SALTER, W/C George William (41315) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.139 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 August 1944. Served in Canadian Army, 1934-1938; RAF, 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 29 October 1938; originally named Salzgeber. Home in North Battleford; in No.78 Squadron from outbreak of war to 15 May 1940; No.77 Squadron, 15 May to 15 August 1940 (wounded) and again, 3-8 November 1940; Driffield, 8 November to 3 December 1940. AFRO 365/41 dated 4 April 1941 reported his promotion to Flying Officer while with an RAF school in Canada; AFRO 1129/41 dated 3 October 1941 reported his promotion from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant while still in Canada. Air Ministry Bulletin 15067/AL.853 refers. AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944 (announcing his DFC) specifically identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. No published citation. Public Record Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 15 May when he had flown 61 sorties (292 hours 50 minutes). At the time of this recommendation he was a Flight Lieutenant. All sorties on first tour on Whitley aircraft; all sorties on second tour were in Mosquito aircraft.

 

First Tour Second Tour

8 May 40 Hirson (9.00) 29 Nov 43 Dusseldorf (2.20)

9 May 40 Charville Meziers (7.00) 2 Dec 43 Berlin (4.15)

11 May 40 Turin (8.25) 3 Dec 43 Berlin (4.25)

13 May 40 Abbeville (8.20) 10 Dec 43 Leverkusen (2.55)

14 May 40 Rheims (7.45) 13 Dec 43 Dusseldorf (2.35)

17 May 40 Gelsenkirchen (6.15) 22 Dec 43 Frankfurt (3.20)

18 May 40 Hanover (6.10) 29 Dec 43 Magdeburg (3.45)

20 May 40 Osnabruck (6.00) 4 Jan 44 Cologne (2.50)

21 May 40 Hamm (6.00) 5 Jan 44 Berlin (4.30)

24 May 40 Mannheim (5.35) 27 Jan 44 Berlin (4.05)

25 May 40 Kiel (7.45) 28 Jan 44 Hanover (3.30)

27 May 40 Cologne (6.30) 3 Feb 44 Dortmund (2.45)

29 May 40 Frankfurt (7.35) 5 Feb 44 Berlin (4.25)

2 June 40 Brussels (6.20) 8 Feb 44 Brunswick (3.25)

3 June 40 Hamburg (6.15) 10 Feb 44 Berlin (4.55)

7 June 40 Hamm (2.35) 15 Feb 44 Berlin (4.05)

13 June 40 Mannheim (6.35) 20 Feb 44 Munich (4.45)

28 June 40 Wismar (8.00) 9 Mar 44 Dusseldorf (2.35)

3 Aug 40 Mannheim (8.00) 10 Mar 44 Duisburg (2.35)

12 Aug 40 Rhinefelden (10.00) 15 Mar 44 Munich (4.40)

14 Aug 40 Bordeaux (9.00) 18 Mar 44 Kassel (3.35)

19 Mar 44 Berlin (4.00)

21 Mar 44 Cologne (2.30)

22 Mar 44 Berlin (4.25)

24 Mar 44 Berlin (4.40)

26 Mar 44 Hanover (3.05)

30 Mar 44 Nuremburg (4.10)

1 Apr 44 Hanover (3.05)


6 Apr 44 Hamburg (3.25)

9 Apr 44 Ludwigshaven (3.40)

10 Apr 44 Hanover (3.05)

12 Apr 44 Osnabruck (2.40)

13 Apr 44 Berlin (4.25)

27 Apr 44 Stuttgart (3.40)

1 May 44 Ludwigshaven (3.30)

6 May 44 Ludwigshaven (3.15)

7 May 44 Leverkusen (2.30)

9 May 44 Berlin (4.20)

10 May 44 Ludwigshaven (3.15)

12 May 44 Kiel Canal (3.10)

 

This officer has now completed 61 bombing sorties against the enemy.

 

He carried out a first tour of operations consisting of 21 sorties in Whitley aircraft in 1940. This tour was brought to an end prematurely by the fact that he was severely injured in an enemy bombing raid on an airfield at which he was then serving.

 

Since joining this squadron he has carried out a further 40 sorties on Mosquito aircraft. These sorties have been carried out against many of the most heavily defended enemy targets, and in many varied roles such as dropping spoof fighter flares, Window cover ahead of main force attacks and taking part in spoof attacks. His list of successful sorties include twelve attacks on Berlin.

 

All his sorties have been carried out with determination and a high standard of courage in the face of the enemy. For his long list of successful sorties and devotion to duty shown by this officer I recommend the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

SALTER, W/C George William (41315) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.33 Service Flying Training School, Carberry, Manitoba - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1946 for services with RAF in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 

SALZGEBER, George William - see SALTER.

 

* * * * *

 

SANDERS, F/O Evatt Anthony (106175) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.29 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 February 1943. Born in Brandon, Manitoba, 1908; educated in UK; RAFVR, 1940. AFRO 373/43 dated 5 March 1943 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 9216 refers.


As observer this officer has completed numerous operational sorties. On the night of 17th January 1943 he took part in the destruction of four enemy aircraft. Flying Officer Sanders has always displayed resolution and tenacity when pursuing the enemy.

 

* * * * *

 

SANDERS, Sergeant Henry Richard (581044) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 January 1941. Born 30 July 1918 at Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire. Educated at Lord Roberts School and Shaughnessy College, Vancouver, 1924-1932 and Kitsilano Technical High School, 1932 to 1936. Shipping clerk and newspaper reporter. In RCAF Auxiliary, 8 December 1936 to 13 January 1939 as an Aircraft Hand; all spent with No.11 (Army Cooperation) Squadron, Vancouver, rising to AC1. Arrived overseas, 1 February 1939. Enlisted in RAF, 1 May 1939 when mother living in England (she had apparently been widowed and remarried). Canada. Trained as an Air Observer; reported to No.83 Squadron, 6 December 1939; to Station Lossiemouth, 8 March 1940; to No.83 Squadron, 21 March 1940; to No.106 Squadron, 14 November 1940; to No.97 Squadron, 25 March 1941; to No.16 OTU, 13 August 1941; to No.44 Squadron, 26 November 1942. Shot down and taken prisoner, 21 December 1942; liberated by Americans on 1 May 1945. Transferred to RCAF as a Warrant Officer, 9 July 1945 (R225865); commissioned later (J53370) but backdated to 1 February 1945; promoted Flying Officer, 1 August 1945; repatriated 23 July 1945; released 16 October 1946. Postwar accountant and tax assessor. Rejoined the RCAF Auxiliary as a Fighter Controller (58064), serving 7 January 1951 to 3 July 1956 with No.2442 Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron. Air Ministry Bulletin 2784 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/9250 (Non-Immediate Awards, Bomber Command, November 1940) has recommendation dated 25 November 1940 when he was a Sergeant Air Observer, No.83 Squadron, holding appointment as a Bomb Aimer/Navigator,"B" Flight. He had flown 30 hours (207 hours 35 minutes).

 

The above named Non-Commissioned Officer is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Meal for continuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He has been a member of a crew on 30 operations against the enemy; on 14 of these flights he was employed as Air Gunner and 16 as Navigator/Bomb Aimer. He has completed 207 hours 35 minutes operational flying included in which are four attacks on targets in Berlin. His outstanding coolness and ability both as a navigator and bomb aimer has ensured many successful operations, such qualities being illustrated by an occasion on which he was Air Gunner in an operational crew , when the Navigator baled out and the Wireless Operator/Air Gunner was sick in the air. Sergeant Sanders took over the duties as Navigator and the aircraft was successfully landed at base.

 


NOTE: On a form dated 16 July 1945 he stated he had flown 300 operational hours (37 sorties) and 500 non-operational hours. In applying for the 1939-45 Star he stated his first operational sortie had been 17 April 1940; in applying for Aircrew Europe Star he gave his first sortie as 27 May 1940.

 

* * * * *

 

SCAMMELL, Warrant Officer Bernard Thomas (798725) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.10 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943. From Newfoundland (listed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 listing Newfoundlanders in the RAF gives date of enlistment as 9 September 1941; killed in action 24 June 1943. Citation published in Flight, 26 August 1943.

 

On several occasions this airman has displayed remarkable efficiency in repairing intercommunication failures in the minimum of time, and he has twice had his set almost to pieces and together again and in working order in less than an hour. Although his aircraft has several times been damaged by anti-aircraft fire, being twice attacked by enemy night fighters and has once force-landed, this airman has never lost his enthusiasm and keenness to participate in operations.

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation dated 11 May 1943 (found in Public Record Office Air 2/8964) in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000). He had flown 26 sorties (154 operational hours).

 

Flight Sergeant Scammell was posted to this squadron in October 1942, and after completing 26 successful operational sorties, has today been screened for posting as a Wireless Instructor. This Non-Commissioned Officer has throughout his tour been an outstanding member of a particularly successful crew. On several occasions he has shown admirable efficiency in repairing intercom failures in the minimum of time and he has twice had his set almost to pieces and together again in working order in less than an hour. Although his aircraft has several times been damaged by flak, twice attacked by enemy fighters and has once crashed returning from operations, Flight Sergeant Scammell has never for a moment lost his enthusiasm and keenness for operations. This Non-Commissioned Officer's work as a Wireless Operator has, from the commencement of his tour, been almost flawless and I am confident that he is now about to prove himself equally capable as a Wireless Instructor in his new unit as he has been on operations with this squadron.

 

* * * * *

 


SCHWAB, F/L Lloyd Gilbert (37831) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 July 1941. Born in Niagara Falls, 22 January 1915; educated there. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 4 May 1936; with No.112 Squadron, 23 July 1940 to 26 June 1941; Operations Room, Helipolis, June 1941; to UK, October 1941; Flying Instructor, Central Flying School; also instructed in Canada; returned to Canada 1944. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 4420 refers.

 

This officer has led his squadron in combat with considerable skill and has personally destroyed eleven enemy aircraft. He has displayed great courage and determination.

 

SCHWAB, S/L Lloyd Gilbert (37831) - Distinguished Flying Cross (Greece) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942.

 

* * * * *

 

SCOTT, F/L Eric Gresham (39688) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated ? January 1941. Born 1916 in England; home in Estevan for a time, though most of education seems to have been in England. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 9 May 1937.

 

SCOTT, W/C Eric Gresham (39688) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.90 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 19737/AL.1070 refers. No citation.

 

* * * * *

 

SCOTT, F/L George Gilbert (102620) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945. Born 1920 in Bourne End, Buckinghamshire. Enlisted October 1940; commissioned July 1941. Wife living in Calgary (which may have been his only Canadian connection). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, confirms that he married in Canada and that his wife was living in Calgary. Air Ministry Bulletin 20087/AL.1099 refers.

 

...has completed a tour of operational duty. He has attacked such heavily defended targets as Hamburg, Dortmund and Essen. In January 1945 he was detailed to take part in an attack against Magdeburg. On approaching the target his aircraft encountered heavy anti-aircraft fire but, with great skill and courage, he continued to the target which was successfully attacked. As Deputy Flight Commander, Flight Lieutenant Scott has set an inspiring example by his outstanding keenness for operational flying, courage and steadfast devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 


SECTER, S/L John Jacob (85773) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944. Born 14 October 1914 in Winnipeg. Attended University of Manitoba, 1930-31 (Engineering). Went to Britain in 1936 to join RAF and passed Selection Committee in August 1936; commenced flying training but failed to meet standards. Remained in Britain where he married a Canadian girl. Obtained a civilian pilots license in 1938. Was on a Mediterranean cruise when war broke out. Enlisted in Cairo, 15 February 1940. Commissioned as Pilot Officer on Probation, 22 August 1940 in Administration and Special Duties Branch. Served in Middle East until April 1944, operating with 2nd Armoured Car Squadron, RAF, from Cyrenaca to Tripoli (seconded to British 7th Hussars), June 1941 to June 1942, after which he was posted to command RAF Station Hadera, Palestine. Transferred to RCAF, 27 April 1945 (C94026); repatriated 7 June 1945; released 29 August 1945. AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

* * * * *

 

SERVICE, F/L William (49268) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 July 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 10937 refers. Born in Vancouver, 20 January 1916; educated there. Left Canada, 13 May 1939; enlisted in RAF, 10 July 1939 as 581309 Aircraftman 2nd Class under training as Air Observer; reclassified Leading Aircraftman, 11 July 1939; appointed Acting Sergeant and remustered Acting Observer, 25 November 1939; promoted Flight Sergeant, and remustered Air Observer, 25 May 1940; promoted Flight Sergeant, 1 April 1941; promoted Warrant Officer, 1 February 1942; commissioned 18 June 1942 as Pilot Officer on Probation (General Duties); promoted Flying Officer on Probation, 19 December 1942; confirmed in rank, date unknown; Flight Lieutenant, 19 Jun 1944. Flew with No.53 Squadron (18 April to 13 June 1940 in France, 14 June to 26 October 1940 in UK); 44 sorties, 100 hours 40 minutes operational time as navigator. Served in No.2 School of Army Cooperation, 27 October 1940 to 19 July 1941 (although on a form he states he was with No.42 OTU, October 1940 to May 1942). With No.614 Squadron, 3 October 1942 to 4 March 1943 (North Africa); No.114 Squadron, 4 March to 3 May 1941 (North Africa); No.223 Squadron, 4 May to 31 July 1943 (North Africa); No.216 Squadron (Dakotas, 1 August 1943 to 1 April 1944 in North Africa, 1 April to 13 June 1944 in India, and with main squadron thereafter to 29 January 1945; No.282 Wing Operations Room, 30 January 1945. Transferred to RCAF, 1 April 1945 while in Cairo (C94012); repatriated 9 July 1945; released 7 September 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/8971 (Non-Immediate Awards, North-West Africa, Fighter and Flying Training Commands, 1943) has recommendation dated 5 June 1943, emanating from No.114 Squadron, crediting him with 680 hours flown (135 in previous six months), 174 operational hours and 70 operational sorties:

 

This officer has now completed 26 operational sorties on his second tour of operations bringing his total to over seventy. He has always shown the utmost coolness and determination in the face of heavy enemy opposition and his skill as a Navigator/Bomb Aimer are of the highest order.

 

This is further refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee as follows (published in Air Force Routine Order 1724/43):

 

Flying Officer Service, now on his second tour of operational duty, has completed a large number of operational sorties. In the face of heavy enemy opposition he has always displayed utmost coolness and determination, while his skill as navigator-bomb aimer is of the highest order.

 


NOTE: On a form dated 28 May 1945 he summarized his service as having flown 450 operational hours and 1,400 non-operational hours; he had flown Blenheim IV and Vs (approximately 650 hours), Boston (60 hours), Baltimore (40 hours) and Dakota (1,100 hours). An assessment made 27 June 1944 (No.216 Squadron) stated he had flown 1,650 hours, 500 in previous six months, and was considered "an efficient officer". An interview report dated 28 May 1945 confirmed the figure of 450 operational hours (78 sorties).

 

* * * * *

 

SHAKERI, F/O Pedro Louis Alpha (113016) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Marine launch operator; from Halifax. Commissioned as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the Administration and Special Duties Branch, 28 November 1941; confirmed as Pilot Officer on Probation, 28 January 1942.

 

* * * * *

 

SIMPSON, F/L Allan James (41747) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 August 1942. Born in Delhi, Alberta, 2 January 1915; home there; trooper in Lord Strathcona Horse. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 4 March 1939. AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942 (reporting DSO award) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. With No.13 Squadron, 18 December 1939 to 19 November 1940 (hospitalized); award for services in No.6 Squadron. Transferred to RCAF (C89524), 19 December 1944; repatriated January 1945; remained with postwar RCAF (service number 20077), attaining the rank of Squadron Leader on 1 June 1948. Much time spent with Canadian Joint Staff, Washington. Died in Ottawa, 4 July 1999.

 

In June 1942 this officer led a fighter formation in an attack on a large number of enemy armoured vehicles. Although he was wounded in the chest by enemy ground fire, he continued to attack and obtained several hits on the objective. Although weakened by the loss of blood and with his right arm useless, he attempted to gain height and evade the heavy barrage, but his aircraft was hit. Hot oil sprayed over his face and being unable to see, owing to smoke which was penetrating into the cockpit, he was forced to leave his aircraft by parachute at about 500 feet. Flight Lieutenant Simpson descended safely, however, and was rescued by one of our ambulance units. Throughout he displayed great gallantry and outstanding devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

SINCLAIR, P/O George Leslie (or Leonard) (41748) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 July 1940. Born in St.Mary, Kent; home in Bagot, Manitoba. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 4 March 1939. Air Ministry Bulletin 1203 refers. In No.26 Squadron, 18 December 1939 to 4 May 1941. No published citation. A Sergeant G.R. Stephenson who appears to have been his usual gunner received a DFM at the same time. Public Records Office Air 2/6075 (Non-Immediate Awards, Air Component of the Field Force, 1940) has recommendation dated 29 May 1940, giving his name as Leslie and rank as Pilot Officer:


During the course of operations between 10th and 28th May 1940, Pilot Officer Sinclair has displayed coolness, courage and devotion to duty above the average. In particular on the 19th of May, 1940, whilst on a reconnaissance sortie in the Peronne area he found and attacked enemy tanks under heavy anti-aircraft fire. In spite of the fact that his machine was badly damaged by this fire he returned to a British aerodrome bringing back useful information.

 

On Monday, 27th May, whilst under heavy and very accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire he saw a large force of tanks in the St.Pol area. Despite the fire he came low and identified and attacked the enemy, returning again to his base with very valuable information.

 

For his coolness under fire and his courage, Pilot Officer Sinclair is recommended for the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This was further refined for submission to the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

In a reconnaissance sortie in the Peronne area on the 19th May, 1940, this Pilot Officer attacked enemy tanks under heavy anti-aircraft fire. He returned to a British aerodrome with useful information despite his machine being badly damaged. Regardless of heavy and very accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire he attacked a large force of tanks in the St.Pol area on the 27th May and secured very valuable information. In all operations between the 10th and 28th May Pilot Officer Sinclair has displayed coolness, courage and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

SINNOTT, WO John Dierney (798576) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.176 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 - From Newfoundland; Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 listing Newfoundlanders in the RAF states he enlisted 10 September 1940; left Newfoundland for BCATP training, 12 September 1940; graduated as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, 26 May 1941; sailed for United Kingdom, 18 June 1941. See Kerri Button, The Forgotten Years: The Formation of the 125th (Newfoundland) Squadron, Royal Air Force, 1938-1941 (university paper, institution not mentioned; copy held by National Aviation Museum). Also listed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). Demobilized as a Flying Officer (177197) on 10 March 1946. Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 5 Jul 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (176 hours).

 

23 Nov 43 Berlin 30 Mar 44 Nuremburg

26 Nov 43 Berlin 11 Apr 44 Aachen

2 Dec 43 Hanover (last resort) 20 Apr 44 Cologne

20 Dec 43 Mannheim 22 Apr 44 Dusseldorf

23 Dec 43 Berlin 24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe


29 Dec 43 Berlin 26 Apr 44 Essen

5 Jan 44 Stettin 7 May 44 Bruz

14 Jan 44 Brunswick 9 May 44 Merville

31 Jan 44 Berlin 11 May 44 Hasselt

19 Feb 44 Leipzig 19 May 44 Orleans

20 Feb 44 Stuttgart 21 May 44 Duisburg

24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt 22 May 4 Dortmund

25 Feb 44 Augsburg 24 May 44 Aachen

22 Mar 44 Frankfurt 31 May 44 Tergnier

24 Mar 44 Berlin

 

Warrant Officer Sinnott (a Newfoundlander) is a Wireless Operator (Air) who has now completed 29 operational sorties against the enemy, the more outstanding of these being on Mannheim, Stettin, Brunswick, Leipzig and Berlin, the latter on six occasions.

 

Warrant Officer Sinnott takes exceptional care in the maintenance of the wireless equipment he uses and consequently no failures have occurred during any of his operational sorties. Throughout he has set a magnificent example to the fellow members of his crew by his coolness under fire, whilst his outstanding ability and strong sense of duty have largely been responsible for his fine record of achievement. The award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to Warrant Officer Sinnott would be a fitting recognition of such valuable and courageous services.

 

* * * * *

 

SKEY, F/L Laurence Wilton (39423) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.228 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1940. Born in London, Ontario, 29 November 1911. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the RAF, 28 January 1937. Notes compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History) describe his early service career in great detail; served with No.228 Squadron from outbreak of war to 7 May 1940. He participated in many early patrols aiding crews of torpedoed ships and looking for German warships breaking out into the Atlantic. Subsequent to his DFC, he was very active in the Norwegian ccampaign. Ferried Liberator AL534 to Britain, November-December 1941; ferried PBY FP246 to Britain, October 1942. Commanded No.422 Squadron, 1 July 1942 to 26 October 1943. Transferred to RCAF (C46953), 10 July 1944 whilst on the staff of No.1 General Reconnaissance School. Released 13 March 1946. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".

 

SKEY, W/C Laurence Wilton (39423) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.

 

* * * * *

 


SMITH, F/O Donald Taylor (102564) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.226 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1942. Born 2 August 1909 in Port Colbourne, Ontario; educated in St.Catharines, Ontario, but eventually gave his home as Oakville, Ontario. Employed as a clerk by Northern Electric, Toronto, 1929-32, by Toronto Daily Star as journalist, 1932-34, Associated Publishing House, Shanghai, China, 1934-37 (self employed), and by Stone and Cox Publishers, London, January 1938 to enlistment. Enlisted as 1379861, Aircraftman 2nd Class (Aircraft Hand Pilot), 2 October 1940; reclassified as Leading Aircraftman and remustered under training as Pilot, 30 November 1940; commissioned 22 June 1941; promoted Flying Officer, 22 June 1942; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 28 August 1943. He summarized his postings as follows: No.4 ITW, Paighton, Devonshire, October 1940 to December 1940; EFTS at Sywell, January to March 1941; No.32 SFTS, Moose Jaw, March to June 1941; No.17 OTU, Upwood, July to October 1941; No.226 Squadron, November 1941 to April 1943; to No.34 OTU, Pennfield Ridge, June 1943. Transferred to RCAF (C46810), 10 July 1944, while on the staff of No.6 OTU. To No.4 Release Centre, 1 October 1945; released 18 October 1945. AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942 (reporting his DFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 8087 refers and publishes the following citation with only minor differences.

 

This officer was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to lay a smoke screen along an area at Dieppe during the combined operations. In the face of intense opposition from the ground defences, Flying Officer Smith began his release run. When half way over the target a shell shattered the windscreen, wounding him in the face and a piece of perspex became imbedded in his right eye. Despite this he bravely pressed on and completed his task successfully. On the return flight Flying Officer Smith's left eye also became affected by powdered perspex causing him great discomfort but he eventually flew his aircraft back to this country and made a safe landing. Throughout this officer displayed the highest qualities of courage and resolution.

 

NOTE: In a letter dated 19 February 1944 to the Commanding Officer, No.34 OTU, he wrote, in part:

 

I was in Europe at the outbreak of war and upon reaching England offered my services to the RCAF through the offices of Canada House. I was informed that in view of my age and conditions then existing my chances of becoming eligible for flying crew were negligible. I then approached the RAF and finally in October 1940 was accepted for pilot's training in the RAFVR.

 

* * * * *

 


SMITH, F/L Donald William MacKay (41483) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942. Born Sackville, New Brunswick, 26 June 1917; home in Elgin, New Brunswick; educated in Preston, Ontario, 1925-1936. Office and bank clerk in Preston and Galt Ontario. Applied for Short Service Commission in RAF, 4 May 1938. Medical examination at London, Ontario, 26 August 1938; interviewed by RCAF officers (including A/C L.S. Breadner) on 20 September 1938; advised next day that he had been selected for appointment. Sailed for England, 23 September 1938 aboard SS Ascania. Pupil Pilot, RAF, 6 October 1938, training at the Blackburn Aircraft Company school. Appointed as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 December 1938; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 6 October 1939; promoted to Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; to Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941. Attained rank of Wing Commander. In No.218 Squadron, March 1940 to 20 May 1941; OTU instructor between tours; commanded No.428 Squadron, 21 February to 14 September 1943 (Halifax MK913, POW); reported safe, 7 May 1945. Transferred to RCAF with effect from 24 November 1944 (C94093); repatriated 23 July 1945; released 20 September 1945. AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943 (reporting him missing), AFRO 2507/43 dated 3 December 1943 (reporting him a POW) and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945 (reporting his liberation) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

SMITH, S/L Donald William MacKay (41483) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943.

 

SMITH, W/C Donald William MacKay (41483) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 10475 refers. Citation published in Flight, 1 July 1943.

 

Wing Commander Smith has completed a large number of operational sortie, ten of them being daylight raids. He is an ideal leader and his cheerful courage and unselfishness had been a great factor in the squadron's success.

 

DHist cards give a slightly different summary:

 

...large number of sorties, including ten daylight raids...an ideal leader...cheerful courage and unselfishness a great factor in squadron's success...has always displayed skill and determination of highest degree...an inspiration to all ranks.

 

* * * * *

 

SMITH, W/C Forgrave Marshall (37613) - Mention in Despatches - unit unknown - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944. Born 17 March 1913 in Edmonton. Educated in Westmount abd Victoria. Served in Canadian Army, 1933-1936. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 2 March 1936.

 

SMITH, W/C Forgrave Marshall (37613) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Award effective 23 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 30 October 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Air Ministry Bulletin 20075/AL.1095 refers.

 


Wing Commander Smith has completed four tours of operational duty. His first and second tours were completed during the Battle of Britain and consisted of interception sorties, convoy patrols and day and night air cover over Dunkirk, France and Belgium. His third operational tour was completed in the Middle East and his fourth in Burma. This officer has destroyed at least five enemy aircraft and damaged others. He has recently taken part in operations against Japanese lines of communications over mountainous and dangerous country. As Wing Commander (Flying) of his present unit he has displayed exceptional keenness at all times.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9287 has original recommendation by G/C G.P. Marvin dated 27 July 1945 when he was credited with 346 hours operational flying time and was Wing Commander (Flying) of No.902 Wing, No.224 Group.

 

Wing Commander Smith is in his fourth operational tour and has carried out 280 operational sorties involving 346 hours flying.

 

This officer's first and second tours were carried out during the Battle of Britain and consisted of interception, convoy patrols, day and nigh air cover over Dunkirk and sweeps over France and Belgium during which time he carried out 236 operational sorties involving 300 hours flying. During the Battle of Britain he was wounded in the head by a cannon shell. His third tour was carried out in the Middle East and consisted of bomber escorts and fighter sweeps over Alamein involving 16 sorties totalling 17 hours flying. This tour was terminated on his posting to India.

 

During the above operational tours he has destroyed three Ju.88s, one Do.17, one Me.109 and damaged one Me.110 and three Me.109s.

 

Wing Commander Smith is now in his fourth operational tour and has carried out 28 operational sorties involving 30 hours flying in the Burma theatre of operations. He has taken part in escort to bombers, bombing and ground strafing Japanese positions and sampans over the worst type of country to be found in any theatre of operations. His record shows that he has been almost continuously on operational flying throughout the present hostilities.

 

As Wing Commander Sweep Leader during his present tour he has displayed exceptional keenness and has at all times set a very high example to the pilots of the squadrons in the wing.

 

To this, the Air Officer Commanding, No.224 Group, adds on 4 August 1945:

 

During his appointment as Wing Commander Flying in the Burma campaign Wing Commander Smith has displayed a fine sense of leadership and his courage and devotion to duty have been largely responsible for the offensive spirit of this wing. This and his previous operational record make him worthy of the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for which he is strongly recommended.

 

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SMITH, F/L James Duncan (40325) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942. Home in Winnipeg. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 28 January 1937; served in No.73 Squadron (Dunkirk, Battle of Britain, North Africa). Credited with the following victories: 11 September 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed and one damaged; 15 September 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed in flames; 16 December 1940, one SM.79 destroyed near Bardia plus one CR.42 probably destroyed; 18 December 1940, one SM.79 destroyed. Killed in action 14 April 1941, aged 27; buried in Knightsbridge War Cemetery, Libya. Commonwealth War Graves Commission record states, "Son of William and Alexandrina Smith of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada." DHist cards list a James Duncan Smith as being with the RCAF, 8 November 1934 to 16 January 1936 and gives a file reference 4095-A; this man had been born 17 March 1914 which would have made him 27 in 1941. It is not known if the two men are the same; but the probability is that they are.

 

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SMITH, F/L Robert Rutherford (40952) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.112 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 23 February 1943. Born in London, Ontario, 17 August 1915; home there; educated there. Applied for Short Service Commission, 31 August 1937; first medical examination not favourable; examined again, 2 November 1937; tentatively accepted as of 9 April 1938 and ordered to Ottawa for final interviews; these held on 2 May 1938 (G//C Stedman) and he was issued travel warrants to travel on SS Antonia. Sailed from Canada, 6 May 1938. Pupil Pilot, RAF, 16 May to 8 July 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 July 1938; confirmed in appointment as Pilot Officer, 16 May 1939; promoted Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941. Trained at No.3 FTS, Hamble and South Cerney. In No.229 Squadron at outbreak of war. Wounded, 15 September 1940 in action over Kent (bullet through left leg). Flying instructor in England and South Africa until August 1942 when posted to No.112 Squadron. Shot down in Kittyhawk FR325, 45 miles northwest of Foumtatouin, 1530 hours, 10 March 1943 (Prisoner of War). Transferred to RCAF with effect from 24 November 1944 (C94080); repatriated 23 July 1945; released 16 November 1945. Died in Montreal, 17 November 1965. AFRO 513/43 dated 26 March 1943 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943 (reporting him a POW) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Credited with the following victories: 29 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed; 1 June 1940, one Ju.87 destroyed; 11 September 1940, one He.111 destroyed (possibly two other victories in 1940); 1 October 1942. one Bf.109 probably destroyed; 22 October 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed; 31 October 1942, one Ju.87 (Italian Air Force) destroyed; 31 December 1942, one Bf.109G destroyed plus one MC.202 destroyed.

 

Flight Lieutenant Smith is a courageous fighter. In October 1942, on his first sortie with the squadron, he shot down one of four Messerschmitts which were intercepted. Some days later, during a bomber sortie, he destroyed an Italian aircraft after evading an enemy fighter which had pursued him. In December 1942, Flight Lieutenant Smith destroyed two enemy aircraft on one sortie, bringing his total victories to eight. He has displayed great keenness and determination.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 19 July 1945 he estimated his service at 450 operational hours (150 sorties), 1,000 non-operational hours.

 


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SMITHERS, F/O Alfred William James (178944) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.37 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 February 1945. Born in Egham, Surrey, 1920; home there; educated at Farnham Intermediate School, Quebec (which means a rather tenuous Canadian connection). Served in the ranks; commissioned June 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 17524/AL.976 refers.

 

Now on his second tour of operational duty, Flying Officer Smithers has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. He has attacked targets in Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia and northern Italy, both in daylight and at night. In August 1944 he was detailed for an attack on the Ploesti oil refineries. Much opposition was experienced from enemy night fighters while en route and over the target area. This officer gave his captain valuable assistance in evading enemy attacks. Flying Officer Smithers has also participated in three daylight attacks on the railway sidings at Sarajevo, despite considerable fire from the ground defences and by his cool and concise directions he enabled successful evasive action to be taken. Throughout his operational career he has displayed great keenness and devotion to duty.

 

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SNELL, F/O Fred Wace (39349) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.88 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 July 1940 - Born in Bruisyard, Saxmundham, Suffolk; supposedly from Saskatoon but Canadian credentials are uncertain; Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, merely states that he married in Canada. Enlisted April 1936; commissioned 21 December 1936; promoted to Flying Officer, 12 July 1939; to Flight Lieutenant, 19 December 1940; in India, 1944-45. Public Record Office Air 2/8884 has recommended citation.

 

During May 1940, this officer has taken part in five night and four day operational flights in Battle aircraft. Despite strong enemy opposition, Flying Officer Snell has carried out his attacks successfully on each occasion and returned safely to his base. This officer has displayed great courage and skill.

 

NOTE: The same document has the quota formula for Advanced Air Striking Force non-immediate awards for May 1940. There had ben 1,444 flying hours carried over from April 1940, to which were added 2,223 hours in May (total of 2,667). Application of a divisor (150) gave a figure of 24 awards, but there had already been 17 immediate awards plus two Victoria Cross awards made, leaving only five. The Advanced Air Striking Force was, on this occasion, recommending 38 awards (one Bar to DFC, 17 DFCs, 17 DFMs, one MM and two Military Medals).

 

SNELL, W/C Fred Wace (39349) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.82 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 October 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 20017/AL.1097 refers. With Ministry of Supply, London as of 1954.


Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, Wing Commander Snell has completed many sorties including close support operations and low level attacks on bridges and oil installations. He has obtained many excellent and valuable photographs and his work has at all times been characterized by sound organization, enterprise and determination. The personal contribution made by this officer in the advance from Imphal to the capture of Rangoon is a very outstanding and notable one.

 

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SODERHOLM, F/O Samuel Gustav (40194) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941. From Kimberley, British Columbia (Commonwealth War Graves Commission gives parents as "John Gustaf and Jenny Soderholm on Kimberley, British Columbia".. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 6 October 1937; confirmed in that rank, 31 May 1938; served in No.14 Squadron; killed in action 3 July 1940, aged 26. Name on El Alamein Memorial.

 

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SPRINTALL, P/O Robert Basil Taylor (189283) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.77 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1945. Born 1921 in Ontario; educated at Prince of Wales School in Ontario and Haworth Schools, Yorkshire. Enlisted 1941; trained in Canada; commissioned 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 18789/AL.1018 refers. No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty".

 

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SPROULE, W/C John Alexander (39692) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.48 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 October 1944. Born Brandon, Manitoba, 23 November 1917. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 9 May 1937. AFRO 142/42 dated 30 January 1942 reported his promotion to Squadron Leader, effective 1 December 1941, while with an RAF school in Canada. Ferried Boston BZ250 from Canada overseas via Brazel and Natal, December 1942; ferried PBY JX269 to Britain, September 1943. Later transferred to RCAF (C89500), commanded No.437 Squadron and awarded Netherlands Bronze Lion (see RCAF awards data base). In postwar RCAF; awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 as a Wing Commander in London. Photos PL-33876 and PL-33879 show him. AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944 (announcing his award) also confirmed him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 16017/AL.899 refers.

 


One morning in August 1944, Wing Commander Sproule led his squadron on a vital supply mission to France. While over the target his aircraft was hit by light anti-aircraft fire in many places. Although the aircraft had sustained much damage and the rudder was useless, a course was set for a landing ground which was safely reached. Almost as the aircraft touched down it collided against a tree. Even so, a successful crash landing was effected. This officer displayed exceptional skill and great determination in the face of most adverse circumstances.

 

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ST.PIERRE, F/O Maurice Arthur Joseph (59543) - Air Force Cross - No.206 Advance Flyng School - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 June 1953.

 

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STANSFELD, F/L Noel Karl (42272) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.242 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 October 1940. Born 25 February 1915 in Edmonton; educated in Vancouver, 1921-36. Worked on Vancouver Stock Exchange, 1936-1939. Served in No.11 (Army Co-Operation) Squadron, RCAF, Vancouver, 28 March to 13 June 1935 (left owing to employment pressures, Vancouver Stock Exchange). Pupil pilot, RAF, 1 May 1939; trained at No.3 E and R FTS, May to July 1939; appointed Pilot Officer on Probation, 24 June 1939; training at No.8 FTS, Montrose, July to December 1939; flew with No.242 Squadron, 3 February 1940 to 29 September 1940; No.229 Squadron, 29 September to uncertain date (wounded ?); confirmed as Pilot Officer, 1 May 1940; Flying Officer, 27 December 1940 (although was Acting Flight Lieutenant earlier); confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 27 December 1941; Squadron Leader on 12 May 1943. At No.34 SFTS, Medicine Hat, January 1941 to October 1942; No.32 OTU, Patricia Bay, October 1942 to September 1943; No.2 FIS, Montrose, January to March 1944; No.20 (P) AFU, Kidlington, April to July 1944; No.2 FIS, July 1944 to February 1945; transferred to RCAF, 12 February 1945 (C89571); with No.426 Squadron, 26 June to 31 December 1945; with No.436 Squadron, 8 January to 11 February 1946 when posted to Headquarters, No.120 Wing; returned to Canada, 10 July 1946; Station Sea Island, 24 August 1946 to 18 October 1948; released 15 December 1948. Awarded Czech Medal for Bravery, 1948. Credited with the following victories: 22 May 1940, Hs.126 destroyed; 31 May 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed; 1 June 1940, one Ju.87 probably destroyed; 30 August 1940, one He.111 destroyed; 7 September 1940, one Do.215 destroyed; 15 September 1940, one Do.17 destroyed plus one He.111 destroyed; 27 September 1940, one Ju.88 probably destroyed. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 1892 refers.

 

This officer has destroyed seven enemy aircraft during engagements over Dunkirk and England. He has exhibited excellent fighting qualities, initiative and marked powers of leadership.

 

NOTE: It is interesting to read S/L Bader's assessment of him from 26 September 1940, at which time he had flown 422 hours (198 hours 25 minutes in previous six months):

 


Conduct, very satisfactory. Temperate. This officer is the first Canadian in the squadron [sic]. He has a good brain, plenty of courage and is most reliable. Has a mature sense of judgement and is an excellent pilot. In combat he is ferocious and a good shot. Have a very high opinion of this officer and consider he should make a good Flight Commander with a little more experience. The best junior section leader in the squadron.

 

Yet he may have been affected by "burn out". On 2 September 1942, at No.34 SFTS, G/C A. ap Ellis wrote of him, "An extremely loyal officer. Is a Canadian serving in the RAF. Splendid spirit and a good example to others". On 22 September 1943, G/C E.S. Weston (No.32 OTU) wrote of him as "a loyal officer; suited to instructional duties); two days later, S/L N.K. Lloyd (No.32 OTU) wrote, "A good average training officer - not likely to provide good leadership on operations", while G/C E.L. Wurtelle assessed him as follows: "Has done good work in conversion flight; a loyal officer more suited for training duties". At No.20 (P) AFU, however, having flown 1,579 hours 25 minutes (120 hours 55 minutes in previous six months), G/C N.W. Timmerman wrote:

 

An above average officer who is a useful flying instructor and has done a good job as assistant to the Wing Commander Training.

 

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STEPHENS, F/L Dale Rupert (49282) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.122 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945. From Duncan, British Columbia; served in No.122 Squadron. DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing Canadians in the RAF, early 1940, includes him as an Aircraftman Second Class (646808) but gives next-of-kin as an aunt living in Reading, Buckinghamshire. File 181.005 D.271 listing CAN/RAF personnel in 1941 identifies him as a Leading Aircraftman, Fitter (Engines) with No.242 Squadron. After remustering he served with No.122 Squadron and was credited with the following victories: 4 January 1944, one FW.190 probably destroyed; 6 January 1944, one FW.190 damaged; 12 December 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed (there is some question on Directorate of History cards if this was with No.122 or No.65 Squadron). Transferred to RCAF (C94023) 17 April 1945. Although placed on Class "E" Reserve on 30 June 1945, he returned to the RCAF and was still active when cards compiled on which were based the DHist microfilm.

 

This officer has displayed a high degree of skill and courage in his attacks on the enemy. He has taken part in a large number of varied sorties during which he has attacked numerous locomotives, barges and mechanical vehicles with good results. Flight Lieutenant Stephens has shot down two enemy aircraft.

 

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STICKLEY, S/L Laurence John (34252) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.40 Squadron -awarded as per London Gazette 2 September 1941. Born in Lethbridge, Alberta, 12 August 1912; educated there. Appointed Provisional Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 September 1934; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 14 September 1935; promoted to Flying Officer, 14 March 1937; promoted Acting Flight Lieutenant, 22 April 1938; confirmed as a Flight Lieutenant, 14 March 1939; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 September 1940; to Wing Commander, 1 December 1941. Served in India, 1936-1938; with No.40 Squadron, 15 May 1941 to uncertain date. Joined staff of Air Member for Supply and Organization, 20 July 1942. Remained in RAF postwar and rose to Group Captain (1 January 1952); retired 1 June 1955. Died 1973. See citation to Keddy DFC. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date; AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of OBE) confirms. Air Ministry Bulletin 4907 refers.

 

STICKLEY, W/C Laurence John (34252) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - No.40 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. Public Records Office Air 2/8910 has recommendation as submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee.

 

The squadron under the command of Wing Commander Stickley arrived in Malta at the end of October 1941 and began operations in the beginning of November. The squadron was sent from Malta to the Middle East in February 1942, but during the short time that it was in Malta it dropped over 560 tons of bombs. It maintained its efforts in spite of tremendous difficulties; the winter was the wettest known for 60 years, and the conditions under which the men worked were exceedingly bad. The aerodrome was almost a quagmire and, in addition, continued air attacks by day and night raiders have been experienced. In spite of these difficulties magnificent work was performed by the squadron and the success was undoubtedly due to the personality, drive and judgement of Wing Commander Stickley.

 

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STURDY, F/L Walter Ronald Nisbett (42906) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.214 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 August 1941 (and listed in AFRO 272/43 dated 19 February 1943). Born in Vancouver 1917; educated there (navigating officer with Canadian Pacific Steamships). Appointed Pilot Officer on Probation, 23 October 1939. With No.214 Squadron, 20 December 1940 to 22 June 1941 when posted to RAF Mildenhall. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations." AFRO 272/43 dated 19 February 1943 (reporting the Bar to his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 4812 refers. Public Record Office Air 2/8899 has recommendation drafted when he had flown 28 sorties (162 operational hours).

 

On the night of the 12th March 1941, this officer carried out an attack on the railway station at Hamburg in the face of intense anti-aircraft and searchlight activity. After diving down from 8,000 feet from 8,000 feet to bomb his target, he attacked searchlight concentrations, many of which were put out of action. On the return journey he attacked six enemy mine-sweepers and two 6,000 ton merchant ships whose decks he machine-gunned. This officer has displayed complete qualities of leadership and disregard for his personal safety. He has proved himself to be an inspiration to all.

 

STURDY, S/L Walter Ronald Nisbett (42906) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1943; No.214 Squadron.

 


Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has completed a number of daring sorties against the enemy. In July 1942, when attacking a target in the Ruhr, his aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire. With great presence of mind and by his great skill and coolness, Squadron Leader Sturdy extinguished the fire which had started, enabling him to fly his aircraft to base. In similar circumstances in September 1942, he flew his aircraft back from Bremen, flying several hundred miles on three engines. He has displayed great efficiency and courage in difficulties on several occasions. Throughout, Squadron Leader Sturdy has evinced great powers of leadership and exceptional devotion to duty.

 

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SUMNER, Flight Sergeant Kenneth Law (1481880) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.44 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 May 1944. Born in Saskatchewan, 1923; in Britain at least as early as 1938; RAF, 1941 as Air Bomber. Air Ministry Bulletin 14068/AL.822 refers. AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

This airman has taken part in a large number of successful sorties including seven attacks on Berlin. In April 1944 he was the bomb aimer in an aircraft detailed to attack Schweinfurt. Long before the target was reached the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Flight Sergeant Sumner was hit in the hand and arm by fragments of shrapnel but cooly informed his captain that his injuries were not serious and insisted on fulfilling his duties. When the target area was reached he directed the bombing run with skill and successfully attacked the objective. Only when the enemy coast had been crossed on the homeward flight would he allow anyone to attend to his injuries. His actions throughout were characteristic of the determination and devotion to duty he has shown throughout his tour.

 

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation dated 3 May 1944 (found in Public Record Office Air 2/9156) in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000). He had flown 27 sorties (171 hours 30 minutes).

 


Flight Sergeant Sumner is employed as an Air Bomber with this squadron since June 1943. During this time he has taken part in 26 operational sorties against many heavily defended enemy targets including Berlin (7), Frankfurt (2) and Nuremburg (2). On 26th/27th April 1944, he was bomb aimer in a Lancaster aircraft detailed to attack Schweinfurt. When about 250 miles from the target, in the vicinity of Strasbourg, the aircraft was hit by flak. This caused considerable damage to the aircraft including several hits on bomb bay and Bomb Aimer's compartment. Flight Sergeant Sumner informed his captain that he had been hit but stated that it was not serious and insisted on carrying on with his duties. He continued dropping Window until the target area was reached and then successfully directed his pilot over the target on a good bombing run. Then when the target was in his sights, he dropped his load and operated the camera in spite of damage to the bomb release wiring and the fact that the bombing release itself was shot away. On the return journey he remained at his post dropping Window and assisted his pilot and navigator with pin-points and it was not until the aircraft had crossed the enemy coast that he would allow his injuries to be dressed. Afterwards, he returned to his compartment and carried on for the remainder of the trip. On landing, it was found that he was wounded in the hand and arm including one finger broken and it was necessary to remove him immediately to hospital where he is now under treatment. His conduct in the incident described above came as no surprise to his crew and squadron colleagues to whom his devotion to duty, efficiency and high personal courage have invariably been an inspiration. I strongly recommend Flight Sergeant Sumner for an immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

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SUMPTER, Flight Sergeant Leonard Joseph (655673) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.617 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943. Born in Kettering, England, 1911; home there or in Prince Edward Island; served in Grenadier Guards, 1928-1931 (which suggests very tentative Canadian connection at best; significantly, when RCAF and RAF officials cooperated in 1940-41 to compile lists of Canadians in the RAF - found in files 181.005 D.270 and D.271 - he was not included); enlisted in RAF, 1941; commissioned 15 August 1943. Bomb aimer in F/L J.C. McCarthy's crew, No.617 Squadron. Air Ministry Bulletin 10403/AL.582 refers.

 

SUMPTER, F/O Leonard Joseph (149045) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.617 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 June 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 14260/AL.831 refers.

 

Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal, this officer has participated in many sorties and has continued to display high qualities of courage and devotion to duty. He is a skilful bomb aimer whose determination ro ensure accuracy in the face of the heaviest opposition has been most commendable. he has set a fine example to all.

 

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SUTHERLAND, F/O Harold (119916) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.224 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 December 1943 and AFRO 297/43 dated 11 February 1944. Cited with FS M.N. Werbiski (RCAF) and FS A.P. Gibb (RCAF). Incident occurred on 21 November 1943 when He.177s tried to attack convoys SL-139 and MKS-30 using radio-controlled glider bombs. NOTE: Although AFRO 462/44 dated 3 March 1944 (announcing DFC) describes him as Canadian in the RAF, there is reason to doubt that he is Canadian and more reason to believe that he was a member of the RAF who merely trained in Canada, the confusion arising out of his being involved in an action with several RCAF personnel. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, states he was born 24 February 1921 at Inverness.

 

Flying Officer Sutherland, Flight Sergeant Gibb and Flight Sergeant Werbiski were pilot, observer and front gunner, respectively, of a Liberator aircraft detailed to escort a convoy recently. During the passage five or six enemy aircraft appeared over the convoy and attempted a bombing attack. Disregarding the heavy anti-aircraft fire which was being directed at the enemy formation from the guns of the convoy, Flying Officer Sutherland flew in and engaged the attackers. He manoeuvered to the rear and above one of the enemy bombers and thus enabled Flight Sergeant Werbiski to deliver a burst of fire which hit the enemy aircraft, setting its starboard engines on fire. After jettisoning its bombs the aircraft dived away and was not seen again. Flying Officer Sutherland then attacked a second bomber. Once again his skilful manoeuvering enabled his gunners to deliver telling bursts of fire, which caused the enemy aircraft to break away with large quantities of black smoke pouring from its starboard engines. With complete disregard of the anti-aircraft fire, which was bursting all around, Flying Officer Sutherland attacked a third and then a fourth enemy aircraft, driving them off and forcing them to terminate the engagement. In this very determined action, Flying Officer Sutherland displayed exceptional skill, courage and determination, and was well supported by Flight Sergeants Gibb and Werbiski, whose excellent co-operation, good shooting and tenacity set a very fine example.

 

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TAIT, W/C Victor Hubert - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 June 1938. Born 8 July 1892 in Winnipeg; educated at University of Manitoba; Royal Canadian Engineers, 1914-1917, having enlisted with 2nd Field Compnay; commissioned in 8th Battalion; London Regiment; RFC and RAF, 1917 onwards as a Signals specialist including Director-General of Signals in Air Ministry. To Middle East, 1930 and seconded to Egyptian Air Force, 1932. Promoted to Group Captain, 1 April 1937; to Air Commodore, 1 January 1940; promoted Air Vice-Marshal, 1 December 1942. To Technical Branch, 24 April 1940. Awarded OBE, 1938; Commander, Order of the Nile, 1937. AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943 (reporting CB) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Aso listed in Who's Who.

 

TAIT, A/V/M Victor Hubert - Companion, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 15674/AL.884 refers.

 

TAIT, A/V/M Victor Hubert - Knight Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 September 1944. AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944 describes him as Canadian in the RAF and states that the honour was granted "in recognition of services in planning the landings in Normandy".

 

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TALLALA, F/O Cyril Lionel Francis (130674) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.118 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 July 1943. Born in Malaya, 1921; educated at Victoria Institution, Kuala Lumpur; but gave his home on enlistment as Hamilton, Ontario. Enlisted 1941; commissioned 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 10774 refers.

 

This officer has participated in a large number of sorties and has led his section with great skill and keenness. He has destroyed one enemy aircraft.

 

TALLALA, F/O Cyril Lionel Francis (130674) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.122 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 18365/AL.1008 refers.

 

This officer has participated in a very large number of varied sorties. he has displayed the greatest keennes to engage the enemy and has invariably pressed home his attack with determination. Among the successes is the destrution of four enemy aircraft.

 

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TAMBLYN, F/O Hugh Norman (40862) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.242 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 January 1941. Born in Watrous, Saskatchewan, 1917; educated at Yorkton and Calgary; father living in North Battleford. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 4 June 1938; promoted to Flying Officer, September 1940. Killed in action, 3 April 1941. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2582 refers.

 

Flying Officer Tamblyn has shown the greatest keenness to engage the enemy and has destroyed at least five of their aircraft. He has set a splendid example to other members of his section.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/10175 has the original recommendation dated 10 December 1940, signed by the Wing Commander in charge of Duxford:

 

This officer during operations from Duxford has destroyed five enemy aircraft, and probably destroyed another two. He has, on all occasions, shown the greatest coolness combined with keenness to engage the enemy, and has set a five example to his section.

 

This was minuted by Air Vice-Marshal T. Leigh-Mallory (Air Officer Commanding, No.12 Group) on 11 December 1940, "Strongly recommended for Distinguished Flying Cross", and noted as "Approved" by Air Marshal W.S. Douglas (Air Officer Commanding, Fighter Command) on 12 December 1940.

 

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TAPP, F/O Lorne Arthur, DFC (59336) - Air Force Cross - No.99 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 January 1948. See Second World War data base for biographical details and citation to DFC. One of many ex-RCAF aircrew who accepted a postwar RAF commission. He trained on Avro York transports, and ultimately logged 2,500 hours on the type, first with No.40 Squadron, and then No.99 Squadron. He flew on the Berlin Air Lift. When recommended he had flown more than 4,400 hours, of which 600 had been directly related to the air lift and 330 had been logged in the previous six months.

 

Flight Lieutenant Tapp has been employed as a Captain of a York long range transport aircraft for over two years. Since July 1948 he has flown 335 sorties on the Berlin Air Lift. This officer has shown exceptional enthusiasm, initiative and determination over a long period and this resulted in his being the first pilot at this station [Wunstorf, Germany] to fly 300 Berlin Air Lift sorties. During the past twelve months Flight Lieutenant Tapp has displayed to a high degree qualities of resolute determination, courage and devotion to duty. His enthusiasm and personal example have been an inspiration not only to his own crew but to all the captains in his squadron and have encouraged them to emulate his performance. He is a skilful pilot with a fine record of accident-free flying due mainly to his intense concentration on his task. His personal contribution to the success of the airlift has been most praiseworthy.

 

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TAYLOR, S/L Kenneth Garth (RAF 41331) - Air Force Cross - No.1 General Reconnaissance School - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Born 18 June 1914 in Port Elgin, New Brunswick; home there. Educated at Port Elgin, 1920 to 1932, at Mount Allison University (Sackville), September 1932 to January 1934, and Acadian University (Wolfville, Nova Scotia), January to June 1934 (pre-medical studies). Then took an Aero Engine Mechanics Course at Curtiss Wright Institute of Aeronautics, California. "Worked for Amelia Earhart Union Air Terminal, California, 1936-1937". Received Private Pilots License in California. Also a local surveyor and scaler in lumber industry. When interviewed in September 1937 by Lieutenant-Colonel A.H.W. Landon for RAF consideration, he was described thusly: "Good type - smart - intelligent. Keenly interested in aviation. Has a good personality and is considered suitable ti hold a commission. Has gone to great pains to endeavour to fit himself for professional aviation". Enlisted August 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 29 October 1938. Attended Elementary Flying Training School at Middlesex, August to 9 November 1938; No.3 Service Flying Training School, South Cerney, November 1938 to May 1939; Torpedo Training Unit, Gosport, June-30 July 1939; No.42 Squadron, Thorney Island, August to 15 December 1939; No.254 Squadron (Blenheims), January to July 1940 (anti-submarine patrols and fishing fleet patrols); No.42 Squadron, Wick, July to November 1940 (Beauforts and torpedo training); No.1 School of General Reconnaissance, Blackpool (instructor), November 1940 to January 1941; No.31 School of General Reconnaissance, Charlottetown, January 1941 to August 1942; No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Canada, August 1942 to February 1945; No.1 Radio and Navigation School, Summerside, February 1945 to end of war. AFRO 1129/41 dated 3 October 1941 reported his promotion from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant, effective 3 September 1941; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944. Applied for transfer from the RAF to the RCAF on 29 March 1943; transferred to RCAF 20 October 1944 while serving at No.1 General Reconnaissance School (C49078); to No.1 Radio and Navigation School, 4 February 1945; to Station Greenwood, 17 December 1945; to Eastern Air Command, 10 March 1946; overseas, 7 December 1946 to 8 February 1947; released 13 February 1947. Recommended on 3 August 1944 by G/C A. Lewis; as of that date he had flown 2,381 hours (142 in previous six months) of which 1,550 hours had been on instructional duties (142 in previous six months). As of that date he was also credited with 355 operational hours (78 sorties).

 

This officer, who has had an extensive career in operational and instructional flying, has displayed energy, efficiency and organizing ability far above the ordinary course of duty. As officer commanding a flying squadron, he has proven himself to be a capable and efficient leader. The consistently high record of flying hours with no casualties maintained at this unit are largely due to this officer's capable supervision.

 

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TEAKLES, F/L John MacLaurin (68932) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Born 13 September 1915 in Winnipeg. A former Sergeant (504881); commissioned as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 2 May 1941; confirmed in rank, 20 August 1941. Transferred to RCAF Administration Branch, 5 April 1945 (C94020); repatriated 13 June 1946; released 2 August 1946. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

* * * * *

 

THOMAS, Sergeant James Mathew (798547) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.115 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 October 1942. From St.John's Newfoundland; enlisted 20 August 1940; left Newfoundland on 22 August for training under BCATP; graduated as Air Observer, on 26 May 1941; left for United Kingdom, 18 June 1941; demobilized 19 July 1946. See Kerri Button, The Forgotten Years: The Formation of the 125th (Newfoundland) Squadron, Royal Air Force, 1938-1941 (university paper, institution not mentioned; copy held by National Aviation Museum). This gives Christian names as James Matthews. Also listed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). Public Records Office Air 2/9600 has recommendation dated 20 August when he had flown 34 sorties (161 hours 30 minutes).

 

* minelaying sortie

 

7 Jan 42 Patrol 9 June 42 Frisian Islands*

10 Jan 42 Patrol 20 June 42 Emden

18 Jan 42 Patrol 25 June 42 Bremen


27 Jan 42 Patrol 27 June 42 Bremen

31 Jan 42 Patrol 29 June 42 Bremen

3 Feb 42 Patrol 2 July 42 Bremen

4 May 42 Stuttgart 8 July 42 Wilhelmshaven

6 May 42 Stuttgart 11 July 42 Baltic*

8 May 42 Warnemunde 13 July 42 Duisburg

17 May 42 Heligoland* 21 July 42 Duisburg

19 May 42 Mannheim 23 July 42 Duisburg

29 May 42 Cherbourg 25 July 42 Duisburg

30 May 42 Cologne 26 July 42 Hamburg

1 June 42 Essen 29 July 42 Saarbrucken

3 June 42 Bremen 12 Aug 42 Mainz

6 June 42 Emden 16 Aug 42 Frisian Islands*

7 June 42 Frisian Islands* 18 Aug 42 Flensburg

 

This Air Gunner during his 34 operations on this unit has set an exceedingly high example to the squadron by his cheerfulness in [the] face of adversities and by his extreme courage and devotion to duty.

 

On a night in June Sergeant Thomas was rear gunner in an aircraft which was attacked by a Ju.88 on the way to the target near the Dutch coast; by his accurate control of the aircraft in evasive action and by his return fire the attack was broken off and the Ju.88 was claimed as damaged. They carried on to the target and sustained further flak damage, finally crashing short of petrol at base on return.

 

This Air Gunner had carried out several operations with night fighters before being posted to this unit.

 

This was further refined to the following:

 

Sergeant Thomas has had varied experience, having undertaken minelaying and bombing attacks on enemy or enemy occupied territory. One night in June 1942 he was attacked by a Junkers 88 but, by his accurate control and return fire, the attacker was beaten off. Despite damage to his aircraft he successfully reached the target. This airman has set an exceedingly high example to the squadron by his cheerfulness in face of adversities and his extreme courage and devotion to duty.

 

THOMAS, Warrant Officer James Mathew (798547) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.138 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 February 1944.

 

* * * * *

 


THOMPSON, F/L Allen Edward (39048) - Mention in Despatches - No.18 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941. Home in Saskatoon. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 24 August 1938; killed in action, 7 August 1943, at which time he held the rank of Squadron Leader. AFRO 1949/43 dated 24 September 1943 (reporting his death) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

* * * * *

 

THOMPSON, S/L Edward Henry (70670) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.101 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945. Born in Wimbledom, 14 December 1913; home in Ancaster, Ontario although educated at Rutlish School, Merton. Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage Collection 84/44-3) strongly favour a Canadian connection; although he gave his permanent address as Wimbledom, his wife was listed as living in Goderich. Another next-of-kin, Mrs.J.L. Ward, was living in Ancaster, Ontario; however, a Mrs. M. Thompson (possibly his mother, possibly an aunt) was living in Wimbledom. Enlisted as Pupil Pilot, RAF, 1936. Ferried Liberator BZ791 to Britain, June 1943. No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty." Air Ministry Bulletin 17093/AL.960 refers.

 

* * * * *

 


THOMPSON, S/L James Reginald (41755) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.139 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 July 1941. Born in Perth, Ontario, 26 July 1916; educated in Listowel, Ontario, 1922-1935. Notes compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ) state that he thumbed a ride to Montreal, worked his way to England on a cattle boat (eleven days crossing) and joined RAF in 1939. RAF Records give following appointments and promotions: granted Short Service Commission as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 4 March 1939; graded as Pilot Officer on Probation, 2 October 1939; confirmed in appointment, 28 December 1939; Flying Officer, 2 October 1940; Acting Flight Lieutenant, 27 December 1940 (relinquished 29 December 1940 and reappointed 21 January 1941); Acting Squadron Leader, 27 May 1941 (Substantive Flight Lieutenant, 27 August 1941); Acting Wing Commander, 22 February 1943 (relinquished 15 May 1944). During Battle of Britain he was in a unit bombing French ports. Joined No.139 Squadron, 23 January 1941. Went to Malta in May or June 1941. Posted back to United Kingdom. RCAF Public Relations Release 2066 dated 28 May 1943 stated he was leading a "crack Boston squadron in North Africa" and credited him with 80 sorties, chiefly on Blenheims. He went out to Egypt in December 1943 (three months non-operational in Palestine); to Italy in March 1944 (bombing operations) and then to UK, June 1944. Document dated 16 February 1945 (when he was applying for RCAF) described his career as follows: "Completed 12 trips with No.101 Squadron, flying Blenheims, between 1939 and March 1940 and then became a casualty. Returned to No.101 Squadron in October and flew with them until December 1940. Was posted to No.139 Squadron, flying Blenheims, where he completed 48 sorties as Flight Commander in July 1941. Was Flight Commander at No.13 OTU, instructing on Blenheims, July 1941 to August 1942. Was posted to No.114 Squadron, flying Blenheims, in August 1942. Went to Africa with No.114 Squadron and was made Squadron Commander in December 1942; was promoted to Acting Wing Commander in February 1943. Converted to Bostons with No.114 Squadron, March 1943; was posted to No.13 Squadron in May 1943 as Wing Commander, flying Blenheims, and attached to Coastal Command. Converted to Venturas with No.13 Squadron in January 1944. Completed a tour with No.13 Squadron in Italy (48 trips in all), in May 1944. Returned to the United Kingdom and in September 1944 was posted to the Control Commission, Military Section, where he is presently serving." Transferred to RCAF, 12 March 1945 (C89598 and later 20510); repatriated January 1946. As of 29 December 1945 he claimed 1,500 flying hours including 380 hours operational (108 sorties, the last one flown on 30 May 1944); claimed "seven ships destroyed". Attended RCAF Staff College; on strength of RCAF Headquarters, 19 August 1946 to 15 August 1948 when appointed to No.9424 Unit as Commanding Officer, No.424 Squadron. Killed in flying accident at Atwood (Perth County), Ontario, 27 June 1949 (Harvard AJ733, crashed following aerobatics, killing himself and his brother, Dr.Ross Thompson). Air Ministry Bulletin 4328 refers to award.

 

In May 1941 this officer led a formation of aircraft which attacked an enemy convoy consisting of seven merchant vessels escorted by seven destroyers and two cruisers. Despite the formidable escort the attack was made from a low level, and Squadron Leader Thompson himself obtained three direct hits on a 10,000 ton merchant ship which caught fire and became a total loss. In June 1941 he participated in an attack against a large and strongly escorted enemy convoy to the west of Lampedusa Isle, between Malta and Tunis. The particular section of the convoy attacked consisted of six merchant vessels and six destroyers and when the attack was made the bombs of the leading aircraft struck two of the merchant ships, one of which was an ammunition ship. This blew up with such force that parts of it were hurled 1,000 feet into the air while a formation of smoke rose to about 1,500 feet.

 

Squadron Leader Thompson's aircraft, which was flying in the rear of the formation, was severely damaged by the blast from the explosion and his observer temporarily stunned. Despite this, he led the formation back to base without the aid of navigational equipment, which had been blown out of his aircraft when the ammunition vessel blew up.

 

On another occasion in May 1941 Squadron Leader Thompson obtained two direct hits on an enemy merchant vessel, which after a subsequent reconnaissance was found to be drifting after having been abandoned. He displayed the greatest determination and courage in pressing home his attacks.

 

NOTE: F/L E. Sydney-Smith awarded DFC and Sergeant N.H. Shepherd awarded DFM for sinking the ammunition ship; both were members of No.139 Squadron.

 

NOTE: The report of his fatal accident is on National Archives of Canada Micropfilm T-12338. He was on strength of No.424 Squadron. The document has a summary of his flying time to that date: Mosquito (12 hours), Boston (40 hours), Anson (100 hours), Baltimore (45 hours), Ventura (25 hours), Blenheim (750 hours), Bisley (80 hours), Spitfire (five hours), Auster (65 hours), Harvard (90 hours), other single engined aircraft (150 hours). He crashed in a woodlot, 150 yards from a farmer on a tractor. From the descriptions of several witnesses it was evident that he had been repeatedly looping when he lost control.


* * * * *

 

TIMMERMAN, F/L Nelles Woods (39046) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.49 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 May 1940. Born in Kingston, Ontario, 12 February 1913; educated there (including Queen's University); sailed for England, 8 May 1936 aboard SS Austonia. Pupil Pilot, RAF, 29 June 1936; appointed to Short Service Commission, 24 August 1936 with effect from 29 June 1936; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 29 June 1937; promoted Flying Officer, 29 January 1939; promioted Flight Lieutenant, 19 February 1940; promoted Squadron Leader, 30 November 1940; promoted Wing Commandr, 24 June 1941. Ab initio training at Prestwick, 29 June to 28 August 1936; No.10 SFTS, Ternhill, August 1936 to March 1937; No.49 Squadron, April 1937 to 24 July 1940; No.14 OTU, 27 July 1940 to 3 March 1941; with No.83 Squadron, 3 March 1941 to 27 June 1941 when he was posted to command No.408 Squadron. Sent to Canada, April 1942 for publicity and bond drives. On strength of No.34 OTU, 17 April 1942; to RAF Ferry Command, 8 May 1942; to No.34 OTU, 11 June 1942; to No.31 Personnel Depot for return to Britain, 16 August 1943; arrived in Britain, 25 August 1943; at No.7 FIS, Upavon, September to December 1943; at No.18 (P) AFU, Church Lawford, January to May 1944; at No.20 (P) AFU, Kidlington, 8 May to 6 November 1944. Transferred to RCAF, 7 November 1944 (C89504) in the rank of Wing Commander; remained in postwar RCAF (20461), rising to Group Captain (1 June 1952) and Air Commodore (2 July 1963). Retired 12 February 1966. Cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage) list most of his sorties. Air Ministry Bulletin 683 refers. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.

 

During May this officer was pilot of an aircraft returning to its base when one enemy aircraft was seen to fly past in the opposite direction. Flight Lieutenant Timmerman immediately turned and gave chase, and after firing from his front gun with great determination, shot the enemy down into the sea. In April he successfully attacked two enemy patrol vessels, destroying at least one of them. This officer has displayed great resource, determination and enthusiasm in carrying out special night operations, often under adverse weather conditions.

 

NOTE: This award has an interesting background as shown in Public Record Office Air 2/4094. He was first nominated for a DFC on 28 April 1940 by G/C Walmsley (Station Scampton) as follows:

 


This officer was engaged on a security patrol over Sylt on the night of April 23rd, 1940 during which he located two flak ships four miles west of List. Two attacks were made on the first ship and one on the second ship in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire. Attacks were by dive bombing to 1,500 feet, two 250-pound bombs being released on each attack. A near miss was scored on the first ship, which could not be located again. A direct hit was observed on the second ship, which disintegrated. By the display of resource, coolness and courage in the face of personal danger this officer destroyed an enemy flak ship. By his ability, determination and enthusiasm he has set an excellent example to all pilots in his squadron.

 

This was followed by another recommendation dated 2 May 1940:

 

On the night of May 1/2, this officer was the pilot of an aircraft which was returning to its base after carrying out a special operation. About five miles northwest of Norderny an enemy aircraft with navigation lights on was seen to fly past in the opposite direction.

 

Flight Lieutenant Timmerman immediately turned about and gave chase. After 15 minutes he caught up [to] the enemy aircraft and opened fire with his fixed gun at 400 yards range, closing in to 50 yards astern and slightly below. After a steady burst of 200 rounds the aircraft was seen to turn over on its starboard wing and dive into the sea. Two other enemy aircraft gave chase but after a burst of fire from his observer they turned away.

 

Flight Lieutenant Timmerman is the first pilot of a Hampden aircraft to destroy an enemy aircraft with his front gun. By his enthusiasm, zeal and determination he has set an excellent example to all the other pilots.

 

He has already been recommended by me for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for his attack on flak ships on the night of 3/24 April.

 

This form carries an undated annotation by A/V/M A.T. Harris:

 

This officer is up for a "cumulative" award for a long series of resolutely and efficiently carried out special night operations, often under bad weather conditions, culminating in a successful attack on a flak ship. I now think he deserves an immediate award as the first pilot to bring down an enemy aircraft with his front gun at night.

 

This culminated in a citation placed before Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee which was close to the published citation (though still a bit more detailed):

 

On the night of 1st May, 1940, this officer was pilot of an aircraft returning to its base when an enemy aircraft was seen to fly past in the opposite direction. Flight Lieutenant Timmerman immediately turned and gave chase, and after firing from his front gun with great determination, shot the enemy down into the sea. He is the first pilot of a Hampden aircraft to destroy an enemy aircraft with his front gun. Earlier, on the night of the 3rd April, he successfully attacked two flak ships, destroying at least one of them. This officer has displayed great resource, determination and enthusiasm in carrying out special night operations, often under adverse weather conditions.

 


TIMMERMAN, W/C Nelles Woods (39046) - Distinguished Service Order - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 September 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 5103 refers. No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/8900 has recommendation drafted 28 July 1941, when he was still a Squadron Leader. The sortie list below is compiled from Hitchins cards and from the recommendation.

 

12 Dec 39 Search Looking for Deutschland; not found.

1/2 Apr 40 Heligoland Night reconnaissance

11/12 Apr 40 Kattegat Patrolled Kiel to Skaw; no ships seen.

17/18 Apr 40 Aalborg Recce of aerodrome; icing; nil found.

21/22 Apr 40 GARDENING "Daffodils" south of Copenhagen.

25/26 Apr 40 GARDENING Weather bad; mines brought back.

1 May 40 GARDENING Hampden L4068 with P/O Lewis, Sergeant Batho LAC Powell; returning from unsuccessful mission they shot down a small twin-float seaplane (Ar.196) off Norderney.

15/16 May 40 Cologne

17/18 May 40 Shipping Bombed four destroyers.

23/23 May 40 Aachen yards

25/26 May 40 Battle area Reported that he bombed and destroyed a bridge at Vise, between Maastrict and Liege.

4/5 June 40 A.161 German target, not further identified.

6/7 June 40 A.7 Target not further identified.

8/9 June 40 Amiens

10/11 June 40 Battle area Bombed bridges at Charlesville.

12/13 June 40 Battle area Bombed sidings at Faissault

13/14 June 40 Battle area Bombed station at Chauly.

17/18 June 40 Schipol Bombed aerodrome; attacked enemy aircraft as it was landing and it was seen to pile up. Bombs hit buildings on aerodrome.

26/27 June 40 N.21 Target not further identified.

30 Jun/1 July Hattern Attacked dump but missed.

5/6 July 40 GARDENING Last sortie of this tour.

 

Second Tour

 

13/14 Mar 41 Hamburg (6.25) Three fires.

18/19 Mar 41 Kiel (9.00) Attacked flak battery.

23/24 41 Kiel (6.00)

3 Apr 41 Brest (2.05) Attempted daylight raid at 0900; turned back because of insufficient cloud cover.

3 Apr 41 Brest (3.20) Attempted daylight raid at 1400; turned back because of insufficient cloud cover.


5/6 Apr 41 GARDENING (6.05) Jellyfish" (Brest); listed on sortie sheet but not by Hitchins.

6/7 Apr 41 GARDENING (7.05) "Jellyfish" (Brest)

7/8 Apr 41 Kiel (8.00) See citation as recommended.

14/15 Apr 41 Brest (6.00) Low cloud obscured target.

16/17 Apr 41 Bremen (5.55)

26/27 Apr 41 Hamburg (7.35)

30 Apr 41 Kiel (6.40) Reported good incendiary fires started.

10/11 May 41 Hamburg (6.40)

16/17 May 41 Cologne (6.15) Large fires reported started.

26/27 Aug 41 Cologne Flown after recommendation drafted.

18 Sept 41 Abbeville Spoof raid ?

20 Sept 41 Abbeville

29/30 Sept 41 Schipol Spoof raid ?

7/8 Dec 41 Aachen

10/11 Jan 42 Wilhelmshaven

 

This officer carried out 15 operational flights during his second operational tour in his squadron whilst acting as Flight Commander of his Flight and before being posted away to command a Canadian bomber squadron.

 

So desirous was he of striking at the enemy that his squadron Commander experienced the greatest difficulty in preventing him from detailing himself on every occasion the squadron was detailed.

 

Each operational flight that he carried out has been marked by the painstaking efforts he has made to locate accurately his objective in the face of the heaviest flak. As examples the following may be quoted.

 

He was the first pilot from this station to drop the 2,000-pound HC bomb on Kiel on 8th April and Group Headquarters asked that a report on the bomb burst should be obtained. He spent over 40 minutes locating his precise target and remained over the objective at 12,000 feet for a considerable time in order to report upon the bomb burst. Day photography subsequently confirmed the accuracy of his bombing and of his reconnaissance report.

 

Again on 11th May he spent 40 minutes over the Hamburg area and brought back an excellent reconnaissance report.

 

By his exceptional courage, devotion to duty and inspiring leadership he has set an excellent example to his squadron and has been responsible for the exceptionally high standard of morale that now exists in the Flight of which, until recently, he was in command.

 


His keen desire for operations, his cool determination in the face of the heaviest opposition and the wonderful example that he has set is worthy of the highest reward.

 

For purposes of the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee, this was edited into the following text:

 

Wing Commander Timmerman has displayed great eagerness to attack the enemy. On the 8th April 1941 he was detailed to attack Kiel with a 2,000-pound bomb and to report on the bomb burst. Hem spent 40 minutes locating the precise target and, after releasing the bomb, he remained at 12,000 feet for a considerable time in order to obtain an accurate report upon the burst. On 11th May Wing Commander Timmerman was over Hamburg for 40 minutes, and brought back an excellent reconnaissance report. His exceptional courage, devotion to duty and inspiring leadership, combined with his cool determination in face of the heaviest opposition, have been a wonderful example to all under his command.

 

TIMMERMAN, W/C Nelles Woods (39046) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.

 

* * * * *

 

TRIPE, S/L Phillip Valentine King (42279) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.129 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 January 1944. Born in Ottawa, 24 July 1918; educated at Lisgar Collegiate. Pupil pilot, RAF, 1 May to 23 June 1939. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 24 June 1939; confirmed as Flying Officer, 16 December 1940; as Flight Lieutenant, 16 December 1941; as Squadron Leader in 1943; at No.10 FTS under training to 8 June 1940; to No.7 Bombing and Gunnery School, 8 June 1940 (Flight Commander of Whitley Flight); to No.56 OTU, 14 April 1942; to No.411 Squadron, June 1942; to No.65 Squadron, December 1942; to No.222 Squadron, February 1943; to No.129 Squadron, September 1943; to No.57 OTU (instructing), November 1943; to No.2 Tactical Exercise Unit (Hurricanes), February 1944; to No.130 Squadron, 6 June 1944. commanding as of 11 September 1944 until 16 January 1945). Transferred to RCAF, 22 December 1944 (C89529). Remained in postwar force (numbers 20466 and 431-171-024); reverted to Flight Lieutenant, 1 October 1946; promoted Squadron Leader, 1 January 1948; promoted Wing Commander, 1 January 1960; retired 22 April 1970 to North Bay. The following victories credited to him are in Combat Cards held by Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters: 22 June 1943, one FW.190 damaged; 9 July 1943, one FW.190 probably destroyed; 17 August 1943, two Bf.109Gs destroyed north of Huls; 18 August 1943, Bf.109 destroyed (shared with an RAF pilot); 31 August 1943, one FW.190 probably destroyed; 27 September 1943, one Bf.109 damaged; 22 October 1943, one Bf.109 damaged. AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944 (reportung his DFC described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Died 31 December 1982 at Trout Lake, North Bay (drowned following skating accident). Air Ministry Bulletin 12703/AL.741 refers.

 


This officer has led his flight and squadron during an extended tour of operational duty and has proved himself an extremely capable leader. During his operational career he has personally destroyed two enemy aircraft and shred in the destruction of a number of others. On 17th August 1943 he was chiefly responsible for the destruction, by his wing, of five enemy aircraft. His outstanding ability is reflected in the fighting efficiency of his squadron.

 

NOTE: His application for Operational Wing, dated 12 June 1945, stated that he had flown with Nos.411, 65, 222 and 129 Squadrons, June 1942 to November 1943 (248 operational hours) but does not clearly indicate when he went from one unit to another. However, leav records indicate he was with No.411 Squadron from at least 11 August 1942 until 26 December 1942; he took leave while with No.222 Squadron in May 1943, and while with No.129 Squadron in October 1943. His second tour, June 1944 to January 1945, was with No.130 Squadron (96 hours). The document then lists his sorties by date, duty and time flown. The frst sortie given is 17 August 1942 (Fighter Sweep, Bereke-sur-Mer and Wamport, one hour 15 minutes) and the last is 20 November 1943. The total number of sorties is 148 including four on 19 August 1942 ("Fighter Umbrella for Dieppe Raid: 1.45" - "Close Escort Two Bostons laying smoke scree Dieppe, 1.40" - "Fighter Sweep Protection, Boats returning from Dieppe, 1.30" and a repeat of the previous, 1.30). There is a lonf breakbtween 6 December 1942 and 5 April 1943 followed by intense operations including three trips on each of the following days: 24 June 1943, 4 July 1943, 22 August 1943, 6 September 1943, 8 September 1943, 9 September 1943, 18 October 1943. The second tour sorties run from 8 June 1944 to 16 January 1945 (56 sorties).

 

Form dated 15 January 1953 gives times as follows: Tiger Moth, 60 - Anson, 60 - Avro Cadet, 2 - Whitley, 390 - Magister, 10 - Blenheim, 10 - Lysander 16 - Defiant, 15 - Battle, 20 - Hurricae, 50 - Master, 4 - Spitfire, 608 - Harvard, 29 - C-45, 9.

 

* * * * *

 

TUDHOPE, P/O William Frank (41224) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.144 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1940. Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, 4 March 1919, the son of J.H. Tudhope. Educated in Ottawa and Ryde School (Isle of Wight). Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 17 September 1938. With No.44 Squadron at outbreak of war; with No.76 Squadron, 30 September to 11 October 1939; with No.144 Squadron, 11 October 1939 to 10 August 1940 (killed in action). Air Ministry Bulletin 1275 refers. Public Record Office Air 2/9447 has the original recommendation dated 22 July 1940, drafted by the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Hemswell:

 

This officer was captain of an aircraft which was detailed to attack warships in Wilhelmshaven harbour from a very low level on the night of July 20th. He delivered his attack from 50 feet in the face of terrific anti-aircraft fire from all the defences of the town, during which his aircraft was badly hit by gunfire.

 


In spite of this damage he attempted to make a second attack, but owing to the extreme density of the fire, his aircraft received a great many more hits, and one engine was badly damaged. With great skill and courage he brought his damaged aircraft back across the North Sea and landed it at the aerodrome.

 

This officer has shown conspicuous gallantly and devotion to duty on many previous occasions, and has always pressed home his attacks in the same fearless manner.

 

On 22 July 1940 Air Vice-Marshal A.T. Harris, Air Officer Commanding No.5 Group, minuted the document as "Strongly recommended". The recommendation was approved by the Commander-in-Chief, Bomber Command on 24 July 1940 and forwarded that day to Air Ministry. A draft citation at Air Ministry gave the date of the action - 20 July 1940 - but otherwise did not differ from that published in the London Gazette (below):

 

One night in July 1940, Pilot Officer Tudhope was captain of an aircraft which delivered an attack on enemy warships in Wilhelmshaven harbour from an altitude of only 50 feet. The aircraft was subjected to terrific anti-aircraft fire and was badly hit by a high explosive shell. In spite of this, a second attack was attempted, but owing to the extreme density of the gunfire, one engine was badly damaged and the navigator's cabin was riddled with holes. In spite of this ordeal, Sergeant Belton, the navigator and bomb aimer, with great coolness and courage continued his duties, and enabled Pilot Officer Tudhope to bring the badly damaged aircraft safely home. This officer and Non-Commissioned Officer have shown conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on many previous occasions. [Cited with Sergeant L.S. Belton, DFM].

 

NOTE: Cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters) detail the following sorties:

 

14 Dec 39 Search 2nd pilot of aircraft; 11 machines looking for enemy fleet in North Sea; not found. Captain was F/O Meyer.

20/21 Apr 40 GARDENING 2nd pilot in crew of four laying mines off Scharnhorn Island. Captain was F/O Meyer.

23/24 Apr 40 GARDENING Warnemunde, 700 feet. Captain was F/O Meyer.

25/26 Apr 40 GARDENING 6 hours, 500 feet, Schlieswig. Captain was F/O Meyer.

9/10 May 40 GARDENING Navigating with F/O Meyer, Kiel Fiord, 500 feet.

11/12 May 40 Rhine Valley with F/O Meyer; bombed target (not further identified), 11,500 feet.

13/14 May 40 Aachen With S/L Rebleck; bombed at 10,000 feet.

18/19 May 40 Battle area With S/L Rebleck; bombed bridge between Namur and Dinant; hits observed.

25/26 May 40 Ruhr With F/O Meyer; bombed Remschied-Ruhr (bombs short)


26/27 May 40 Battle area With F/O Meyer; incendiaries in woods, St.Vith area; also bombed roads and bridges.

27/28 May 40 Bremen With F/O Meyer; bombed aerodrome southeast of Bremen; followed by five aircraft.

31 May/1 Jun Not stated With F/O Meyer; unable to locate target.

3/4 June 40 Emmerich With F/O Meyer; bombed alternative; two large fires.

5/6 June 40 GARDENING With F/O Meyer; planted vegetables [mines] near Kielsnor Light; fired on a tug.

8/9 June 40 GARDENING With F/O Meyer; intense electrical storm and rain; dropped vegetables in Battin (Kolding ?) area.

11/12 June 40 Not stated With F/O Meyer; target obscured by haze; anti-aircraft fire accurate; did not bomb.

12/13 June 40 Lille

18/19 June 40 GARDENING Dutch coast.

21/22 June 40 Celle 7 hours.

23/24 June 40 Not stated Bombed and machine-gunned a train south of Ringen.

7/8 July 40 GARDENING Captain for first time; to German coast; dropped vegetables at 650 feet; airborne 7 hours.

11/12 July 40 Ruhr Could not locate target due to storm and did not bomb.

14/15 July 40 Hamburg Target obscured; did not bomb.

20 July 40 GARDENING Dropped special mine. Trip was to Wilhelmshaven and was the subject of his DFC action, yet it is not described in unit diary.

7/8 Aug 40 GARDENING Langeland; dropped vegetables at 600 feet; light flak.

10 Aug 40 Not stated Possibly Hamburg; in Hampden P4365; failed to return; P/O Tudhope, Sergeant S.L.S. Belton, Sergeant D. McKay, Sergeant A.J. Griffiths.

 

* * * * *

 


TUFFORD, P/O Charles Raymond (41335) - Mention in Despatches - No.269 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941. Born 28 October 1914 in Toronto. Home in Hamilton from September 1930 onwards where he took private flying lessons (Taylor Cub). Enlisted in RCAF Auxiliary, serving with No.119 (Bomber) Squadron, 8 June 1936 to 15 October 1938 as a Rigger (trained each summer at Camp Borden); appointed to a Short Service Commission as Acting Pilot Officer on probation, 29 October 1938; elementary flying training at Hanworth, August to October 1938; advanced flying training at No.3 FTS, South Cerney, Gloucestershire, May-June 1939; attended General Reconnaissance School, Montrose, June to August 1939; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 29 August 1939; promoted to Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; AFRO 1129/41 dated 3 October 1941 reported his promotion from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant, effective 3 September 1941, while with an RAF Special School in Canada; appointed Acting Squadron Leader, 17 April 1943; relinquished that rank, 29 October 1943 but reappointed Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944. Posted to No.269 Squadron, 12 June 1939 (this does not seem to fit with the Montrose dates); flew at least 60 sorties, 5 April to 17 November 1940 (possibly as many as 92); to No.2 School of General Reconnaissance, Squires Gate, 17 November 1940; to No.31 General Reconnaissance School, Charlottetown, 28 December 1940; to No.31 OTU (Debert), 20 December 1941; he claimed to have flown at least 760 hours and trained 427 crews during his Canadian tour including navigation to first BCATP graduates to be assigned to Ferry Command. Posted to No.111 OTU, Nassau, 5 February 1944 (Liberator conversion); posted to No.86 Squadron, 7 May 1944, serving with that unit until 15 February 1945 (20 sorties, 250 hours; may have attacked a U-Boat in late 1944). Transferred to RCAF, 19 December 1944 (C89523). Posted to Canada, 2 May 1945 for duties with No.1 Air Command; released 26 February 1946, at which time he had flown 1,760 hours without mishap. DHist cards list many sorties on Hudsons during Norwegian campaign.

 

* * * * *

 

TURNER, F/L Francis William Scott (37775) - Mention in Despatches - unit unknown - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941. Born in Merritt, British Columbia, 1914; home on Salt Spring Island; educated privately and at Vancouver Technical College. Enrolled in RAF as Provisional Pilot Officer, 20 April 1936; commission confirmed in February 1937 after which he was posted to a bomber squadron. Took part in daylight operations on 4 September 1939 (No.107 and 110 Squadrons). AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of DFC) and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943 (reporting him missing) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 7376 refers. Killed in action with No.76 Squadron, 22 September 1943.

 

TURNER, S/L Francis William Scott (37775) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 June 1942. Citation published in RAF Quarterly, December 1942. Public Records Office Air 2/8755 says it was put up when he had 32 sorties (139 operational hours) to his credit. These figures appear low; could they be No.419 Squadron time only ? See also Air 2/8755 which dates the recommendation from 1 May 1942.

 

This officer has had a long experience of operational duties by day and night. He took part in the attack on the German fleet off Heligoland on the 4th September 1939, and in a number of subsequent daylight attacks on Heligoland and Wilhelmshaven. Since January 1940 he has completed numerous sorties including attacks on the enemy's industrial centres and dockyard towns. He has displayed courage and keenness throughout and has performed excellent work in organizing his flight and training the crews.

 

* * * * *

 


TURNER, S/L George (41498) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.107 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1945. Born 5 May 1913 in Vermilion, Alberta; home in Middleton, Nova Scotia; educated at Mount Allison University to complete high school; auro mechanic thereafter. First applied for RAF in April 1937; second application on 17 November 1937; sailed for England 23 September 1938. Pupil pilot in RAF, 6 October 1938; granted Short Service Commission on 14 December 1938 with effect from 6 October 1938; graded as Pilot Officer on Probation, 3 September 1939; confirmed in appointment, 6 October 1939; promoted to Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; promoted Flight Lieuteant, 3 September 1941; appointed Acting Squadron Leader, 3 May 1942; relinquished Acting Squadron Leader, 17 November 1942; promoted Acting Squadron Leader, 15 July 1943; rlinquished Acting Squadron Leader, 23 March 1943; promoted Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944. Trained at No.4 FTS; to No.6 FTS, 2 January 1939 (training on Ansons, 120 hours); to No.114 Squaron, 4 August 1939 (Blenheim bombers, 240 hours) - but cards at DHist say he was with No.114 Squadron, 9 December 1939 to 25 October 1940. To No.151 Squadron, 19 January 1941 (night fighting on Hurricanes, 80 hours); to No.1451 (Fighter) Flight, 5 June 1941 (Bostons, 100 hours); to No.1450 (Fighter) Flight, 13 February 1942 (Bostons, 150 hours); to No.531 Flight, 3 May 1942 (Bostons, 200 hours). Servedin Canada, 9 December 1942 to 30 March 1944, with most of that time spent at No.36 OTU (6 January 1943 to 22 March 1944) - flew 200 hours on Mosquitos. With No.107 Squadron, 2 June 1944 to 16 December 1944. Transferred to RCAF, 12 December 1944 (C89517); repatriated 29 December 1944; released 23 February 1945. Had been promoted to Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; to Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941; to Squadron Leader, 3 May 1942. AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945 (reporting DFC) identified him as Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 17435/AL.972 refers. Deceased as of October 1976.

 

This officer has a long and distinguished record of operational flying. During 1939 and 1940, he was engaged in bombing operations in the course of which he shot down a Heinkel 52. In 1942 Squadron Leader Turner completed a tour of duty in night fighters, during which he destroyed a second enemy aircraft. During his third tour, which he recently completed, this officer took part in some very successful night sorties against ground targets. In September 1944, he attacked the barracks at Arnhem very effectively, despite damage to his aircraft from anti-aircraft fire which caused the failure of one engine. As a flight commander, he has always set the highest example to his crews. Squadron Leader Turner has invariably displayed a fine fighting spirit on all his operations.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 18 December 1944 he claimed to have flown 32 bomber sorties, eight Coastal Command sorties, an unspecified number of fighter sorties - probably 68 (which totsaled 350 hours) and 30 sorties with the Tactical Air Force. he gave the total sorties as 138 (the last being flown on 6 December 1944), and his flying hours as approximately 1,345 (600 on operations, 745 on training).

 

His application for Operatonal Wings, made on 25 January 1945, gives a different picture of his operations from that mentioned above.

 

* * * * *

 


TURNER, F/L Percival Stanley (41631) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.242 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 October 1940. Born at Ivybridge, Devon, 3 September 1913; home in Toronto. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 14 January 1939. Transferred to RCAF, 15 July 1944 (C53459); repatrated July 1946. Remained in postwar RCAF (20426). Air Ministry Bulletin 1892 refers. Awarded Czech War Cross and Czech Medal for Bravery after transfer to RCAF. See H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky.

 

On 15th September 1940, Flight Lieutenant Turner succeeded in shooting down one enemy aircraft when his own aircraft was hit by a cannon shell, which put it temporarily out of control. On recovery, he saw and attacked a further enemy aircraft which he destroyed, afterwards bringing his own damaged aircraft safely back to its base. This officer has personally destroyed a total of ten hostile aircraft during engagements over Dunkirk and England. He has proved himself a most courageous and capable leader, dislaying coolness and initiative in the face of the enemy.

 

TURNER, S/L Percival Stanley (41631) - Bar to Disinguished Flying Cross - No.145 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 August 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 4629 refers.

 

This officer has led his squadron on all sweeps over France, and has set a splendid example by his quiet coolness in the face of the enemy. He has been responsible for the destruction of at least twelve enemy aircraft.

 

TURNER, W/C Percival Stanley, DFC (41631) - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 14006/AL.807 refers.

 

This distinguished fighter pilot has flown nearly 900 operational hours in single engined fighters. Since November 1943 he has taken part in all the more important air operations during the invasion of Sicily and Italy and in the Sangro and Anzio battles. He has destroyed at least fourteen enemy aircraft and has always shown the utmost gallantry, enthusiasm and leadership.

 

* * * * *

 

TWEDDELL, P/O William Oliver (40767) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940. Born in Toronto, 6 March 1919; educated there and Acton, Ontario; mother living in London, Ontario at time of award. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 7 May 1938. Reported to No.83 Squadron (Hampdens), approximately 17-23 October 1939; unit not active until February 1940. According to cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage), his first sortie was the night of 1/2 April 1940 (security patrol, Sylt to Borkum). Numerous bombing and minelaying sorties detailed in cards. Shot down and killed during attack on Dortmund-Ems Canal, 25/26 June 1940. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 801 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/9413 has recommendation dated 28 April 1940:

 


On the night of April 17th this officer was the second pilot and navigator of an aircraft which, after completing a successful "Gardening" operations, carried out a reconnaissance of Northern Denmark, observing large concentrations of enemy aircraft at Aalborg aerodrome.

 

On the night of April 20th an aircraft, of which he was navigator, carried out a successful bombing attack on Aalborg aerodrome, under weather conditions which required a high degree of skill in navigation in order to locate the target.

 

Pilot Officer Tweddell displayed outstanding ability as navigator and by his keenness, energy and zeal he has set an excellent example to other navigators.

 

This was annotated by Air Vice-Marshal A.T. Harris (Air Officer Commanding, No.5 Group), no date shown:

 

Strongly recommended. This officer has taken part in a number of difficult and successful operations.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9413 has citation prepared for Air Ministry Honours and Award Committee:

 

On 17th April 1940, this officer was second pilot and navigator of an aircraft which reconnoitred northern Denmark, observing large concentrations of enemy aircraft at Aalborg aerodrome. On the 20th April he was navigator of an aircraft which attacked Aalborg aerodrome, under weather conditions which required a high degree of skill in navigation in order to locate the target. He displayed outstanding ability, and by his keenness, energy and zeal has set an excellent example to other navigators.

 

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URWIN-MANN, F/O John Ronald (42281) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.238 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 November 1940. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, 29 July 1920; educated at Brighton and mother living in Sussex when he was decorated. Joined RAF March 1939; Pilot Officer as of 1 May 1939; joined No.253 Squadron, 26 January 1940. With No.238 Squadron, May 1940 to summer of 1942; No.126 Squadron, summer 1942 to uncertain date. In postwar RAF, retiring 17 April 1959. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 649/42 dated 1 May 1942 (announcing Bar to DFC) does so as well. It would appear that even those publishing Air Force Routine Orders interpreted "Canadian" very broadly, as Chris Shores (Aces High, 2nd edition) is quite clear that Urwin-Mann was raised in England and had only a brief residence in Canada (rather like Max Aitkin). Air Ministry Bulletin 6590 refers to DFC award.

 


This officer has displayed initiative and dash in his many engagements against the enemy. He has led his section in an excellent manner and has destroyed at least eight enemy aircraft.

 

URWIN-MANN, F/L John Ronald (42281) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.238 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 April 1942. Air Ministry Bulletin 6598 refers.

 

In November 1941 this officer led a formation of aircraft in combat against a superior force of Messerschmitt 109s. Although he was wounded in the back and later his aircraft was badly damaged, Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann flew it safely back to base. Next day this officer was again leading his flight. He has been engaged on operational flying almost continuously since June 1940, both in England and the Middle East. He has led his flight, squadron or wing on some 40 sorties, often in adverse weather conditions. Many successes have been achieved in which Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann played a prominent part. He has destroyed at least eight enemy aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/4782 has original recommendation as communicated by RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry, 24 February 1942. It differs in giving more details and is quoted below:

 

On 23 November 1941, Flight Lieutenant Urwin-Mann was leading a formation of four fighters which was engaged by a much superior force of Messerschmitt 109s. During the combat, Urwin-Mann he was wounded in the back and later had his aircraft badly damaged. Nevertheless, he managed to bring his aircraft over 60 miles across the desert to his base, and was leading his flight again the following day. This officer has been engaged on operations with his squadron almost continuously since June 1940, both in England and the Middle East, and has destroyed eight enemy aircraft, and probably destroyed or damaged four more. During the present campaign he has led his flight, squadron [and] wing on more than 40 operational sorties, sometimes in extremely bad weather and it is due to his unflagging keenness that formations led by him have successfully engaged and destroyed numerous enemy aircraft.

 

URWIN-MANN, S/L John Ronald (42281) - Distinguished Service Order - No.126 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 10199 refers.

 


Within the past six months whilst operating from Malta, this officer has completed a large number of sorties, involving attacks on factories, warehouses, port installations, power stations and airfields in Sicily and nearby enemy islands. On one occasion he led a formation which attacked an airfield and destroyed many aircraft on the ground. Squadron-Leader Urwin-Mann also obtained a hit on a petrol installation, causing a violent explosion and a large fire. Another of his successes was the destruction of a portion of the main railway line during a sortie at Gela in January 1943. During the same operations Squadron Leader Urwin-Mann engaged a Messerschmitt 210, shooting away its starboard engine. By his great skill and inspiring leadership this officer has raised his squadron to a high pitch of fighting efficiency.

 

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VALACHOS, F/O Peter John (41225) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.99 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 February 1941. Born in Brantford, Ontario, 1 October 1915; educated there; family there. Member of Dufferin Rifles, 1935-1936. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 17 September 1938; confirmed as Flying Officer, 3 September 1940. Reported to No.99 Squadro, 11 July 1940. First sorties (as 2nd pilot) on 23/24 July 1940. Hitchins cards list numerous sorties; first as capain of aircraft on 27/18 August 1940. Posted to No.214 Squadron Reserve Flight, 12 December 1940 (but not mentioned in No.214 Squadron ORB). To Middle East, 20 April 1941. Shot down and taken prisoner, Crete, 31 May 1941; promoted Flight Lieutenant, effective 3 September 1941. Transferred to RCAF with effect from 24 November 1944; repatriated 7 July 1945; released 23 October 1945. Postwar service with Canadian Militia (Royal Canadian Artillery), 1953 to 1959. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the exection of air operations". Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2957 refers. Public Records Office Air 2/8888 has recommended citation:

 

This officer has completed thirty major bombing attacks over France, Belgi and Germany since July 1940. He is an exellent captain of aircraft who can always be relied upon to carry out his allotted task to a successful conclusion. By his outsanding skill, keen determination and devotion to duty he has set a fine example.

 

NOTE: This document details December 1940 quotas for Bomber Command as follows:

 

Flying hours - 8,957

 

Awards permissible - 9,868 = 59 less 5 immediate awards = 54

150

 

Awards recommended in submission - 52 (24 DFCs and 28 DFMs)

 

VALACHOS, F/O Peter John (41225) - Mention in Despatces - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.

 

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VALLEE, P/O Homer Joseph (RAF 171395) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944. Born 4 October 1914 at Rosetown, Saskatchewan; educated in Saskatoon; store clerk, 1935-1937. Employed as a toolmaker and machinist in Birmingham from January 1939 until enlistment. Enlisted in RAF, 1 April 1941 as 1238467 Aircraftman Second Class (Aircraft Hand); Reclassified Leading Aircraftman and remustered as Pilot Under Training, 11 October 1941; promoted Sergeant (Pilot), 20 November 1942; promoted Flight Sergeant, 21 October 1943; commissioned 29 January 1944; promoted Flying Officer, 29 July 1944. Attended No.18 EFTS, Fairoaks, Surrey, 15 October 1941 to 15 March 1942. Further trained at No.38 SFTS, 20 July to 20 November 1942; arrived back overseas, 20 February 1943; to No.3 (P) AFU, South Cerney, 16 April 1943; at No.23 OTU, Statford, 14 May to 30 August 1943; at No.1664 HCU, 11 September to 11 October 1943; No.428 Squadron, 11 October 1943 to 14 June 1944; No.20 OTU, Lossiemouth, 14 June 1944 to 14 June 1945. AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Transferred to RCAF, 26 January 1945 (C89573); repatriated to Canada on 2 August 1945; released 9 October 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 dated 12 October 1944 refers. No citation other than "completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1634 (RG.24 Volume 20604) has recommendation dated 13 July 1944 when he had flown 38 sorties (235 hours 30 minutes), 8 October 1943 to 2 June 1944.

 

Pilot Officer Vallee has completed one tour of operations during which he attacked many of the enemy's major targets as well as having carried out many important minelaying operations. At all times he has displayed the finest qualities of leadership and determination in pressing home his attacks and has always achieved very excellent results. His devotion to duty and enthusiasm made him an outstanding captain and greatly respected member of the squadron.

 

For the completion of a very satisfactory tour of operations and for his strong support of the squadron at all times I recommend the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 8 July 1945 he claimed to have flown about 250 operational and 850 non-operational hours (39 sorties).

 

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VATCHER, Flight Sergeant Walter Cyril (798550) - Mention in Despatches - No.174 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. From Rose Blanche, Newfoundland; enlisted 20 August 1940; left Newfoundland for BCATP training, 22 August 1940; graduated as a pilot, 22 April 1941; sailed for United Kingdom, 30 May 1941. Killed in action, 26 July 1944 near Caen. See Kerri Button, The Forgotten Years: The Formation of the 125th (Newfoundland) Squadron, Royal Air Force, 1938-1941 (university paper, institution not mentioned; copy held by National Aviation Museum). Also listed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). AFRO 1672/45 dated 2 November 1945 (reporting DFC) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

VATCHER, F/O Walter Cyril (146329) Distinguished Flying Cross - No.174 Squadron - Award effective 25 July 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1945.


This officer has operated with this squadron since March, 1942, and took part in the attack on Dieppe. Since then he has participated in many varied operations and has completed a large number of sorties over enemy occupied territory involving the bombing of well defended targets such as airfields, military installations and shipping. Since April 1944, he has acted as flight leader and since the invasion of Normandy has done fine work attacking enemy tanks and transport columns. On all his missions he has operated with great keenness in the face of heavy opposition.

 

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WALKER, F/O George Edward (39803) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.58 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 November 1940. Born in Gleichen, Alberta, 12 July 1916; educated there until 1929; took his first year of high school in Edmonton (1929-30) and completed it in Calgary, 1930-34. Obtained a Private Pilot's License, Calgary Aero Club. Appointed Provisional Pilot Officer on Probation, 31 May 1937; confirmed in rank as Pilot Officer, 5 April 1938; promoted Flying Officer, 5 November 1939; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 5 November 1940. Attended Perth Civil School, 5 April to 5 June 1937; No.6 Fling Training School, Netheravon, 8 June to 28 December 1937; No.10 Flying Training School, Tern Hill, 1 January to 30 March 1938 (early Oxford pupil); School of Air Navigation, Manston, 1 April to 30 June 1938; joined No.58 Squadron, 1 July 1938. He described this time as follows:

 

During this period took Link Instructors course, parachute course, astro course, captained station baseball team, played ice hockey with RAF Canadians, trained for Bisley. On operations from beginning of war; loaned to Coastal Command, then back to No.4 Group.

 

According to his application for 1939-45 Star, his first sortie was 3/4 September 1939 (leaflet raid); for Atlantic Star he reported flight on 15 November 1939 (convoy patrol off Ireland in a Whitley) and for Aircrew Europe Star his first bombing raid was an attack on Stavanger aerodrome, 20 April 1940. Shot down (POW), 20/21 June 1940. Escape attempts unsuccessful. Took German language courses while in captivity. Transferred to RCAF with effect from 24 November 1944 (C97001); repatriated 23 July 1945; trained in administration; released 18 March 1946. Upon transfer to the RCAF he estimated he had flown 200 operational hours and 400 non-operational hours, and had participated in 25 sorties. Joined Canadian Militia (South Alberta Light Horse, 29th Armoured Regiment) on 3 December 1957 as Lieutenant; transferred to King's Own Calgary Regiment (Royal Canadian Armoured Corps), 1 April 1959 (Troop Carrier Officer, "A" Squadron, Gleichen, Alberta); promoted Captain, 1 September 1959; released 30 March 1965. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2311 refers. No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/6102 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940) has recommendation dated 20 June 1940.

 


Took part in the first leaflet raid over the Ruhr as navigator and second pilot, forced landing in France after eight hours 15 minutes through lack of petrol and a failing engine. At Boscombe Down, now captain of aircraft, he was only able to do five convoy escorts, totalling 24 hours 15 minutes, because of an astro navigation course which came at a busy time during our detachment. Since returning from Boscombe Down this officer, as captain of aircraft, has successfully carried out fifteen bombing raids over enemy territory, comprising 101 hours 45 minutes. He has always, when it has been humanly possible, pushed his attacks home in an accurate and deliberate manner. His crew works in that unison which is so essential to good long distance bombing.

 

The Station Commander adds (date not given):

 

This officer, with his crew, is now missing. I concur in the above remarks and recommendation.

 

The Air Officer Commanding, No.4 Group, adds (30 July 1940):

 

This navigator would have been recommended by me for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross a month ago except for the fact that he was reported missing. It is now known that he is a prisoner of war.

 

Prior to being captured he successfully carried out many raids over enemy territory with marked success and with great determination. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This was further refined for transmission to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer participated in the first leaflet raid over the Ruhr as navigator and second pilot. He force-landed in France after 8 hours owing to lack of petrol and a failing engine. Flying Officer Walker has successfully carried out 15 bombing raids over enemy territory comprising 101 3/4 hours. On each occasion he has pressed home his attacks in an accurate and deliberate manner. He was reported missing and it is now known that he is a prisoner of war.

 

* * * * *

 

WALKER, F/O George Eric (84711) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.7 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 August 1941. Killed accidentally, 20 March 1942. Canadian credentials uncertain; possibly from Edmonton ? DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists G.E. Walker whose mother was living in Gleichen, Alberta (clearly George Edward Walker). Commonwealth War Graves Commission records state George Eric Walker was the son of George William and Norah Louisa Walker of Finchley, Middlesex; he was married to Madeleine Frances Walker of North Finchley. Cited with Sergeant Bernard Capel. Citation in Flight, 4 September 1941.

 


In July 1941, Flying Officer Walker and Sergeant Capel were navigator/bomb aimer and rear gunner respectively of an aircraft which attacked the battle cruiser Scharnhorst at La Pallice. Flying Officer Walker skilfully navigated the aircraft to the target, and in the face of intense anti-aircraft opposition, succeeded in scoring a direct hit on the battle cruiser with a heavy bomb.

 

During the operation the aircraft was engaged by six enemy fighters and Sergeant Capel by accurate and well-controlled fire destroyed the first two of them which attempted to close the range. The remainder finally flew away.

 

Flying Officer Walker by his navigational and bombing skill contributed largely to the success of the operation, while Sergeant Capel displayed great coolness and accurate shooting when opposed by a superior number of enemy aircraft. Both have participated in many previous missions.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8858 has recommendation dated 24 July 1941, drafted when he had flown 20 sorties (95 hours 45 minutes).

 

On the 23rd July 1941, Flying Officer G.E. Walker was the navigator and bomb aimer in Stirling N.6037 which, together with two other Stirlings, was ordered to attack the battle cruiser Scharnhorst at La Pallice.

 

At 2130 hours, in the face of intense anti-aircraft barrage, Flying Officer Walker directed the aircraft onto the target, scoring a direct hit on the battlecruiser with a 2,000 pound bomb. The success of this operation is attributed to the navigational and bombing skill shown by this officer.

 

Flying Officer Walker has now completed 20 operational sorties. In all these operations he has proven himself to be an outstanding navigator whose final success has been achieved through hard work, determination and painstaking attention to detail.

 

* * * * *

 

WALKER, F/O James Arthur (40768) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.111 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 September 1940. Born in Gleichen, Alberta, 1918; educated there. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 7 May 1938. Served in No.111 Squadron, outbreak of war to 25 April 1941 when posted to No.57 OTU; posted to No.94 Squadron, May 1942; killed 8 February 1944 in India. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 971/44 dated 5 May 1944 (reporting his death) also identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 1591 refers.

 


This officer has shown himself to be a keen and steady pilot and has displayed magnificent courage in the face of superior numbers of enemy aircraft. Since the middle of May he has sht down at least six enemy aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9456 has original recommendation dated 17 August 1940 which does not differ materially from the above. It was endorsed and supported by Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, Air Officer Commanding, No.11 Group, on 22 August 1940 and approved by Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding on 24 August 1940.

 

* * * * *

 

WALSH, F/O Archibald Philip (43421) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 December 1940. Born Toronto, 1912; home in London, Ontario; joined RAF 1936; served in No.9 Squadron, 3 May to 19 September 1940 when posted to No.214 Squadron. Later served with No.419 Squadron; killed in action, 2/3 September 1942. DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing Canadian airmen in the RAF, January 1940, identifies him as a Sergeant at the time (580138), which suggests he was commissioned about that time and rapidly promoted to Flying Officer. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2548 refers. AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 455/43 dated 19 March 1943 (confirming his death) also identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. No citation published other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the exection of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/9327 has recommendation dated 20 October 1940:

 

Pilot Officer Archibald Philip Walsh has taken part as Captain of aircraft in many important operations undertaken by the squadron since 10th May 1940, including low flying attacks in France and Flanders. In his 30 operational flights he has displayed great consistency and determination in finding and attacking his targets in face of severe enemy opposition. By his courage, persistent determination and skill as a Captain of aircraft, this officer has at all times set an example deserving of the highest praise.

 

This was further commented upon by the Commanding Officer of RAF Station Honington (21 October 1940):

 

Pilot Officer Walsh has consistently achieved satisfactory results, in particular on 18th June at Leverkusen, 29th June in the Black Forest, and 9th August near Cologne when he succeeded in starting large fires at his objective. He also delivered a very determined attack on the aerodrome at Waalhaven on 10th May, descending to 1,000 feet to drop the bombs which ignited four large fires in the hangars.

 

This was further refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee to the following (unpublished) citation:

 


Pilot Officer Walsh has taken part in 30 operational flights including raids on Leverkusen, on objectives in the Black Forest, near Cologne and on the aerodrome at Waalhaven. He has displayed great consistency and determination in finding and attacking his targets in the face of severe opposition. By his courage and skill as a captain of aircraft he has always set an example deserving of the highest praise.

 

WALSH, W/C Archibald Philip (43421) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, S/L Leslie John (41501) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.102 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945. From New Westminster, British Columbia; home in Crumlin, County Antrim although education is given as John Oliver School in Vancouver and Univeristy of British Columbia. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 14 December 1938. AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 17466/AL.967 refers. No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty."

 

* * * * *

 

WARDLE, F/L Howard Douglas (41761) - Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 May 1944. Born in Dauphin, Manitoba; home in Windsor, Ontario. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 4 March 1939. AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Served in No.218 Squadron, 29 November 1939 to 20 April 1940 (shot down, POW). No published citation. G.A. Brown, Those Who Dared: A Comprehensive List of World War II Allied Escapers (Battle Line Books, 1983) has an account in Wardle's own words following his escape from German captivity in company with Captain P.R. Reid, Royal Army Service Corps; this may also have appeared in Aldan Crawley's Escape From Germany:

 

On the 15th of October [1943] we walked across country east and south. Lay up in the woods all day. On the following day we walked south and west across the Mulde River and lay up in the woods. Waving washed, shaved and cleaned our clothes, we walked to Penig along roads, arriving at 1330 hours.

 

At 1730 hors we left by train for Zwickau, arriving at 1900 hours. Bought tickets for 0115 hours, Schnellzug for Munich. Went to the cinema to help pass the time. From 2300 hours to 0300 hours, on the 17th, we spent waiting in the waiting room, the train having been delayed two hours by an air raid.

 

We left [for] Munich, arriving 1030 hours. Had one control by civilian, status unknown. Had coupon-free meal at Munich, of soup, potatoes, vegetables - quite appetizing and temporarily filling, but containing no sustaining food value.

 


We took tickets to Rottwell, and then by Schnellzug via Augsburg Ulm to Tuttlingen, where we arrived at 1730 hours. By mistake we took the road going southeast, located by accident a well-camouflaged factory. We retracted our steps, turning southwest and slept in the woods.

 

By Swiss frontier map and a half-inch diameter brass compass, we walked across country and by secondary roads only. Near Welschingen we were surprised and suspected by a forester while lunching in a wood, so we travelled fast. We arrived at Binningen at 1300 hours and continued straight on to Riedheim-Hilzingen, along the frontier road, and to the hills near Hilzingen and Singen. At 1800 hours we began reconnaissance in daylight to find Neave's fork. Unfortunately, our arrival at what must have been this fork coincided with the passing of a cyclist patrol and it was necessary to continue walking to Singen for appearance's sake. At the junction of the Hilzingen-Singen main road and the Gottemadingen-Singen road, we were stopped by an Army sentry at a post which seemed to be permanent. Papers were examined and explanations demanded. These were given satisfactorily and we continued on our way. Out of sight of the sentry we broke off the road northwards, and in a wide circle, returned to the original point from which our reconnaissance had begun. Now knowing our position, we proceeded west along a road in the woods, arriving at a wide gap in the woods on the left-hand side, with the road running northwest, proceeding along the edge of the woods, which brought our direction gradually around to south. We crossed the double railway line and approached the Singen-Gottemadingen road very carefully. We entered the woods in sight of a road proceeding east, to locate the fixed sentry post. We found a sentry box on the north side of the road, about 250 yards east of the edge of the wood. We placed ourselves midway between this point and the edge of the wood. We took a compass bearing (magnetic south) which pointed to the left-hand edge of dark low woods about 1,000 yards across open fields. The moon was behind clouds, visibility in the field about 200 yards. We crossed the road quietly and ran, crouching across the fields for 500 yards. We continued at walking pace on magnetic south bearing, which took us straight to Ramsen across open country the whole way.

 

At 2000 hours, a few lights were showing in Ramsen. We gave ourselves up in the village to the local Swiss police authorities.

 

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WATERTON, F/L William Arthur (42288) - Air Force Cross - No.39 SFTS - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Born 18 March 1916 in Camrose, Alberta. Home in Edmonton, ex-RMC. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 10 June 1939. Served in No.242 Squadron, 20 November 1939 to 20 August 1940. Following instructional duties he ferried Boston BZ386 to Britain, April 1943. The citation is misleading, suggesting continuous instructing from 1939 and takes no account of his service in No.242 Squadron. Awarded a George Medal as a civilian test pilot.

 


Flight Lieutenant Waterton has been an outstanding instructor since June 1939. He has flown a total of 1,283 hours, 900 of which were as instructor. He has shown above average ability and exceptional devotion to duty as evidenced by the fact that, in one month, although not required to do so in his capacity as Flight Commander, he flew over 100 hours as instructor. His industry and enthusiasm have been an example to all and have resulted in turning out a goodly number of trained pilots.

 

WATERTON, S/L William Arthur (42288) - Bar to Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 June 1947.

 

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WEIR, S/L Thomas Cameron (37918) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.61 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 October 1941. Born in Winnipeg, 22 April 1912; educated University of Manitoba and University of Toronto; trained with RCAF, 1930-31 (C728). Served in Cameron Highlanders. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 6 July 1936. With No.44 Squadron on outbreak of war until 26 December 1939; No.50 Squadron, 26 December 1940 to 28 March 1940; No.44 Squadron, 28 March to 29 April 1940; No.106 Squadron, 29 April to 15 November 1940; No.61 Squadron, 15 November 1940 (Officer Commanding, 2 September 1941); with No.6 Group, 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 5394 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations." Public Records Office Air 2/8904 has recommendation dated 15 August 1941 when he had flown 16 sorties (108 operational hours):

 

This officer began his second tour on operations in November last, since when he has commanded a flight. On one occasion, under severe icing conditions, he was one of three aircraft out of twelve to reach the Cologne area and did not abandon his search for the primary target until he found the cloud to be 10/10 through to below level 2,000 feet. On another occasion, under similar conditions, he has descended to 500 fet trying to find Bremen, and spent one and a half hours over Brest before letting his bombs go. Recently, in pressing home an attack on Krefeld, a shell burst beside his cockpit and filled his eyes with splinters. Despite shock, handicapped by blinded vision and bad weather conditions he brought his crew and aircraft safely home.

 

This officer has consistently set his flight a fine example of determination, courage and skill.

 

This document includes a detailed (though incomplete) accounting of sorties, thus:

 

13 March 1941 - Target Berlin - Target identified. Bombed from 10,000 feet but bursts not seen.

 

19 March 1941 - Target Kiel - Bombed from 11,500 feet; no bursts seen but incendiaries started five fires.

 


22 June 1941 - Target Boulogne - Made three runs, bombing from 8,500 feet; no burst seen owing to bad visibility and searchlights, but dense black smoke seen on leaving target area.

 

24 June 1941 - Target Dusseldorf - Bombed from 9,500 feet. No burst seen owing to cloud cover over target. Manchester aircraft.

 

27 June 1941 - Target Kiel - Bombed from 9,500 feet. No bursts seen owing to thick haze. Manchester aircraft.

 

22 July 1941 - Target Frankfurt - Unable to identify Frankfurt owing to weather. Bombed Cologne instead from 11,000 feet.

 

7 August 1941 - Target Karlsruhe - Bombed from 6,000 feet. Bursts seen followed by thick black smoke; spent one hour looking for target. Aircraft received minor damage from anti-aircraft.

 

9 August 1941 - Search for dinghy.

 

12 August 1941 - Target Krefeld - Bombed from 9,500 feet. Shell burst to left of cockpit and splinter came through triplex and grazed pilot's shoulders. Also triplex got into eyes of pilot, blurring his vision. Electrical storms encountered.

 

The text of he recommendation was edited for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee to read:

 

This officer commenced his second operational tour in November 1940, when he assumed command of a flight. Throughout, Squadron Leader Weir has consistently displayed great determination, courage and skill and spares no effort in an endeavour to locate and bomb his objective. Recently, during an attack on Krefeld, a shell burst near the cockpit of Squadron leader Weir's aircraft. Despite shock and the handicap of being almost blinded by splinters from broken triplex, Squadron leader Weir flew his aircraft safely to this county.

 

FURTHER NOTE: The late W/C F.H. Hitchins compiled notes from Squadron Operational Record Books on a number of Canadians in the RAF. The following were his notes pertaining to Weir:

 

3 September 1939: In No.44 Squadron at Waddington, Hampshire. He piloted one of nine aircraft which that day searched for German fleet. Did not find it due to darkness, low cloud and rain. Acting Flight Lieutenant (1820-2350)

 

26 December 1939: Acting Flight Lieutenant Weir attached to No.50 Squadron at Waddington (Hampdens) pending posting. Granted acting rank of Squadron Leader on assuming command of "B" Flight.

 


10 February 1940: North Sea sweeps from Lossiemouth; Cox in crew [a reference to Sergeant A.B. Cox, another Canadian in the RAF].

 

15 March 1940: North Sea sweep.

 

20/21 March 1940: Nickel raid and reconnaissance of Oldenburg; weather bad.

 

28 March 1940: Squadron Leader Weir attached No.44 Squadron.

 

11/12 April 1940: Successful reconnaissance of area, looking for "von Scheer"; nothing seen of it.

 

13/14 April 1940: "Successfully planted water melons in Asparagus area".

 

17/18 April 1940: planted water melons in Asparagus again.

 

29 April 1940: Acting Squadron Leader Weir posted to No.106 Squadron, Finningly with effect from 26 April 1940; on Hampdens and Ansons.

 

6 May 1940: Posted to No.7 (Navigation] Squadron with effect from 30 April 1940. Hitchins notes: "But this squadron had ceased April 1940 - was resuscitated only in August 1940; no ORB for intervening period".

 

3 June 1940: Attached No.106 Squadron with effect 30 May 1940.

 

June 1940: Training, test and cross-country flights on Hampdens.

 

30 July 1940: Regranted Acting Squadron Leader with effect from 30 April 1940.

 

July 1940: Local circuits, formation, operational training.

 

9 September 1940: No.106 did its first operational flight; Weir led three aircraft Gardening; up 7 3/4 hours.

 

21 November 1940: Squadron Leader Weir, commander of the operational flight, was posted to No.61 Squadron, Hemswell, with effect 15 November 1940; succeeded in No.106 Squadron by Squadron Leader Threapleton.

 

25 November 1940: First appearance in No.61 Squadron ORB, Hemswell; Hampden, crew of four; aircraft was unserviceable.

 

27 November 1940: Early morning raid on B.48, Koln, 5 1/2 hours.

 

6 December 1940: On night fighter interception patrol over Bristol area - 7 hours - crew of 5 and extra load of ammunition carried.


20 December 1940: Icing up; brought bombs back.

 

9/10 January 1941: Successfully attacked Haamstede aerodrome.

 

16 January 1941: Early morning raid; Wilhelmshaven docks.

 

3 February 1941: Early morning raid; Hipper cruiser, Brest; 10/10 cloud, icing.

 

10 February 1941: Baurafen railroad junction; weather very poor.

 

15/16 February 1941: Bombed synthetic oil works, Homburg; wide.

 

Sick at end of February 1941.

 

12/13 March 1941: Bombed Berlin, 8 1/4 hours.

 

18/19 March 1941: Kiel docks; no further reference to him until:

 

21/22 June 1941: Attack on Boulogne; two runs over target. On Manchester L.7388. First Manchester operations from Hemswell (six aircraft); crew of seven; 15 x 500 pound bombs. Some Hampdens still in use.

 

23/24 June 1941: Raid on Dusseldorf; bombed reflection of large fires.

 

26/27 June 1941: Kiel, 5 hours 34 minutes.

 

17 July 1941: Squadron moved from Hemswell to North Luffenham; no Manchester operations in July.

 

22/23 July 1941: On Hampden; bombed Cologne, 11,000 feet, 8 1/2 hours.

 

6/7 August 1941: On Hampden; bombed Karlsruhe, 6,000 feet; four large fires; heavy flak; one shell burst under tail; minor damage.

 

8 August 1941: On Manchester; searched for a dinghy; not found.

 

11/12 August 1941: Only one of 10 aircraft to reach Krefeld yards; bombed town; aircraft hit by flak. He was wounded by pieces of smashed perspex and almost blinded but succeeded in returning safely to base. Hampden AE288 (2242-0437).

 

2 September 1941: Wing Commander Valentine lost on Manchester; Weir becomes Commanding Officer as Wing Commander.

 

30 September/1 October 1941: Wing Commander; on Hampdens; bombed Blohm and Voss aircraft factory at Hamburg; three large explosions followed incendiaries.


October 1941: only one aircraft engaged on operations.

 

4 October 1941: first allotment of Manchesters (should this read "Lancasters" ?) made and program of training began.

 

WEIR, W/C Thomas Cameron (37918) - Mention in Despatches - No.6 Group Headquarters - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1944.

 

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WELLBURN, S/L Dennis Crosby (40965) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No. 61 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943. Born in Calgary, 1916; home in Vancouver; educated at Launa School and Britannia High School, Vancouver. Enlisted in RAF as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 July 1938; confirmed in rank of Pilot Officer, 4 April 1939. Killed in action, 1 September 1943. AFRO 1889/43 dated 17 September 1943 (reporting him missing) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 11720 refers. AFRO 1020/44 dated 12 May 1944 (reporting award) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

...many successful sorties. On ten occasions acted as Deputy Flight Commander during effective raids on Ruhr area. Since appointment to Flight Commander has taken part in further sorties and obtained excellent photographs of targets he has bombed. His determination to press home attacks in face of heaviest defences has set fine example to rest of squadron.

 

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WENZEL, F/L Clifton Leonard, DFC (59362) - Air Force Cross - No.40 Squadron - awarded aas per London Gazette dated 9 June 1949. See Second World War data base for biographical details including information on his DFC. One of many ex-RCAF aircrew who accepted a postwar RAF commission. AFC for services on the Berlin Airlift; citation not found as of 26 August 1999.

 

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WESTINGHOUSE, F/L Richard Lawrence (108984) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.680 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943. Born in Oak Bay (Victoria), British Columbia, 4 March 1919; home there; enrolled in private schools from 1925 onwards; in Boston, 1932-33; Webb School, California, 1933-35; Brentwood College, British Columbia, 1935-36; attended Royal Academy of Music, 1938-1939. Enlisted in RAF, 12 August 1940 (Aircraftman Second Class, Aircrafthand Pilot, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve); mobilized 15 March 1941; reclassified as Leading Aircraftman and remustered to Pilot (training); attended No.9 FTS, Hullavington; commissioned as Pilot Officer, 1 November 1941; promoted to Flying Officer, 1 October 1942; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 1 November 1943. Attended No.61 OTU, November 1941 to January 1942. Posted to No.611 Squadron in Scotland, 20 January 1942; first sortie on 9 February 1942; left No.611 Squadron on 21 March 1942. Posted to No.2 Photo Reconnaissance Unit, Egypt (first sortie on 30 August 1942 over Tobruk). Unit subsequently redesignated No.680 Squadron. Report compiled 16 August 1943 stated he had flown 568 hours (219 in previous six months), remarking, "This officer takes a lot of interest in the airmen's welfare; he is a good organizer and an excellent operational pilot". Instructor in photo reconnaissance at No.74 OTU, Palestine, September-December 1943 and subsequently with No.13 AGS, Ballah. Report prepared at the latter unit on 14 April 1944 (on posting) gave flying time as 749 hours 35 minutes (67 hours 25 minutes in previous six months), stating, "Has a working knowledge of several languages. Classical pianist and music lover. A good type of officer with an exceptionally broad general knowledge and a wide range of interests. Above average ability in all duties. Has done excellent work in developing the flying side of 13 AGS." Returned to operations (No.682 Squadron), May 1944, flying first sortie on 19 May 1944. Report dated 17 June 1944 by S/L J. Morgan gave flying time to date as 789 hours (120 in previous six months); "This officer during his short period with this squadron has proved himself to be exceptionally sound. He appears to have plenty of drive and shows an excellent example to his subordinates by his keenness and untiring energy". Most of his time had been away on detachment; even then he was contemplating transfer to the RCAF to expedite repatriation. Posted to No.3 Air Gunnery School, Castle Kennedy, 10 October 1944 (staff pilot). Transferred to RCAF (C94014), 23 March 1945; repatriated to Canada, 9 July 1945; to Western Air Command, 20 July 1945; released 23 August 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 11749 refers.

 

This officer has undertaken very large number of reconnaissances and has displayed skill and devotion to duty of a high order. In September 1943 he executed a reconnaissance over a very extensive area and obtained valuable results. His efforts on this occasion were worthy of the highest praise.

 

NOTE: When applying for Operational Badges he described his first tour as being from 30 August 1942 to 30 September 1943 (70 sorties, 300 hours 20 minutes, all on Spitfires with No.2 Photo Reconnaissance Unit and No.680 Squadron; second tour was 19 May to 9 August 1944 with No.682 Squadron (photo reconnaissance Spitfires; 57 sorties, 200 hours 30 minutes). On a form dated 24 May 1945 he claimed flying time on the following types: Tiger Moth (68 hours 10 minutes); Master I, II and III (69 hours 25 minutes), Hurricane I and II (61 hours 50 minutes); Spitfire I, II, IV, VII and XI (706 hours 15 minutes); Ju.52 (one hour 45 minutes); Harvard (14 hours 30 minutes); Anson (115 hours 45 minutes), Martinet (three hours 15 minutes), Magister (25 minutes). He noted that he had flown a total of 502 hours 40 minutes on operations and 538 hours 40 minutes non-operational (total of 1,041 hours 20 minutes); had flown 129 sorties and that the last sortie had been on 9 August 1944.

 

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WHELAN, F/O James Roger (40330) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.18 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 July 1940. Born in Saskatoon, 29 April 1914; home in Bathurst, New Brunswick; educated there and St.Francis Xavier University. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 28 November 1937 and ultimately attained rank of Group Captain (1 July 1956). With No.18 Squadron, 11 May to 22 December 1940 (wounded 16 May 1940); detached to West Rynham, 7 September 30 November 1940; to PDC, Uxbridge, 22 December 1940; with No.680 Squadron (PRU), July 1943. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944 (announcing his DSO) also confirmed him as a Canadian in the RAF. AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945 (reporting Bar to his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 1203 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/6075 (Non-Immediate Awards, Air Component of the Field Force, 1940) has recommendation dated 31 May 1940 when he was a Pilot Officer:

 

This officer was employed as a pilot in a squadron engaged in long distance reconnaissance and bombing over enemy territory from 15th April 1940 to 16th May 1940.

 

While on a bombing raid over enemy positions his aircraft was attacked by six enemy fighters. His observer was shot dead, one engine was put out of action and set on fire, and he himself was badly burned. Although in considerable pain, he handled his aircraft with such coolness and skill that he succeeded in evading further persistent attacks by the enemy fighters and in carrying out a forced-landing inside the Allied lines.

 

By his courage and skill, Pilot Officer Whelan saved both the aircraft and air gunner from destruction or capture by the enemy.

 

This was further refined for submission to Air Ministry Honour and Awards Committee:

 

This officer was employed as a pilot in a squadron engaged in long distance reconnaissance flights and bombing operations over enemy territory from 15th April 1940 to 16th May 1940. On one occasion whilst on a bombing raid over enemy positions, his aircraft was attacked by six enemy fighters, one engine being put out of action, his observer killed, and he himself was badly burned. Although in considerable pain he succeeded in evading further persistent attacks by the enemy fighters. He made a forced-landing inside friendly territory. By his courage and skill, Pilot Officer Whelan saved both his aircraft and air gunner from destruction or capture by the enemy.

 

WHELAN, W/C James Roger (40330) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.680 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 11626 refers, add ing that he had "gained the DFC for his part in operations hen British forcs were beleaguered in Calaias in May 1940".

 


...has commanded squadron since May 1942 and has completed many long distance reconnaissance sorties over the sea and enemy territory. Recently he successfully completed a mission at the extreme range of his aircraft which thereby required precise flying and most accurate photography. At all times his example of perseverance and efficiency has been an inspiration to his squadron.

 

WHELAN, W/C James Roger (40330) - Distinguished Service Order - No.680 Squadron- awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 October 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 15797/AL.893 dated 3 October 1944 refers.

 

This officer has commanded the squadron since June 1942. During the period he has completed a very large number of photographic reconnaissances and has displayed the highest qualities of skill, courage and leadership. By his untiring zeal, initiative and excellent organizing ability he has contributed in a large way to the successes of the squadron which has undertaken many notable missions, the results of which were of immense value.

 

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WHITECROSS, F/O James Alexander (41888) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.50 Squadron - awarded effective 27 July 1941 as per London Gazette dated 28 July 1942. Born in Winnipeg, 1917; home there; educated at St.John's College School and University of Manitoba. Enlisted in RAF, 1939; killed in action 15 August 1941. AFRO 1497/42 dated 18 September 1942 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 7611 refers. No published citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/8900 has recommendation for a DSO dated 27 July 1941 when he had flown 29 sorties (180 hours 45 minutes). However, a 30th sortie (incomplete) is described in the text. The document specifies that he is Canadian.

 

5 Nov 40 Bremen; returned early 13 Jan 41 GARDENING, St.Nazaire

owing to bad weather. 29 Jan 41 Wilhelmshaven

7 Nov 40 Essen 4 Feb 41 Dusseldorf bombed target

10 Nov 40 Mannheim; bombed target of of last resort

last resort. 7 Feb 41 Dunkirk

20 Nov 40 Duisburg 10 Feb 41 Hannover

25 Nov 41 Kiel 11 Feb 41 Bremen

27 Nov 41 Cologne; bombed target of 21 Feb 41 GARDENING, Brest

last resort. 24 Feb 41 Brest

7 Dec 40 Dusseldorf; returned with 26 Feb 41 Cologne

engine trouble. 13 Mar 41 Hamburg

20 Dec 40 Cologne; bombed target of 14 Mar 41 Gelsenkirchen

last resort. 29 Mar 41 Brest; early return, weather

28 Dec 40 Lorient 30 Mar 41 Brest

1 Jan 41 Bremen; bombed target of 8 Apr 41 Kiel

last resort 15 Apr 41 Kiel

4 Jan 41 Brest 17 Apr 41 Berlin

8 Jan 41 GARDENING, Elbe River 24 Apr 41 GARDENING, Copenhagen

 


Flying Officer Whitecross has served in an operational unit for nine months. His conspicuous bravery and determination to attack his allotted target throughout this period and in all kinds of adverse weather conditions has been an outstanding example to the other pilots and air crews in his squadron. His consistently cheerful demeanour irrespective of the conditions and opposition which he encountered on his operational missions is worthy of the highest praise. His judgement and skill in finding his primary target and delivering his attack to the very best advantage have achieved the very highest results. His determination to do his duty is exemplified by the following example.

 

On the 29th April 1941 he was detailed to lay a mine in the harbour of La Rochelle. During this flight the oil pressure of his starboard engine started to fall and he accordingly altered his course towards his base. As he was reluctant, however, not to carry out his task to the best of his ability he descended to a low altitude and laid his mine at Lorient. By this time the oil pressure had fallen to 30 pounds per square inch and shortly after having laid the mine his starboard engine caught fire. He thereupon altered course in order to get over the land and having done so he ordered his crew to abandon the aircraft. After they had done so he also abandoned the aircraft by which time it had reached a height of less than 1,500 feet.

 

He alighted within a short distance of his crashed aircraft, divested himself of his parachute and immediately set out to make good his escape. After walking for seven days and enduring all kinds of hardships, he succeeded in getting out of occupied France into unoccupied France, where he was arrested. He was taken to an internment camp from which he subsequently succeeded in escaping and travelling by devious means he succeeded in reaching the Spanish frontier which he managed to cross without being detected. He made his way through Spain to Barcelona where he was again arrested and thrown into prison. He was eventually released from prison and with the aid of diplomatic representatives eventually reached Gibraltar from when he returned to this country.

 

His courage and tenacity it is considered are worthy of the highest praise and should receive official recognition.

 

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WHITEHEAD, Leading Aircraftman George William (533230) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.82 Squadrons - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1940. Born in York, Ontario, 22 November 1916. Went to England, May 1936. Enlisted in RAF, 13 July 1936; trained as a Wireless Operator at Cranwell; in No.82 Squadron as of October 1937; on 26 November 1937 that unit declared him medically fit for training as an Air Gunner; with that unit until 5 July 1940 (last of 32 sorties on 21 June 1940); to No.17 OTU for a rest; with No.110 Squadron, 25 October 1940 to 6 August 1941 (26 sorties); attended Gunnery Instructor Course, Manby, September-October 1941; on staff of No.17 OTU, Upwood, October 1941 to April 1942; took Wireless Course, Yatesbury, April 1942. Promoted Warrant Officer, 1 May 1943. Commissioned 14 July 1943 (service number 53738); promoted Flying Officer, 14 January 1944. Arrived in Canada via No.31 Personnel Depot, 27 July 1942; to No.34 OTU, 18 August 1942; to No.32 OTU, 8 February 1944; to No.6 OTU, 31 May 1944. Transferred to the RCAF, 10 July 1944 while a Gunnery Officer stationed at No.6 OTU in Canada (C47184) with rank of Flying Officer; released 29 August 1945. Listed as a Canadian airman in the RAF in DHist file 181.005 D.270; next of kin (father) living in Toronto. Air Ministry Bulletin 1085 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations." Public Records Office Air 2/6080 has recommendation dated 30 May 1940.

 

Leading Aircraftman Whitehead has carried out thirteen operational flights since the outbreak of war.

 

He has already been recommended for the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal for the part he played in a reconnaissance of Sylt on 20th March 1940. In this occasion a complete line overlap of Sylt was obtained from a low altitude in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and the presence of enemy fighters.

 

Since that date Leading Aircraftman Whitehead has carried out many other tasks and has at all times displayed great courage and coolness under fire.

 

This was further refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This airman took part in a reconnaissance of Sylt on 20th March 1940. In spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and the presence of enemy fighters, a complete line overlap of Sylt was obtained from a low altitude. Since then he has carried out many other tasks, and has at all times displayed great courage and coolness under fire.

 

WHITEHEAD, Sergeant George William (533230) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 July 1940.

 

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WHITFORD, A/C John (05019) - Commander, Order of the British Empire - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 September 1943. Born in Tavistock, Devon, England, 17 December 1892; educated at Alberta College and McGill University; rancher in Edmonton (where his mother lived) when he enlisted with Lord Strathcona's Horse, going overseas with First Continent, CEF. To France in June 1915; commissioned in CEF, April 1917. To RFC on secondment at Reading, 25 September 1917; to No.41 TS, 12 November 1917; to No.73 TS, 9 February 1918; to No.6 TS, 19 February 1918; graded as Second Lieutenant (Aeroplanes and Seaplanes), 25 April 1918; to No.32 TDS, 15 July 1918; seconded to CAF, 8 July 1919; permanent commission in RAF, 15 August 1919. Mentioned in Despatches (South Kurdistan), May 1932; commanding No.24 (Communications) Squadron, 1933 ; awarded OBE as a Squadron Leader, June 1935. Group Captain, 1 March 1940; Air Commodore, November 1942. Air Officer in Charge of Administration, AHQ, Western Desert when awarded CBE. Later appointed CB (date uncertain). Appointed Acting Air Vice-Marshall, 1944; substantive A/V/M, 1 January 1946. Created KBE, 1949; retired 1949. Air Ministry Bulletin 11503 refers. NOTE: DHist card states that he was awarded AFC in December 1921 and Bar to AFC in October 1927; further states he was a 1927 Schneider Trophy winner in September 1927; these are not borne out by research and the source of these statements is unknown as of 1 November 1998. No citation for his award other than "in recognition of distinguished services rendered in the Mediterranean Air Command during the period February 1st, 1943 to May 12th, 1943.

 

WHITFORD, A/C John (05019) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943.

 

WHITFORD, A/C John, CBE (05019) - Commander, Order of the Bath - Advanced Headquarters, Desert Air Force - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/9017 has recommended citation as brought to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer has been Air Officer in Charge of Administration with the Desert Air Force since December 1942. He carried out his duties with conspicuous efficiency during the campaign from Benghazi to the fall of Tunis. His duties since then have included the preparation of the force for the operations against Sicily, the operations in Sicily and the mobile campaign in Italy. These operations have been of a most varied character and the success which has been achieved is due in no small measure to the foresight, capacity for organization and tireless energy of Air Commodore Whitford. His wisdom in administration, good sense and special attention to welfare have greatly contributed to the high morale of the Desert Air Force.

 

WHITFORD, A/C John, CBE (05019) - Legion of Merit (Degree of Commander) (United States) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 October 1945. Citation published in a War Department Press Branch release of 24 November 1945 (Army HQ file 54-27-94-32, Volume 1, National Archives of Canada RG.24 Volume 2236).

 

For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Armed Forces of the United States government from December 9, 1942 to October 1, 1943. As Air Officer in charge of administration , Desert Air Force, Air Commodore Whitford by his personal zeal, foresight, aggressiveness and understanding consideration, continuously supervised and assisted in the supply of the United States Air Force units then functioning under operational control of the Desert Air Force during operations in Tripolitania, Tunisia, Sicily and Italy to include the capture of Naples. His influence was particularly felt during the early stages of the desert campaign when American supply facilities were extremely limited. By his helpful and cooperative action he contributed in no small way to the maintenance of the high serviceability rate of the American units involved, thus permitting these units to establish an enviable record in combat, which in turn constituted a major factor in the success of Allied operations.


* * * * *

 

WHITING, F/O Sidney Gouinlock (42549) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. Born Whonnock, British Columbia, 14 February 1913; home there; educated at McLean High School. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 19 August 1939. Trained in Canada, No.31 ANS. No details. AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943 (reporting DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. This is confirmed by Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage Collection 84/44-3). Ferried Hudson FH338 to Britain, May 1942.

 

WHITING, S/L Sidney Gouinlock (42549) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.233 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 11627 refers.

 

Throughout two operational tours has displayed keenness and devotion to duty. Targets have included Norway, U-Boat bases in France, Bay of Biscay and Mediterranean. He has set a splendid example of zealous determination to maintain an ever vigilant and efficient search for the enemy, often in most adverts weather.

 

* * * * *

 

WHYNACHT, F/O Kelley Aeriel, DFC (59546) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 June 1953 - No.230 Operational Conversion Unit. See Second World War data base for biographical details. Accepted Short Service Commission with the Royal Air Force, 1947. Still in that force as of 1957 when he was a Flying Control Officer.

 

* * * * *

 

WICKENKAMP, P/O Estelles Arthur (41088) - Member, Order of the British Empire - No.115 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940. Born in Dorchester, Nebraska, 3 November 1912; educated in Yorkton, Saskatchewan; RAF, 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 20 August 1938. Served in No.115 Squadron, 8 November 1939 to 7 April 1940 (missing, believed killed). MBE incident occurred 24 February 1940. Air Ministry Bulletin 800 refers.

 

For gallantry, promptitude and disregard of his own safety in saving life when an aircraft in which he was second pilot crashed and burst into flames.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/4072 has extensive correspondence relating to this award. The process began with a firm submitted on 28 February 1940 by the Commanding Officer, No.115 Squadron:

 


On the evening of 24th February, 1940, Pilot Officer Wickenkamp was second pilot of a Wellington aircraft of No.115 Squadron which hit a tree, crashed and burst into flames whilst taking off at Marham. At the time of the crash Pilot Officer Wickenkamp was standing in the astro hatch position with two members of the crew - 606808 AC.2 Bax, B.F, W/OP.AC and 630680 AC.2 Orford, J., W/Op.Ac, close to him, the remaining for occupants of the aircraft all being further forward.

 

The aircraft was enveloped in flames immediately it hit the ground but Pilot Officer Wickenkamp despite extensive bruising as a result of the impact, first helped AC.2 Bax to safety and then re-entered the blazing fuselage and dragged out AC.2 Orford who was temporarily unable to walk on account of his dazed condition and injuries to his legs. During this second rescue Pilot Officer Wickenkamp's parachute harness became caught in some wreckage and he was forced to remove it; he also received burns to his left hand.

 

Both these airmen were in a very dazed condition due to the crash and I consider that it was only Pilot Officer Wickenkamp's prompt action and complete disregard for his own personal safety which saved them from serious injury and in all probability death.

 

The remainder of the crew escaped or were thrown out through the forward part of the aircraft.

 

An immediate award of the Albert Medal is recommended; failing this, the award of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for gallantry.

 

Pilot Officer Wickenkamp is employed as an operational pilot in this squadron.

 

On 1 March 1940 the Air Officer Commanding, No.3 Group, added his remarks:

 

I consider this officer showed most commendable coolness and great disregard for his personal safety in the action he took when this aircraft caught fire. I most strongly recommend him for an award of the Albert Medal. There appears little doubt that his prompt action certainly saved the life of one, if not both, of the airmen concerned.

 

On 26 February 1940, the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Marham (Group Captain C. Hilton Keith), had already written directly to Headquarters, No.3 Group, with his own assessment:

 


I wish to support the recommendation made by the Officer Commanding, No.115 Squadron in respect of No.41088 Pilot Officer E.A. Wickenkamp. Having personally seen the conditions of the crash I consider that this officer displayed great gallantry in returning to the burning airframe, at very considerable personal risk, and rescuing a member of the crew who was dazed and unable to extricate himself. This young Canadian officer was posted here from Feltwell on the 29th November 1939, and during the time he has been at Marham he has established a very good reputation for himself, and has been very keen, reliable and unassuming. In the light of my knowledge as to the grant of awards for similar acts I have no hesitation in suggesting that he should be strongly recommended for the immediate award of the Albert Medal or if this cannot be entertained the award of some other appropriate decoration.

 

This was altered to a recommendation for the Empire Gallantry Medal as follows:

 

On 24th February 1940, this officer was second pilot of a Wellington which, when taking off at Marham, hit a tree, crashed and immediately burst into flames. Despite extensive bruises this officer helped an airman to safety and then re-entered the blazing fuselage and dragged out another injured airman. During the second rescue, Pilot Officer Wickenkamp's parachute harness became caught on wreckage and he was forced to remove it; he also received burns on his left hand. He showed great disregard for his personal safety and his prompt action certainly saved the life of one, if not both, of the airmen concerned.

 

On 25 April 1940 a letter (evidently from Sir Arthur Street) is sent to Sir Robert Knox:

 

We recently received a recommendation from the Commander-in-Chief, Bomber Command, for the award of the Empire Gallantry Medal to Pilot Officer Estelles G. Wickenkamp. Particulars are given in the statement attached. His Wing Commander rated his action so highly that he recommended Pilot Officer Wickenkamp for the immediate award of the Albert Medal, and this was strongly supported by the Air Vice Marshal commanding the Group. The Air Member for Personnel accepted the recommendation of Bomber Command and submitted the case for the award of the Empire Gallantry Medal.

 

When the papers came before me, I took the view that our chances of securing such a high award as the British Empire Meal for Gallantry were extremely small. I based this view on the experience that I had gained of similar cases in the recent past.

 

I minuted the papers accordingly and sent them on, with the suggestion that Pilot Officer Wickenkamp should be recommended for the Meritorious Service Medal.

 

Sir Kingsley Wood accepted this suggestion, but the Chief of the Air Staff is not happy about it. He feels that Pilot Officer Wickenkamp fully earned the Empire Gallantry Medal, and he regards the Meritorious Service Medal as inappropriate to this particular case. He wishes to know the composition of the British Empire Medal Selection Committee and its terms of reference.

 

I am sorry to trouble you with this matter but would you be so good as to let me have the information which Sir Cyril Newall requires. It would at the same time be helpful if you would give some indication of the standard which the Committee have set for the Gallantry and Meritorious Service Medals respectively...

 


On 30 April 1940, the Honourable R.U.E. Knox wrote to Sir Arthur Street. The recommended award was referred to as the Medal of the Order of the British Empire for Gallantry but this was under consideration. Having addressed the letter to "My dear Street". it goes on:

 

Many thanks for your letter of the 25th April, about a recommendation for the award of the Medal of the Order of the British Empire for Gallantry to Pilot Officer Estelles G. [sic] Wickenkamp.

 

The Committee of Selection for the Medal of the Order of the British Empire for Gallantry have always taken the view that this medal should only be granted when the recommendation is of an exceedingly high standard. The kind of standards to which the Committee have found it desirable to have regard when recommendations are under review have been as follows:

 

1. Did the individual recommended very nearly - and so far as his own prospects were concerned, absolutely - lay down his life for those whom he saved ?

 

Was it a case of the greatest gallantry ? Was the standard of personal heroism the highest possible ?

 

Was the immolation of self complete ?

 

Was the risk altogether exceptional. Was it incurred more than once on the same occasion, or if incurred only once, did it place the recipient's life at the extremist hazard ?

 

2. Was the action carried out under conditions of very great danger and risk for the individual recommended ? Did he not only seriously imperil his own life, but did he do it under conditions which made his survival extremely unlikely ?

 

3. Was the action carried out under conditions of great danger and risk for the individual recommended ? Did the risk of death equal or approach the chance of survival ?

 

These are some of the tests which are applied. Recommendations otherwise in order and falling in the first and second classes would be suitable without doubt for approval for the award of the EGM. In the third class also candidates would usually be eligible.

 


The standard for the EGM is exceedingly high and recommendations falling below 3, that is to say, recommendations for actions involving some personal risk when the risk of death does not approach the chance of survival, would often be considered, in the case of Officers and Warrant Officers, for appointment to the Order, and in the case of other ranks, for the award of the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, for Meritorious Service.

 

It is the view of the Selection Committee that, should the requirements for the grant of the EGM be allowed, except in the rarest instances, to fall below a very high standard, the award will quickly become of slight value.

 

The appropriate award for Pilot Officer Wickenkamp would appear to be appointment as MBE, Military Division. As a recommendation for the award of an Honour for this action was made while he was still alive, I do not think that the fact that he was subsequently killed would prevent the appointment now being made.

 

The Selection Committee for the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Military Division, for Gallantry, and for the Medal for the Order of the British Empire, Military Division, for Meritorious Service, has been in existence since 1923. It was set up in consultation with Lord Stamfordham. The Chairman is the Permanent Secretary of the Treasury, who is ex officio Secretary to the Order of the British Empire. The Members are the Private Secretary to the King, the Private Secretary to the Prime Minister, and the Permanent Under Secretaries of State, or Permanent Secretaries, of the three military Departments. One other Permanent Head of a Department of State is included in the Membership. At present this officer is also Secretary to the Admiralty and therefore already a Member. I am Secretary to the Committee.

 

I have a file here containing lengthy schedules showing the names of individuals who declined, in the years 1918 to 1921, appointment to the Order of the British Empire. There is no doubt that the Order fell into disrepute. It is very easy for a while to make appointments and awards too freely. The result of lowering the standards is that the awards become of slight value.

 

We cannot expect that another new Order will be introduced during the present war. We must therefore, you will agree, make the best of those we have got. Having regard to the history of the Order of the British Empire, it is essential that in cases of doubt, recommendations should not be made. In that way the Order and the Medals may be preserved as awards which are likely to be valued by the recipients.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9317 has correspondence which bears specifically on this award but also on the Order of the British Empire as a whole. Discission Wickenkamp's award appears to have overlapped that of an EGM to E.R.C. Frost. Mr. R.U.E. Knox wrote:

 

The appropriate award for Pilot Officer Wickenkamp would appar to be appoitment as MBE, Military Division. As a recommendation for the award of an Honour for this action was made while he was still alive, I do not think that the fact that he was subsequently killed would prevent the appointment now being made.

 


The Selection Commitee for the Medal of the Order of the British Empire, Military Division, for Gallantry, and for the Medal of the Order of the British Emoire, Military Division, for Meritorious Service, has been in existence since 1923. It was set up in consultation with Lord Stamfordham. The Chairman is the Permanent Secretary to the Treasury, who is ex officio Secretary to the Order of the British Empire. The Members are the Private Secretary to the King, the Private Secretary to the Prime Minister, and the Permanent Under Secretaries of the three Military Departments. One other Permanent Head of a Department of State is included in the Membership. At present this Officer is also Secretary to the Admiralty and therefore already a Member. I am Secretary to the Committee.

 

I have a file her containing lengthy schedules showing the names of individuals who declined, in the years 1918 to 1921, appointment to the Order of the British Empire. There is no doubt that the Order fell into disrepute. It is very easy for a while to make appointments and awards too freely. The result of lowering the standards is that the awards become of slight value.

 

We cannot expect that another Order will be introduced during the present war. We must therefore, you will agree, make the best of those we have got. Having regard to the history of the Order of the British Empire, it is essential that in cases of doubt, recommendation should not be made. In that way the Order and the Medals may be preserved as awards which are likely to be valued by the recipients.

 

* * * * *

 

WIDDOWSON, S/L Reuben Pears (34256) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.75 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 July 1941. Born in Winnipeg, 1915; educated there; RAF, 1934; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 September 1934; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 14 September 1935, having been granted a Distinguished Pass following ab initio training at No.3 Flying Training School, Grantham (reported in Aeroplane of 6 November 1935); promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 15 April 1938. Posted from No.1 OTU to No.75 (New Zealand) Squadron, 22 March 1941; with that unit to 25 September 1941 when posted to No.20 OTU. Later commanded a Wellington squadron in Italy. Incident was 7/8 July 1941 attacking Munster; Sergeant J.A. Ward awarded VC (5 August 1941, Air Ministry Bulletin 4667); Sergeant Allen Robert James Box awarded DFM. See also Alex Lumsden, Wellington Special. Air Ministy Bulletin 4602 (found in DHist file 181.009 D.3053, RG.24 Volume 20634) has citation (same as in London Gazette):

 

One night in July 1941, Squadron Leader Widdowson and Sergeant Box were captain and rear gunner respectively of an aircraft which carried out a successful attack on Munster. On the return journey the aircraft was attacked by a Messerschmitt 110. In the ensuing action Sergeant Box fired a burst of 200 rounds at point-blank range, causing the attacker to turn away and dive steeply towards the sea with its engine on fire and emitting trails of black smoke.

 


Squadron Leader Widdowson's aircraft was severely damaged and a fire of considerable proportions had broken out in the starboard wing. Nevertheless he refused to abandon the aircraft. Excellent crew control was displayed and tremendous efforts were made to subdue the fire. All loose articles were jettisoned and, despite reduced speed with gradual loss of height, Squadron Leader Widdowson, with great skilll, flew the aircraft to an aerodrome in this country and landed safely.

 

This officer and airman displayed splendid courage, coolness and skill throughout. Both have completed numerous operational missions against the enemy.

 

* * * * *

 

WIGMORE, S/L William Charles (42931) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.235 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1942. Born in Toronto, 1918; home in York; educated at Queens University. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 23 October 1939; with PRU, Benson as of 6 April 1941; to Gibralter, 2 July 1941; with No.235 Squadron, June 1942. AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942 (reporting his DFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. No citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations" but AFRO 1653/42 publishes the following:

 

Squadron Leader Wigmore is an outstanding leader. One morning in June [1942] whilst escorting convoys to Malta, he attacked and shot down an enemy fightter and damaged a Junkers 88. He has led his section in fighter cover on naval units and enemy convoys. He has shown great determination.

 

Public Record Office Air 2/9596 has a letter dated 3 August 1942 from Group Captain W.J.M. Akerman at Headquarters, Royal Air Force, Middle East to the Air Ministry, recommending Wigmore for an non-immediate Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This officer has done 300 hours operational flying and is a most outstanding leader. On the mornings of 14th and 15th June, he escorted convoys to Malta from east of Cape Bon and near Pantellaria respectively when there was much enemy single-engined aircraft activity in those areas. Despite this he attacked and shot down one fighter and attacked and damaged a Junkers 88 attacking the convoy. He has also led his section in fighter cover on all strikes of Beauforts against Italian Fleet and convoys to the west and east of Malta with much determination and has driven off enemy escorting aircraft.

 

This was refined into the following citation (subsequently printed in Air Ministry Bulletin 8079):

 


Squadron Leader Wigmore is an outstanding leader. One morning in June he escorted convoys to Malta from east of Cape Bon and near Pantellaria respectively when there was much enemy fighter activity in those areas. Despite this, he attacked and shot down one fighter and damaged a Ju.88 which was attacking the convoy. He has led his section in fighter cover on all Beaufort sorties against the Italian fleet and against convoys to the west and east of malta. He has shown great determination.

 

* * * * *

 

WILCOX, F/L Hugh Clayton George (40160) - Mention in Despatches - No.98 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941. Born 7 July 1913 in Lashburn, Saskatchewan; educated at there, 1921-25, and at St.John's College, Winnipeg, 1926-31. Pupil Pilot, RAF, 12 July to 4 September 1937; Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 5 September 1937 with effect from 12 July 1937; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 12 July 1938; promoted Flying Officer, 12 April 1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 15 July 1940; Acting Squadron Leader, 1 April 1942. Attended Desford Civil Flying School, July to September 1937; RAF Uxbridge, September-October 1937; RAF Netheravon, October 1937 to April 1938; with Ferry Flight, Station Cardington, April to December 1938; with Ferry Flight, Filton, December 1938 to April 1939; No.105 Squadron (Harwell), April to October 1939; No.35 Squadron, Cranfield, October-November 1939 (OTU course); No.98 Squadron, November 1939 to August 1941 (Hucknail, Nantes in France, and Kalderdarnes, Iceland; injured in motor accident, 13 May 1941 with a skull fracture); Commanding RAF Transit Flight, Luqa, Malta, March 1942 to September 1943; at Patricia Bay, December 1943 to April 1944 (operations room); at Station Trenton, May-June 1944 (CFS Course); with RAF Statio Marketharborough, August to December 1944; with Station Waterbeach, January to June 1945 (Flight Commander, No.514 Squadron). Transferred to RCAF as a pilot, 8 June 1945 (C94073) with rank of Squadron Leader; repatriated 5 August 1945; served at No.6 OTU, Comox; released 9 March 1946. Subsequently rejoined the RAF (reported a member there in 1950 but not further details). Public Record Office Air 2/9489 identifies unit (then in No.18 Group) and offers the following brief citation:

 

This officer has displayed outstanding devotion to duty and technical ability.

 

WILCOX, F/L Hugh Clayton George (40160) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1941.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 19 November 1945 he claimed 400 hours on Battles, 150 on Wellingtons, 200 on Lancasters, plus unstated time on Anson, Oxford, Hampden, Hart, Overstrand and "numerous other obsolete types." In a letter dated 10 October 1943 he described his previous recent work as follows:

 

I was sent to Iceland in July 1940 to make preparations there for the arrival of No.98 Squadron. This squadron arrived in September 1940 and I remained with it for the duration of its stay in Iceland, returning to England in September 1941.

 


After a period of leave I was attached to various A.D.R.U.s for instruction prior to taking over a Transit Flight in Malta, which I did in April 1942. I remained as O.C. of that unit until the date of my recent posting, September 27th, 1943.

 

The Transit Flight in Malta was originally organized for the reception and despatch of reinforcement aircraft to the Middle and Far East. There were also occasional transport aircraft operating into Malta and the number of these increased to a peak during the months of July and August 1943, when they had risen to some 30 a day.

 

My duties were concerned with routing and briefing of the crews, the signalling out of the aircraft and the supervision of their loading. In addition, there was a certain amount of administrative work.

 

On a form dated 11 July 1945 he reported having flown 200 operational and 1,200 non-operational hours. With No.514 Squadron he had flown 12 sorties.

 

* * * * *

 

WILLIAMS, F/L Alvin Thomas (40276) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1940. Born in Haliburton County, Ontario, 17 January 1916; educated in Elsie and Toronto. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 24 October 1937. Posted from No.23 to No.222 Squadron, 8 November 1939; to No.263 Squadron, 9 May 1940; served in Norway. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Notes compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins describe following victories: On 26 May shared in the destruction of a Ju.88 that was bombing Skaanland (it fell into sea in pieces, burning). On 28 May 1940 destroyed a He.111 that was bombing a cruiser at Ofot fiord, west of Narvik; enemy aircraft last seen on fire over hostile territory. On 29 May attacked several motor cars, rail line near Hundalen. On 2 June 1940, with Sergeant Herbert Horatio Kitchener, attacked 12-15 enemy aircraft south of Narvik. Together they set fire to the first He.111 (crashed, set fie to a second, and sent down a third with both engines out of action. Later they both set fire to a Ju.87 which was seen to crash in mountains (but see recommendation, below). Lost with sinking of HMS Glorious, 8 June 1940. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/4571 has recommendation dated 18 June 1940.

 

Flight Lieutenant Williams through his leadership, determination and patience, set a high example to his flight and squadron. During two patrols as section leader, in company with one other aircraft, he successfully brought to action and destroyed one Ju.88 and three He.111. On a third patrol he destroyed single handed a fourth He.111, demonstrating that it was possible to overcome the limitation of inferior speed with a Gladiator in combat with faster hostile aircraft by superior handling and tactics. In addition, this pilot took off and twice landed his aircraft on an aircraft carrier without arrester gear.

 

This was further refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee; in the text that follows, the italicized words had been marked with a notation, "cut out":


This officer has set a high example of leadership, determination and patience. During two patrols, as section leader, in company with one other aircraft, he successfully brought to action and destroyed one Ju.88 and three He.111s. On a third patrol he destroyed, single handed, another He.111, demonstrating that it was possible to overcome the limitation of lesser speed with a Gladiator in combat with faster hostile aircraft by his superior handling and tactics. On two occasion this pilot took off and twice landed his aircraft on an aircraft carrier successfully without arrester gear.

 

* * * * *

 

WILLIAMS, F/L Arthur Hugh (142919) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.223 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945. Born 1916 at Shillog, Assam, India; educated at Tawyn County School, South Wales and Welsh National School of Medicine, Cardiff. Enlisted July 1940; trained in Canada and wife living in Toronto (this may be his only Canadian association). Commissioned December 1942; earned Africa Star. Died in Toronto, 19 July 1998. Air Ministry Bulletin 20087/AL.1099 refers. No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty".

 

* * * * *

 

WILLIAMS, F/O David Brynmore (50482) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.34 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943. Home in Vancouver. AFRO 2386/43 dated 19 November 1943 described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

Displaying great skill and determination, Flying Officer Williams has participated in a large number of day and night operational sorties despite enemy opposition. On one occasion he made a low level attack on a heavilly defended enemy airfeld in order to accurately bomb a number of enemy fighter aircraft on the ground. His aircraft was badly damaged by the defences and the flap and brake system rendered unserviceable. Nevertheless, this officer landed safely by night at his base. An outstanding operational pilot, his courage and yenacity have been demonstrated by the excellent results obtained.

 

* * * * *

 


WILLIAMS, S/L Leonard Henry (48727) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944. Born 20 July 1915 at East Plomstead and home given as Chingford, Essex, but educated at Fort William, Ontario, 1923 to 1932. Worked for Great Lakes Paper on paper machines, 1933 to 1938. Enlisted in RAF, 2 November 1938 as 625162 Aircraftman Second Class, Aircraft Hand, under training as Wireless Operator; remustered as Wireless Operator, Group 2, 7 October 1939; Remustered as Wireless Operator under training as Air Gunner, 9 March 1940; remustered as Wireless Operator Air Gunner, 13 April 1940; promoted Sergeant, 27 May 1940; promoted Flight Sergeant, 1 April 1942; commissioned 30 April 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 30 October 1942; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 July 1943. Wounded by flak while with No.107 Squadron, 5 August 1941. Transferred to RCAF, 8 January 1945 (C89534); repatriated 18 June 1945; released 13 September 1945. Awarded Bar to DFC as RCAF officer. DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists him as a Canadian in the RAF about January 1940, rank of AC2 (625162); next-of-kin was his brother, living in Fort William. He seems to have been missed when CAN/RAF list found in DHist file 181.005 D.271 was compiled. Stated in June 1945 that his first tour had been 43 sorties (148 hours 50 minutes), 17 June 1940 to 7 February 1942; second tour was 25 sorties (138 hours 18 minutes), 7 February 1944 to 2 January 1945. In application for 1939-1945 Star he gave his first sortie as being 27 August 1940 (Fairey Battle, patrol); in application for Africa Star he gave his first sortie as 24 August 1941 (convoy attack out of Malta, No.107 Squadron); he appears to have spent most of his time between tours at No.17 OTU (where he was stationed when commissioned) and No.12 OTU (to which he was posted on 21 April 1943).

 

WILLIAMS, S/L Leonard Henry (48727) Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette of dated 13 October 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 dated 12 October 1944 refers. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Volume 20627) has recommendation dated 18 July 1944 when he had flown 56 sorties (259 hours five hours). The sortie list shows a very interesting career commencing 14 June 1940. From 31 August 1940 to 26 April 1941 he was flying Fairey Battles on sea patrols (at least part of this was out of Iceland); from 21 June to 8 October 1941 he was on Blenheims attacking shipping, targets in France and then (24 August 1941 to end of tour) targets in North Africa. His second tour (Bomber Command) had run from 13 March to 6 July 1944 and included a fight with a Bf.110 on the raid to Nuremburg (30 March, 1944).

 

Flight Lieutenant L.H. Williams as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner has completed an outstanding first tour of operations including daylight sorties to France, Iceland, in the Mediterranean theatre of war, and trips on coastal reconnaissance early in the war. In addition he has completed sixteen sorties with this squadron on his second tour consisting of raids on heavily defended German targets, railway marshalling yards in France, and mining operations. Following his first tour, Flight Lieutenant Williams was posted to a training station where he instructed for two years.

 

His marked ability and efficiency shown as an instructor, together with resourcefulness and outstanding courage displayed while on his first tour of operations, earned him the position of Gunnery Leader in No.424 Squadron. Both on the ground, as a leader of a successful Gunnery Section, and in the air, he has continued to show a marked degree of ability and his work has been an inspiration to the members of his section and to all aircrew in the squadron.

 

Sorties by L.H. Williams

 

14 June 40 Ensign Ferry to France (time not noted)

31 Aug 40 Battle Ferry to Iceland (11.20)

9 Sept 40 Battle Coastal Recce (3.45)


30 Nov 40 Battle N. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (2.15)

1 Dec 40 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.30)

6 Dec 40 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.35)

12 Jan 41 Battle N. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (2.10)

26 Jan 41 Battle N. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.40), low cloud, DNCO

24 Feb 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.00)

11 Mar 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.15)

12 Mar 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (40 minutes, W/T failure, DNCO)

27 Mar 41 Battle N. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.55)

7 April 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.20)

8 April 41 Battle N. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (2.15)

19 April 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.20)

23 April 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.15)

26 April 41 Battle S. Patrol, Iceland, anti-sub (1.10)

 

21 June 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, Dutch coast, nothing to report (3.00, day)

23 June 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, Dutch coast, nothing to report (4.20, day)

25 June 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, French coast, nothing to report (3.15, day)

30 June 41 Blenheim France, DNCO, weather u/s (3.50, day)

1 July 41 Blenheim France, DNCO, weather u/s (1.30, day)

2 July 41 Blenheim Lille power plant, heavy fighter interception (2.00, day)

4 July 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, DNCO, engine cutting (1.00, day)

6 July 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, North Sea, two patrol vessels sunk (4.00, day)

10 July 41 Blenheim Le Havre, shipping and docks attacked (3.40, day)

12 July 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, attacked convoy (1.40, day)

19 July 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, shipping attacked off Dutch coast (2.15, day)

1 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, E. Channel, 6,000-tonner hit; wounded by shell (1.25, day)

5 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, shipping off The Hague (time not shown, day)

18 Aug 41 Blenheim Ferry to Gibralter (7.45, day)

20 Aug 41 Blenheim Ferry to Malta (7.00, day)

24 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, convoy attacked south of Lampedosa (2.30, day)

25 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, convoy attacked, three ships sunk (5.30, day)

27 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, nothing to report (5.00, day)

28 Aug 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, two ships off Benghazi, one sunk (5.30, day)

1 Sept 41 Blenheim Cottrone, chemical factory attacked (5.00, day)

12 Sept 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, convoy, 6 destroyers, 4 ships attacked (2.55, day)

13 Sept 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, Green coast, nothing to report (5.50, day)

3 Oct 41 Blenheim Marina Cantanzaro, power station, successful (4.10, day)

4 Oct 41 Blenheim Sea sweep, Tripoli to Zuara (3.35, day)

5 Oct 41 Blenheim Catania, turntable hit, many enemy aircraft (3.15, day)

8 Oct 41 Blenheim Road sweep, Burata to Cirte, lorries and troops bombed and machine gunned (4.30, day)

29 Oct 41 Blenheim Stabetti, pumping station and railway hit (4.00, day)

9 Nov 41 Sunderland Ferry, Malta to Gibralter, relief gunner (9..45, day)


11 Dec 41 Sunderland Ferry, Gibralter to Mount Batten, relief gunner (9.45, day)

 

13 Mar 44 Hal Le Mans marshalling yards (5.50, night)

15 Mar 44 Hal Stuttgart (8.00, night)

26 Mar 44 Hal Essen (5.30, night)

30 Mar 44 Hal Nuremburg, combat with Me.110 (9.00, night)

20 April 44 Hal Lens marshalling yards (4.25, night)

21 April 44 Hal Brest, mining (5.35, night)

22 April 44 Hal Dusseldorf (5.15, night)

8 May 44 Hal St.Nazaire, mining (5.05, night)

9 May 44 Hal St.Valery-en-Caux (4.05, night)

10 May 44 Hal Lorient, mining (5.00, night)

22 May 44 Hal Le Mans (5.05, night)

12 June 44 Hal Arras (4.25, night)

16 June 44 Hal Fruges (4.45, night)

21 June 44 Hal Oisemont (4.35, day)

25 June 44 Hal Gorenflos (4.40)

6 July 44 Hal Siracourt (4.40)

 

 

* * * * *

 

WILLIS, F/O David Alexander (40331) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 May 1940. Born 2 September 1914 in St.Boniface, Manitoba. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 28 November 1937; with No.10 Squadron from outbreak of war to 27 November 1939 (injured); later with Headquarters, No,4 Group, No.31 ANS at Port Alberta in Canada (February to July 1942); ferried Mitchell FL215 to Britain, July 1942; Staff Officer (Liaison) to USAAF 8th Air Force (April 1943); to Calcutta in August 1944 as staff officer to Lieutenant-General Stratemeyer; transferred to RCAF (C53455). Awarded U.S. Bronze Star Medal (6 December 1945) and Legion of Merit (Officer), 15 July 1947 while a member of the RCAF, although they were for services while in the RAF. Postwar he commanded Station Summerside (1951); awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 21 October 1953 (Wing Commander, AFHQ); at SHAPE, 1959-62 and Commanding Officer, Station Winnipeg, 1962-65 with rank of Group Captain. On retirement he became an administrator with the Department of Labour, Ottawa, 1966-1980. Died in Ottawa, 27 July 1984. His widow published a biography, Left Hand Salute.No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations." Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 640 refers; following published in RAF Quarterly, said only:

 

A leaflet raid over Berlin gave another officer his opportunity which led to an award. Both his wireless operators collapsed, owing to the altitude at which the aircraft was flying. He dragged them to his cabin, afterwards baling out leaflets until he in turn collapsed.


Public Records Office Air 2/4072 has recommendation dated 10 November 1939 in the form of an extract from a report by W/C W.E. Staton, MC, DFC, Commanding Officer of No.10 Squadron:

 

During raid on Berlin on the night of 1st/2nd October 1939. On arriving at the position where nickels [leaflets] had to be dropped, Pilot Officer Willis relayed my instructions to the crew detailed to carry out this operation. After some five minutes had elapsed, I inquired as to progress. Pilot Officer Willis was unable to ascertain the state of affairs and he therefore crawled aft and discovered the second wireless operator in a state of collapse with the first wireless operator endeavouring to assist him.

 

Pilot Officer Willis came back and reported the state of affairs. H gave me a change of course, then returned, finding both wireless operators collapsed. With considerable difficulty he managed to drag the first wireless operator back into his cabin; this entailed pulling him a distance of some 25 feet through a small tunnel.

 

This in itself required very considerable determination, since Pilot Officer Willis had himself been without oxygen for about ten minutes at a height of 22,500 feet. He then crawled back and endeavoured to get the second wireless operator clear of the turret so that he himself could bale out nickels.

 

During this time I spoke to the tail gunner by inter-communication, and he informed me that he was locked in his turret on account of it freezing up. I ascertained, however, that nickels were falling behind and by this I realized that Pilot Officer Willis was active.

 

After another ten minutes nickels ceased to fall and I decided that Pilot Officer Willis had also lost consciousness. I thereupon descended to 9,000 feet and the tail gunner reported that his turret had freed itself. I instructed him to go forward and render what assistance he could, and at the same time continue to bale out nickels. Before he went forward he reported to men that he could see Pilot Officer Willis moving about. I gave him instructions to go forward and tell Pilot Officer Willis to return to the navigator's cockpit; this he did. He arrived back in the cockpit in a state of distress, but he immediately took up his job as navigator, setting a new course for the first leg of the return flight.

 

On 11 November 1939 the Commanding Officer, Station Dishforth, added his opinion:

 

I concur in the recommendation made by Officer Commanding No.10 Squadron in respect of Pilot Officer D.A. Willis. In the action recounted above the officer showed coolness and determination which resulted in the operation ordered being completed successfully.

 

To this, the Air Commodore Commanding, No.4 Group, added (25 November 1939):

 


The success of the operation referred to herein, the first occasion on which Berlin was visited, was due in no small measure to the excellent example of this very able Canadian officer.

 

The particular incident related herein, for which I strongly recommend recognition, showed gallantry and initiative which has since been followed by enthusiastic work of the same high standard.

 

The squadron Commanding Officer's text is further refined to a citation for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

During a leaflet raid on Berlin carried out at a height of 22,500 feet, on the night of 1/2 October 1939, this officer found the 2nd wireless operator in a state of collapse with the 1st operator trying to assist him. After reporting this to the pilot, he returned to find both operators had collapsed and, although he had himself been without oxygen for about ten minutes, he succeeded in dragging the 1st operator about 12 feet, through a small tunnel, into his cabin. He returned to get the 2nd operator clear of the turret and then baled out leaflets until he collapsed. After the aircraft descended to a lower altitude, Pilot Officer Willis, although still in a state of distress, returned to his post and continued his navigational duties.

 

NOTE: This document details February 1940 quotas for Bomber Command as follows:

 

Flying hours - 973

 

Awards permissible - 973 = 6 (no immediate awards made in February)

150

 

Awards recommended in submission - 2 (one DFC and one EGM; see Wickenkamp).

 

* * * * *

 


WILSON, F/L William Walter (RAAF 400610) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.455 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 November 1943. Born 9 April 1918 in Rochester, Victoria, Australia; served in 9th Battery, Royal Australian Artillery; enlisted in RAAF, No.1 Recruiting Centre, Melbourne, 18 September 1940 and posted to No.2 ITS, Bradfield Park; promoted LAC, 9 November 1940; to No.8 EFTS, Narrandera, 14 November 1940; to No.2 ITS, 24 December 1940; to No.2 Embarkation Depot, Bradfield Park, 1 February 1941; embarked at Sydney, 22 February 1941; arrived in Canada, 16 March 1941; to No.2 AOS, Edmonton, 18 March 1941; to No.2 BGS, Mossbank, 8 July 1941; to No.1 ANS, Rivers, 20 August 1941; commissioned 14 September 1941 and posted to "Y" Depot, Halifax. Taken on strength of No.3 PRC, 20 October 1941; to No.14 OTU, 2 November 1941; promoted Flying Officer, 15 March 1942; to No.49 Squadron, 1 April 1942; to No.455 Squadron, 3 April 1942; to No.3 APC, 12 December 1942; returned again to No.455 Squadron, date uncertain; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 15 September 1943; to No.1 TTU, 3 October 1943; to No.11 PDRC, 7 October 1943; embarked in UK, 18 October 1943 for duty with No.455 Squadron in Australia; disembarked Australia, 30 December 1943; to No.1 Embarkation Depot, 20 January 1944; to HQSA, 21 January 1944 (instructing); to No.1 OTU (Beaufort Course), 1 March 1944; to No.32 Squadron, 18 May 1944; to No.1 RPP, 6 September 1945; to No.2 RD, date not shown. Released 30 January 1946. Air Ministry Bulletin 12011/AL.689 refers.

 

A very reliable navigator and squadron torpedo officer, Flight Lieutenant Wilson has completed a fine tour of operational duty. This has included a transit flight to North Russia in appalling weather, a daylight search for major enemy units in the Barents Sea and sweeps north of Trondheim in search of the German battleship von Tirptz. On several occasions he has located enemy merchant Flight Lieutenant Wilson's navigational ability is of a high order and he has always displayed marked determination and courage.

 

His file includes a sheet, "Extracts From Flying Log Book". It states that his service in No.455 Squadron began with a sortie on 7 April 1942 and concluded with a sortie on 4 July 1943. It does not list all his sorties but begins with the following:

 

10 April 1942 Lille

12 April 1942 Heligoland

15 April 1942 St.Nazaire

1 May 1942 Bergen, patrol

16 May 1942 Haugessund, Gardening

5 July 1942 Strike, Trondheim area

9 July 1942 Strike, Trondheim area

 

It states he flew 22 other operations with No.455 Squadron. Next it deals with service in No.32 Squadron, Lowood (first operational flight, 20 May 1944; last operational flight 29 June 1945. A partial listing of flights gives the following, which appear to be transit flights:

 

30 March 1945 Garbutt - Merauke

31 March 1945 Merauke - Morotai

1 April 1945 Morotai - Leyte

4 April 1945 Leyte - Morotai

5 April 1945 Morotai - Noemfoor

 

Note: A statement his home was in Winnipeg seems incorrect. Married 17 September 1941; wife identified as Mildred Phyllis Wilson, living in Medicine Hat, Alberta and later in Glenhuntly, Victoria, Australia.

 

* * * * *

 


WINDER, F/L Kenneth Proctor (61041) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.21 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944. Born 1916 in Wigan, Lancashire. Enlisted for aircrew, 1940; commissioned 1941. Wife living in Quebec (which may be his only Canadian connection). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, stated, "No apparent connection with Canada. Discharge address in Canada." Air Ministry Bulletin 16815/AL.950 refers.

 

This officer has completed a large number of operational sorties. These have consisted chiefly of attacks on enemy road and rail transport in France and Germany and he has inflicted much damage on the enemy's locomotives and mechanical transport. On one occasion in August 1944, Flight Lieutenant Winder was detailed for a low level attack on an important bridge at Rouen. This he accomplished successfully despite accurate anti-aircraft fire. At all times this officer has evinced a high degree of coolness, courage and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

WOLFE, S/L Denzil Lloyd (39805) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1942. Born in Regina, 19 February 1915; home there; RAF 31 May 1937; Flight Lieutenant as of 7 January 1941. Served in No.419 Squadron; posted from No.1659 HCU, 3 May 1943 to No.405 Squadron; killed in action 14 July 1943. AFRO 1371/42 dated 28 August 1942 (reporting his DFC), AFRO 1783/43 dated 3 September 1943 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 55/44 dated 14 January 1944 (reporting him presumed dead) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. No citation in London Gazette but AFRO 1371/42 says:

 

This officer has participated in many attacks on the enemy's industrial targets and dockyard installations. Throughout his tour of operations he has set a high standard of skill and efficiency. He has participated in every one of the recent raids on Essen and Cologne. His exploits also include a low flying attack on Villiers and successful attacks against Lubeck and Rostock.

 

Air Ministry Bulletin 7751 has a version differing in significant detail:

 

Since January 1942 this officer has participated in many attacks on the enemy's industrial targets and dockyard installations. Throughout these operations he has set a high standard of skill and efficiency. He has participated in every one of the recent raids on Essen and Cologne; his exploits also include a low flying attack on Gennevilliers, a mine-laying operation and successful attacks against Lubeck and Rostock.

 

Public Record Office Air 2/9595 has the original recommendation drafted by Wing Commander John Fulton, when Wolfe had flown 26 sorties (124 operational hours) as follows:

 

23 Jan 42 Boulogne docks 14 Apr 42 Dortmund industrial target

28 Jan 42 Boulogne docks 22 Apr 42 Cologne industrial target


31 Jan 42 St.Nazaire docks 23 Apr 42 Rostock industrial target

10 Feb 42 Brest docks 26 Apr 42 Rostock industrial target

1 Mar 42 Dinghy search 7 May 42 Kiel docks

3 Mar 42 Paris industrial target 17 May 42 GARDENING, Frisian Islands

10 Mar 42 Essen industrial target 21 May 42 Lorient docks

28 Mar 42 Lubeck industrial target 29 May 42 Paris industrial target

5 Apr 42 Cologne industrial target 30 May 42 Cologne industrial target

6 Apr 42 Essen industrial target 1 June 42 Essen industrial target

8 Apr 42 Hamburg docks 2 June 42 Essen industrial target

10 Apr 42 Essen industrial target 5 June 42 Essen industrial target

12 Apr 42 Essen industrial target 6 June 42 Essen industrial target

 

This officer has set a high standard throughout his tour of operations and has led his flight on all important missions on which the squadron has been engaged. He has taken part in every one of the recent raids on Essen and Cologne, and his exploits include a low flying attack in the last and successful raid on Gennvilliers, mine laying in the entrance to Kiel harbour, and successful attacks in the raids on Lubeck and Rostock.

 

* * * * *

 

WOODRUFF, F/L Patrick Henry, DFC (39806) - Mention in Despatches - Award as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1941. Born in Edmonton, 11 May 1912. Family farmed at Vermilion. Educated in Edmonton and University of Alberta (Pharmacy, 1935). Worked for Sun Drug, Edmonton for one year. Learned to fly at Edmonton Aero Club. Travelled by car, cattle train and cattle boat to England in October and November 1936 to enlist in RAF. Worked as a dispensing chemist while waiting for acceptance. Pupil pilot in RAF, 5 April to 30 May 1937. Appointed Provisional Pilot Officer on Probation, 31 May 1937; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 31 May 1938. Trained at Civil Aviation School (Scottish Aviation, Prestwick, preliminary instruction on Tiger Moths), No.6 Service Flying Training School (Netheravon - won wings and a cup as best pupil on course). Further trained at Netheravon on single-seat fighter instruction, concluding 8 January 1938. Posted to No.87 Squadron, Debden (Gladiators to July 1938, Hurricanes thereafter). Commissioned in RAF, Short Service Commission, 31 May 1937. Confirmed in appointment and graded as Pilot Officer, 5 April 1938. Went to Upavon 8 August 1938 to train as instructor; remained at Upavon to 7 October 1938 when posted to No.600 Squadron as Assistant Adjutant. To No.11 Group Operational Training Unit, St. Athan, 4 September 1939; to Hendon, 4 October 1939 for Hendon, converting to Blenmheims. In January 1940 went to No.248 Squadron. To Silloth, June 1940, as Coastyal Command instructor on Blenheims. Commanded No.404 Squadron from formation. Acting Flight Lieutenant, 4 October 1939 (substantive Flying Officer, 5 October 1939). Substantive Flight Lieutenant, 5 October 1940. For some time he was a flying instructor. Transferred to Reserve 5 April 1941 yet kept on Active List. Acting Squadron Leader, 3 May 1941. Acting Wing Commander, 12 September 1941. To No.9 OTU, Aldergrove, 18 June 1942. Killed on active service, 27 February 1945. Medals with Canadian War Museum (AN 19840625-002).

 


WOODRUFF, W/C Patrick Henry (39806) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.404 Squadron. Awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 June 1942 and AFRO 137/42. AFRO 1371/42 dated 28 August 1942 (reporting his DFC), AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches), AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945 (announcing his death) and AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945 (reporting his DSO) all described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 7317 refers.

 

On the 17th May, 1942, this officer led a formation of bomber aircraft in the attack on the German cruiser "Prinz Eugen". Despite interference from enemy fighters Wing Commander Woodruff accomplished his task in a skilful and determined manner. Throughout, he showed great leadership and determination. He has commanded the squadron since May 1941, and by his personal example has contributed largely to its high standard of operational efficiency.

 

WOODRUFF, W/C Patrick Henry, DFC (39806) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.

 

WOODRUFF, W/C Patrick Henry, DFC (39806) - Distinguished Service Order - No.337 Wing - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 March 1945 and AFRO 802/45. Deceased at time of award. Air Ministry Bulletin 17932/AL.986 refers.

 

This officer has shown the very highest qualities of leadership, courage and devotion to duty. He has led his wing on numerous hazardous missions and on these sorties has shared in the destruction of two He.111s on the ground and at least two complete trains, eleven engines and many other railway and tracked vehicles. His determination in pressing home his attacks against ground targets defended by extremely intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire has instilled confidence in the pilots of the squadron and has resulted in a high standard of efficiency and morale. He has, by his tireless energy, courage and sense of responsibility made a very marked contribution to the successes attained against the enemy.

 

* * * * *

 


WOODS, F/L Eric Norman (60119) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.72 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 July 1942. See Michel Lavigne, Canadian Wing Commanders. Born in England (Shores) or Buenos Aeres (Blatherwick), 8 May 1910; father joined Royal Navy in 1914. Family moved to Victoria in 1920 and to Vancouver in 1924, where he was educated. Moved to England in 1936, working for a phone company and for the Reigle Police Force, Surrey. Enlisted in RAF, May 1940 but was placed in reserve until August 1940 when he began pilot training at No.10 EFTS (August to October, Tiger Moths) and No.15 FTS (Harvards). Received wings and commission in January 1941. Served at Central Flying School and No.58 Operational Training Unit (Grangemouth). Promoted to Flying Officer effective 14 January 1942. Joined No.124 Squadron in May 1941 and remained with that unit to March 1942 when posted to No.72 Squadron with which he served as a flight commander (Flight Lieutenant rank) until the end of July. On 10 August 1942 he flew off HMS Furious for Malta where he took command of No.249 Squadron. Rested in February 1943 when posted to Egypt and No.73 Operational Training Unit, Abu Sueir. Took command of No.249 Squadron again in July 1943. Promoted in November 1943 to leas No.286 Wing of Balkan Air Force, Brindisi. Missing in action, 16 December 1943 when flying with No.126 Squadron (believed shot down by Bf.109s or collided with S/L K.B.L. Debenham, who also did not return). Chris Shores, Aces High (second edition) lists victories as follows: 23 March 1942, one FW.190 destroyed, St.Omer-Hardelot (No.124 Squadron, Spitfire BL918); 28 April 1942, one FW.190 damaged, Calais-Gris Nez (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire BL773); 8 May 1942. one Bf.109 probably destroyed, Dieppe (No.72 Squadron, same Spitfire); 17 May 1942, one FW.190 damaged, Gris Nez (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire BM516); 5 June 1942, one Bf.109F destroyed, Le Crotoy (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire BL773); 27 August 1942, one MC.202 destroyed on ground, Gela airfield (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TE867); 2 October 1942, one MC.202 damaged, Syracuse area (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 10 October 1942, one Bf.109 damaged, north of Gozo (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 12 October 1942, one Ju.88 destroyed and one Bf.109 damaged, Luqa, plus one Bf.109 destroyed and one Ju.88 damaged off south Sicilian coast (all with No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 13 October 1942, two Bf.109s destroyed 20 miles north of Gozo (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 14 October 1942, one Ju.88 probably destroyed, Grand Harbour (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 15 October 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed and one Ju.88 damaged off Kalafrana (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466); 16 October 1942, one Ju.88 damaged, Halfar (No.249 Squadron, Spitfire TR466; shot down in this engagement); 22 October 1942, one MC.202 probably destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged north of Grand Harbour (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire AD529); 27 October 1942, one Bf.109 probably destroyed, Malta (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire AD529); 11 December 1942, one Bf.110 destroyed plus 1/3 share of a Ju.88 destroyed, both near Lampari Island (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire AR559); 14 December 1942, 1/3 shared of a Ju.88 destroyed west of Lampedusa (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire AR559); 19 December 1942, one Do.24 destroyed near Delimara (No.72 Squadron, Spitfire EP728); 4 December 1943, one Ju.87 destroyed at Podorica airfield (No.286 Wing, Spitfire MA701).

 

This officer has participated in 74 sorties over enemy territory. He has led his flight, and occasionally the squadron, with courage, skill and judgement. His resourcefulness in difficult circumstances has helped to promote and maintain the high morale of the squadron. Flight Lieutenant Woods has destroyed one and damaged a further two enemy aircraft.

 

WOODS, S/L Eric Norman (60119) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.249 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 November 1942.

 


In the recent heavy air fighting over Malta this officer has led his squadron against enemy formations with great success. Between 12th and 17th October 1942, 27 aircraft were destroyed by the squadron, and much of this success can be attributed to Squadron Leader Woods' outstanding leadership. In one engagement, on the 13th October, he shot down two enemy aircraft, bringing his victories to six. His example of courage and devotion to duty has inspired his fellow pilots.

 

* * * * *

 

WOODWARD, F/L Vernon Crompton (41092) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 May 1941. Born in Victoria, British Columbia, 22 December 1916; educated there. Enlisted in RAF, June 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 20 August 1938; confirmed as Pilot Officer, June 1939; Flying Officer, September 1940. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 1949/43 dated 24 September 1943 (reporting his Bar to the DFC) also described him as a Canadian in the RAF. See H.A. Halliday, Woody: A Fighter Pilot's Album, published by Canav Books. Died in Victoria, British Columbia, 26 May 2000. Lengthy obituary in National Post dated 26 July 2000 which noted that, after his retirement from the Corps of Commissionaires (1990), he was "a familiar figure speeding along the winding lanes of the Saanich Peninsula in his black Jenzen or burgundy Jaguar" but that his license had been suspended in 1995. Air Ministry Bulletin 3827 refers; no citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Records Office Air 2/9532 has recommendation sent on 18 April 1941 from RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry; rank stated as Flying Officer;

 

Recommended for his outstanding courage and devotion to duty on each of his frequent engagements with the enemy. He attacks the enemy with such determination and vigour that he invariably concludes the engagement with a confirmed victory. His fighting spirit and keenness has an excellent effect on all pilots in the squadron, and to date he has destroyed eleven enemy aircraft and probably one other.

 

This was further refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer has displayed outstanding courage in his many engagements against the enemy. His attacks are pressed home with such determination and vigour that he invariably concludes with a confirmed victory. He has destroyed at least eleven enemy aircraft, and his fighting spirit and keenness have set a splendid example.

 

WOODWARD, S/L Vernon Crompton (41092) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 11042 refers.

 

Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross in April 1941, this officer has destroyed nine enemy aircraft, bringing his total victories to twenty. Squadron Leader Woodward has a fine record of achievement, displaying at all times outstanding courage and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 


WORDEN, F/O Kenneth Lendrum (182696) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.463 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945. Born in Fort Qu'appelle, Saskatchewan; home in Sutton, Surrey; educated at Banstead Road School and Wimpleton Technical College. Enlisted August 1940; commissioned July 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 20218/AL.1104 refers.

 

This officer has completed two tours of operational duty during which he has participated in attacks against such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Hamburg, Cologne, Genoa and Milan. In December 1944 he was rear gunner in an aircraft detailed for an attack against Giesson. While on the bombing run over the target his aircraft was attacked by three Focke Wulf 190s. The enemy fighters were driven off but the pilot was forced to make another bombing run when again the aircraft was attacked by two Focke Wulf 190s. Once again the enemy aircraft were beaten off, one of them being seen to dive away out of control, and the mission was completed successfully. At all times this officer has displayed outstanding courage and resolute coolness in the face of the enemy.

 

* * * * *

 

WYND, Corporal A. (number ?) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. This man is mentioned in DHist cards for CAN/RAF personnel but not in awards cards.

 

* * * * *

 

WYNNE-POWELL, W/C Geoffrey Turner (90915) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.90 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 February 1944. Born in Toronto, 22 March 1915; home in Leichester; commissioned in Auxiliary Air Force, 1935; F/O 3 September 1940; S/L 1 March 1942; Acting W/C in 1943; confirmed 1 July 1947; retired 4 March 1958. AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944 (reportung his DFC described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 12876/AL.754 refers.

 

This officer has participated in many sorties involving attacks onargets in the Ruhr and many other important centres. He has displayed great skill throughout and although his aircraft has been hit by anti-aircraft fire on several occasions, Wing Commander Wynne-Powell has invariably pressed home his attacks with great dtermiation. By his personal example of courage and resil;ution this officer has contributed materially to the high standarsd of morale of the squadron he commands.

 

* * * * *

 


YEATES, F/L John Harold Whishaw (106191) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.487 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 1917. Home at West Hagley, Worcester; educated at Yakima [?] Senior High School. Enlisted 1940; commissioned 1941. After war commanded an RAF Meteor squadron and was killed in flying accident at Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire, 28 June 1951. AFRO 25343/44 dated 24 November 1944 (announcing his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 refers.

 

During two tours of operations, Flight Lieutenant Yeates' fine fighting spirit and keenness to operate against any target, even in most appalling weather, has proved him to be an outstanding operational pilot who has rendered most valuable services. he has destroyed eleven enemy trains, damaged many others, and has attacked a large variety of targets including mechanical transport convoys and military barracks by day and by night. He possesses great determination and has never failed to complete the task allotted to him.


ERRONEOUS "CAN/RAF" PERSONNEL

 

The following individuals have been identified in publications as "Canadians enrolled in the Royal Air Force". Although some of the persons included in the main data base have fairly tenuous Canadian connections, it will be seen that in the cases of those noted below, their Canadian affinities were not established either through birth or upbringing, but through brief professional contacts or by postwar immigration.

 

* * * * *

 

ALDRIDGE, S/L Frederick Joseph (43281) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air No.34 Service Flying Trainig School, Medicine Hat, Alberta - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 April 1945. Born in Dublin (birthplace provided by RAF Personnel Management Agency, letter dated 2 February 1999 to H.A. Halliday). British officer decorated for services while stationed in Canada. See separate data base dealing with RAF personnel in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 

ANDERSON, Flight Sergeant James Beattie (968589) - Air Force Medal - No.31 Elementary Flying Training School - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Born in Govan, a suburb of Glasgow (birthplace provided by RAF Personnel Management Agency, letter dated 2 February 1999 to H.A. Halliday). British airman decorated for services while stationed in Canada. See separate data base dealing with RAF personnel in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 

BETTS, F/L John Marchbank (RAF 85657) - Air Force Cross - No.35 Service Flying Training School, North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Awarded 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. Squadron Leader as of announcement. Born in Liverpool (birthplace provided by RAF Personnel Management Agency, letter dated 2 February 1999 to H.A. Halliday). British officer decorated for services while stationed in Canada. See separate data base dealing with RAF personnel in Canada.

 

* * * * *

 


BIDDELL, F/L William Hugh (37376) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.206 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1940. Born in England, 3 April 1916; to Ferry Command, 30 December 1940. Flew many trans-Atlantic deliveries which are detailed in Ferry Command crew cards, Directorate of History and Heritage Collection 84/44-3. Although his wife was living in Montreal, his home address was given as Holte Corner, Lowden, Kent. It thus appears that his only Canadian connection arose from serving in Ferry Command with Dorval as its headquarters. As a Squadron Leader he investigated South Atlantic delivery routes in July 1942; as a Wing Commander he commanded No.231 Squdron. See Carl A. Christie, Ocean Bridge (University of Toronto Press, 1995) for references. Missing on Liberator AL504 "Commando", 27 March 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/4096 has recommendation dated 4 June 1940.

 

Since the invasion of the Low Countries, and especially since the start of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force, Flight Lieutenant Biddell has shown qualities of leadership, endurance and devotion to duty of an extremely high order. During the last three weeks, his Flight has carried out 227 hours flying by day and night, and due to battle casualties, this has been done with an average of 3.5 aircraft serviceable daily. During the same period, Flight Lieutenant Biddell has himself taken part in night bombing raids, reconnaissance and offensive patrols and by his personal example has set a very high standard of keenness and morale throughout his Flight.

 

When leading a flight of three Hudsons on an offensive patrol over the ships evacuating the British Expeditionary Force on the evening of 31st May 1940, he saw a squadron of Skuas being attacked by eleven Me.109s. The Skuas were being hard pressed and two were shot down. Without hesitation, and though the Hudson is not a fighting aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Biddell led his flight between the Skuas and the Me.109s and though the result of the action is indecisive, it is known that at least one Me.109 was severely damaged, and the remainder broke off the engagement. The Skuas who, it subsequently transpired, had expended all their ammunition, were enabled to withdraw without further loss.

 

Flight Lieutenant Biddell has commanded his Flight since November 1939 and has set a very high standard throughout.

 

This was further edited for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee as follows:

 

On 31st May 1940, whilst leading a flight of thee Hudson aircraft on a patrol over the ships engaged in evacuating the British Expeditionary Force, this officer sighted a squadron of Skuas being attacked by eleven Messerschmitt 109s.. The Skuas were hard pressed and two were shot down. Without hesitation and despite the fact that the Hudson is not a fighter aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Biddell led his flight against the enemy, damaging one Messerschmitt and causing the remainder to break off the engagement. Since the invasion of the Low Countries, and particularly since the commencement of the evacuation of the British Expeditionary Force, this officer has displayed qualities of leadership and endurance of a high order.

 

BIDDELL, W/C William Hugh (37376) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Ferry Command - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944. This award almost certainly arose from his Ferry Command work in Canada.

 

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CALDWELL, S/L Peter Lawson (RAF 85651) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.418 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 October 1942. Although described elsewhere as a Canadian in the RAF, he was British serving with an RCAF squadron; see appropriate data base.

 

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COOKE, S/L Charles Alfred (43634) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.264 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1942. Listed by Blatherwick and Allison (who claims he came from Regina and flew with No.66 Squadron in Battle of Britain). Not in Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ records; Mason, Battle Over Britain, identifies him as British. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Newport, Isle of Wight in 1912. It would appear that his Canadian connection (if any) is tenuous.

 

This officer had been engaged on operational flying since the war began and has completed many sorties. He fought in the Battle of Britain and, on one occasion, he participated un an engagement against a very large force of enemy fighters and bombers. During the battle he probable destroyed several fighters before his own aircraft was so badly damaged that he was forced to leave it by parachute. One night in July 1942 he skilfully intercepted a Junkers 88 and destroyed it. This officer has always displayed fine fighting qualities.

 

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COUPLAND, P/O Maurice (40209) - Les Allison, Canadians in the Royal Air Force, states that this man was awarded a Distinguished Flying Cross for services with No.243 Squadron (Dakotas), 1944-1945. The London Gazette has no listing of an award to this man and he is not listed by Nick and Carol Carter, The Distinguished Flying Cross and How it Was Won (Savannah Press, 1998).

 

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FINN, Sergeant Robert Cyril (778244) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.615 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 19 December 1941. Les Allison listed him as a Newfoundlander, but Commonwealth War Graves Commission records stated he was the son of Frederic Edward and Annie Margaret Sarah Finn of Maghull, Lancashire. Commissioned 19 January 1942. He is not listed as a Newfoundlander by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969), nor does he appear in the Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 listing Newfoundlanders who served in the Royal Air Force. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Folkstone, Kent in 1921. Killed in action 2 January 1943; buried in Taukkyan War Cemetery, Myanmar (Burma).

 


This airman has participated in a large number of operational sorties consisting of interception and convoy patrols. In addition he has taken part in 43 attacks on enemy shipping and ground targets in Northern France. In the course of these attacks, six ships of various types have been destroyed, two set on fire and five damaged, whilst on land a transformer station and a factory were badly damaged. Sergeant Finn has carried out the duties of section leader for five months, displaying great keenness and devotion to duty.

 

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FITZGIBBON, F/L Basil Francis (41571) - This officer was British-born but serving with the BCATP in Canada when Commended for Valuable Services in the Air (No.31 Operational Training Unit, Debert, Nova Scotia) on 16 April 1943; see data base on RAF personnel decorsted for services in Canada.

 

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GEORGE, Sergeant Cecil Spencer (915708) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.10 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1942. Public Record Office Air 2/9578 has a recommendation dated 20 November 1941 when he had flown 27 sorties (187 operational hours). Died 6 January 1942. The form identifies him as being Canadian. However, Commonwealth War Graves Commission give his next of kin as Samuel Cecil and Ethel George of Plymouth (where he was buried) and Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency confirm he has no Canadian connection.

 

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HAWKINS, F/L Desmond Ernest (40700) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.240 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 April 1942. Canadian connection uncertain; cited with P/O Jerauld George Wright (RCAF, awarded DFC). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, stated, "No apparent connection with Canada".

 

As captain of aircraft and navigator respectively, Flight Lieutenant Hawkins and Pilot Officer Wright recently carried out an extremely important mission. The flight, which was one of twenty-four and three-quarter hours' duration, necessitated flying more than 2,000 miles across the sea. That completion was achieved despite adverse weather and intense cold can be attributed to the skilful piloting of Flight Lieutenant Hawkins, combined with the brilliant navigation of Pilot Officer Wright. Throughout, both these officers showed great powers of endurance and their outstanding performance is worthy of the highest praise.

 

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HOPE, F/L Eustace Jack Linton (04060) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1925. DHist cards list this man with no further details, and report him missing in July 1941. Who's Who in British Aviation (1935) states that he was born at Kingston-on-Thames, 29 March 1899; educated at Merchant Taylor's School, learned to fly in 1917 and served in the RNAS and RAF. He participated in the first RAF Cairo-to-Capetown flight (1926), served aboard HMS Argus and was attached to the Shanghai Defence Force in 1927; with the Atlantic Fleet, 1928-29, No.17 (Fighter) Squadron in 1930, and in 1931 was with High Speed Flight (Felixstowe) and the Schneider Trophy team. From 1933 onwards he was in Coastal Command. As of 1 July 1938 he was promoted to Wing Commander, promoted to Group Captain, 1 December 1940. Killed in action, 6/7 August 1941 on Hurricane Z3224 (intruder mission to France; believed shot down by a night fighter). The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records described him as "Son of Major and Mrs. Linton Hope; husband of the Hon. Mrs. Evelyn Hope Hope of Sheffield". It would appear that he strayed into CAN/RAF records by virtue of brief 1941 service in Ferry Command, but that in all other respect he was British.

 

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HORNBY, Flight Sergeant Arthur Newlove - Air Force Medal - No.31 Air Navigation School, Port Albert, Ontario - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 185/43 dated 5 February 1943. Born in York (birthplace provided by RAF Personnel Management Agency, letter dated 2 February 1999 to H.A. Halliday). This man is a British airman who had been seconded to Canada for service in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

 

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LAWSON, P/O Kenneth John (82728) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.149 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 April 1941. Biographical notes, apparently published in connection with his Bar to DSO in Air Ministry Bulletin 19709/AL.1091, state that he was brn in Winnipeg, 1918; home there; commissioned from LAC to Pilot Officer on Probation, 28 July 1940; however, Ferry Command delivery cards held by Directorate of History as Document 84/44-3 state he was born 24 March 1913 in Ealing (London) and give his home as Ealing; he ferried B-26 FK124 to Gibraltar, October 1942. Confirmed as Pilot Officer and promoted to Flying Officer, 28 July 1941. DHist cards have only the award of the Bar to DSO (no earlier awards) and he is not listed in CAN/RAF cards. Commonwealth War Graves Commission records are ambiguous as to his Canadian status; he was killed on 2 January 1945, aged 31, in the rank of Wing Commander with No.405 Squadron; buried in Durnbach War Cemetery, Bayern, Germany; "Son of Frederic John and Beatrice Mary Lawson, of Ealing, Middlesex", which suggests that, even if born in Canada, his British roots ran deeper.

 

LAWSON, S/L Kenneth John (82728) - Distinguished Service Order - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943; no published citation.

 

LAWSON, W/C Kenneth John (82728) - Bar to Distinguished Service Order - No.405 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1945 with effect from 1 January 1945 (since deceased). Air Ministry Bulletin 19709/AL.1091 refers.

 


Wing Commader Lawson has a long record of operational flying. Since his last award he has participated in numerous attacks against heavily defended targets. This officer has proved himself an outstanding leader with a high sense of devotion to duty and a fearlessness which has inspired confidence in his less experienced subordinates. Both in the air and on the ground Wing Commander Lawson has displayed great zeal and efficiency.

 

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LITTLE, S/L James Hayward (90125) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.219 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 March 1941. This officer was listed as a Canadian (from Vancouver) in Allison's Canadians in the Royal Air Force; significantly, he was not listed in They Shall Grow Not Old. A veteran of the Battle of Britain, he was listed in Francis Mason's book on the subject as British. He commanded No.418 Squadron with the rank of Wing Commander, 12 December 1942 to 12 June 1943 when he was killed in action; the Commonwealth War Graves Commission stated that his parents were living in Hoylake, Cheshire. It would seem that his strongest Canadian connection was that through No.418 Squadron.

 

This officer has commanded the squadron since May 1940. He has carried out numerous operational flights by night, and on one occasion he succeeded in shooting down a Dornier 17. His excellent leadership has contributed materially to the operational efficiency of the squadron,

 

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PENNICK, W/C Harry (87455) - Died in Toronto, 1957. Although listed as a Canadian in the RAF by Les Allison, there is no record of him in DHist awards cards. Allison also states that he was awarded both the DSO and DFC; there is no listing of a DFC to this man in Nick and Carol Carter's book, The Distinguished Flying Cross and How it Was Won. It is likely that he was a British officer who migrated to Canada after the war.

 

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PEXTON, W/C Richard Dunning (72150) - Although listed by Les Allison (Canadians in the Royal Air Force), this man is a British officer who had been seconded to Canada for service in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, and who won the AFC. See data base for British personnel serving in Canada.

 

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PRESS, P/O Leslie George - Although sometimes listed as a Canadian in the RAF, this man is a British officer who had been seconded to Canada for service in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, and who won the AFC. See data base for British personnel serving in Canada.

 


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RALPH, S/L Richard John (79526) - incorrectly identified in some records as a Canadian in the Royal Air Force; see data base concerning RAF personnel serving in Canada.

 

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SENIOR, F/O Reginald Kenneth (RAAF 408706) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.179 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943. Had served in No.15 Squadron. Born in Melbourne, Australia, 11 April 1915. Home in Melbourne. Ferry Command crew cards, Directorate of History and Heritage Collection 84/44-3 confirm his Australian origins; he was engaged in ferrying of one (possibly two) Hudsons to Britain between June and August 1942. This man appears to have been misidentified as a Canadian by virtue of his having been is cited with an RCAF officer, J9403 Flying Officer D.F. McRae.

 

Flying Officer McRae and Flying Officer Senior as captain and wireless operator air gunner respectively have flown on many anti-submarine patrols and recently have successfully executed three attacks on enemy submarines. On the latter of these Flying Officer McRae, displaying brilliant airmanship, executed his attack with great precision from a height of 100 feet precisely. This officer has displayed great courage and tenacity and his efforts have been well supported by Flying Officer Senior whose skilful work has been of a high order. These officers have set an unsurpassed example of keenness and devotion to duty.

 

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REILLY, Corporal Terence Desmond (550357) - Air Force Medal - No.31 Air Navigation School - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Born in London (birthplace provided by RAF Personnel Management Agency, letter dated 2 February 1999 to H.A. Halliday). British airman decorated for services while stationed in Canada. See separate data base dealing with RAF personnel in Canada.

 

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ROGER, W/C James (40330) - Directorate of History cards on CAN/RAF personnel included an entry for this man as having a DSO and DFC, but no explanatory notes accompanied the card. It is, in fact, an incomplete entry for W/C James Roger Whelan (40330), described more fully elsewhere in this data base.

 

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SIMES, F/L Keith Owen (RAAF 420285) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.464 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1945. Born 11 May 1922 in Tenterfield, New South Wales. Enlisted October 1941; commissioned October 1942. Wife living in Halifax, Nova Scotia (which may be his only Canadian link). Air Ministry Bulletin 19670/AL.1080 refers. See also John Herrington, Air Power Over Europe, 1944-45 (Canberra, Australian War Memorial, 1963), pages 321 and 393.

 

Flight Lieutenant Simes has completed numerous sorties and has achieved some outstanding successes. He has attacked and damaged many trains and a large number of motor vehicles. In addition he has taken part in attacks on industrial targets and railway sidings. At all times this officer has et an inspiring example by his cheerful courage, exceptional skill ad great devotion to duty.

 

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TOLLEMACHE, F/O Anthony Henry Hamilton (90100) - Medal, Military Division, Order of the British Empire (later converted to George Cross) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 August 1940. This name was found in DHist, supposedly a Canadian in the RAF: however, Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, stated "no apparent connection with Canada". Promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1940.

 

On the night of 11th March 1940, this officer was pilot of an aircraft which carried a passenger and an air gunner and was engaged in a searchlight cooperation exercise. When approaching the flarepath to land at 2320 hours, after completing the exercise, the aircraft struck a tree and crashed into a field, where it immediately burst into flames. Flying Officer Tollemache was thrown clear of the wreckage and his air gunner was able to escape. Realizing, however, that his passenger was still in the aircraft, Flying Officer Tollemache, with complete disregard of the intense conflagration or the explosion of small arms ammunition, endeavoured to break through the forward hatch and effect a rescue. He persisted in this gallant attempt until driven off with his clothes blazing. His efforts, though in vain, resulted in injuries which nearly cost him his life. Had he not attempted the rescue it is considered he would have escaped almost unscathed.

 

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UPTON, F/O Hamilton Charles (42544) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.43 Squadron- awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 April 1941. Born in Manchester, England, 13 March 1912; educated at Southampton College (1918-1920), Hayle Grammar School, Cornwall (1920-1923) and Harrow (1924-1929). It would appear that he visited relatives in Canada three times before the war, and that on the last occasion he obtained a job with the St. John Ambulance Society. However, he joined the RAF on 26 June 1939; transferring to the RCAF on 24 July 1945 (C97015). He retired from that force on 1 December 1953 with the rank of Squadron Leader, and died in Canada in 1965. Public Records Office Air 2/8893 has recommendation dated 25 February 1941.

 

This officer has destroyed the following hostile aircraft:-

 


12th July 1940 Heinkel destroyed

8th August 1940 two Junkers 87 destroyed

one Junkers 87 probable

13th August 1940 one Dornier 17 destroyed

15th August 1940 1/3 Junkers 88 destroyed

16th August 1940 three Junkers 87 destroyed

18th August 1940 one Junkers 87 destroyed

one Messerschmitt 109 destroyed

4th September 1940 one Messerschmitt 110 destroyed

 

Total - 9 7/12 destroyed

one probable

 

Pilot Officer Upton was shot down on 8th and 16th August 1940, but in spite of these two reverses still showed great keenness to engage the enemy.

 

To the above, on 25 February 1941, Air Vice-Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory added:

 

Over a long period including the intensive operations of the summer and autumn of 1940 this gallant young officer carried out his duties in the best traditions of the Service. In particular on 16th August he scored a magnificent success by destroying three enemy bombers.

 

He has personally destroyed 9 7/12 enemy aircraft and probably destroyed a further one.

 

I strongly recommend him for the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

Draft as sent to Honours Committee read as follows:

 

This officer has been actively engaged in operations against the enemy over a long period, including the intensive operations over this country in the summer and autumn of 1940. He has destroyed nine hostile aircraft, three of which he shot down in one day, and has shared in the destruction of others. He has shown the greatest keenness to engage the enemy.

 

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WATERHOUSE, G/C Richard Henry, CBE, DFC, AFC (34092). Although he appears on lists of CAN/RAF personnel, this officer had no Canadian connection other than a period of service here. See data base on RAF personnel decorated for services in Canada.

 

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END OF REEL 54 (49 to 54 NOT checked for CANRAF Transfers)