps.  This led to a special portion of the Jackson List (DHist document 000.8 dossier 30) dealing with CMGC officers.  Appointed Lieutenant, Queens Own Rifles of Canada, 7 February 1916; embarked from Canada, 26 September 1916; taken on strength Canadian Training Depot, placed on General List and posted to Canadian Machine Gun Corps (all on 6 October 1916); completed 20th regular course, Canadian Machine Gun School, 23 December 1916; to Canadian Machine Gun Depot, 31 January 1917; on command to RFC, 18 February 1917; Royal Aero Club Certificate No.4597 issued 24 April 1917; graded Flying Officer, RFC and seconded to RFC, 23 May 1917; ceased to be seconded to RFC, 14 April 1919; struck off strength, CEF, 15 April 1919.  National Archives of Canada RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 gives more details of RFC service:  at No.1 School of Aeronautics, 16 February 1917; to No.2 Reserve Squadron, 27 March 1917; to No.42 Reserve Squadron, 30 April 1917; to No.49 Squadron, 23 May 1917; instructing in that unit as of 28 August 1917; to No.40 Training Squadron approximately 24 October 1917 and to No.56 Training Squadron about 30 October 1917.  To Expeditionary Force (France), 15 November 1917 and attached to ASD (Spad training); to No.19 Squadron, 18 November 1917; to No.23 Squadron, 4 May 1918 (appointed Captain); to Home Establishment, 8 July 1918; posted to Canada, 11 July 1918; to School of Special Flying (No.43 Wing, Canada, 13 September 1918; appointed Examining Officer, 21 October 1918; struck off strength of RAF Canada, 15 April 1919.  Types flown were Curtiss, Shorthorn, BE (unspecified), Martinside, Avro, Pup, DH.4, DH.9, Spad, Dolphin.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  During four months he has destroyed four enemy machines and has driven down two others completely out of control. When engaged with hostile aircraft he has at all times displayed the utmost dash and courage.

 

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*FAIRWEATHER, Captain Charles Duncan - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  For services in Canada (superintending engineer); may have been Canadian.

 

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FALKENBERG, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Carl Frederick - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Home in Quebec City (clerk); enlisted there in 8th Royal Rifles, June 1915; Corporal, then commissioned in March 1916.  Posted to 171st Battalion, Valcartier, July 1916; went overseas with them, September 1916; to 14th Battalion, 20 October 1916.  Wounded 27 November 1916 and hospitalized in England.  Seconded to RFC, June 1917; to No.1 School of Aeronautics, 18 June 1917; to No.14 Training Squadron, 31 July 1917; to No.45 Training Squadron, 23 August 1917; to No.1 School of Aerial Fighting, 15 November 1917; to Oxford, 17 December 1917; to No.45 Training Squadron, 20 December 1917; to No.61 Training Squadron, 11 January 1918; served with No.84 Squadron, 28 February to 10 May 1918 (wounded) and again from 20 May to 2 November 1918.  Posted to Home Establishment and to original Canadian Air Force in England.  Demobilized, 30 October 1919.  Joined CAF in Canada, 1920 to 1 April 1921.

 

A bold and skilful airman, who has destroyed four enemy machines and driven down four out of control.  In addition he has performed many gallant deeds in attacking troops, transport, etc. on the ground.

 

FALKENBERG, Lieutenant (Acting Captain) Carl Frederick - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 December 1918.

 

A gallant and skilful fighter who, since he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, has destroyed four enemy machines and one balloon, and has also driven down two more machines out of control, making in all fourteen enemy aircraft and one balloon to his credit.  He has further rendered gallant service in attacking ground targets and reconnoitring enemy lines.

 

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FALL, Lieutenant Harry - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918; citation in issue of 3 August 1918.  Born in Montreal; enlisted there in CEF (Canadian Army Service Corps), although card lists home as Leeds, Yorkshire (business manager).  Seconded from CASC to RFC and appointed 2nd Lieutenant, 10 February 1917; to No.82 Squadron (No.23 Wing), 2 May 1917; served in No.102 Squadron, 27 November 1917 to 16 August 1918; Captain, 13 June 1918.   Award may be effective 9 June 1918.

 

Has been very successful in bombing enemy positions and trains from low altitudes.  During the past seven months he has taken part in sixty night-raiding expeditions.  Lieutenant Fall has displayed great skill, courage and determination.

 

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FALL, Flight Lieutenant Joseph Stewart Temple - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1917.  Born in Canada, 17 November 1895; home in Hillbank, Vancouver Island (working on father's farm).  Accepted as RNAS candidate, 23 August 1915; went to Montreal, 1 August and paid $ 350 to Montreal School of Flying.  No training given; he  received a refund and sailed to UK on his own, 12 November 1915.  Appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, 26 January 1916; at Naval School, 30 January 1916; at Chingford, 14 April 1916; at Eastchurch (No.3 Wing), 6 August 1916; to Dunkirk, 1 February 1917; with No.9 (N) Squadron, 3 February 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 28 February 1917; to No.9 (N) Squadron, 30 August 1917; to Freiston (No.9 Group), 24 April 1918; to No.4 Flying School, 7 November 1918.   Served as a Group Captain in RAF, Second World War, and was Mentioned in Despatches, 11 June 1942.  See W.R. Cumming, "Joseph Stewart Temple Fall: The Man Who Refused to Die", Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society, Summer 1990.

 

For conspicuous bravery and skill in attacking hostile aircraft.  On the morning of the 11th April, 1917, while escorting our bombing machines, he brought down three hostile aircraft.  The first he attacked and brought down completely out of control.  He was then attacked by three hostile scouts who forced him down to within about two hundred feet of the ground.  By skilful piloting he manoeuvred his machine close behind one of them, which was driven down and wrecked.  Shortly afterwards, this officer was again attacked by a hostile scout, which he eventually brought down a short time before recrossing the lines.  He then landed at one of the aerodromes, his machine having been riddled with bullets from the hostile machines, and also by rifle fire from the ground.

 

FALL, Flight Lieutenant Joseph Stewart Temple - Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917.

 

In recognition of the conspicuous courage displayed by him in attacking enemy aircraft in superior numbers on many occasions.  On the 15th October, 1917, he attacked an enemy machine from in front at very close range, at times within twenty-five yards.  He then turned sharply and attacked from behind, sending the enemy machine down spinning on its back and emitting great volumes of black smoke.

 

FALL, Flight Lieutenant Joseph Stewart Temple - Second Bar to Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 December 1917.

 

In recognition of his services on the 1th and 13th November, 1917, when he had successful engagements with three enemy machines.  He has always shown great courage and gallantry in the face of the enemy, and maintained a high record of achievement, having destroyed many enemy machines.

 

FALL, Captain Joseph Stewart Temple - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919 (name given as John Stewart Temple Fall).  No citation.

 

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FARRELL, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Conway Macalister - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Home in Regina (student); to No.93 Squadron, 13 October 1917; served in No.24 Squadron, 11 March to 30 August 1918; in No.56 Squadron, 30 August to 6 October 1918 (invalided to England and hospitalized).  Bush pilot after the war.

 

This officer rendered conspicuous service on the 8th August in attacking enemy troops and transport with machine gun fire and bombs.  Having silenced a machine gun, he attacked some transport, driving off the personnel.  Later on he attacked a dump and carried out a reconnaissance in an area where our cavalry was reported to be held up, rendering a most valuable report of the situation.  Eventually, in a combat with about forty scouts, he was shot down.  He has destroyed or taken a leading part in the destruction of seven enemy machines.

 

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FAWCUS, Captain Ernest Augustus - Croix de Guerre (Belgium) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 April 1918.  Described as being of Newfoundland Forces and Royal Flying Corps.  There may be confusion here; Public Records Office Air 1/1169/204/5/2592 has recommendation dated 22 December 1917, identifying him as being from 6th Northumberland Fusiliers, now RFC; position given as "Late Flight Commander, No.27 Squadron, RFC."

 

The work done by this officer, both as a Flying Officer and a Flight Commander, has been excellent. He has always led his Flight with the greatest success, and has on various occasions dropped his bombs with great success.

 

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FERGUSON, Lieutenant William Bruce - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 November 1917 - Born 12 August 1896; home in Ameliasburg, Ontario (farmer); in Canadian Expeditionary Force (Railway Troops according to card, 15th Battalion, CEF according to Jackson List); embarked from Canada, 22 August 1916; attached to RFC, 11 April 1917; to No.1 School of Military Aeronautics, 19 April 1917; to W and O School, 22 April 1917; to BEF, 20 May 1917; served in No.6 Squadron, 24 May 1917 to 17 November 1917; to No.1 School of Military Aeronautics, 8 December 1917; to No.200 (N) Training Squadron, 6 February 1918; to No.198 (N) Training Squadron, 24 April 1918.  Graded as Observer.  Drowned 7 July 1918 when his aircraft fell into Thames.  NOTE:  One W.B. Ferguson was awarded Military Medal as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1917 and some lists suggest same man; Jackson List indicates to be highly unlikely.  RG.24 Accession 1995-96/670 listing includes Military Medal and then crosses it out.  Same source noted that after six months as an observer he had flown ten hours solo in DH.6 machines and one hour solo in FE.2b.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He has continuously done valuable work in locating targets and ranging and observing artillery fire and was responsible for the destruction of hostile batteries by our artillery.  He successfully took part in several aerial combats while engaged in this work, and showed great initiative and determination throughout.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1282/204/10/46 has extensive correspondence indicating a determination by his superiors to secure an award for Ferguson.  The first was a letter dated 21 September 1917 signed by the Commanding Officer, No.6 Squadron to the Officer Commanding, 2 Wing, Royal Flying Corps:

 

I have the honour to call to your notice the conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty of Lieutenant William Bruce Ferguson, Canadian Pioneers and Royal Flying Corps.

 

This officer on 20 September 1917 carried out two reliable contact patrols between 1,000 and 500 feet, in each case securing very valuable information. He attacked and scattered a party of Germans from 500 feet and two, who were seen to fall, were still lying there ten minutes later.

 

Today he has already carried out two special low reconnaissances of great importance, and obtained results by 7.15 a.m. materially affecting the attack by 41st Division at 9.30 a.m.

 

He accurately located over 300 Germans in the redoubt holding up the advance, and a concrete dugout, attacked the enemy from 100 feet with machine gun fire, and only desisted when his elevator controls were cut by rifle fire.  Immediately after landing he made his report and ascended again in another machine.

 

From among his numerous earlier instances of gallantry and resource, I would call to your notice those detailed in my Squadron record Book under dates August 16th, 18th and 22nd, and September 13th.

 

He has almost certainly destroyed two German machines.

 

This was followed by another report dated 22 September 1917 from the Lieutenant-Colonel commanding No.2 Wing to Headquarters, 2 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps:

 

I bring forward for your consideration for award the name of Lieutenant William Bruce Ferguson, 1st Canadian Pioneers and Royal Flying Corps, for gallantry and skill as observer, with special reference to his observation of bombardment previous to attack day on 20th September, and his contact patrol reports on 20th and 21st September.

 

The following are outstanding features of useful work during the battle:-

 

20 September 1917 Two contact patrols with detailed reports on landing: height 1,000 - 500 feet during barrage, observing a concentration of Germans and fearing that the advance would get held up at this point he used his machine gun and dispersed them.

 

21 September 1918 The 41st Division were to attack at 9.30 a.m.  He reconnoitred the position at daybreak and found the enemy trenches strongly held, and estimated a force of 300 Germans formed up at 28.J.21.c to J.26.d  Fearing they would attack before 41st Division was ready, he descended to 100 feet and traversed the redoubt, dugouts and trench which was holding up our advance and by 7.15 was in possession of details of defences and strength of enemy, which he dropped on a map to 41st Division, and reported verbally to General Staff. He returned owing to his rudder controls having been shot away. After reporting he took a fresh machine ten minutes later and directed a barrage on the threatened point, flying behind the barrage at 2,000 feet for 1 1/4 hours.

 

Since joining No.6 Squadron he has been consistently successful in artillery work, the following being examples:-

 

13 August 1917         Ranged four heavy batteries on different trench targets, observing 90 round for 3 1/4 hours.

 

16 August 1917         While on C.B. [counter battery] patrol, he neutralized two active hostile batteries and sent five zone calls. He was then attacked by seven Albatross Scouts, one of which was seen to crash by an independent witness.

 

17 August 1917         With 221st Siege Battery he obtained 2 O.Ks and 12 M.O.Ks on hostile battery.  The target was completely obliterated.

 

18 August 1917         While on artillery work he engaged two enemy two-seaters working over our trenches, drove them away, and afterwards brought off a successful shoot.

 

23 August 1917         Successful trench bombardment. Combat with enemy two seater. Climbed along wing to right pilot's gun which had jammed.

 

14 September 1917 In adverse weather he ranged 183rd, 219th, 276nd and 298th Siege Batteries on to four different targets, observing 170 rounds.

 

17 September 1917 He ranged a 15-inch howitzer, a 6-inch Mark VII, a battery of 9.2-inch howitzers and a battery of 8-inch howitzers on to four different targets giving 111 observations.

 

He has shown throughout an example of gallantry combined with a great offensive spirit and resource.

 

On 13 October 1917 the Commanding Officer, No.6 Squadron write again to the Officer Commanding, 2 Wing, Royal Flying Corps.  Although he refers to a letter of 29 September, this is not available and may be a mistaken reference to the communication of 21 September:

 

Further to my letter of 29 September 1917 I wish again to bring to your notice Lieutenant William Bruce Ferguson, Canadian Pioneers, for gallantry, skill and devotion to duty.

 

He has carried out the following Contact Patrols, flying at extremely low altitudes, and obtaining very valuable information in each case:

 

(1)       5 October 1917 - height 500 feet.

(2)       6 October 1917 - height 500 feet

(3)       9 October 1917 - height 700 feet

 

On 3 October 1917 he successfully ranged three batteries on trench points from 1,000 - 1,500 feet.

 

On 11 October 1917 he carried out a successful knock-out shoot from 1,800 feet, after all other machines had returned owing to weather conditions.

 

In addition he has carried out 12 successful trench bombardments during the period under review.

 

The Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding, 2 Wing, wrote on 14 October 1917 to Headquarters, 2nd Brigade, Royal Flying Corps:

 

Xth Corps and No.6 Squadron have been almost continuously in the heavy fighting since June, and for want of ground observation the calls on the squadron have been unusually heavy. Certain officers have borne the brunt of the fighting and been consistently successful. I forward the names of two who are deserving of immediate award:-

 

Lieutenant William Bruce Ferguson, Canadian Pioneers, O.F.O., 6 Squadron

 

This officer was brought to your notice in may A.11/274 of 22 September 1917, a copy of which is attached.

 

Between 29 September 1917 and present he has observed for 16 successful shoots under bad weather conditions, notably on 11th instant when he carried out a knock-out shoot with 34th 9.2-inch Siege [Battery] on a hostile battery from a height of 1,800 feet after all other machines had returned owing to bad weather. he gave 20 observations and a fire was caused.

 

Between 5th and 9th October he carried out three contact patrols at a height of 500-700 feet, obtaining valuable information and locating our infantry.

 

The other officer whose duties were described in this document was 2nd Lieutenant Alfred John Tyler, General List and O.F.O. No.6 Squadron.

 

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*FERRAND, Lieutenant Jules Edward - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919 - Home in Boston; American who joined RFC Canada in Toronto; as a 2nd Lieutenant he sailed from Halifax, 12 January 1918.  Served in No.74 Squadron from 14 August 1918 to uncertain date.

 

On October 26 this officer took part in an engagement with a large hostile formation.  Singling out a Fokker he attacked it at close range, driving it down to crash.  Being isolated from his companions he turned to regain our lines but was at once attacked by seven Fokkers, who kept up a running fight for many miles.  He maintained a stout defence against these long odds, crashing two of the enemy machines, and eventually reaching our lines with all his ammunition exhausted.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded to Royal Air Force Headquarters on 29 October 1918 which is much more detailed; curiously, it spells his name "Ferrard".

 

On the 26 October 1918 when on Offensive Patrol near Cordes, a fight took place with a large hostile formation. Lieutenant Ferrand singled out an opponent whom he attacked at close range. Noticing that the enemy machine was hit in the engine he followed it down to 2,000 feet and saw the Fokker crash to earth.  Lieutenant Ferrand then turned to regain the lies, as he was quite isolated from his companions, but was at once attacked by seven Fokkers who kept up a running fight for many miles.  One Fokker which overshot his dive was at once shot down by Lieutenant Ferrand; another shared the same fate; both these machines are since confirmed as having crashed.  Lieutenant Ferrand regained our lines, having exhausted all his ammunition; his Vickers gun, Aldis sight and whole machine were very much shot about.

 

This officer put up a very stout fight against long odds with complete success; such successful efforts do much to raise the morale of a squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FERRIE, 2nd Lieutenant Robert Leighton Moore - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 February 1918; citation published in London Gazette dated 2 July 1918.  Home in Hamilton, Ontario; accepted as RFC candidate in Canada, 20 November 1916; appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation), 19 December 1916.  Served with No.46 Squadron, 17 June 1917 to 3 January 1918 (killed in action leading a patrol; see A.G. Lee, No Parachute, p.208).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He ledt his flight with greay skill and determination in very bad weather, and dropped bombs on an enemy aerodrome from a height of 400 feet, destroying one shed and badly damaging another.  On two later occasians he bombed villages and attacked enemy infantry with his machine gun from a low altitude.  He has brought down two enemy machines and assisted in destroying others.  He has shown great courage and resource at all times.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1515 has recommendation forwarded from Headquarters, 3 Brigade, Royal Flying Corps to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps on 5 December 1917.

 

For skill and gallantry.

 

On the morning of November 20th he led his flight with great skill and determination, in view of the extremely bad weather prevailing, to Caudry aerodrome.  He dropped four bombs, destroying one shed and damaging another badly, from a height of 400 feet.  He then led his flight back over the lines and conducted them to the landing ground through the mist.

 

On 23rd November he attacked Bourlon village, bombing it, and firing 500 rounds at German infantry there at a low height, and brought back information as to the positions of our troops in that area.

 

On November 26th he made an attack on Inchy with bombs and machine gun, firing 200 rounds at German infantry in the street, scattering them, from a low height.

 

This officer has two German machines to his credit previously, and has been a valuable assistant in bringing down others with his flight, and has shown pluck and resource at all times.

 

The weather in the recent operations has been almost impossible for flying.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FETHERSTONHAUGH, Lieutenant-Colonel William Samuel - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Member of Canadian Forestry Corps; for services in France.  Appointed Lieutenant, Canadian Militia, 1 March 1916; embarked from Halifax, 19 May 1916; to Canadian Forestry Corps, 22 November 1916;  commended in War Office List, 7 August 1917; Acting Lieutenant-Colonel, 22 August 1917; on command to Canadian Forestry Corps, France, 20 June 1918.  Returned to Canada, 4 April 1919.  Struck off strength, CEF, 12 April 1919.  NOTE: The Canada Gazette of 3 June 1919 reported that he had been made an Officer, Order of the British Empire; this was cancelled in the Canada Gazette of 30 August 1919 in view of his earlier CBE.  Creagen Papers have a note spelling his name as "Featherstonhaugh".

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

*FILLEY, 2nd Lieutenant Oliver D. - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1915.  American (Harvard student) who joined RFC, appointed 2nd Lieutenant on Probation, 2 March 1915, having obtained Royal Aero Club Certificate No.1101 at Brooklands.  With No.1 Squadron when decorated.  To Home Establishment, 22 January 1916.  Commanded Camp Borden in spring of 1917 with rank of Major; transferred to United States Air Service with rank of Lieutnant-Colonel.  See Hiram Bingham, An Explorer in the Air Service, p. 16.

 

For conspicuous gallantry on July6th, 1915, when he and his observer were cooperating with our artillery.  On two occasions, although they were not in a special fighting machine, they attacked German aeroplanes and, after driving them away, resumed their artillery work.  Finally, two hostile aeroplanes came up simultaneously, and although they had only five round of ammunition left, they at once proceeded to attack.  In this encounter the observer was kmilled in the act of firing, and the engine damaged, but Second Lieutenant Filley landed safely in our lines.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

**FINDLAY, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Maxwell Hutcheon, DSC - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918; citation in issue of 3 August 1918.  Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, 26 June 1916 and appointed to President for RNAS.  Identified by red ink notation as "Canadian" in page proofs, advance copy of London Gazette dated 3 August 1918,  RG.9 III C.14 Vol.4608.  However, Canadian connextions not clear as of 5 May 1997.

 

A skilful and courageous patrol leader.

 

During the past few months this offcer has destroyed seven enemy machines and brought down seven more out of control.

 

On one occasion he fought an enemy machine from 18,000 feet down to an altitude of 10,000 feet, at which point he gained an advantage and destroyed his antagonist.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FINDLEY, Lieutenant Thomas Irving - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 July 1918 - Home in Toronto; served in France with Canadian Field Artillery, 1916-1917.  To RFC, 30 August 1917 as observer; served with No.82 Squadron, 5 November 1917 to 2 April 1918 (wounded, leg and arm; his pilot, Captain G.I. Paterson of Regina was killed).

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  On one occasion under adverse climatic conditions, he carried out during a flight of three hours at an altitude of 300 feet, a most valuable reconnaissance.  During recent operations his work in attacking enemy troops at low altitudes has been of the greatest value, and he has set a splendid example of energy and determination to all ranks of his squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

*FISHER, Captain (Acting Major) Harry Gilbert - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919.  British officer serving with RFC/RAF Training Program, Canada and Texas, 1917-1918.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

*FISHER, Major Herbert Frank - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 June 1919; for services in Canada.  Harry Creagen Papers (National Aviation Museum) carried notation from Canada, 14 June 1919 that Major Hubert [sic] F. Fisher had been Chief Instructor at Toronto School of Aeronautics and had died 22 March 1919.

 

*FISHER, Major Herbert Frank - Commended for Valuable Services in Connection with the War - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1919; for services in Canada.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FISHER, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Philip Sydney - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 May 1917.  Born 31 March 1896; home in Montreal (student, McGill University).  Obtained ACA Certificate No.31 (hydroplanes) at Thomas School, 18 August 1915; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 27 October 1915.  Trained at Eastbourne and Calshot; to Dover Seaplane Base, 23 April 1916; to Dunkirk Seaplane Base, 9 June 1916; to Seaplane Defence Flight, 29 June 1917; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 1 April 1917; to No.4 (N) Squadron, 19 August 1917; badly wounded in knee, 24 September 1917.  Hitchins list indicates he was with "C" Flight, No.204 Squadron from June 1918 until wounded again on 2 September 1918 - Fisher letters do not substantiate this.  Awarded CBE (Civil), 1 July 1946 (President, Southam Company); awarded Service Medal, Order of Canada, 15 July 1967 which was converted to Officer, Order of Canada, June 1972.

 

For conspicuous skill as a seaplane pilot during the last nine months.  Has carried out many valuable reconnaissance patrols and several bomb attacks with good results.

 

FISHER, Flight Commander Philip Sydney - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in air fights and bombing raids.  On one occasion, when very heavy fighting took place between eight machines of his squadron and about twenty Albatross scouts, he fought at least six combats single-handed, shooting down one of his opponents out of control.  On another occasion, when he was acting as leader of a flight of five machines detailed for an offensive patrol, a general action took place with a number of Albatross scouts, in the course of which Acting Flight Commander Fisher was wounded whilst fighting with great gallantry.  He has shown himself to be a most efficient and plucky flight leader and has also taken part in numerous night bombing raids in addition to his day fighting.

 

Public Record Office Air 1/74 has considerable documentation on this award.  On 26 September 1917, Wing Commander C.H. Courtney (No.4 Wing, RNAS) wrote to the Senior Officer, Headquarters, Dunkerque respecting Fisher:

 

In accordance with H.Q. Memo No.3160 of 11th August, I would especially bring to your notice the name of (act) Flight Commander P.S. Fisher in connection with the Report of Operations of No.4 Squadron dated 23rd-24th September 1917.

 

This officer was Leader of a flight of five machines detailed for an Offensive Patrol.

 

In the course of this patrol, a hostile two-seater was sighted and attacked and immediately afterwards a number of Albatross Scouts appeared and a general action took place.

 

Flight Commander Fisher was unfortunately wounded, and it has not been possible to obtain a report of his proceedings, but from the reports of the other pilots, it is evident that he fought with great gallantry.

 

Although badly wounded, he succeeded in bringing his machine back to the aerodrome and making a safe landing.

 

Flight Commander Fisher has frequently shown himself to be a most efficient and plucky flight leader.

 

In very heavy fighting which took place on August 22nd, between eight machines of No.4 Squadron and about 20 Albatross Scouts, he fought at least six combats singe-handed, shooting down one of his opponents out of control; on this occasion his machine was very badly damaged by machine-gun fire, having over 100 holes in it and both petrol tanks pierced; he made a safe landing having returned a few feet above the sea.

 

On September 10th he destroyed an enemy seaplane, which crashed into the sea about 12 miles north of Wonduyne.

 

I strongly recommend this officer for such honour or award as may be considered.

 

The Captain (R.N.) at RNAS Headquarters, Dunkerque, wrote on 27 September 1917 to the Vice-Admiral, Dover Patrol:

 

Submitted. Forwarded.

 

(2) In accordance with Admiralty Letter M.07302/17 of 2nd July 1917, Acting Flight Commander Phillip Sydney Fisher, DSC, is recommended for the award of the DSO.

 

(3) This officer was awarded a DSC on the 25th April 1917 and since that date has shown conspicuous skill and gallantry on many occasions.

 

(4) During the last two months he has led a flight with great courage.

 

(5) In addition to the acts mentioned above, since the award of the DSC, Acting Flight Commander Fisher has carried out numerous night bombing raids in addition to his day fighting.

 

(6) On the 23rd September he was unfortunately hit in the knee by an explosive bullet and it is feared that he will lose his leg.  Notwithstanding a shattered leg he brought his machine back safely and landed her undamaged.

 

On 18 October 1917 the Admiralty advised Vice-Admiral Commanding Dover Patrol that, in consequence of a report filed on 30 September, "the King has been pleased to approve of the appointment of Flight Commander Fisher to be a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLAVELLE, Captain Gordon Aird - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918 - Born 16 May 1897.  Home in Lindsay, Ontario (student).  Appointed Probationary Flying Officer with RNAS, Ottawa, 19 January 1917.  The card at DHist has several posting dates; his logbook indicates service with "A" (N) Squadron - later No.216 Squadron, 4 October 1917 to 23 March 1918; No.14 (N) Squadron, 23 March to 20 April 1917; No.207 Squadron, May 1918 to 30 August 1918; No.58 Squadron, 31 August to 12 September 1918; No.207 Squadron, 13 September 1918 to 7 April 1919.

 

On the night before one of our attacks, this officer was detailed for a special and most important duty which necessitated patrolling our advance lines.  He attempted to leave the ground at 10.00 p.m. but was forced to return owing to low clouds and driving rain.  Two hours later he made a second attempt in what appeared almost impossible weather condition; he, however, persevered.  Flying on a compass course, and judging the time necessary for the flight, he reached his objective and patrolled the lines for two hours and fifty minutes, returning to his aerodrome in a state of complete exhaustion after a flight of three and a half hours.  The courage, skill and determination exhibited by this officer cannot be too highly commended.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLEMING, Lieutenant Austin Lloyd - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918.  Home in Toronto (stock broker).  Accepted as RFC candidate and sailed from Montreal, 7 November 1916.  Appointed 2nd Lieutenant (on probation) with RFC, 17 November 1916; appointed Flying Officer, 13 May 1917.  With No.46 Squadron, 8 June to 4 July 1917.  Injured 11 September 1918.  Not clear what unit he was with when he won MC.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  He attacked a formation of three enemy machines and forced the leading machine, which was a two-seater, to land, although the other two were attacking him from behind.  He then attacked and destroyed another of the enemy machines and engaged the third, which succeeded in escaping.  He destroyed four enemy machines during one month and showed splendid courage and skill on many occasions.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLETCHER, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Ernest William - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918 and reported in Canada, 16 November 1918.  Described as a Canadian officer with the Essex Regiment.

 

This officer is a very brilliant artillery observer.  In this service he displays remarkable skill combined with clear judgement and perseverance. The success that has attended the numerous operations in which he has taken part is largely due to the valuable services rendered by this officer. By his energy and fine example he has brought his flight to a high state of efficiency.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1580 has recommendation forwarded by Headquarters, Second Brigade to Headquarters, Royal Air Force, 12 August 1918.

 

For conspicuous skill when flying in active operations against the enemy and devotion to duty.

 

I wish to draw attention to the extremely high speed at which this officer carries out his shoots.  He is one of the best artillery observers this Brigade has ever possessed.  By his energy and example he has brought his Flight to a high degree of efficiency.

 

The following are some instances of this officer's good work:-

 

14 July 1918  With 268 S (four 6-inch howitzers:- 50 ranging rounds in 40 minutes including one OK.1, three Z. etc.

31 reranging rounds in 22 minutes including one OK, two Y, three Z etc.

Three explosions and fires caused. 181 rounds observed.                    

 

10 July 1918  With 268 S (four 6-inch howitzers):- 85 ranging rounds in 59 minutes including one Y, two Z., seven A. etc.

30 reranging rounds in 22 minutes including one OK, two Y, five Z., etc.

Two explosions and a fire caused. 200 rounds observed.

 

6 July 1918    With 268 S (four 6-inch howitzers) - DOCUMENT DAMAGED AND REMAINDER OF THIS ENTRY MISSING.

16 June 1918            19 reranging rounds in ? minutes including three Z., seven A, four B, etc.

 

5 June 1918   With 88 S (four 6-inch howitzers):- 33 ranging rounds in 35 minutes including one OK, two Y, three Z.

30 reranging rounds in 29 minutes including four Y, six Z., etc.

31 reranging rounds in 32 minutes including one OK, four Y, four Z.

Explosion and series of fires caused; 18 plates exposed over required areas.

 

4 June 1918   With 88 S (three 6-inch howitzers):- 23 ranging rounds in 22 minutes including one Y, two Z, eleven A.

40 reranging rounds in ? minutes including four Y, four Z, etc.

20 reranging rounds in 19 minutes including one OK, three Y, four Z, etc.

Three explosions caused.

 

2 June 1918   With 268 S (three 6-inch howitzers):- 31 ranging rounds in 43 minutes including one Y, three Z, ten A.

20 reranging rounds in 23 minutes including one Y, one Z, seven A.

Two explosions caused.

 

26 May 1918 With 30 S (two 8-inch howitzers):- 31 ranging rounds in 35 minutes including three Z, seven A, etc.

38 reranging rounds in 36 minutes including one OK, two Y, etc.

39 reranging rounds in 40 minutes including one OK, four Y, three Z, etc.

Explosion and fire caused.

 

21 May 1918 With 88 S (three 6-inch howitzers):- 34 ranging rounds in 35 minutes including three Z, seven A, etc.

17 reranging rounds in 16 minutes including one Y, one Z, etc.

24 reranging rounds in 24 minutes including one Y, four Z, etc.

 

19 May 1918 With 30 S (two 8-inch howitzers):-33 ranging rounds in 35 minutes including one OK, two Y, two Z.

9 reranging rounds in ? including one OK, one Y, two Z, etc.

15 reranging rounds in - minutes, including one OK, one Y, two Z, etc.

Two small explosions caused.  Fire caused.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLETT, Flight Lieutenant Walter Ernest - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 May 1917 - Born in Toronto, 8 May 1887; home there; obtained ACA Certificate No.436 at Curtiss School, Newport News, 29 March 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Sub-Lieutenant, RNAS in Ottawa, 13 April 1916.  Served with No.3 (Naval) Wing and participated in Freiburg Raid when his gunner, Air Mechanic (1st Grade) R.C. Kimberley was wounded four times but managed to shoot down two enemy aircraft (awarded DCM).  Flett was sick in Canada for much of 1917 and invalided from RNAS as Flight Lieutenant, 25 March 1918.

 

For conspicuous gallantry during an air raid.  Shortly after leaving the objective he was engaged by three enemy machines - two single-seaters and one two-seater.  His gunlayer, Air Mechanic, 1st Grade, R.G. Kimberley, was slightly wounded in the wrist, which numbed his hand.  Notwithstanding this, he succeeded in bringing down two of the enemy machines, being again wounded by an explosive bullet in the ankle.  The machine was riddled with bullets, and owing to the damage navigation was most difficult and the return journey was very slow.  Consequently he was again attacked, but although the gunlayer was twice wounded, the enemy machine was driven off.

 

FLETT, Flight Lieutenant Walter Ernest - Croix de Guerre (France) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1917.  No citation other than "for distinguished services rendered during the war".

 

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FORMAN, Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) James Henry - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 July 1918; citation in London Gazette dated 3 August 1918.  Born 1 February 1896; home in Kirkfield, Ontario (farmer, school teacher).  Trained at Toronto Curtiss School but no certificate.  Appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 17 November 1916.  Trained at Crystal Palace, Vendome, Freiston and Dover.  Served in No.12 (N) Squadron (no dates), No.6 (N) Squadron (June 1917 until wounded, 28 July 1917), No.1 (N) Squadron, 29 September 1917 to 21 May 1918, and No.70 Squadron, 21 May 1918 until shot down and taken prisoner, 4 September 1918.  Repatriated 10 December 1918,

 

A skilful patrol leader who has displayed on all occasions a high standard of courage, endurance and skill.

 

In a period of ten months he has been engaged on seventy-seven offensive patrols, and has brought down three enemy aeroplanes in flames and five out of control.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FORSTER, Captain Kivas Burton - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Born 10 November 1891; educated in Britain; home given as London, England, but occupations as rancher (Red Deer, Alberta, June 1910 to April 1912) and bank clerk (Vancouver, May 1913 to September 1915).  Served in a Manitoba unit of CEF; attached to RFC on 30 August 1917; appointed Flying Officer, 18 February 1918.  Posted to No.62 Squadron, 30 October 1917; to No.7 Brigade, Italy, 13 March 1918; with No.34 Squadron, 17 March to 3 December 1918 (injured in aeroplane accident, 22 March 1918 but apparently not long hospotalized).

 

This officer has rendered most valuable service in co-operation with our artillery, displaying in this service keenness and devotion to duty worthy of high praise.  he also carried out, during one of the later battles, several patrols, obtaining much valuable information.

 

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FOSS, 2nd Lieutenant Roy Holmes - Croci di Guerra (Italy) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 February 1919.  Home in Sherbrooke, Quebec (student); member of 7th Canadian Siege Battery.  To No.14 Wing, Italian Expeditionary Force, 24 July 1918; with No.28 Squadron, 28 July 1918 to 10 February 1919.  Award not indicated on DHist cards; listed by Dodds.

 

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FOSTER, Lieutenant George Buchanan - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 November 1918.  Home in Montreal (law student); son of Senator G.G. Foster of Knowlton, Quebec.  Joined RFC in Canada, trained here, shown as 2nd Lieutenant sailing from Canada on 19 November 1917.  Served in No.24 Squadron, 8 March to 27 August 1918.

 

This officer has destroyed four enemy machines and driven a fifth down out of control.  He is an intrepid fighter, who on one occasion, in company with another pilot, attacked two kite balloons, shooting down one in flames and driving down the second in a deflated condition.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

**FOX, Captain John Bertram - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 May 1918.  Name appears on lists of Canadian-born officers but with no details as to origins.  Joined No.55 Squadron, 29 July 1917.

 

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  During a long period of two months he led his formation on six long-distance bombing raids into enemy territory.  On the last occasion, though engaged by three separate hostile formations, he dropped his bombs with excellent effect over his objective, and brought the whole of his formation back to the aerodrome intact.  His formation accounted for three enemy aeroplanes desroyed and four driven down out of control.  He has carried out upwards of 40 successful operations, his skill and leadership being of the highest order.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 1/1650 has recommendation submitted 27 March 1918 which identifies him as Flight Commander and has much more detail:

For consistent determination, gallantry and skill as a leader of long distance bomb raids, notably on the following occasions:

 

On March 24th two formations of six machines left to bomb the Chemical Factory at Ludwigshafen. Captain Fox was leader of the expedition and was leading the first formation of six machines.

 

The raid was attacked over Mannheim by twelve enemy aeroplanes and by two separate formations of ten enemy aeroplanes over Dieuze. In spite of this bombs were dropped with excellent effect over the objective, and though unfortunately two machines are missing, Captain Fox brought the whole of his formation back to the aerodrome intact, and from reports it would appear that his formation bore the brunt of the attacks.  Out of a total of three enemy aeroplanes destroyed and four driven down out of control, this formation was responsible for two destroyed and four driven down out of control.

 

Other raids into Germany include:-

 

On February 2nd       - Offenburg

   February 19th         - Treves

   February 20th         - Pirmasens

   March 16th  - Zweibrucken

   March 17th  - Kaiserlautern

 

He has also carried out two excellent Photographic Reconnaissances in the Luxembourg and Saarburg areas.

 

Captain Fox has done in all 38 successful operations and his leading on the long raids into Germany has been excellent. His mechanical ability has helped greatly to keep his flight at a high state of efficiency during the recent spell of fine weather.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FRASER, Flight Sub-Lieutenant Frederick Earle - Distinguished Service Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1917. Born in Regina; home in Winnipeg.  Appointed Sub-Lieutenant, RNVR, 16 December 1915.  Flew as observer and then as pilot; claimed to have flown six months on seaplane patrols on British east coast, seven months in France with No.3 (N) Wing;  in April 1917 at Killingholme, near Grimsby; RN List shows him in No.6 (N) Wing as of 18 June and 18 September 1917. To Canada, sick, 4 December 1917 to at least April 1918.  At Prawle Point in late 1918.  No citation.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FRASER, Captain Norman Graham - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1919. Born in Toronto, 20 July 1889; home there.  Passed tests at Toronto Curtiss School, 17 December 1916; appointed Probationary Flight Officer, RNAS, Ottawa, 17 December 1916.  At Crystal Palace 18 February 1917; at Vendome, 21 March 1917; at Cranwell, 9 June 1917; to Kellingholme, 28 July 1917; to Calshot, 10 September 1917; to Cattewater, 13 October 1917; to Felixstowe, 4 March 1918; to No.76 Wing, 7 November 1918; to No.231 Squadron, 13 March 1919; discharged 10 December 1919.  No citation.  He appears to have won the AFC by virtue of being a seaplane instructor at Kellingholme, Calshot and Cattewater; his stretch at Felixstowe was either learning or teaching on Large America flying boats.  Fraser subsequently joined the Canadian Air Board as a pilot-navigator and was assigned to the air station at Jericho Beach (Vancouver).  On 24 July 1921 he crashed a Felixstowe F.3 (G-CYDI) at Thurston Bay.  None of the five persons aboard were injured, but the court of inquiry was very critical of Fraser who was described as "inclined to be nervous in the air" and who was held to have over-reacted and put the aircraft down too heavily when an engine faltered or misfired. See RCAF file 1021-2-25, "F-3 Boats - G-CYDI" in National Archives of Canada, RG.24, Volume 5075.

 

FRASER, Captain Norman Graham - Member, Order of the British Empire  - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1919.  For services in north Russia.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FRENCH, Lieutenant Cecil Ernest - Mentioned for Valuable Services While in Captivity - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 December 1919.  Home in London, England (mother there) but served in CEF and home also given as St.Thomas, Ontario.  To RFC, 2 October 1916; served in No.56 Squadron, 18 April to 20 May 1917 when shot down and taken prisoner; held at Karlsruhe.  One of several listed in a block of awards to personnel "for gallantry while Prisoners of War in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, or for valuable services rendered in the Prison Camps of the enemy."

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FRENCH, 2nd Lieutenant H.H. - Brought to the Notice of the Secretary of State for Air in Respect of Valuable Service - Air Ministry List dated 29 August 1919 (found in Flight, issue of 4 September 1919).  Although identified as being with "Canadian Signals" there is no card in DHist files, no details available and he is not listed in Militia List of 1918. Public Record Office Air 1/1479/204/36/131 has a recommendation for a Mention in Despatches for Lieutenant (Temporary Captain) Hartley French, 3rd Battalion (Reserve), West Yorkshire Regiment and General Staff, attached to 1st Brigade, Royal Flying Corps, France.  This was forwarded on 5 October 1917 to Headquarters, Royal Flying Corps; it is not known as of 19 January 2000 if Hartley French" and "H.H. French" are the same or different. Text of document read:

 

This officer has carried out his duties as Staff Captain and Wing Adjutant with zeal and skill.