EDE, F/O Herman Francis Grant (23307) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.263 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1940.  Born in Bermuda, 17 February 1917; attended Trinity College School, Port Hope (information from Trinity College School: Old Boys at War (Port Hope, 1948); served at Narvik; lost on HMS Glorious, 9 June 1940.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission confirms tenuous Canadian connection as parents living at Pembroke, Bermuda. Public Records Office Air 2/4571 has recommendation dated 25 May 1940 by S/L J.W. Donaldson:

 

The above mentioned officer is strongly recommended to be decorated with the Distinguished Flying Cross. On the 25th May he pressed home an attack on a He.111 forcing the aircraft to abandon his bombs safely and retreat.

 

On the 24th May this officer courageously directed an attack single handed against four Me.110s causing the aircraft to abandon their attack on the aerodrome and retreat.

 

On the 25th May this officer attacked single handed two Ju.90s causing one to retreat unloading his bombs harmlessly into the sea and pressed home an attack on the remaining enemy aircraft causing it to crash in flames.

 

Accompanying this is a note, dated 25 May 1940, by W/C R.L.R. Atcherley to AOC Headquarters, Air Component, Harstdat:

 

I should like to draw the report overleaf to your attention.  I concur with O.C. 263 Squadron's recommendation.

 

I personally observed from the ground the combat between F/O Ede and the four Me.110s in the vicinity of this aerodrome.  This attack was carried out with resolution and single handed and from my observations without binoculars I formed the opinion that one Me.110 had been hard hit and that the remainder wee deterred from attacking the aerodrome.

 

The same document has the recommendation edited, as of 18 June 1940, to the following:

 

On the 24th of May this officer, while flying a Gladiator, courageously diverted an attack single-handed, against four Me.110s, causing the aircraft to abandon their attack on Bardu Foss aerodrome and on the 25th of May this officer attacked and destroyed single-handed two Ju.90s.

 

On the 24th [sic, 25th] of May he attacked and shot down a He.111.  During this action his aircraft was badly hit by return fire and he was only able to return to base by skilful handling.

 

This officer also shot down at last one enemy aircraft at Andalsnes.

 


There was a further revision (notably involving the date of one victory) before the recommenda­tion went to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committe:

 

On 23rd May, Flying Officer Ede attacked and shot down a Heinkel 111. During this action his aircraft was badly damaged, but skilfully handing his aircraft, he was able to reach his base. On 24th May,1940, this officer, single-handed, courageously diverted an attack by four Messerschmitt 110s, causing the enemy to abandon their attack on Bardu Foss aerodrome.  The next day Flying Officer Ede attacked, single-handed, two Junkers 90 and after causing one to retreat and jettison its bombs into the sea, he attacked the second aircraft and shot it down in flames.

 

NOTE: In sending the awards for Ede and A.T. Williams to Air Ministry, the number of awards permitted to the North Western Expeditionary Force (Air Component) - the name given to the RAF in the Narvik Expedition - is calculated as follows:

 

Operational Flying Hours                 -           1,252

 

Awards permissible              -           1,252 = 6 (less one already made,) = 5

 200      DFC to F/L Hull)                  )

 

Awards recommended         -  4 (3 DFCs and 1 DFM)

 

Mentions recommended      -           10 (Proportion: 2 ½ per award = 12

 

Further notes indicate that as of June 1940, Air Ministry was concerned because the Army scale was six awards per 5,000 troops every six months, and in other circumstances a macimum of one award per 250 troops.  If the Air Component (with 400 ranks) had been governed by the same rule, there would have been less than two awards to the RAF.  The divisor of 200 was borowed from Fighter Command.

 

It is clear that of the officers recommended (F/O Ede, F/L Williams, P/O Louis Reginald Jacobsen) together with Sergeant H.H. Kitchener) at least one (Williams) had been put up for awards after the sinking of HMS Glorious.  The Air Ministry seems to have ignored this in respect to the ban on posthumous awards; the men were deemed alive (hopefull as POWs) until proven otherwise.  However, the policy of "no awards to POWs" was skirted in a minute dated 26 July 1940:

 

The three officers are missing, and may, therefore, be prisoners of ar, but as they were on board H.M.S. "Glorious" when she was sunk I do not think they could be regarded as in any way to blame for their capture...

 

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EDY, F/L Allen Laird (41566) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.613 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 November 1940.  Born in Winnipeg, 1916; home there; Commonwealth War Graves Commission records stated his parents lived at St.Andrews, Manitoba (a village downstream from Winnipeg).  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 January 1939.  Served in No.613 Squadron in France; No.602 Squadron in Battle of Britain.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. No citation although document Air Ministry Bulletin 2180 points to supply drops to Calais.  Killed in flying accident 5 December 1941.  Public Record Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommendations for three DFCs to members of No.613 Squadron - S/L Alan Ford Anderson  (CO), F/L Donald Walker (a flight commander who led the operations of 25 and 27 May 1940) and P/O Edy, whose portion read as follows:

 

On 25th May 1940, Pilot Officer Edy was a member of a formation of aircraft detailed to carry out a dive-bombing attack on a heavy battery near Calais.  He pressed home his attack in the face of severe anti-aircraft fire with the utmost courage.  His bombs were observed to fall inside the target area, and it was later reported that the battery had been moved.  On 27th May 1940, this officer took part in low flying bombing and supply dropping sorties over the Calais garrison area and although his single front gun failed, the raid was carried out at a very low altitude.  By the skilful manipulation of his aircraft Pilot Officer Edy not only evaded the enemy anti-aircraft defences, but enabled his air gunner to put two machine gun posts out of action.  He remained over the target, drawing the enemy fire to himself, until the supply dropping aircraft no longer required support.  Pilot Officer Edy has shown a complete disregard of personal danger and has set a fine example by his keenness and magnificent spirit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

ELLIOTT, P/O George Arthur Litchfield (43830) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.77 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 November 1940.  Born on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia, 1915; served in Canadian Scottish, 1935; to RAF, 1936; P/O 1940; F/O 25 April 1941; F/L 25 April 1942; remained in postwar RAF and made Wing Commander as of 1 July 1955.  Listed as Canadian in the RAF, January 1940, Dist file 181.005 D.270.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 3827 refers.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Records Office Air 2/8856 has recommendation drafted 25 September 1940.

 

This officer was promoted to commissioned rank on the 13th June 1940 and has carried out 32 operational sorties, only two of which have been unsuccessful.  He has shown exceptional ability and determination and is considered to be outstanding as a bomber captain.

 

He has on many occasions pressed home his attack in spite of the most unfavourable conditions of weather and enemy opposition, and has set a fine example to his crew and other captains in the squadron.


Public Records Office Air 2/8351 has recommended citation which went to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

Pilot Officer Elliot has carried out 32 operational flights and is considered to be outstanding as a bomber captain.  He has shown great determination in pressing home his attacks, often in spite of enemy opposition. Pilot Officer Elliott is a zealous captain of aircraft and sets a splendid example to his crew.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

ELLIS, F/L Lawrence Ellsworth (40095) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.228 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 May 1941.  Born in Chicago, June 1912; educated in Sioux Lookout, Ontario and Marconi Radio School, Toronto.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 5 September 1937; confirmed in rank as Pilot Officer, 12 July 1938; F/O January 1940; F/L January 1941.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/9532 (which spells his middle name as "Ellsforth") has recommended citation, cabled from RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry, 19 April 1941:

 

This officer has carried out 80 long and arduous patrols in all kinds of weather and has 838 flying hours to his credit since the outbreak of war.  Has shown outstanding devotion to duty as the captain of a Sunderland.  The work of a Sunderland, although not spectacular, is particularly tedious and exacting, and Flight Lieutenant Ellis has on several occasions been detailed for patrols which were known in advance to require a high degree of courage and skill to carry them through, yet he has never shown the slightest hesitation or reluctance to get on with the job.  His calm demeanour under ever condition has been an inspiration to all ranks in the squadron.  Particular instances of his work are as follows.  On 12 February 1939 [sic - should read 1940) when operating from Pembroke Dock he carried out a sweep together with three other Sunderlands to the North West coast of Portugal for five enemy vessels.  This was a particularly long and arduous patrol of thirteen and a half hours.  Twelve days later as Captain of a Sunderland he carried out another thirteen and a half hour anti-submarine patrol in extremely bad weather conditions.  On 28 June 1940 while on patrol from Malta he sighted an attacked an enemy submarine; later sighted light enemy forces which were subsequently attacked by the Royal Navy.  The following day while on patrol,he again sighted and attacked an enemy submarine.  On 1 September 1940 he carried out a twelve and a half hour patrol successfully shadowing the Italian battle fleet. On 1 November 1940 while on patrol with Flight Lieutenant Ware the aircraft was attacked by hostile aircraft; this attack was successfully repulsed and the Sunderland brought safely back to Malta.

 

This was further refined for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 


Since the outbreak of the war, this officer has carried out 80 long and arduous patrols in all kinds of weather, involving 838 hours flying.  As captain of a Sunderland flying boat, Flight Lieutenant Ellis has on several occasions been detailed for patrols which required a high degree of courage and skill.  On one occasion, in company with three other Sunderlands, he carried out a 13 ½ hour anti-submarine patrol in extremely bad weather conditions. On two occasions, whilst on patrol, he has attacked enemy submarines and, on another, he carried out a 12 ½ hour patrol, successfully shadowing the Italian battle fleet.  His devotion to duty and his calm demeanour under every condition have been an inspiration to all.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


ENGLAND, S/L Donald Lockart (37763) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.61 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 July 1940.  Born in Kingston, Ontario, 18 June 1915. Educated there. Took a medical board at Kingston, 3 July 1935 and as of that date had obtained a Pribvate Flying Licence at the Kingston Airport.  Documnts applying for RAF sent from Kingston to Ottawa, 28 August 1935;furher inviewed on 23 September 1935 by Lieutent-Colonel C.E. Connolly (Military Disticrt No.3), notably to resolve discrepancies on Birth Certificate and other documents re his Christian names; documents sent to Air Ministry, 27 September 1935; on 25 October 1935 S/L F.C. Higgins (RCAF Liaison Officer, London) wrote "If Mr. England is prepared to travel to England at his own risk and expense, arrangemnts will be made for him to appear before the Selection Committee, but no guarantee can be given that he wil be considered eligible by the Commitee or pass the Royal Air Force Medical Examination".  He was further advised to arrive in Britain about the ened of December 1935.  This was communicated to the Disytrci Officer Commanding, No.3 Military District on 9 November 1935.  H was advised to sail with the SS Ausonia leaving Halifax on 29 December 1935. Pupil Pilot, RAF, 17 February to 19 April 1936; granted Short Srvice Commission as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 20 April 1936 with effect from 17 February 1936; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 17 February 1937; promoted Flying Officer, 18 August 1938; promoted Flight Lieutennt, 29 April 1940; Acting  Squadron leader, 10 June 1940; confrmed in Flight Lieutenant rank, 17 August 1940 but relinquished Acting Squadron Leader, 24 November 1940; appointed Squadron leader, 1 September 1941; transferred to RCAF (C89575) 12 February 1945. Following are his postings:  Elemntary Fyng Training School, Prestwick, 17 February to 17 April 1936; No.2 Flying Traing School, Digby, 1 May 1936 to 10 January 1937; No.7 Squadron, Finningly, 11 January 1937 to 10 September 1939 (attached No.10 Squadron, Dishforth, 14-25 Fbruary 1938 for pilot conversion; also attached AFDE, Northolt, 3 February to 19 Aprl 1939); No.61 Squadron, Hemswell, as flight commader, 11 September 1939 to 25 November 1940; No.31 Air Navigation School, Port Albert, 10 December 1940 to 23 May 1941; No.31 BGS, Picton, 24 May 1941 to 14 March 1942 (flight commander); No.32 OTU, Patricia Bay, 15 March 1942 to 10 October 1943 (Chief Armament Officer); No.63 OTU, Peplow, 10 March to 20 September 1944 (Chief Armament Officer); No.86 OTU, Ossington, 21 September 1944 to 10 February 1945 (Chief Armanent Officer); repatriated to Canada on 30 March 1945; Air Armament School, Mountain View, 14 May to 20 September 1945 when posted to AFHQ, Ottawa; released 5 September 1946. Rejoined RCAF as an Optomitrist in the Medical Branch (Flight Lieuteant rank), 1 June 1953; served at Rockcliffe to 1 April 1961, then at National Defence Medical Centre and retired again 22 Octovber 1964. Died in Picton, Ontario, 10 October 1990. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 1251 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommendation dated 1 July 1940 which spell his name as Donald Lochart:

 

This officer has completed a large amount of operational flying over enemy territory at extreme ranges.  He has taken part in reconnaissances, bomb raids and mine laying expeditions, during which he has displayed consistent determination and devotion to duty in the face of severe enemy opposition.  By his personal skill and devotion to duty he has set a splendid example to his flight.

 

This was subsequently submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee as follows:

 

Squadron Leader England has completed a large amount of operational flying over enemy territory at extreme ranges.  During reconnaissances and bomb raids he has displayed consistent determination and devotion to duty in the face of severe enemy opposition.  By his personal skill and leadership he has set a magnificent example to his flight.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 22 February 1945 he stataed he had flown 200 operation and 717 non-operational hours. He had flown 32 sorties (the last on 15 November 1940).  He listed the following types flown: Tiger Moth (62 hours), Hart and Audax (100), Heyford (210), Whitley (250), Hampden (257) and Anson (38).  On applications for Atlantic Star he recorded his first sortie as 25 December 1939 (North Sea sweep); in applying for ArcrewEurope Star he noted first sortie as 24 Febriary 1940 (leaf;et drop, Hamburg).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


ENNIS, F/L James Moore (42341) - Air Force Cross - No.204 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Born 29 January 1915 in Vancouver.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 22 July 1939.   Ferry Command delivery cards held at Directorate of History (document 84/44-3) indicate he made three deliveries of PBY Catalinas to Britain, 9 February to 14 July 1941; as of the latter date he had logged 60 hours in Tiger Moths, 110 in Oxfords, 100 on Ansons, ten on Harts, 50 on Singapores, 600 on Sunderlands, 20 on Whitleys and 60 on Catalinas.  He delivered three PBYs to Britain, February to July 1941. L.A. Gribble, Epics of the Fighting RAF, pp.26-27, writing of experiences in tropic waters, writes, "Flight Lieutenant J.M. Ennis, AFC and eight other members of a Coastal Command Sunderland spent 70 hours in the water after their craft had run into a 'line squal', a violent tropic storm". Aircraft was forced down, landed in rough water and broke its back. One man killed outright while the remainder crawled out onto wing.  Ennis was injured and could not move easily.  Warrant Officer D.T. Shakes and Sergent Prior returned for dingy despite danger of drowning. Ennis was helped into it and the men swam away, pushing it.  Sunderland sank and depth charges exploded.  Another Canadian, F/L Alexander George Espley, took command." 'He set us all a grand example, and put up a magnificent show' sais Ennis afterwards. 'Time and again he gave up his rest in the dinghy to other members of the crew who, he said, were more in need of it, and eventually I had to order him into the dinghy so that I could massage his legs.  Out of the first 48 hours we were in the sea he spent 45 in the water, most of the time swimming beside us supporetd only by his lifejacket to relieve the downward drag of the dinghy. We kept each other cheerful as much as we could.  Dogfish came flipping into the water-logged dinghy and but me on the chest, and some of the other chaps as well. The dinghy was so low in the water that I was sitting in it up to my neck most of the time. Some of the fellows were a bit anxious about sharks. I didn't know anything about it, but I told them it was the wrong time of year. Then I remembered that one of our other crews in a dinghy had had a shark nosing about for some time. But we were quite luck and didn't see one'".  They spent three days in the dinghy before being sighted by a Sunderland and rescued by a destroyer.  On another occasion he landed at night off Dakar due to petrol shortage but managed to sail back to Bathurst. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of AFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. He was originally recommended for a Distinguished Flying Cross about 10 February 1942 following the rescue from Vichy French waters of the crew of BOAC Ensign "Enterprise" (Public Record Office Air 2/8754); the final citation as drafted for Air Ministry read:

 

This officer has completed over 700 hours operational flying and has carried out Atlantic ferrying duties. On the 3rd February 1942, when the crew of an Ensign aircraft belonging to British Overseas Airways Corporation were in difficulty, he alighted on the sea in a heavy swell, 300 yards off the coast of French West Africa, embarked the crew and took off in the dark in spite of the rough sea. On another occasion he was captain of a Sunderland flying boat which was forced down on the sea at night, off Dakar, owing to petrol shortage. Flight Lieutenant Ennis rigged an awning as a sail and set course back to Bathurst. On all occasions, this officer has displayed outstanding courage and determination.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

ENO, F/L Lloyd Higgs (40096) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1941.  Born in Maryville, New Brunswick, 1919; educated in Aberdeen and Moncton.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 5 September 1937.  Promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942.  Killed in action 15 March 1944. DHist cards refer to Air Ministry Bulletin 11720, 11th Awards List, page 7.  AFRO 921/44 (reporting both his death and his DSO) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF; it was also stated he had trained at No.35 SFTS.

 

ENO, S/L Lloyd Higgs (40096) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.51 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."   DHist cards give following from Air Ministry Bulletin.

 

...has proved himself to be an outstanding Flight Commander, showing great powers of leadership and skill as captain of aircraft.  Once, when detailed for special reconnaissance, circled target area for over half an hour. Has at all times displayed greatest keenness to engage the enemy and has shown a fine fighting spirit.

 


ENO, S/L Lloyd Higgs (40096) - Distinguished Service Order - No.51 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 March 1944.  DHist cards refer to Air Ministrt Bulletin 13408/AL.785.

 

This officer has completed many sorties on his second tour of operations and his continued good work has won great praise.  In recent operations Squadron Leader Eno has attacked many targets including Dusseldorf, Stuttgart, Magdeburg and Berlin.  He has at all times displayed great courage and determination and his example has impressed all.  In addition to his work in the air, Squadron Leader Eno has rendered valuable service in the training of other members of the squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FAWCETT, S/L Rowland Edens (Roland Edons ?) (430332) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 15 October 1943 - No.156 Squadron.  Born in Duncan, British Columbia, 1918; educated there.  Signaller and gunlayer, 1934; RAF 1939; confirmed a s Pilot Officer, 4 July 1941 with effect from 1 June 1941; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 13 July 1941; A/S/L 1943; missing 1/2 January 1944. AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO/358/44 dated 18 February 1944 (reporting his death) identified him as Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 11720 refers.

 

This officer has flown on operations against targets in Germany, Italy and North Africa and enemy occupied territory.  While serving in North Africa his aircraft was shot down whilst attacking an enemy motor transport.  During the time he has served in his present squadron, Squadron Leader Fawcett as captain of aircraft has maintained his high reputation and has shown great skill and determination in the execution of his duties setting an outstanding example to all.

 

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FEARON, F/L Rowland (88801) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 8 June 1944.  Commissioned 29 November 1940 in Administration and Special Duties Branch; confirmed in rank of Flying Officer, 29 November 1941; name has been misspelled as "Feardon". AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Candian in the RAF.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Port Arthur, Ontario in 1913.

 

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FENWICK-WILSON, S/L Royd Martin (34218) - Air Force Cross - No.12 SFTS - awarded as per London Gazette 1 April 1941.   Born in Greenwood, British Columbia; father living in Rock Creek, British Columbia.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on probation, Royal Air Force, 24 August 1934.  Promoted to Acting Flight Lieutenant, 24 March 1938; relinquished that rank, 22 November 1938.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Served in No.405 Squadron, 13 August 1941 to 17 February 1942.  Later commanded No.218 Squadron during GLIMMER - combined air and naval diversion on night of 5/6 June 1944; see Appendix E to War in the Ether.  Public Records Office 2/8891 has recommendation dated 9 January 1941:

 

Squadron Leader Fenwick-Wilson, an officer with a varied experience of service flying, has been a flying instructor for two years, latterly as Officer Commanding No.2 Squadron.  His exceptional ability, both as an instructor and an administra­tor, has maintained a very high standard in his squadron.  His personality and splendid qualities of leadership have inspired all those under his command to emulate his example to the great benefit of the school.

 

This was endorsed by the AOC, No.21 Group, on 14 January 1941:

 

This officer's devotion to his flying instructional duties merits recognition.  Strongly recommended.

 

The citation as submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee differs little from the original recommendation:

 

Squadron Leader Fenwick-Wilson, an officer with a varied experience of service flying, has been a flying instructor for two years, latterly as Officer Commanding No.2 Squadron.  His exceptional ability, both as flying instructor and an administrator, has maintained a very high standard in his squadron.  His personality and splendid qualities of leadership have inspired all those under his command.

 

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FLEMING, F/O James Grant (40380) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.201 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 21 February 1941.  Born in Calgary, 23 May 1917; home there.  Gunner in Royal Canadian Artillery, 1936.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 January 1938.  Directorate of History holds Ferry Command deliver cards (document 84/44-3) which include him, confirming his Canadian birth and address. He was active in Ferry Command from December 1940 (when he set out to deliver PBY AM266 to Britain) until September 1941 and again from January 1943 to September 1943.  The card also has a photograph of him. Missing 6 September 1944. AFRO 2231/44 dated 13 October 1944 (reporting him missing) confirmed him as Canadian in the RAF.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  AFRO 1085/45 dated 29 June 1945 (confirming his death) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 3067 refers, stating, "Some of the above officers have been on convoy escort duty in all kinds of weather by day and night."  Public Record Office Air 2/9498 has recommendation drafted 29 October 1940 by W/C C.S. Richard, Commanding Officer, No.201 Squadron.  The document is annotated, "A Canadian Officer".

 


Since the outbreak of war this officer has sone more than 700 hours operational flying, and has never failed to carry out his duties in the air in anything but an exemplary way, consistently showing courage and resource in his interpretation of his orders.

 

Although this officer has not taken part in any spectacular flight, it is thought that he is very worthy of consideration for reward, as his example as Captain of his aircraft has always been of the highest order.

 

The Group Captain in command of RAF Station Sullom Voe added his remarks:

 

The award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to Flying Officer Fleming is recommended.  A Canadian with three years in the Service, this officer has carried out a great amount of operational flying since the outbreak of war, and has always displayed keenness and resource.

 

On 31 December 1940 the Air Officer Commanding, No.18 Group, wrote:

 

This officer is an outstanding pilot in a very good flying boat squadron.  He has flown with consistent gallantry, skill and devotion to duty throughout the first 16 months of the war and continues to set a very fine example to all ranks in No.201 Squadron.

 

Flying Officer Fleming's conduct in the execution of operational tasks has been proved over a long period to be pre-eminently of the type for which the Distinguished Flying Cross was instituted as public recognition and I strongly recommend that this be awarded to him.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLEMING, S/L John Baldwin Aston (43531) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 8 June 1944.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Toronto in 1916; third Christian name give as "Acton".  Attended Trinity College Boys School, Port Hope, Ontario.  To England in November 1939; from Royal Artillery to RAF, May 1940.  Commanded No.26 (R) Squadron in early 1944.  Later in Italy and Palestine.  AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Candian in the RAF.

 

FLEMING, S/L John Baldwin Aston (43531) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945.

 

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FLEMING, F/O Mervyn Matthew (39975) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.58 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 17 January 1941 - Born in Ottawa, 23 December 1914; educated there. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 31 May 1938; served in No.58 Squadron, 23 June 1940 to 8 October 1940; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942; Ferry Command delivery cards (Document 84/44-3, Directorate of History and Heritage) show him with Ferry Command as a Specialist Navigator from at least 23 January 1942 and delivering Hudson FH262 from Canada to Britain between 25 March and 2 April 1942; returned to operations as CO, No.419 Squadron, 8 September 1942.  Joined Department of Transport after the war.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  AFRO 166/44 dated 28 January 1944 (reporting his DSO) describes him as Canadian in the RAF but on this occasion spells his name as "Flemming". Air Ministry Bulletin 2784 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/9250 (Non-Immediate Awards, Bomber Command, November 1940) has recommendation by W/C K.B.F. Smith dated 25 November 1940.

 

This officer completed 27 trips with over 200 operational hours to his credit. He set a fine example to his squadron as an unspectacular but most reliable captain. I have flown with Flight Lieutenant Fleming and was very impressed by the time and pains he spent in making sure that he identified his target.  On one flight his second pilot lost control in cloud and in righting his aircraft the ailerons were completely stripped of all fabric.  Flight Lieutenant Fleming returned and landed safely.  On another occasion he took off a fully loaded aircraft at night when, through no fault of his own, the pilot [sic, "pitot"] head cover had not been removed.  Flight Lieutenant Fleming landed, removed the obstruction and resumed his sortie.  In addition to this example of steady valuable flying this officer was in charge squadron navigation and in this capacity rendered valuable service to the other crews.  I consider his activities well merit the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

To the above, the Commanding Officer of Station Linton-on-Ouse adds (25 November 1940):

 

Flight Lieutenant Fleming has just those qualities of dogged perseverance and imperturbability that go to make the ideal heavy bomber pilot.  I consider his long spell of operational work is well worthy of recognition.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9251 has a further refinement of the recommendation:

 

This officer has completed 27 operational missions involving over 200 hours flying and has proved a reliable captain of aircraft, taking great pains to ensure accurate identification of his targets.  He was officer in charge of squadron navigation and in this capacity rendered valuable service.

 

FLEMING, W/C Mervyn Matthew (39975) - Distinguished Service Order - No.419 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 30 November 1943.  Air Ministry Bulletin 12170/AL.709 refers.

 


Wing Commander Fleming has displayed outstanding skill, courage and devotion to duty.  He has undertaken a large number of sorties during which he has attacked many important targets with success. Wing Commander Fleming is an ideal leader, whose example has contributed materially to the operational efficiency of the squadron he commands.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FLEMING, S/L Robert Benvie (41572) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 8 June 1944.  Born in Stellerton, Nova Scotia, 17 May 1916; educated in Bonavista, Newfoundland; his identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969), although Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) give his permanent address as Stellerton (but next-of-kin in Bonavista).  Joined RAF 31 October 1938; appointed Pilot Officer on Probation, 3 September 1940.  Demobilized as a Wing Commander, 9 October 1946.  Ferry Command delivery card showed him with that formation from 25 January to 17 July 1941 (the dates are approximate; he could have been on strength both earlier and later).  When the card was compiled he claimed 60 hours on Tiger Moths, 150 on Ansons, 475 on Hudsons, and 65 on B-17s. AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944 (announcing MiD), AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944 (announcing his AFC) and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945 (reporting DFC) identified him as Canadian in the RAF.

 

FLEMING, S/L Robert Benvie (415172) - Air Force Cross - No.1674 Heavy Conversion Unit - awarded as per London Gazette 1 September 1944. Public Record Office Air 2/9019 has recommended citation, drafted when he had flown 1,040 hours, 172 in the previous six months.

 

Since being posted to this unit as flight commander this officer has taken part in, and was largely responsible for, the conversion of No.220 Squadron to Fortress and Nos.160 and 86 Squadrons to Liberator aircraft. He operated the first Liberator to be fitted with the Leigh Light and was also responsible for the initial training of two squadrons with aircraft so fitted. Squadron Leader Fleming has displayed the greatest keenness and determination throughout his career.

 

FLEMING, S/L Robert Benvie (415172) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 6 February 1945 - No.547 Squadron.  Air Ministry Bulletin 17329/AL.970 refers.

 

Squadron Leader Fleming has completed three tours of operational duty.  On a number of occasions he has attacked enemy shipping.  Throughout his long and arduous flying career, he has displayed courage and determination of a high order.  He has a fine record of courage and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9046 has recommendation for this award, dated 11 December 1944.  The main sheet credits him with "approximately 200" sorties and 1,160 flying hours.  The document says he has had "no very spectacular incidents" but goes on to summarize his career as follows:

 

                        No.220 Squadron, November 1939-January 1941 (Career)


 

28 May 1940             Bombed ship at Ijmuiden

29 May 1940             Attacked two He.111 off Dunkirk

30 May 1940             Attacked one He.111 off Dunkirk

31 May 1940             Attacked three MTBs off Ijmuiden

2 June 1940               Attacked one MTB in Channel

23 June 1940                        Attacked a German destroyer escorted by two Do.18s.

26 July 1940              Attacked by a Do.215

4 Sept 1940               Attacked by a He.115

2 Nov 1940                Bombed ship off Lister Light

 

                                             428 operation hours on first tour

 

           No.220 Squadron, January to September 1942 (Fortresses)

 

                                               142 operational hours

 

          No.86 Squadron (September 1942-August 1943 (Liberators)

 

Two sightings of submarines with one attack (no observed results)

 

                  466 operational hours - total of 608 hours on second tour

 

                  No.547 Squadron, May-December 1944 (Liberators)

 

                                         124 operational hours to date

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

FLETCHER, F/L Andrew William (37280) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.235 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 October 1940.  Born in Cardston, Alberta, 27 January 1915; educated in Lethbridge. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 16 September 1935.  Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) confirm his Canadian origins and give his permanent address as Lethbridge. As a Wing Commander he is shown on frequent delivery missions between March 1943 and October 1944 including Coronado JX485 in February 1944. Card also has his photograph.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date; AFRO 1340/41 dated 14 November 1941 (announcing Bar to DFC) also stated he was a Canadian in the RAF. No published citation. Public Record Office Air 2/9489 has citation as submitted to Air Ministry Awards Committee.

 


Since joining the squadron in June 1940, this officer has carried out 36 patrols. On 8th August 1940, whilst leading a section of three aircraft over Le Havre, he was attacked by 15 Messerschmitt 110s. By skilfully manoeuvring his section, he enabled the rear gunners to bring cross fire to bear on the enemy aircraft, one of which was seen to explode in mid-air. He then succeeded in bringing back the section intact. Flight Lieutenant Fletcher has by his personal example inspired a fine fighting spirit among members of the squadron.

 

FLETCHER, F/L Andrew William (37280) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 1 January 1941.

 

FLETCHER, S/L Andrew William (37280) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.272 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 31 October 1941.  No published citation.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5435 refers.  Public Record Office, Air 2/4782 (Non-Immediate Awards, Middle East, 1941-1943), has a recommendation communicated from RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry on 2 October 1941, as follows:

 

The above named officer arrived at Malta on 21 July and left on 3 August. He was in command of a detachment of Beaufighters with role of covering the passage of the convoys moving between Gibraltar and Malta and their return to Gibraltar.  During the above period attacks were made by Beaufighters on certain aerodromes and seaplane bases with the object of keeping down enemy air activity.  The total bag of the Beaufighters in these operations was: aircraft destroyed, 49; badly damaged, 22; aircraft damaged 20. Of the six ships in convoy which made the journey from Gibraltar to Malta and the seven ships which arrived from Malta only one was hit by a torpedo and she arrived safely in Malta.  There is not the slightest doubt that the operations against aerodromes and seaplane bases by the Beaufighters crippled the enemy's air activity so seriously that he was unable to carry out effective reconnaissance and to launch a strong striking force against the convoys.  The success of the operations was due to the courageous leadership and determination shown by this commander of the Beaufighters.  His offensive spirit is beyond all praise and the fact that all Beaufighter crews were very determined is due entirely to his fine example.  The enemy certainly played into the hands of this fine leader by presenting him with rows of aircraft without any consideration for dispersal.  Nonetheless, the results achieved were due to a very careful planning and discussion by this commander with the crews concerned.

 

This was edited for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee as follows:

 


From 21st July to 3rd August 1941, this officer commanded a detachment of Beaufighters operating from Malta with the role of assisting in the safe passage of convoys sailing between Gibraltar and Malta.  Attacks were made on certain aerodromes and seaplane bases which resulted in a loss to the enemy of 49 aircraft destroyed and a further 42 damaged.  The successes achieved undoubtedly crippled the enemy's air activity so seriously that he was unable to carry out effective reconnaissance and to launch a strong striking force against the convoys. Throughout, Squadron Leader Fletcher displayed courageous leadership and determination and set an example which proved an inspiration to all.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FOORD-KELSEY, W/C Alick (36044) - Air Force Cross - RAF College and SFTS, Cranwell - Award effective 31 August 1943 as per London Gazette of that date.  Born in Alberta, 1913; educated at King's School (Canterbury), Corpus Christie, and Canterbury University.  AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943 (reporting AFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 1 July 1934; commissioned 1935; Acting Flight Lieutenant, he was promoted to Flight Lieutenant on 1 April 1938 with seniority from 1 January 1938; to No.56 Squadron, North Weald, 16 March 1936.  Air Ministry Bulletin 11246 refers.  Wing Commander as of 1941.  Recommended 21 May 1943 when he had flown 602 instructional hours, 218:25 in previous six months.  Recommendation read: "Wing Commander Foord-Kelsey has been Chief Instructor at this unit for the past nine months.  He has been an outstanding success.  Besides being a first class organizer, he is an exceptional pilot, and has found time to do a great deal of flying without detriment to his organization and supervision of the Flying wing.  Perhaps his most admirable quality in his judgement and sound sense of proportion in allotting to each of the many items of the training syllabus its due amount of time and effort.  I consider he has made a valuable contribution to our Training Effort, and well merits an award."  This was seconded by the A/V/M commanding 21 Group on 11 June 1943 - "I agree with the remarks of the Commanding Officer.  An excellent Chief Instructor whose work is worthy of recognition.  Strongly recommended."  (PRO Air 2/8968, Awards to Flying Instructors, 1943).  Final citation as follows:

 

This officer has been chief flying instructor at the unit for the past nine months and has been an outstanding success.  He is an exceptional pilot, but perhaps his most admirable qualities are his judgement and sense of proportion in allotting to each of the many items of the training syllabus its due amount of time and effort.  He has made a valuable contribution to the  training effort.  He has made a valuable contribution to the training effort.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FORSYTHE, S/L Kenneth Cadham (41573) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 8 August 1941 - No.110 Squadron.  Born Winnipeg, 1920; educated there.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 January 1938; P/O 1939; F/L June 1941; S/L July 1941.  Later with TCA.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 4688 refers. Text below found on National Archives of Canada microfilm C-11789 (Cabinet Minutes, 1940).

 


In July 1941 this officer participated in an attack on an enemy convoy consisting of five merchant ships with five escorting destroyers. As a result, one merchant ship of 7,000 tons,  with ammunition on board, blew up, and another 6,000 ton-ship was so severely damaged that, about an hour later, only the stern was above water. A third ship was so badly hit that the speed of the convoy was reduced in consequence. This enabled Swordfish aircraft to complete the destruction of the disabled vessel and also to destroy another one.  By his splendid leadership and skill, Squadron Leader Forsythe contributed material to the brilliant success of this operation.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8858 has original citation sent from Middle East to Air Ministry on 24 July 1941 (provided courtesy of Sean Morrison, Tewksbury):

 

This officer played a great part in a brilliant attack on Palermo on 22 July.  He led a formation of four aircraft to attack a convoy of five merchant ships escorted by five destroyers.  One merchant ship of 7,000 tons with ammunition on board blew up, another 5,000 tons was so severely damaged that an hour later only the stern was above water with destroyers picking up survivors.  One ship of 6,000 tons was badly hit which reduced speed of convoy and allowed Swordfish to finish it off also destroying another.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FORTIER, F/L Douglas Charles Wilson (142046) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.103 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 June 1944.   Born Toronto, 1916; educated at University of Toronto.  RAF 1940, commissioned 1942.  No citation other than "This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy during which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty".  AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944 (announcing his DFC) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14451/AL.834 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/9015 has recommendations dated 18 April 1944 when he had flown 48 sorties totalling 277 hours 30 minutes (31 sorties, 154 hours 40 minutes in first tour and 17 sorties, 122 hours 50 minutes in second tour).  The sortie list also gives a trip on 30 May 1941 (target, Cologne) as the first of his second tour; this is clearly an error and is more likely a sortie flown on 30 May 1942 as a member of an OTU crew participating in the first 1,000-bomber raid.

 

First Tour                                                        First Tour (cont.)

 

30 Aug 40  Berlin                                    17 Apr 41     Scharnhorst and Gneisnau

2 Sept 40   Erfurt                                     20 Apr 41     Scharnhorst and Gneisnau

5 Sept 40   Hamm                                   24 Apr 41     Kiel

8 Sept 40   Emden                                  29 Apr 41     Mannheim

11 Sep 40  Ostend                                  2 May 41      Hamburg

18 Sep 40  Flushing                               

28 Sep 40  Hamm                                                         Second Tour

1 Oct 40      Gelsenkirchen                                          

7 Oct 40      Boulogne                              30 May 42    Cologne

9 Oct 40      Grebenboich                        29 Dec 43    Berlin

13 Oct 40   Kiel                                       14 Jan 44     Brunswick

15 Oct 40   Kiel                                       20 Jan 44     Berlin

29 Oct 40   Berlin                                    21 Jan 44     Magdeburg


15 Nov 40   Hamburg                              27 Jan 44     Berlin

17 Nov 40   Hamm                                   29 Jan 44     Berlin

29 Nov 40   Kiel                                       30 Jan 44     Berlin

4 Dec 40    Duisburg                              10 Feb 44    Leipzig

16 Dec 40  Mannheim                            20 Feb 44    Stuttgart

18 Dec 40  Ludwigshaven                     21 Feb 44    Schweinfurt

8 Jan 41     Gelsenkirchen                     25 Feb 44    Augsburg

11 Feb 41  Rotterdam                            15 Mar 44    Stuttgart

26 Feb 41  Cologne                               18 Mar 44    Frankfurt

11 Mar 41   Kiel                                       22 Mar 44    Frankfurt

17 Mar 41   Gelsenkirchen                     26 Mar 44    Essen

19 Mar 41   Cologne                               11 Apr 44     Aachen

30 Apr 41   Scharnhorst and Gneisenau

 

Having completed thirteen sorties on his second tour, Flight Lieutenant Fortier joined No.103 Squadron on 6th March 1944, to continue his second tour of operations, since when he has completed four sorties, totalling 40 hours.

 

This officer has taken part in seven operational sorties on Berlin.  Throughout his tour he has concentrated all his boundless stock of energy on playing his pat to the full in unremitting assault upon Germany's war production centres. During this time he has allowed nothing, not even the fiercest scale of enemy flak and fighter opposition, to deter him from this unrelenting purpose, and has on all occasions forced home his attack right to the centre of the most heavily defended targets.

 

He has displayed in so doing, superb coolness, courage and cheerful devotion to duty, which have been an inspiration to his crew, and largely responsible for their many successful missions.  In recognition of this splendid example and record of achievement I recommend him most strongly for the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

FOSTER, F/L George Arthur Carey (29009) - Air Force Cross - No.10 SFTS - awarded as per London Gazette 1 January 1941.  Born in Shellbrook, Saskatchewan, 18 November 1907; educated in England.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 21 February 1930.  Attained rank of W/C, 1942.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2636 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8887 has recommended citation as placed before Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee.

 

Flight Lieutenant Foster has been an instructor at No.10 Service Flying Training School since October 1939 and has always displayed great devotion to duty. His reliability and keenness set an excellent example to all.

 


FOSTER, W/C George Arthur Carey (29009) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 21 April 1944 - No.101 Squadron.  Air Ministry Bulletin 13588/AL.769 refers. No citation other than "This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy during which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty".

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FOSTER, S/L Robert Arnold Denys (70222) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 11 June 1942.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan in 1908 and gives his middle Christian name as Arnhold.  Killed in action 26 March 1943, aged 34, while serving with No.144 Squadron; commemorated on Runnymede Memorial.  Names as given in London Gazette of 4 July 1941 (has been called "Archibald" in some sources, "Arnold" in others). AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission gives name as shown here and describes him as "Son of George Muir Foster and Marie Therese Foster; husband of Jane Foster of Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire".  The same source states that he held an MA from Cantaberry University.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FOWLER, W/C Anglesey Albert William (77629) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Vancouver in 1904.  Commissioned as Pilot Officer, 20 September 1940 in Administration and Special Duties Branch. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FRASER, P/O Cecil Victor (42212) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 22 November 1940 - No.115 Squadron.  Born in Claresholm, Alberta, 19 July 1918; educated there.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 24 June 1939.  Served in No.115 Squadron, 27 March 1940 to 8 September 1940 (possibly longer); posted to No.7 Squadron (Stirlings), July 1941; killed in action 10 July 1941.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2329 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8856 has recommendation drafted 19 September 1940:

 


This officer was detailed to attack an aerodrome near Munster. Weather conditions were poor with frequent thunderstorms, so it was necessary to dive to a low altitude to make certain of his target.  In doing so, one engine cut; in spite of this he continued his run and dropped his bombs, putting a stick across the target and hitting the watch office.  In view of the stopped engine and the consequent difficulty of control the aircraft almost capsized, but by his unusual coolness and skilful piloting he righted the aircraft, the engine in the meantime having picked up again, and he made a successful recovery.  On another occasion he brought his aircraft back from his target in the Ruhr on one engine, the other engine picking up occasionally for three or four minutes.  On a still further occasion he had a running fight with a Messerschmitt 110 which made astern and beam attacks on the way to the target which, undeterred, he reached and successfully attacked.

 

Since the commencement of the war his personal record of operations has been one sweep and 28 bombing raid or major operations.

 

He is an officer who has always shown exceptional conscientiousness and enthusiasm in all his duties, and has always taken great care in the preparing and running of his aircraft and crew.  In the face of opposition and emergency, his courage and coolness have been outstanding.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/8351 has recommendation finally submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer was detailed to attack an aerodrome near Munster. Adverse weather conditions made it necessary for Pilot Officer Fraser to dive to a low altitude to make certain of the target.  In doing so, one engine failed, but undeterred he continued his run and dropped his bombs, putting a stick across the target and hitting the watch office.  By coolness and skill he made a successful recovery.  On another occasion he brought his aircraft back from his target in the Ruhr on one engine.  During another raid he succeeded in reaching and successfully bombing his target after a running fight with a Messerschmitt 110. Since the commencement of the war this officer has taken part in one sweep and 28 major operations. The quite exceptional keenness and unconcerned gallantry displayed by Pilot Officer Fraser are worthy of the highest traditions of the service.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FROST, AC1 Ernest Ralph Clyde (612282) - Empire Gallantry Medal (later converted to George Cross) - No.90 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 5 July 1940.  Born in Three Rivers, Quebec, 22 July 1917.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Although he normally went by the name Ernest Ralph Frost, he was named for an older brother who had been killed during the First World War, and was christened Ernest Ralph Clyde Frost, the "Clyde" being added to distinguish him from the dead sibling.  Educated at Three Rivers, 1923 to 1934, attaining Grade X level; he took a course at Three Rivers Commercial School (book keeping, accountancy), August 1934 to December 1935 and was employed as a Time Keeper at Canadian Iron Foundries (Three Rivers), 1936-1937.  He then worked his way across the Atlantic on a steamer and enlisted in the Royal Air Force as 612282 Aircraftman Second Class, Aircraft Hand Under Training, Mate Group V, 16 May 1938.


Remustered to Mate Group V, 30 September 1938 (presumably this is merely confirmation of status after minimum training); remustered to Mate Flight Mechanic Group IV, 4 October 1938;  appears to have taken Aero Engine training at Manston in 1938-1939; remustered Flight Mechanic Group II, 18 August 1939 and probably joined No.90 Squadron about this time; reclassified as Airman First Class, 1 November 1939; reclassified as Leading Aircraftsman, 1 April 1940; remustered as Flight Mechanic Under Training (Fitter 2E), 3 May 1940; reclassified as Airman First Class and reclassified as Fitter 2E, 4 September 1940; reclassified as Leading Aircraftman, 1 January 1941; promoted to Corporal, 15 April 1941; instructed at the School of Technical Training, Cosford, 1940 to 1941.

 

Remustered to Training, Pilot, 6 August 1941; elementary flying training on Tiger Moths at a school in England; remustered Under Training, Pilot, Group II, 2 January 1942; arrived at No.31 Personnel Depot, Moncton, 11 May 1942; on 1 June 1942 sent to Turner Field in the United States; did not fly in that country, and on 1 July 1942 was posted again to No.31 Personnel Depot; 7 July 1942 posted to De Winton, Alberta; 1 October 1942 went to No.37 SFTS, Calgary; graduated on 5 February 1943 and commissioned as a Pilot Officer (part of Course No.66; service number 55031).

 

To Central Flying School, Trenton, 20 February 1943; 26 March 1943; promoted to Flying Officer, 5 August 1943;  to No.41 SFTS (staff pilot); 19 November 1943, to No.32 OTU (staff pilot); 8 December 1943, to No.31 SFTS (staff pilot, instructor); 19 August 1944, to No.34 SFTS (supernumerary); 6 September 1944, to No.6 OTU, Comox, on course: NOTE, a separate document (which differs in detail from other forms) states that course lasted 6 November 1944 to 2 March 1945; he was not too confident at first but graduated as above average.  Flying times as follows: EXPEDITOR, 10 hours 10 minutes day dual, 33 hours 15 minutes as first pilot by day, one hour 50 minutes as 2nd pilot by day; 5 hours 45 minutes dual at night; 10 hours 35 minutes as first pilot by night; one hour 35 minutes as 2nd pilot by night;  DAKOTA:  8 hours 50 minutes dual by day; 27 hours 35 minute as first pilot by day; one hour 20 minutes as 2nd pilot by day; 7 hours 5 minutes dual by night; four hours 25 minutes as first pilot by night; three hours 10 minutes as 2nd pilot by night; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 5 February 1945.

 

18 March 1945, arrived at No.7 Personnel Reception Centre, United Kingdom; 31 March 1945, to Aircrew Holding Section, Morecambe (supernumerary); discharged to RCAF, 4 May 1945 (service number C.94035); 12 May 1945, to No.1333 Transport Support Conversion Unit. His documents are vague on this posting; he seems to have taken a course in day and night glider towing at Leinster and a Paratroop and Supply Drop course at Ringway.  Course lasted 14 May to 23 June 1945 during which time he flew Dakotas as follows: dual to first solo, one hour; day dual, two hours 40 minutes, day solo, 27 hours 55 minutes; night dual to first night solo, 30 minutes, total night dual, 30 minutes; night solo, 17 hours 25 minutes; formation flying, seven hours;  23 June 1945, to No.271 Squadron flying Dakotas between UK and the continent, logging approximately 140 hours.  One document says the unit was No.217 Squadron - this is probably incorrect but should be checked.

 


Posted to Canada, 1 August 1945; released from RCAF, 2 October 1945.  Following the war he took an accountant's course at the Shaw Business School, Toronto (November 1945 to June 1946) and then became an accountant in Blenheim, Ontario.  On 30 June 1948 he cabled Air Marshal W.A. Curtis, Chief of Air Staff, as follows: ACCORDING TO NEWSPAPER BRITAIN REQUESTING BERLIN AIR TRANSPORT ASSISTANCE FROM DOMINIONS HAVE SERVED AS CAPTAIN ON DAKOTA AIRCRAFT WITH RAF TRANSPORT COMMAND ENGLAND GERMANY LICENSED COMMERCIAL PILOT DO YOU REQUIRE EXPERI­ENCED SERVICE PERSONNEL.  To this, Curtis replied on 2 July 1948, stating in part, "At the present time, there is no indication that the Service will be required to call upon former personnel to help in the European situation."

 

Rejoined RCAF, 24 March 1949 in Toronto as Aero Engine Technician with rank of LAC; 24 July 1949, to Centralia;1 October 1950, promoted to Corporal; 2 April 1951, to FTS, Centralia; 17 May 1951, commissioned and graded as Pilot; 18 May 1951, to Trenton (FIS); 14 August 1951, to FTS, Centralia; 2 June 1953, awarded Queen's Coronation Medal (automatic to George Cross recipients); 1 July 1953, promoted to F/L; 11 March 1955, to AFS, Gimli; 3 July 1955, to PWS, Macdonald; 16 September 1955, to No.1 OTU, Chatham; 5 January 1956, to No.427 Squadron, Zweibrucken; 1 October 1958, to FIS, Trenton (disembarked in Montreal from SS Saxonia, 9 October 1958); 14 June 1959, to FIS Detachment, Portage; 10 September 1959, to No.12 A and FF, Trenton; 18 December 1964, released. Subsequently served as Chief Pilot for Great Lakes Airlines (later Air Ontario).  Died in Sarnia, Ontario, 28 July 1969  He had married Patricia Kathleen Small (formerly an RCAF nurse) on 27 December 1943; he had one brother (V. Frost) and one sister (Jean Frost). He had four children - Mary Jacqueline, Patricia Wilma, David Errol and Peter Karl.

 

NOTES RE FLYING TIMES AND SERVICE DETAILS:  In a document dated 7 October 1948 he gives his flying times as follows:  Tiger Moth, 50 hours in training; Harvard, 90 hours in training, 660 as an instructor; Lysander, 50 hours in training; Expeditor, 60 hours in training; Dakota, 100 hours in training, 140 hours on operations.

 

However, another document dated 20 November 1950 which appears to have been compiled with greater care gives the following:

 

DUAL                         SOLO                         UNITS

 

Tiger Moth                  27 hrs 25 min             33 hrs 15 min             EFTS

Stearman                   14 hrs 20 min             39 hrs 25 min             EFTS

Cornell                        2 hours                      6 hrs 35 min               EFTS

Lysander                       -                                11 hours                     SFTS

Harvard                      55 hrs 15 min             748 hrs 20 min          SFTS pupil and                                 instructor

Anson                         2 hrs 15 min               29 hrs 50 min             SFTS

Expeditor                   7 hrs 20 min               57 hrs 35 min             OTU

Dakota                       10 hrs 15 min             154 hrs 50 min          OTU and sqn

 

NOTE:  Yet another form states that in training he flew Tiger Moths at No.29 EFTS (25 hours dual by day, 21 hours 15 minutes solo by day, two hours 25 minutes dual by night, and three hours 45 minutes on instruments; dual time to first solo was 9 hours 55 minutes; the course at No.29 EFTS was 11 February to 13 May 1942.  He graded "Above Average" in most categories

 


Stearmen training at No.31 EFTS was 13 hours dual and 39 hours 25 minutes solo; at No.31 EFTS he also had ten hours in Link Trainer, two hours 40 minutes dual navigation and five hours 20 minutes solo navigation; dual time to first solo was four hours 35 minutes,  At No.31 EFTS he also flew Tiger Moths (four hours 50 minutes dual by day, four hours dual by night, four hours 50 minutes on instruments).

 

Beechcraft civilian aircraft, 1946-1949, 119 hours 20 minutes dual and 56 hours 20 minutes solo.

 

ASSESSMENTS:  His file contains many detailed assessments and they are routinely enthusiastic in praising him.  Examples:

 

24 September 1954, S/L J.M. Wicken, Station Centralia: "Presently employed as OC Standards Squadron, F/L Frost is performing his duties in an above average manner.  Employed prior to his present employment as a flight line instructor, Flight Commander and Examining Officer, he has acquitted himself in a creditable fashion in all respects. Additionally as leader of the Harvard aerobatic team he displayed an exceptionally high calibre of pilot ability which has reflected very favourably on the unit and on the RCAF..."

 

14 October 1958, S/L H.R. Knight, Commanding Officer, No.427 Squadron (Sabres): "F/L Frost has more drive and energy than most men half his age. This is evident in everything he does, in flying, in the ground part of his job as Flight Commander, in sports and in all extra duties to which he is assigned.  He is extremely loyal to the service and ever ready to assume more responsibility.  He has a most pleasant personality and is well liked and admired by his associates.

 

30 January 1962, S/L J.F. Fewell, No.129 A and FF, No.6 Repair Depot, Trenton: "Flight Lieutenant Frost is one of the most enthusiastic and well motivated officers I have met. He is a very experienced jet pilot who, despite his age, sets a pace which is difficult for younger officers to match. He has a most cheerful disposition and does much to maintain morale amongst both his fellow officers and the men.  Because of his jet background and his ability, F/L Frost was made Officer in Charge of test and acceptance flying for 129 AFF.  In this respect he is very thorough and competent and turns out a first class product.  This officer accepted any assignment cheerfully and without question regardless of its unpleasantness or personal inconvenience.

 

FURTHER NOTE: This last has a summary of his flying for 1961 - F-86 (131 hours), T-33 (78 hours), CF-100 (20 hours), C-47 (137 hours), C-45 (123 hours), B-25 (75 hours), Otter (20 hours), Harvard (3 hours), Lancaster (20 hours), L-19 (one hour), Canso (22 hours).  It also lists his flying time for the previous ten years (i.e. his total RCAF postwar flying career) - F-86 (1,244), T-33 (958), CF-100 (73), C-47 (616), C-45 (624), B-25 (100) Otter (83), Harvard (2,363), Chipmunk (12), Lancaster (20), L-19 (one), Canso (22).

 


25 March 1964, S/L J.F. Fewell, No.129 TFF, 6 Repair Depot: "Flight Lieutenant Frost is a highly competent pilot with a wealth of experience on jet and piston aircraft.  He is current on eight types and holds a valid jet and piston instrument rating.  As Officer in Charge of acceptance and tested at No.6 RD and its detachments, he has done an excellent job and eliminated previous problems and bottlenecks.  This phase of flying operations now runs smoothly and efficiently with excellent technical/aircrew relationships which has resulted in a superior product.

 

 

Air Ministry Bulletin 1023 refers to his award.  Cited with 536451 LAC Michael Campion.

 

These two airmen displayed great courage in effecting the rescue of an uncon­scious pilot from a burning aircraft which resulted from a collision in which two Blenheim aircraft were involved while taking off.  Aircraftsmen Campion and Frost were among the first to arrive on the scene.  Not knowing that the pilot was the sole occupant, Aircraftman Frost promptly entered the rear cockpit, which was full of smoke and fumes, in search of the wireless operator.  Satisfying himself that no one was there, he climbed out and, nearly exhausted, ran to the front cockpit where Leading Aircraftman Campion was trying to rescue the pilot. Working heroically, both men, with great risk to themselves, due to the imminent danger of the petrol tanks exploding, extricated the pilot from the burning wreckage. Shortly afterwards the tanks exploded and the whole aircraft was rapidly burned out. Unfortunately the pilot died later.

 

The principal document leading to this award appears to have been a memo dated 17 March 1940 from Group Captain Sumers who commanded RAF Station Upwoods, Hants., to Headquarters, No.6 Group respecting Frost and Campion:

 

The above named airmen are recommended for an immediate award in respect of their gallant action in attempting to rescue the occupants of a burning aircraft under the following circumstances.

 

At approximately 1000 hours on the 12th March, 1940, there was an accident at this aerodrome involving Blenheims L.6596 and L.8845.  The two aircraft collided when taking off and when just about to become airborne; they separated after the collision and finished up a short distance apart.  Both aircraft caught fire but the fire in L.6596 was confined to the engine nacelles.

 

The occupants of L.6596 were able to escape from their aircraft unaided, but the pilot and sole occupant of L.8845 was rendered unconscious in the crash.

 


AC1 Frost and LAC Campion were among the first to arrive at the scene of the accident. Not knowing that the pilot was the only occupant of the aircraft, AC1 Frost climbed into the turret to search for the wireless operator.  By this time the aircraft was well alight and the fuselage was full of dense smoke and fumes.  When AC1 Frost had completed his search of the interior of the fuselage he was seen to get out, obviously suffering from the effect of the fumes, but quickly recovered and joined LAC Campion in rescuing the pilot which they did with the aid of a fire-proof blanket.  I myself arrived on the scene just as they were lifting the pilot out of the wreckage and was surprised to find that the rescuers had not suffered severe burns as the cockpit appeared to be surrounded by flames.  There was at this time imminent danger of the main petrol tanks exploding and this, in fact, happened shortly afterwards and the whole aircraft was rapidly burned out.  The pilot unfortunately died from his injuries, but had he lived his rescue would have been entirely due to the prompt action and disregard of personal danger of the two above-mentioned airmen.

 

Reports by Wing Commander A. Leach and Flight Lieutenant D.R. Biggs who were witnesses of the rescue are attached.

 

In view of the fact that these airmen were nt members of the flying crew of either aircraft, it is considered that the award of the Air Force Medal might not be appropriate and I therefore recommend them for either the Medal of the Order of the British Empire or the Empire Gallantry Medal.

 

A brief account was also filed on 17 March 1940 by Wing Commander Leach, Commanding Officer, No.90 Squadron.  Ultimately, the award seems to have been delayed through comparisons with discussions of an MBE to E.A. Wickenkamp (which see) which brielfy held up consideration of lesser honours for Bomber Command and on 26 April 1940 it was decided to proceed immediately with awards of seven DFCs and four DFMs while discussing the Frost and Camption awards further.

 

Frost's medals are with the Canadian War Museum (AN 19730006-001).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


FROST, Sergeant Stephen Robert (905015) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.57 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 November 1941.  Born in Vancouver, 23 June 1921; educated at New Massett Public School (1928-35), correspondence courses (1935-1936), Comox High School (1937-38), and Prince Rupert High School (1938-39); home in Massett, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia (lumberjack).  Arrived in Britain on 24 August 1939 to join RAF; enlisted 18 October 1939; Wireless Operator/Air Gunner. Basic training at Uxbridge, 20 October to 17 November 1939; wireless school at Yatesbury, 18 November 1939 to 18 July 1940; Air Gunnery School at Dumfries, 20 July to 24 August 1940; No.15 OTU, Harwell, 26 August to 17 October 1940; No.149 Squadron, Mildenhall, 20 October to 23 December 1940; No.214 Squadron, 23 December 1940 to 25 May 1941; No.57 Squadron 26 May to 26 August 1941; No.3 Gunnery Training Flight, Stradishall, 17 August to 24 August 1941; No.57 Squadron, Feltwell, 24 August to 3 October 1941; No.12 OTU, Chipping Warden, 4 October 1941 to 27 May 1942 (ground instructor in gunnery); No.1653 Conversion Unit, 11 June 1942; No.160 Squadron, Middle East, 29 July 1942; Air Headquarters, Egypt, 14 November 1942; No.25 EFTS, 23 November 1943; No.23 SFTS, 17 December 1943 (pilot training; failed to qualify);  returned to Britain 28 August 1944. Transferred to RCAF, 7 March 1945 in the rank of Flight Sergeant; repatriated to Canada, 13 August 1945; released 12 October 1945.  Died 10 October 1949. DHist file 181.005 D.271 compiled in late 1941 confirms him as a Canadian in the RAF; he was then a Sergeant/Wireless Operator at Station Stradishall; next of kin living Massett.  AFRO 1463/41 dated 5 December 1941 describes him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 5646 refers.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  However, Ian Tavender records his recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/9334, drafted 20 September 1941, in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000); when recommended he had flown 35 sorties (217 hours 45 minutes):

 

Since November 1940, Sergeant Frost has taken part in 35 bombing raids as Second Wireless Operator/Air Gunner.  At all times he has shown the utmost keenness in both branches of his work and his enthusiasm and hard work have set an example to all.  His cheerfulness under all conditions have made him a most valuable member of his crew.  His record of operations is an inspiring one, including such long and arduous flights as Berlin (three times), Milan, Turin, Munich and Bordeaux, and is worthy of recognition.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 26 July 1945 he reported having flown 60 sorties, 448 hours ten minutes on operations, 317 hours five minutes non-operational.  His last sortie had been on 16 October 1942 with No.160 Squadron.  His experience on types had been as follows: Anson and Oxford, 219 hours 15 minutes: Wellington, 390 hours ten minutes; Liberator, 155 hours 50 minutes.  His first tour he described as with No.149 Squadron, 1 November to 24 December 1940 (twelve sorties, 87 hours five minutes) followed by No.57 Squadron, 10 June to 13 September 1941 (27 sorties, 180 operational hours).  His second tour was with No.160 Squadron had been 15 sorties (112 hours), 29 July to 16 October 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

FULTON, S/L John (37095) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.99 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 8 October 1940.  Born in Kamloops, British Columbia, 4 November 1912; educated there.  Trooper in British Columbia Hussars.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 15 March 1935; F/O 1937; F/L 1939; S/L 1 September 1940.  With Instrument Armament Defence Flight, Experimental Section, Royal Aeronautical Establishment at Farnborough in September 1939.  With No.99 Squadron, 4 June 1940 to 18 October 1940; with No.311 Squadron, 18 October 1940; reposted to Farnborough, 24 October 1940. Took command of No.419 Squadron, 21 December 1941.  Killed in action, 28/29 July 1942.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942 (reporting DSO award) described him as a Canadian in the RAF, as did AFRO 1497/42 dated 18 September 1942 (reporting his death) and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943 (confirming it). Air Ministry Bulletin 1839 refers.

 


This officer has taken part in twenty major operations over enemy territory since early in June 1940.  On the night of 15th September an attack on the marshalling yards at Brussels was frustrated by the failure of the starboard engine and he turned for home.  Later, however, the engine functioned normally and Squadron Leader Fulton decided to resume his mission.  He made two successful attacks from 11,000 feet straddling the railway junction with both sticks of bombs.  By his persistent determination, outstanding skill and devotion to duty in the face of heavy opposition and many set backs, Squadron leader Fulton was able to complete his task.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9456 has recommendation dated 16 September 1940 which goes into considerable more detail:

 

On the night of 15th/16th September 1940, Acting Squadron leader Fulton took part in a raid on the marshalling yards at Brussels, which are situated near Helmet.

 

This officer, with a comparatively inexperienced crew, decided to attack his objective from about 9,000 feet. On crossing the Belgian coast at about this height, the aircraft showed signs of icing up and the starboard engine began to lose power and eventually stopped. Squadron Leader Fulton then turned for home, gradually losing height until pin pointing himself in the vicinity of Orfordness at 2,000 feet.  The starboard engine appeared to pick up at this height, and began functioning in a normal manner.  The captain therefore decided to resume his mission and turned again for his objective.

 

In view of the thick cloud observed in the vicinity of the target on his earlier attempt, Squadron Leader Fulton approached from a south-westerly direction, but found conditions still unsuitable. He again returned to the Belgian coast to pin point himself and to decided to follow the river Scheldt to Antwerp, and thence along the canal to Brussels. This he did and found the weather clearing over the objective.  He approached at about 7,000 feet and was met by very heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire which prevented him making an accurate run on the target. Whilst climbing to make a further run at a greater height, the target became temporarily obscured by cloud. He therefore waited a further 30 minutes in the vicinity and finally made two successful attacks from 11,000 feet on the marshalling yard, both sticks straddling the railway junction.

 

By his persistent determination to complete his task and his outstanding skill and experience as a pilot, this officer was able to destroy the primary objective in the face of heavy opposition and many set-backs. I consider this action deserving immediate recognition.

 

Prior to this action and since the 11th June 1940, this officer has taken part in 20 major operations over Germany, Holland, Belgium and France and has at all times displayed conspicuous determination and devotion to duty.

 

On 17 September 1940, G/C F.J. Fogarty, Commanding RAF Station Mildenhall, wrote:

 


An officer who at all times displays the highest courage and determination in the carrying out of operations. Very strongly recommended.

 

On 18 September 1940 the Air Officer Commanding, No.3 Group, added his remarks:

 

The above is a typical example of this captain's determination and the fine example he always sets to other members of his unit.

 

In addition to his courage, the experience which this officer has gained as a test pilot, and his general thoroughness, has been instrumental in improving the handling of engines by other captains of his unit, thus increasing the endurance of the aircraft.

 

I strongly recommend him for consideration for an immediate award.

 

FULTON, S/L John (37095) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 1 January 1942 - Experimental Section, Royal Aeronautical Establishment.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5952 refers. Public Record Office Air 2/6269 (New Years Honours List, 1942, Non-Operational Commands, Lower Awards) has citation.

 

This test pilot has had two tours of duty with the experimental section, interspaced with a period of operational flying during the course of which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.  During the first posting to the experimental section he was in the research department flight at Exeter in the days when impacts into balloon cables first began in earnest.  He carried out 38 actual impacts into cables, two of which were of unusually original nature in Wellingtons.  He also carried out very successful and important de-icing work in Blenheims and Harrows.  Since his return to the experimental section he has been successful in completing a large number and variety of experiments, particularly at night, in connection with aids to night flying.  He has set a splendid example and has shown initiative, determination and courage.

 

FULTON, W/C John (37095) - Distinguished Service Order - No.419 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 4 August 1942.  Air Ministry Bulletin 7711 refers and has the following text:

 


This officer has participated in attacks on industrial targets, dockyard towns, aerodromes and other important enemy targets.  On one night in April 1942 he successfully attacked Kiel.  On the return journey his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter whilst flying at a height of 1,500 feet.  Wing Commander Fulton's aircraft sustained much damage.  One blade of the port propeller was shot away, the rear turret completely shattered and the rear gunner wounded.  The hydraulic system was damaged and many of the aircraft's instruments were rendered unserviceable.  The damaged propeller caused intense vibration.  To offset this Wing Commander Fulton decided to continue the journey on one engine. The aircraft would not maintain height, however, an descended to some twenty feet above the level of the seas.  Wing Commander Fulton was compelled to restart the port engine and he succeeded in regaining height.  The vibration recommenced and continued in an alarming manner until the base was reached where an excellent landing was made with the undercarriage retracted.  This officer's skill and determination was responsible for the safe return of his damaged aircraft and his crew after a hazardous flight of some 118 miles after the aircraft had been attacked.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GALLIENNE, F/L William Albert George (127457) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943.  Promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 4 February 1943.  No Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ cards for awards; Allison gives home town at Ottawa and Halifax. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Barnet, Hertfordshire (London) in 1909.   No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".

 

GALLIENNE, S/L William Albert George (127457) - No.83 Squadron - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944.

 

Squadron Leader Gallienne has completed many successful sorties against a wide range of targets including Berlin. In his capacity as Squadron Navigation Leader he has set a high example of accuracy and has been of vital assistance in the many successes achieved.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9276 has recommendation dated 13 June 1944 when he had flown 53 sorties (343 hours 20 minutes) of which 23 sorties (152 hours 30 minutes) had been flown since previous award.

 

27 Jan 43         Dusseldorf                                    29 July 43         Hamburg

30 Jan 43         Hamburg                                       7 Aug 43           Turin/Genoa

7 Feb 43           Lorient                                           27 Aug 43         Nuremburg

13 Feb 43         Lorient                                           31 Aug 43         Berlin

18 Feb 43         Wilhelmshaven                             3 Sept 43          Berlin

1 Mar 43           Berlin                                             6 Sept 43          Munich

3 Mar 43           Hamburg                                       16 Sept 43       Modane

8 Mar 43           Nuremburg                                    20 Sept 43       Hanover

9 Mar 43           Munich                                           7 Oct 43            Stuttgart

11 Mar 43         Stuttgart                                         8 Oct 43            Hanover

12 Mar 43         Essen                                            18 Oct 43          Hanover

22 Mar 43         St.Nazaire                                     22 Oct 43          Kassel

29 Mar 43         Berlin                                             10 Nov 43         Modane

5 Apr 43            Dortmund                                      20 Dec 43        Ludwigshaven

13 Apr 43         Spezia                                           19 Feb 44         Leipzig

16 Apr 43         Pilsen                                            24 Feb 44         Schweinfurt

18 Apr 43         Spezia                                           1 Mar 44           Stuttgart


20 Apr 43         Stettin                                            18 Mar 44         Frankfurt

26 Apr 43         Duisburg                                       28 Mar 44         Bordeaux

12 May 43        Duisburg                                       29 Apr 44         Bordeaux

12 June 43       Bochum                                         1 May 44           Tours

19 June 43       Le Creusot                                    3 May 44           Mailey-le-Camp

21 June 43       Krefeld                                           11 May 44        Bourg

22 June 43       Mulheim                                         5 June 44          La Panelle

12 July 43         Turin                                               6 June 44          Caen

24 July 43         Hamburg                                       8 June 44          Saumur

27 July 43         Hamburg

 

Squadron Leader Gallienne is a conscientious navigator of great ability and determination who has completed 53 sorties against the enemy, 40 of which were with the Pathfinder Force. Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has taken part in attacks on the majority of Germany's most formidable targets, including six attacks on Berlin. Squadron Leader Gallienne has at all times displayed coolness and courage under concentrated fire, never wavering from the arduous tasks allotted to him. His dependability has been consistent and he has set a high example of accuracy both in the air and on the ground in his capacity of Squadron Navigation Leader. He has been an unfailing inspiration to the whole squadron and of vital assistance in gaining his crew's many successes.  Squadron Leader Gallienne is strongly recommended for the award of a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

GALLIENNE, S/L, William Albert George (127457) - Distinguished Service Order - No.139 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 April 1945.

 

This officer has participated in more than 80 sorties during which attacks have been made on a wide range of enemy targets.  He is a navigator of high merit, whose exceptional skill, great courage and devotion to duty have set a splendid example to all.  In spite of more than one trying experience, Squadron Leader Gallienne has shown the greatest keenness and has taken every opportunity to operate against the enemy.  His efforts have been untiring and he has contributed much to the success of the squadron.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

GARDINER, Sergeant Frank James (639074) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.49 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1941.   Born in Halifax, 31 July 1904.  Mother living in Manchester so Canadian connection many be thin.  Significantly, neither DHist file 181.005 D.270 or DHist file 181.005 D.271, compiled in 1940-41 to identify Canadians in the RAF, list him.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/8892 has recommendation dated 25 February 1941.  Has been spelled "Gardiner" but London Gazette says "Gardner".


Sergeant Gardiner has carried out a total of 30 operational flights against the enemy as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, during the course of which he has completed 184 hours flying.

 

Amongst other successful operations in which he has participated have been attacks on Berlin, Stettin, Bordeaux and the Dortmund-Ems Canal.  Throughout these operations his work, both as an Air Gunner and as a Wireless Operator, have been of the greatest assistance to his pilot.

 

Sergeant Gardiner has been involved in two serious aircraft crashes at night.  On one of these occasions his aircraft crashed after taking off with a full bomb load and caught fire.  Although older than most members of aircrews - he is 36 years old - and although he suffered injures to his back, these unpleasant experiences have in no way damped his enthusiasm for flying and his genuine keenness for operations.

 

Sergeant Gardiner's enthusiasm for operations and his skill, calmness and attention to detail under difficult circumstances have been of the highest order.  He has been an excellent influence in his squadron and the example he has set has been a source of inspiration to other Wireless Operator/Air Gunners.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GARDNER, Flight Sergeant John Edward (1391109) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.97 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943.  Born in Manitoba, 1920; RAF 1941. Air Ministry Bulletin 11720 refers.

 

...as air bomber has taken creditable part in numerous operational sorties.  Member of very successful crew who have always shown great determination in pressing home attacks.  His bombing has always been of a very high standard.

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/8983, drafted 25 August 1943, in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000); when recommended he had flown 32 sorties (188 hours 20 minutes):

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer has completed 32 sorties, 16 of these as marker. He is the Air Bomber in a successful crew which has always shown determination in pressing home their attacks. His bombing has been of a high standard.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


GARRITY, Flight Sergeant Francis Frank (627050) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.206 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 January 1941.   Home on awards card given as Fort Henry and Kingston. Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) state he was born 15 June 1915 in Aurington, England but give his permanent address as Kingston.  He is listed as flying Wellington Z8772 to Canada (via Iceland) in June-July 1941 (apparently for delivery to Dayton, Ohio).  DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists him as a Canadian in the RAF, January 1940, but next-of-kin given as a grandmother living in Lancashire.  DHist file 181.005 D.271 compiled in 1941 confirms next-of-kin and describes him as a Sergeant Wireless Operator in No.206 Squadron. AFRO 140/43 dated 29 January 1943 (confirming his death) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Lost with No.206 Squadron, 9 January 1942.  No published citation.  Public Records Office Air 2/8869 has recommendation (undated):

 

At 0030 hours on 15 November 1940, Sergeant Garrity was gunner in a Hudson aircraft which carried out a bombing attack on St.Leger.

 

Our aircraft made three runs over the target, the last of these being carried out at a height of approximately 500 feet.  At the completion of this run, one of two Me.110s, which had previously been observed taking off, made a beam attack from the starboard, opening fire at approximately 350 yards range with its front guns.  Sergeant Garrity held his fire until he was sure of the target, and then got in two long and accurate bursts, firing 700 rounds in all.  Other members of the crew confirm that this fire was extremely well directed and struck the Me.110 in the nose and amidships.  The enemy aircraft at once lost speed and went out of control, spinning into a wood at the edge of the aerodrome.

 

Sergeant Garrity came over from Canada, at his own expense, in September 1938 in order to join the Royal Air Force.  He was already the holder of a Second Class Pilot's License in Canada, having completed some 150 hours flying time in that country.  It was his intention to become a pilot, but, learning that it might be some time before he could expect to qualify as a member of an operational crew in this capacity, he at once applied for training as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner.

 

He was posted to this unit as a Wireless Operator on 2 September 1939 and carried out his gunnery training in this squadron.

 

Since that time, Sergeant Garrity has completed more than 450 hours operational flying as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner and in both capacities he has earned the complete confidence of the pilots and crews with whom he has flown.

 

On several occasions he has been engaged by enemy aircraft and on October 10th last, when his own aircraft was attacked by two He.111s, he succeeded in shooting one of them down into the sea.  He has also taken part in more than twenty battle flights and raids over enemy territory, and has on numerous occasions been subject to very heavy anti-aircraft fire from the ground.  Upon these occasions, the cool and collected manner in which he has made his reports to his pilots has been of the greatest assistance.

 


Sergeant Garrity has always shown himself most anxious to keep himself up-to-date with all developments in gunnery technique and his keenness in this direction has been a constant source of inspiration to the other gunners in the squadron.

 

The acceptance of this recommendation is, consequently, urged in the strongest possible terms.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9251 has the final edited version as cleared by Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

On 15th November 1940, Sergeant Garrity was the gunner in a Hudson aircraft which carried out a bombing attack on the aerodrome at St.Leger. Three runs were made over the target, the last of these being at a height of 500 feet.  At the completion of this run, the aircraft was attacked by a Messerschmitt 110 which opened fire at short range.  Sergeant Garrity withheld his fire until he was sure of his target, and then delivered two long bursts which put the Messerschmitt out of control until it finally crashed near the aerodrome.  On a previous occasion he succeeded in destroyed a Heinkel 111.  Sergeant Garrity has completed 450 hours operational flying as wireless operator/air gunner and has earned the complete confidence of pilots and crews with whom he has flown.  He has shown himself most anxious to keep himself up-to-date with all developments in gunnery technique and his keenness in this direction has been an inspiration to other air gunners of his squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GARVEY, F/L Frederick James (117420) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 10 September 1943.  Born in Vancouver, 1913.  Home there.  RAF, 1940; died of injuries 15 February 1944.  AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944 (reporting his death), AFRO 824/45 dated 18 May 1945 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945 (reporting his DSO) all described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Following from Air Ministry Bulletin 11391.

 

...on many occasions has led attacks on most important targets in Germany, including Ruhr centres.  His high courage and coolness have contributed to success of many bombing operations against enemy objectives.  Aircraft has been damaged by anti-aircraft fire on several occasions but this has never deterred him from pressing home attack and completing mission.

 

GARVEY, F/L Frederick James (117420) - Distinguished Service Order - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 7 January 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 12507/AL.733 refers.

 


Flight Lieutenant Garvey has been continuously engaged on operations since January 1943.  Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross he has continued to perform his duties with outstanding distinction and brilliance.  During one of his sorties over Essen a large bomb was hit by anti-aircraft fire after being released and exploded directly beneath his aircraft.  Determined to complete his task, despite this hazardous experience, Flight Lieutenant Harvey made several runs over this most heavily defended target.  Flight Lieutenant Garvey's fearlessness and resolution in the face of the enemy have at all times been exceptional.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GAUNCE, S/L Lionel Manley (37632) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.615 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 23 August 1940.  Born in Lethbridge, 20 September 1915; educated in Edmonton.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 March 1936.  In No.3 Squadron, 17 September 1939 to 28 February 1940; No.615 Squadron, 28 February to 26 August 1940 (baled out over sea, rescued) and again 14 September to 31 October 1940; No.46 Squadron, 31 October to 1 December 1940; supernumery to Station Kenley, 21 June 1941; to No.41 Squadron, 16 July 1941; killed in action 19 November 1941. Victories listed by Chris Shores, Aces High (2nd edition) as follows: 20 July 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (Hurricane P2966); 25 July 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (Hurricane P3109); 12 August 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Hurricane P2966); 16 August 1940, one Bf.110 damaged (Hurricane P9266), 18 August 1940, one Bf.109 damaged (identified by him as a He.113, flying Hurricane P2966); 26 August 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (Hurricane P2966); 11 November 1940, one BR.20 (shared with another pilot) plus one CR.42 destroyed plus one CR.42 probably destroyed (all on Hurricane V6928 during Italian raids on Britain; see H.P. Blatchford); 20 August 1941, one Bf.109 damaged (Spitfire W3374); 21 August 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire W3626); 27 August 1941, one Bf.109 damaged (Spitfire P8759); 28 August 1941, one Bf.109 damaged (Spitfire P8759); 17 August 1941, one Bf.109 damaged (Spitfire AB858).  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 1416 refers to award.  A mountain in the Moberly area, Jasper National Park is named for him.

 

This flight commander has displayed excellent coolness and leadership since the return of the squadron to England.  In July his flight took part in resisting an enemy air attack on Dover when three of our aircraft were attacked by forty Junkers 87s.  At least two of the enemy were shot down.  Flight Lieutenant Gaunce has shot down three enemy aircraft since returning to England.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office has an undated recommendation for this award, prepared by a Squadron Leader J.R. Kayll:

 


This officer took over command of "A" Flight on May 16th, 1940, and his coolness and leadership since return of this squadron to England has ben exemplary. His Flight took part in the Battle of Dover on July 14th when three of our aircraft were attacked by 40 Junkers 87s of which two were definitely shot down and one probably destroyed. Flight Lieutenant Gaunce has personally shot down three enemy aircraft since returning to England quite apart from taking part in numerous patrols whilst in France.

 

On 8 August 1940, Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park adds his comments:

 

I understand this officer has already been recommended for an award for his work in France, which recommendation may have been mislaid by his Wing Headquarters (61 Wing).

 

He is a gallant young Canadian and has personally destroyed three enemy aircraft. He has shown exceptional ability as a leader of his flight; for this in particular as well as for his successes, I consider him well worthy of the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for which I strongly recommend him.

 

Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding wrote "Approved" on the form on 11 August 1940.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GAUNT, P/O Daniel Buntin (80446) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.214 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 15 June 1943.  Born in Pennant Creek, Saskatchewan, 25 September 1920; home there. Left Canada 20 September 1937 to become a mining technician in Southern Rhodesia (the mine owner was a Quebec industrialist); applied to join "Rhodesian Wing of the RAF", although his acceptance was deferred and he apparently had trouble getting back to Canada.  Enlisted in RAF as an AC2 (service number 778553), 3 January 1941; remustered from Aircraft Hand to Air Gunner under Training, 6 May 1941; trained as a gunner at Evanton, 1 September to 12 October 1941; promoted LAC, 25 August 1941; confirmed as Air Gunner, 13 October 1941; commissioned 14 October 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 14 April 1943; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 14 October 1944, Injured 18 November 1943 when Halifax of No.192 Squadron overshot on landing; three others in crew killed; he was rear gunner; missing (POW), 25 May 1944 on Special Duty mission, No.192 Squadron, to Aachen. Transferred to RCAF with effect from 24 November 1944 (C97012); repatriated 6 August 1945; released 16 October 1945. AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943 reporting his award - but as a DFM) and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944 (reporting him missing) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 10534 refers.  Flight, 5 August 1943, published the following:

 

Pilot Officer Gaunt's operational missions have included sorties against such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Hamburg, Turin and Genoa.  He has experienced attacks by enemy night fighters on several occasions.  These have invariably been beaten off or evaded successfully as the result of the skilful direction given by Pilot Officer Gaunt.

 

NOTE: DHist cards have a more detailed account, published in AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943.

 


Pilot Officer Gaunt is a rear gunner who has served in this squadron since July 1942.  His operational missions have included sorties against such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Hamburg, Turin and Genoa.  He has experienced attacks by enemy night fighters on several occasions.  They have invariably been beaten off or evaded successfully as the result of the skilful direction given by Pilot Officer Gaunt.  He has always set an excellent example to other aircrewss and much of his success as an air gunner has been due to the care and efficiency with which he prepares for operations.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 26 July 1945 he stated he had flown two tours with Nos.214 and 192 Squadrons (30 and 18 missions respectively), June 1942 to 24 May 1944, totalling 280 operational hours.  Nothing to indicate when he began his tour with No.192 Squadron, but as he took a Gunnery Leader Course at Sutton Bridge, December 1942 to January 1943, it would appear the course marked the conclusion of his first tour.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GAUNTLETT, F/L John Reginald (106221) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.159 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 22 August 1944.  Born in Saskatchewan, 1917; educated in Regina and Britain; home given as Orillia.  Served as 2nd Lieutenant, Royal Artillery; to RAF, 1941.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15185/AL.861 refers.  AFRO 2231/44 dated 13 October 1944 (announcing DFC) confirmed him as Canadian in the RAF.  Died in Toronto, 27 September 1994.

 

Flight Lieutenant Gauntlett has completed a tour of operational duty during which he has attacked a variety of targets in Burma. He has at all times displayed a fine fighting spirit, great skill and devotion to duty.  In April 1944 he was captain of an aircraft detailed for an attack against Rangoon.  When his aircraft was attacked and badly damaged by enemy night fighters and the rear gunner killed, it was largely due to Flight Lieutenant Gauntlett's superb airmanship that the damaged aircraft reached home safely.  As Deputy Flight Commander his skill and keenness have done much to maintain a high standard of operational efficiency in his squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GIBBS, F/L Sidney Robert (37776) - Mention in Despatches - No.204 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated  11 July 1940.  Born in Calgary 5 February 1916; educated in California and England.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 20 April 1936.  Remained in RAF until May 1950, rising to Wing Commander.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) confirm his Canadian birth, although his permannt address is given as Wansford, Peterborough, England.  The card shows him making three PBY deliveries to UK, February to July 1941. When the card was compiled the following aircraft types were listed: Blackburn B.2 (60 hours), Hawker Hart (60 hours), Anson (70 hours), Saro Cloud (30 hours), Saro London (600 hours), Sunderland (1,200 hours) and Catalina (60 hours).  Air Ministry Bulletin 1085 refers.


GIBBS, F/L Sidney Robert (37776) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.204 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 13 September 1940.  Air Ministry Bulletin 1610 refers.

 

In August 1940 Flight Lieutenant Gibbs, as captain of a Sunderland aircraft, was detailed to carry out a reconnaissance of Tromso.  After a long night flight, under bad conditions he located eight Heinkel 115 float planes, which he promptly attacked.  As a result, three of these aircraft were destroyed and the remainder seriously damaged.  Flight Lieutenant Gibbs brought his aircraft safely to his home base after being in the air for 15 and a half hours.  Valuable information concerning shipping in the Tromso area was obtained.  This officer has carried out over 600 operational hours flying since the commencement of hostilities.  His excellent reconnaissance work include the locating of survivors of the Andania and guiding a destroyer to the rescue.  His perseverance and unflinching devotion to duty have proved invaluable.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9456 has recommendation (undated) which provides more details:

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant Gibbs was captain of a Sunderland aircraft ordered to carry out a reconnaissance of Tromso, Norway, on the morning of August 26, 1940.  After a flight of seven hours, partly through bad weather and at night, he arrived at Tromso at 0315 hours.  On approaching the Tromso roads he saw eight Heinkel 115 float planes at moorings.  He ordered his gunners to machine gun, and he dropped three 250-pound anti-submarine bombs.  Three Heinkels were definitely sunk and the remainder seriously damaged. Valuable information concerning shipping in the Tromso area was obtained.  The Sunderland returned to base after being in the air for 15 ¼ hours.

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant Gibbs has done just over 600 hours operational flying since the outbreak of hostilities, during which he has carried out some excellent work, notably a reconnaissance of Narvik on the 17th June and the location of the Andania survivors and the guiding of a destroyer to the assistance of the trawler carrying them (16th June). He has already received a Mention in Despatches.

 

These documents included a report of the sortie which went into considerable detail:

 


C/204 - Recce, Tromso - Reports - Flew up about 50 miles off Norwegian coast to position GFJA 3000. Entered on south-east course down Raasa and Skagoy Sund to Musvaer Island. Thence turned southeast down Kvalsundet over Hanmeset Light into Tromso Sound.  Height of aircraft then 50 feet. Sighted eight Heinkel 115 floatplanes moored off shore of Tromsoy Island two miles north of Tromso.  Front gun opened up and got full burst into two He.115s.  Aircraft climbed steeply to 600 feet and dropped three 250-pound anti-submarine bombs, securing one direct hit and two near misses.  Two of the floatplanes were seen to sink, and one was on fire. The remaining five, it is considered, sustained very severe damage and are probably to be written off.  On the island opposite the moorings are two large uncompleted hangars in front of which two aircraft were seen - thought to be an M.F. 11 and Fokker.  Immediately to north of hangars there is a new camp - no activity observed there.  Just south of the hangars are two fuel dumps.  Lying in sound off Tromso Harbour five camouflaged motor vessels, two 3,000 tons, two 2,000 tons, one 1,000 tons.  Front and rear guns raked decks and bridge of at least one motor vessel.  Damage unknown.  Slight activity observed on deck. The two larger vessels had 4-inch gun on poop, and the smallest had light gun on forecastle.  Photos taken, but owing to low altitude of aircraft, which had now descended to 50 feet again, and to speed (180 knots) results are unlikely to be good.

 

A few trawlers, apparently innocent, were lying in the harbour. No evidence of troops seen. On leaving the town, three more fuel dumps were seen on the south side.  Front gunner got in one good burst, which was seen to enter the dump, but no result observed.  No opposition of any kind was encountered - aircraft having clearly taken enemy by surprise.  Left Tromso by south, then southwest past Ryoy into Malangen Fjord, then northwest to Hekkingen and 50 miles out to sea on same course before setting course for base.  Time at Tromso, 0315 hours.

 

For future reference it was noted that it is necessary to fly at 500 feet when approaching Tromso from the northwest, in order to avoid the suspended cable between Kvaloy and Ringvassoy.  Nothing sighted in remainder of district.  My form SUL/B.1/26/8 refers, and annotated map will follow as soon as possible.  Aircraft in air 15 hours 25 minutes.

 

The Station Commander added his remarks (again undated):

 

The award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to Acting Flight Lieutenant S.R. Gibbs is very strongly recommended.  This officer has carried out a very great amount of operational flying since the outbreak of war.  His keenness and great devotion to duty is exceptional. The three sorties mentioned above have been outstanding and could not have been carried out with greater success.

 

The Air Officer Commanding, No.18 Group (Air Vice-Marshal Charles Breese), concurred on 27 August 1940, writing his own review:

 

This officer is the very best type of Flight Commander and his example has been invaluable to all ranks of the flying boat squadrons located at his base.  His conscientious perseverance and unflinching devotion to duty, proved throughout a great period of operational flying, is eminently the service for which the Distinguished Flying Cross was instituted and I recommend that an immediate award be made in recognition of his outstanding achievement on the 25th/26th August.


Finally, the Air Officer Commanding, Coastal Command, concurred on 30 August 1940.

 

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GILBERT, F/L Ronald (178882) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.199 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945.  Born 1923 in Edmonton, Alberta; home there. Educated at Eldon Boys School. Enlisted June 1941; trained in Canada; commissioned June 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 19245/AL.1062 refers.  No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty".

 

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GILCHRIST, F/L Peter Alexander (37348) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.51 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940.  Born in Weyburn, Saskatchewan, 1 August 1910; home in Port Pelly, Saskatchewan. Educated in Canada.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 7 October 1935; F/O 1938; F/L April 1940; S/L May 1940; W/C 1 June 1942.  In No.51 Squadron at outbreak of war and remained until late July 1940.  Joined No.35 Squadron, 5 November 1940; posted to No.405 Squadron to command, 20 May 1941.  Missing, 24 July 1941.  Evaded capture; interned in Switzerland, 18 November 1941 and reached UK 6 July 1942. Active in Ferry Command, September-December 1942; commanded No.53 Squadron in 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 26 February 1945 (C89584).  Extensive postwar career rising to Air Commodore before retiring 21 December 1962.  Medals with Canadian War Museum (AN 19860228-001) along with photos and documents.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 801 refers.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/9413 has only marginally better citation:

 

This officer has always shown great determination and courage and keenness in successfully carrying out his missions at night over enemy territory.

 

Annex 1Y to this recommendation indicates that he was recommended for the DFC on 23 April 1940 and had previously been recommended on 12 March 1940, but adds nothing of substance; there might be more in the recommendation of 12 March 1940, if it could be located.

 

Public Record Office Air 2/9412 has the recommendation dated 23 April 1940 by the Commanding Officer of No.51 Squadron (a Wing Commander Owen):

 

This officer has always shown great determination and keenness in carrying out his missions at night over enemy territory. He was recommended on 12 March 1940 and since then he has performed five further successful missions.

 

On 25 April 1940 the Commanding Officer of the station added:

 


I concur in the above remarks. This officer has shown determination and high courage in successfully completing his allotted tasks in the face of the enemy. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

Finally, on 30 April 1940, Air Commodore A. Coningham, Air Officer Commanding No.4 Group, added:

 

This Canadian officer has shown great determination and devotion to duty in carrying out many operational flights over enemy territory. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

GILCHRIST, W/C Peter Alexander (37348) - Mention in Despatches - No.405 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 11 June 1942.  Public Records Office Air 2/5684 has recommendation:

 

This officer was captain of a Wellington aircraft which bombed Brest on 24th July 1941. Shortly afterwards they were attacked by an enemy aircraft and compelled to bale out. On landing he immediately hid in a wood and, travelling by night and hiding by day, crossed the Mountains d'Aree on 28th July. He then went to Nantes and on 25th August left Nantes to make his way to Switzerland which he reached, after crossing Lake Geneva in a rowing boat on 30th August. He remained in Geneva until 12th January 1942 when he left to travel to Gibraltar via Madrid. He was repatriated from Gibraltar on 27th January 1942.

 

NOTE: This award began as a recommendation for a DSO drafted by G/C S.D. Bufton (Officer Commanding, RAF Station Pocklington) on 30 July 1941, noting that he had flown a total of 2,117 hours including 33 sorties.  It read:

 

Wing Commander Gilchrist led his squadron on its first daylight operation, the target being the "Gneisenau" at Brest.  He was responsible for organizing the operation as a whole, and in this he spared no effort.  His attention to detail, his powers of leadership and his own personal example inspired the whole squadron and were responsible for its success as a whole.

 

Leading his own section of three aircraft, he arrived over the target exactly on time and carried out a successful attack.  Immediately after bombing, and before his following aircraft could rejoin him, his aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter, and when last seen two members of his crew had baled out.  The aircraft appeared under control in a gentle dive, and it is possible that the remainder escaped also.

 

In the event of this officer being a prisoner of war, I recommend that his leadership and cool determination in leading his squadron to the completion of a successful operation should be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Service Order.

 


On 31 July 1941, A/V/M/ C.R. Carr (Air Officer Commanding, No.4 Group) added, "Strongly recommend the award of the DSO." 

 

Further to this, Public Record Office Air 2/8754 has a letter dated 11 February 1942 from the Group Captain commanding RAF Station Pocklington to Headquarters, No.4 Group, dated 11 February 1942:

 

May I bring to your notice the exploits of Wing Commander P.A. Gilchrist whilst engaged on bombing operations culminating in his last flight, when he led No.405 (RCAF) Squadron in a daylight attack on Brest on 24th July 1941.

 

Prior to taking command of No.405 Squadron at Driffield in June 1941, Wing Commander Gilchrist had completed some 32 operational flights in his previous squadron.  He was awarded the DFC in respect of consistent good work previous to joining No.405 Squadron and there was no doubt that his energy and enthusiasm stimulated a high sense of duty and morale in No.405 Squadron from the very beginning.

 

During his brief period in command he completed two operational flights, brief details of which are as follows:

 

(i)         As Commanding Officer, No.405 Squadron, one night sortie, target Osnabruck Marshalling Yard. "Clearly identified and attacked large building in north of town near railway. Caused five big red fires seen for 15 minutes afterwards.

 

ii)         One day sortie, target the cruisers at Brest.  He led his squadron in three formations of three, and was the first over target.  He was seen to be heavily engaged by flak, and five members of the crew were seen to bale out.  It is understood he bombed the target and that almost immediately afterwards was attacked by fighters who killed his rear gunner and shot the aircraft about badly.  He ordered his crew to bale out.

 

After being shot down over Brest he made his way across France and was interned in Switzerland.  He has recently returned to this country after some seven months of absence.

 

I have little doubt that his efforts to escape which were eventually crowned with success were due entirely to his enthusiasm and resourcefulness.  I submit, therefore, that his last flight (leading a day raid over Brest) coupled with his untiring efforts to escape are well worthy of recognition.

 

On 17 February 1942, Air Vice-Marshal Tarr (Air Officer Commanding, No.4 Group) wrote to Headquarters, Bomber Command, enclosing the above letter.  He wrote, in part:

 


A recommendation for the award of a DSO was put forward in the list of recommendations arising out of operations on 24th July 1941, under cover of my letter of even reference dated 31st July 1941.  A copy of this recommendation, which was not proceeded with, as Wing Commander P.A. Gilchrist was missing as a result of the operation, is attached herewith.

 

In view of his escape and safe return to this country, referred to in the Officer Commanding RAF Station Pocklington's letter, I strongly recommend an immediate award of the DSO to Wing Commander Gilchrist, in recognition both of the daylight operation over Brest and his subsequent achievement in escaping to this country.

 

Bomber Command Headquarters sent this forward to Air Ministry on 20 February 1942, strongly urging award of a DSO.  On 24 February 1942, a Mr. C.G. White writes to Major the Hon. O.E. Vesey (both apparently are in Air Ministry), reporting in outline the recommendation and adding:

 

As the recommendation contains no details of the escape, would you be good enough to ascertain from M.I.9 whether this entailed any special features such as might qualify the officer for an award under Army standards.

 

It is about this time that a citation appears to have been drafted:

 

This officer completed 32 operational flights in his previous squadron and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He took over command of No.405 Squadron in June 1941. His first operational flight with No.405 Squadron occurred at night when a successful attack was made on the marshalling yards at Osnabruck. On 24th July 1941, Wing Commander Gilchrist carried out his second operational flight when he led his squadron in a daylight attack on the German battlecruiser Gneisenau at Brest.  At the head of the first formation of three aircraft, he arrived over the target exactly on time and carried out a determined and successful attack. After the bombs had been released, his aircraft was attacked and damaged by the fire from an enemy fighter. The rear gunner was killed and other members of the crew baled out when ordered to do so. Wing Commander Gilchrist was ultimately shot down but, by his courage and resourcefulness, succeeded in making his way across France to Switzerland where he was interned. After a period of seven months he made good his escape and returned to this country. Wing Commander Gilchrist was responsible for organizing the whole of the operation against Brest and he spared no effort in the task. His high qualities of leadership and his personal example have been largely responsible for the many successes he has achieved.

 

On 9 March 1942 Mr. Vesey writes to White:

 


I have now heard from M.I.9 who say that the case of Wing Commander P.A. Gilchrist, DFC, is under review but that it is improbable that his evasion performance will be found to justify a recommendation for an award.  In view of this, you may think it well to proceed with the recommendation in respect of gallantry in air operations without further delay.

 

A minute in the file, dated 14 March 1942, reads in part:

 

Wing Commander Gilchrist received the DFC for completing 32 sorties and is recommended for the DSO for two further sorties plus a successful escape from France.  It has been ascertained from the War Office (vide 1J) that this officer's case is under examination by the escape authorities but that it is improbable than an award is justified in respect of the escape.  You will probably think, therefore, that consideration for the DSO should be deferred until he has carried out further operational flying.

 

A minute dated 4 May 1942 appears to shut down DSO action and substitute a Mention in Despatches:

 

...the War Office have now confirmed at 9A that no award should be make to Wing Commander Gilchrist in respect of his escaping from France.  Meanwhile the RAF Awards Committee considered at their 31st meeting a proposal by D. of I. [Director of Intelligence) that all escapers should receive at least a mention in despatches.  The citation at 103 of 2A certainly seems to justify a mention in despatches and a letter to Bomber Command in reply to 1F is submitted on the assumption that AMP [Air Member for Personnel] will wish a mention to be approved.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GILES, W/C John Hassell (37851) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.90 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 August 1943. Born in Shanghai, 1910; educated at Victoria high schools in British Columbia; in 1935, at Britannia Mines, British Columbia, he applied for a Short Service Commission in the RAF.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 18 May 1936; attained rank of Squadron Leader, 1941; Wing Commander, 1942. Commanded No.90 Squadron and then No.186 Squadron. Left RAF in 1946; rejoined 1947. As of 1953 he was Group Captain (later Air Commodore) as Assistant Chief of Staff (Intelligence), Headquarters, Allied Air Forces Central Europe.  See Roundel, May 1960.  Air Ministry Bulletin 11124 refers. No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Following from DHist cards (based on Air Ministry Bulletins).

 

...has completed number of operations over enemy territory and has participated in attacks on targets at Essen, Hamburg and Berlin.  Once, aircraft cornered by searchlights for nine minutes, damaged by anti-aircraft fire over Essen. Has at all times displayed high degree of courage and determination and has set fine example to the younger captains.

 

GILES, W/C John Hassell (37851) - Distinguished Service Order - No.186 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945.


Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has led his squadron on may daylight operations with courage and skill. He is an excellent squadron commander who by his untiring efforts and unswerving devotion to duty, both in the air and on the ground, has set an inspiring example to all and has materially contributed to the high standard of operational efficiency attained by his squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GILPIN, Sergeant William Cleghorn (968152) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.115 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 December 1941. Born in Paisley, Saskatchewan, 1919; left Technical College to join RAF, September 1937. Air Ministry Bulletin 5883 refers.  No citation published in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Citation published in Flight, 15 January 1942.

 

This airman has been employed as a first wireless operator on active operations for some months. Many of the missions in which he has participated were carried out in the winter months in adverse conditions but by his exceptional skill he gained the complete confidence of his captain and aircrew. On several occasions Sergeant Gilpin has shown resource in most trying circumstances and has assisted considerably in the safe return of his aircraft. He has set a fine example throughout.

 

DHist cards (excerpt from AFRO 1/42) give a slightly different version ("eight months" rather than "many months").

 

This airman has been employed as a first wireless operator on active operations for the past eight months. Many of the missions in which he has participated were carried out in the winter months in adverse conditions but by his exceptional skill he gained the complete confidence of his captain and aircrew. On several occasions Sergeant Gilpin has shown resource in most trying circumstances and has assisted considerably in the safe return of his aircraft. He has set a fine example throughout.

 

NOTE: The original recommendation, dated 19 October 1941, when he had flown 31 sorties (180 hours) was found in Public Record Office Air 2/9572 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000).

 


This Non-Commissioned Officer has taken part in 31 operational sorties as First Wireless Operator amounting to 180 hours flying.  He has been engaged on operations for eight months which included flying in severe weather conditions in the past winter and has consistently displayed exceptional skill in his capacity as a radio operator.  On several major diversions, Sergeant Gilpin has shown great resource and it is largely due to his cool ability under the most difficult and trying conditions that his crew have landed safely.  Sergeant Gilpin is still flying with this squadron and will continue on operations until he has completed 200 hours. For his skill, ability and the great enthusiasm for operational flying which he has always displayed, I strongly recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

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GINDER, F/L Cyril Joseph (82182) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.106 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 June 1944.  Born at Handsworth, Birmingham, 1911; home in Kingston, Ontario.  Enlisted 1939.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14428/AL.834 refers. No citation other than "completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation dated 15 March 1944 when he had flown 21 sorties (139 hours 45 minutes).

 

30 Aug 43  Munchen-Gladbach (5.00,   2 Dec 43     Berlin (6.40)

second pilot)                         16 Dec 43   Berlin (7.15)

27 Sep 43  Hanover (5.35)                      2 Jan 44      Berlin (7.15)

29 Sep 43  Bochum (5.15)                      14 Jan 44    Brunswick (5.50)

1 Oct 43     Hagen (6.05)                         27 Jan 44    Berlin (8.20)

4 Oct 43     Frankfurt (6.35)                     28 Jan 44    Berlin (7.50)    

8 Oct 43     Hanover (5.10)                      15 Feb 44   Berlin (7.15)

18 Oct 43   Hanover (5.55)                      19 Feb 44   Leipzig (6.50)

3 Nov 43    Dusseldorf (4.35)                  20 Feb 44   Stuttgart (7.15)

23 Nov 43  Berlin (7.05)                          24 Feb 44   Schweinfurt (7.40)

26 Nov 43  Berlin (7.45)                          1 Mar 44      Stuttgart (8.00)

 

Flight Lieutenant Ginder as captain of aircraft has completed 21 successful operational sorties against such heavily defended targets as Berlin (eight times), Leipzig and Schweinfurt.  This officer has proved himself to be a skilful and courageous pilot and an outstanding captain.  Not once has he abandoned a mission.

 

Flight Lieutenant Ginder has at all times set a splendid example to the members of his squadron, and I consider that his fine record and quiet but dogged determination fully merit the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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GODDEN, P/O Edwin George (184160) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.77 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945. Born 1922 in Newfoundland; home in St.John's.  Educated at Prince of Wales and Upper Canada College.  Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 lists him as a Newfoundlader in the RAF; enlisted 10 January 1942 (798746); commissioned August 1942; demobilized as a Flying Officer, 27 December 1946.  His identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969).  Air Ministry Bulletin 17468/AL.967 refers.  No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty."

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GOOD, F/O Bryan Lancelot (AUS 423250) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.622 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944.  Born 8 April 1912 in Battleford, Saskatchewan; home in Vancouver (parents listed variously as living on Galiano Island and in Vancouver).  Served in RCN about 1933.  No indication of where or when he went to Australia, where he became a "manufacturer's agent".  Enlisted 20 June 1942 at No.2 Recruiting Centre and posted to No.2 ITS; promoted LAC, 12 September 1942; to No.2 Embarkation Depot, Bradfield Park, 10 October 1942; to No.1 Embarkation Depot, Ascot Vale, 31 October 1942; embarked from Melbourne, 2 November 1942; arrived in Canada 24 November 1942 and posted to No.3 Manning Depot, Edmonton; to No.8 BGS, Lethbridge, 6 December 1942; to No.2 AOS, Edmonton, 7 March 1943; commissioned 16 April 1943. Posted to "Y" Depot, Halifax, 1 May 1943; arrived in UK, 26 May 1943; to No.4 (O) AFU, 1 July 1943; to No.11 OTU, 27 July 1943; to No.1665 Conversion Unit, 22 October 1943; to No.3 Lancaster Finishing School, 21 December 1943; to No.622 Squadron, 1 January 1944 (30 sorties, 150 operational hours); to No.29 OTU, 20 August 1944; to No.12 OTU, 22 December 1944; to No.29 OTU, 15 January 1945; to No.11 PDRC, 26 April 1945; returned to Australia 22 October 1945; Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 dated 12 October 1944 refers.  No citation other than "completed numerous operations against the enemy during which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Biographical information from Air Ministry Bulletin, but one must wonder how a Canadian came to be a member of the RAAF.

 

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GOODBODY, S/L Roger Relton (31087) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943 with effect from 23 December 1942. AFRO 232 dated 12 February 1942 (announcing award) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in North Vancouver in 1913.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GOODWILL, Sergeant Eric (981347) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 11 June 1942. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Saskatchewan in 1919, gave his Christian name, and identified his trade as that of Radar Operator; eventually promoted to Flight Sergeant.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


GOURLIE, F/L Robert Norman (104471) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 November 1943. Born 2 September 1920 in Toronto; home there; educated in Toronto. Applied to join RCAF, 25 September 1939 but not enlisted until 30 May 1940; discharged as impatient; arrived in England, 1 July 1940; enlisted directly in RAF, 3 August 1940 (service number 1109876);  promoted to Leading Aircraftman, 21 December 1940; commissioned 2 August 1941; with No.70 Squadron in Middle East, November 1941 to October 1942; with No.420 Squadron, March to October 1943; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 15 April 1943.  Transferred to RCAF, 31 August 1945 (C97022), at which time hews serving with No.437 Squadron; repatriated 8 May 1946; released 20 September 1946.  Joined the Faculty of Law at University of British Columbia. Re-engaged in the Supplementary Reserve from 1 December 1950 to 1 June 1957 as a part-time instructor on Chipmunk aircraft.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Following from DHist cards (based on Air Ministry Bulletin 12171/AL.905).

 

...has completed large number of sorties as captain of night bombing aircraft. During Sicilian-Italian campaign has consistently pressed home attacks with enthusiasm and total disregard for enemy defences. Has obtained many excellent photographs of aiming point and set high standard of proficiency.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 15 April 1946 he claimed two tours and 80 sorties, the last one being on 15 October 1943; claimed 700 operational hours and 1,000 non-operational.

 

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GRAEME, F/L Dudley Brian (66598) - Air Force Cross - No.287 (Ant-Aircraft Cooperation) Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944.  Born 8 October 1914 in Steveston, British Columbia. Home in Vancouver. Educated at Dawson Public School, 1922-28, King George High School, 1928-32, and King Edward High School, 1932-1933.  Employed by Cedar Door Sash and Door Company, 1934-37 (clerk), Canadian White Pine Company (1935-37; went to England to visit timber market there) and J.L. and F. Wilkinson Limited of Liverpool (1937-38; yard manager).  Enlisted in RAF, 16 August 1940; promoted to Leading Aircraftman, 16 November 1940 and posted to No.10 EFTS; subsequently posted to No.15 SFTS, 15 January 1941; commissioned 18 May 1941; posted to No.11 Group Flight, 31 May 1941; this unit was subsequently redesignated No.287 Squadron;  promoted to Flying Officer, 1 December 1941 (confirmed in rank, 18 May 1942): promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 18 May 1943. NOTE; in application for Defence Medal he stated he joined No.287 Squadron on 1 May 1941.  To No.60 OTU, 9 August 1944; to No.2 General Service Unit, 18 October 1944; to No.107 Squadron, 19 October 1944, reporting 21 October 1944. First sortie was 31 October 1944 (application for 1939-45 Star, although application for France and Germany Star gives date of first sortie as 25 November 1944 - not sure how to explain this).  Transferred to RCAF 30 January 1945 (C89555) with which force he was Mentioned in Despatches (1 January 1946).  Last sortie with unit was 26 April 1945.  Posted out of squadron, 8 July 1945.  Repatriated to Canada, 7 August 1945. In a form dated 18 July 1945 he reported that he had flown one operational tour and had flown 38 months on anti-aircraft co-operation duties.  His flying totalled 1,420 hours (116 operational in 41 sorties, 1,304 non-operational). The latter had included one year as Officer Commanding Night Flying, No.287 Squadron on anti-aircraft and searchlight cooperation duties.  Types flown had been Tiger Moth (48 hours), Oxford (464 hours), Hurricane (13 hours), Lysander (116 hours), Blenheim (46 hours), Master (61 hours), Hudson (15 hours), Defiant (442 hours), Harvard (one hour) and Mosquito (217 hours). Released 9 October 1945.  The following information from No.287 Squadron assessments indicate the nature of his work.  That dated 19 August 1942 gave his flying time as 550 hours 25 minutes (274 hours five minutes in previous six months) - "This officer has loyalty and tact. Has a good influence and an energising result on his subordinates.  This officer has been in charge of detachment of this squadron for the last 14 months, and has shown above average ability and initiative."  That dated 23 July 1943 gave flying time as 966 hours (198 hours in previous six months); he was then Flight Commander, "A" Flight - "With further service experience this officer should make an excellent Squadron Commander. A very fine type of officer, his keenness and general ability are outstanding."  That dated 14 July 1944 gave his flying time as 1,190 hours (106 hours in previous six months), still as "A" Flight Commander - "This officer has a high capacity for work and a complete knowledge of the work upon which he is employed; he is however lacking in tact to a marked degree in his handling of those in subordinate positions.  This fault must be overcome before he can be considered fit to command".  That dated 25 July 1945 (on posting from No.107 Squadron, signed by W/C W. Maher and G/C L.W.C. Bower) stated, "A reliable pilot and capable officer with a quiet manner.  Has shown marked initiative in the air, in emergency, on several occasions."  Public Record Office Air 2/9004 has citation drafted when he had flown 1,084 hours (132 in previous six months).

 

This officer has served with the squadron since May 1941. He inaugurated the detachment at Tangmere in June 1941 and subsequently acted as Commander there.  Flight Lieutenant Graeme is a keen and skilful pilot with a high capacity for hard work.  He has flown at night on Anti-Aircraft Co-Operation, some of it under adverse conditions.  Although the work has been somewhat monotonous and uninteresting he has not allowed this to affect his keenness during the time he has been engaged on this type of flying.  His enthusiasm has been a source of inspiration to other pilots.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GRAHAM, F/L Archibald Reid (13301) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.542 Squadron - awarded with effect from 12 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 March 1945. AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force.  However, Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Ardrossan, Ayrshire in 1921 and spells out no Canadian connection.

 


Flight Lieutenant Graham has taken part in numerous successful reconnaissances over Germany and Western Europe.  His keenness and determination to complete his allotted task were well demonstrated in November 1944, when he was detailed for a sortie to Leipzig and Chemnitz.  This involved flying over a very heavily defended area.  Despite the intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire encountered over his first target this officer made a second run to ensure accuracy and then pressed on to complete his mission, which he successfully accomplished although his aircraft was damaged by fire from the enemy's defences.  At all times Flight Lieutenant Graham has displayed outstanding ability and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GRAHAM, F/L John Claude (41174) - Mention in Despatches - No.269 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943.  Name variously given as John Charles and John Claude. Born in Ottawa, 1917 and educated in that city (confirmed by Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999).  Enlisted as pupil pilot in RAF, July 1938.  Notes compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (cards held by Directorate of History and Heritage, NDHQ) have him in No.269 at the very outbreak of war, flying many patrols on Anson (U-boat sighted on 29 April 1940; bombed without effect) and Hudsons (from 20 July 1940 onwards.  Attacked by Bf.109 on W/269, 8 September 1940.  After two firing passes, the Hudson escaped into cloud without damage or casualties (Norwegian coast).  No references to him after 6 December 1940.  Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) have an incomplete card for a P/O J.C. Graham (no Christian names and no service number) delivering B-17 AN537 to Britain in May 1941 and Hudson AM836 in July 1941; this may be our man.

 

GRAHAM, S/L John Claude (41174) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.206 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 March 1945.  Air Ministry Bulletin 17932/AL.986 refers.

 

This officer has a long record of outstanding courage, determination and devotion to duty. He has been engaged on operational flying since the outbreak of the war. On one occasion, as navigator, he participated in the probably destruction of an enemy submarine, and six months later he took part in another attack on a U-Boat which was badly damaged. Now on his third tour of operational duty, Squadron Leader Graham is an outstanding flight commander who, by his leadership and devotion to duty, both in the air and on the ground, has set a magnificent example to all.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9150 has recommendation dated 24 January 1945 when he had flown 247 sorties (1,168 hours out of a total of 2,084 hours in his career).  Original recommendation as follows: the attacks of 23 February and August 1940 are not mentioned in the Hitchins cards.

 


Squadron Leader J.C. Graham has been engaged on operations in Coastal Command since the outbreak of the war.  On 23rd February 1940, when a member of No.269 (General Reconnaissance) Squadron, he was the navigator of an Anson which attacked a U-Boat south of the Faeroes, which was later assessed as "probably sunk".  Again in August 1940, another U-Boat was attacked, with an assessment of "badly damaged".  On August 27th, 1942 as captain of Hudson D/269 he attacked a U-Boat southeast of Iceland, but no results were observed. Squadron Leader Graham is an outstanding officer and Flight Commander.  He has now completed 15 months of his third operational tour. He has flown 247 sorties, amounting to 1,168 operational hours. His qualities of leadership and devotion to duty are of the very highest order. His hard work in the squadron, his magnificent example in the air, and the degree to which he has contributed to the spirit of the squadron cannot be over-stressed, and the very strongest recommen­dation is hereby submitted for an award to Squadron Leader Graham of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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GRANT, F/L George Francis (42216) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.109 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 March 1942.  Born in Ottawa, 31 May 1916; educated at Lisgar Collegiate.  Father living in Toronto when award made. Commissioned in RAF, 24 June 1939; retired 20 April 1949.  AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944 (announcing DSO) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945 (reporting his Bar to his DSO) also described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 6484 refers.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Records Office Air 2/9262 has recommendation dated 9 January 1942 stating he had flown 33 sorties (100 hours 25 minutes).  "Trinity" appears to operational trials of "Oboe".

 

7 Nov 40           Cherbourg

11 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     10 Apr 41         Cherbourg

14 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     21 Apr 41         Cherbourg

19 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     22 Apr 41         Cherbourg

20 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     26 Apr 41         Cherbourg

23 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     3 May 41           Cherbourg

26 Nov 40         Cherbourg                                     4 May 41           Cherbourg

20 Feb 41         Cherbourg                                     6 May 41           Cherbourg

23 Feb 41         Cherbourg                                     8 May 41           Cherbourg

10 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     10 May 41        Cherbourg

11 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     11 May 41        Cherbourg

13 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     17 May 41        Cherbourg

18 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     15 June 41       Cherbourg

19 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     10 Oct 41          Lorient

20 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     7 Dec 41           "Trinity"

30 Mar 41         Cherbourg                                     12 Dec 41        "Trinity"

6 Apr 41            Cherbourg                                     15 Dec 41        "Trinity"

 

Flight Lieutenant Grant has been a member of this unit for the past 18 months. During this time he has carried out 100 flights under all conditions of weather in connection with Radio Counter Measures.  In addition, he has done the 33 operational flights, some of which involved attacking along a beam in the face of heavy anti-aircraft opposition.  He has displayed considerable courage and his keenness to attack at all times has been most commendable.

 

To the above the Group Captain commanding No.80 Wing (E.B. Addison) comments:


This officer has set a very fine example by the courageous and enthusiastic manner in which he has performed the difficult task of "beam-edge" flying during the recent Trinity offensive. This task, demanding as it does intense application, he successfully carried out in the face of very accurate and intense gun fire.

 

During the past 18 months he has been a leading spirit in the difficult and often dangerous task of investigating from the air the enemy's radio activities, and he has carried out a number of attacks on the beam transmitting stations used by the enemy for raids on this country.  His highly developed and unselfish sense of duty coupled with high courage in face of danger have enabled his technical abilities to be put to very valuable use in his work connected with certain vitally important radio counter-measure operations.

 

These were finally combined into a citation put before the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee; a memo dated 11 March 1942 explicitely described the citation as "most secret and must not be published under any circumstances."

 

During the past 18 months, this officer has carried out 100 flights, in all conditions of weather, in connection with radio counter-measures and other operational sorties.  Flight Lieutenant Grant has set a very fine example by the courageous and enthusiastic manner in which he has performed the difficult task of "beam-edge" flying during the recent "Trinity" operations.  The task, demanding intense application, he carried out successfully in the face of accurate and intense enemy gun-fire.  Flight Lieutenant Grant has taken a leading part in the difficult and often dangerous task of investigating, from the air, the enemy's radio activities; he has also carried on attacks on the beam transmitting stations used for raids on this country.  His services in connection with certain vitally important radio counter-measure operations have been of the highest value.

 

GRANT, W/C George Francis, DFC (42216) - Distinguished Service Order - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 November 1943.  Air Ministry Bulletin 12026/AL.6­99 refers.

 

Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has undertaken many sorties covering a wide range of targets. His unswerving devotion to duty, fortitude and tenacity were amply demonstrated on one occasion when he attacked Bochum in the face of difficult circumstances. Wing Commander Grant is an outstanding leader whose great skill and devotion to duty have inspired all.

 

GRANT, G/C George Francis (42216) - Bar to Distinguished Service Order - No.109 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945.  Commanding a station (hence rank) when gazetted.

 


Group Captain Grant has been in command of his squadron since May 1944. He has displayed great powers of leadership and has been largely responsible for the successful operations completed by his squadron.  During his long operational career this officer has displayed the greatest enthusiasm and determination and by his untiring efforts and splendid example the squadron has attained a high standard of skill and accuracy.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GRANT, F/O John Ritchie (40220) - Mention in Despatches - No.57 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941.  See Trinty College School: Old Boys at War (Port Hope, 1948). Born in Halifax, 13 January 1915.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 24 October 1937. Served with No.57 Squadron from September 1939 to 2 November 1940 (many sorties listed on cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins). Instructed in Canada, June 1941 to June 1943;  Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) confirm his Canadian birth and give his home as Kingston, Ontario; delivered Mitchell FR165 to Britain, July 1943.  Killed in action, 15 May 1944 with No.115 Squadron.

 

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GRASSICK, F/L Robert Davidson (41579) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.242 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1941. Born in London, Ontario, 22 May 1917; home there.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 January 1939.  An original member of No.242 Squadron, serving with that unit from 5 November 1939 to 28 September 1941. Victories recorded by Chris Shores (Aces High, 2nd edition) as follows: 15 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed while attached to No.607 Squadron; 16 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Ju.88 destroyed while attached to No.607 or No.615 Squadron (Shores notes that the Ju.88 may have been a Blenheim of No.59 Squadron); 23 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed and one Bf.109 damaged; 29 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed; 31 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed; 1 April 1941, one Ju.88 destroyed (shared with another pilot); 10/11 May 1941, one He.111 probably destroyed; 17 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one probably destroyed; 23 June 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed plus one damaged. Subsequently posted to Middle East, serving at No.73 OTU, Aden until February 1942.  Attended Middle East Air Fighting School in March 1942 before joining No.260 Squadron.   Posted in June 1942 to Communications Flight at Eastleigh, East Africa.  In January 1943 he became a test pilot and flying control officer at Kisuma; returned to Eastleigh as test pilot, July 1943.  Posted to No.216 Group, February 1944; to No.2 ADU, 11 June 1944; to No.216 Squadron, 15 February 1945. Transferred to RCAF, 1 May 1945 (C94024) while stationed in Cairo, Egypt. Repatriated to Canada, 9 July 1945 and released in September 1946.  Died approximately 1978.   See H.A. Halliday, 242 Squadron: The Canadian Years (Canada's Wings, 1981).  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 4508 refers.

 

This officer has been a member of the squadron since its formation.  He has displayed an indomitable spirit and has proved himself to be a first-class section leader. Flight Lieutenant Grassick has destroyed at least six enemy aircraft.


NOTE: In a form dated 6 June 1945 he claimed to have flown two tours, 340 sorties (440 operational hours) plus 1,350 non-operational hours. The types are diverse and not broken down well: Moths and Harvards (150 hours); Hurricanes, Spitfires, Kittyhawks (620), Harvard, Master and Thunderbolt (100), Oxford, Anson, DH.89, Blenheim, Boston (330), Baltimore, Beaufighter and Mosquito (310), Wellington and Dakota (230), miscellaneous small types (70).

 

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GREEN, P/O John Henry (42748) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.49 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 January 1941.  Born in Vancouver, 30 May 1918.  Educated at Alberni District High School.  Father worked at Allison Logging Company, Cumshews Inlet, Queen Charlotte Islands.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 October 1939.  First mentioned in No.49 Squadron Operational Record Book, 13 October 1940 when it was reported he ceased to be attached to Finningly; first raid reported 16/17 October 1940 (but see below).  Missing (POW), 10/11 February 1941.  Killed 17 September 1947 as a Flight Lieutenant when his Spitfire crashed in sea near Bournemouth.  Air Ministry Bulletin 2784 refers.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Records Office Air 2/9250 (Non-Immediate Awards, Bomber Command, November 1940) has recommendation dated 28 November 1940.

 

This Canadian officer joined his squadron on 12th October 1940, and carried out his first operation, as a First Pilot, on 16th October.  On this occasion he flew through extremely difficult weather conditions and was one of four out of twelve aircraft to locate and attack enemy submarines at Bordeaux.

 

On 20th November this officer was captain of an aircraft detailed to bomb the Skoda works in Czechoslovakia which he attacked successfully from 1,500 feet causing fires and explosions.

 

Pilot Officer Green's work as an operational pilot has been outstanding and his enthusiasm, skill and courage have been a source of inspiration to the newly joined flying personnel in his squadron.

 

He has completed a total of ten operational flights against the enemy during the course of which he has completed 77 hours flying as a first pilot.

 

Air 2/9251 has a more refined draft of the citation, prepared for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 


This officer has completed ten operational missions since October 1940, during the course of which he has flown 77 hours as first pilot.  On one occasion he flew through extremely difficult weather conditions to locate and attack enemy submarines at Bordeaux. On 20th November, 1940 he was captain of an aircraft which successfully attacked the Skoda Works from a height of 1,500 feet, causing fires and explosions.  Pilot Officer Green's work has been outstanding and his enthusiasm, skill and courage have set a fine example.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

GREENBURGH, F/O Louis (49803) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.514 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 March 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 14 March 1916; enlisted in RAF, 21 July 1937 as 2nd Class Aircraft Hand General Duties (mechanic, service number 542422) and posted to RAF Depot, Henlow; to Station Manston, 22 October 1937; to No.3 School of Technical Training, Manston, 2 September 1938 (remustered to Aircraft Hand/Fitter Mechanic/Rigger on same day); to No.3 Wing, St.Athan, 1 November 1938; remustered as Fitter/Mechanic Group 2 and reclassified Aircraftman 2nd Class, 13 July 1939; to No.37 Squadron, 21 July 1939; reclassified Aircraftman 1st Class, 1 December 1939; to No.242 Squadron, 20 March 1940; to No.215 Squadron, 10 April 1940; to No.11 OTU, 18 May 1940; remustered Fitter/Mechanic (Engines), 21 November 1940; reclassified Leading Aircraftman, 1 February 1941; to Aircrew Reception Centre, Regents Park, 25 August 1941; (remustered as Fitter/Mechanic Engines under Pilot Training on same date); to No.13 Initial Training Wing, 27 September 1941; remustered as Pilot Under Training, Group 2, 13 November 1941; assigned to Special Duty List (United States), ATTS (whatever that means), 24 January 1942; Station Moncton, 12 February 1942; No.6 Basic Flying Training School, Ponca City, 10 March 1942; to No.31 Personnel Depot, Moncton at uncertain date but likely about date he was commissioned as Pilot Officer (25 September 1942); to No.7 Personnel Reception Centre, 11 December 1942; to No.6 (P) Advanced Flying Unit, 16 March 1943; promoted to Flying Officer on Probation, 25 March 1943 (confirmed in appointment at uncertain date); to No.12 OTU, 1 June 1943;  No.1651 Conversion Unit, 2 September 1943; No.620 Squadron, 1 October 1943; No.1678 Conversion Flight, 16 November 1943; No.514 Squadron, 12 December 1943; reported missing, 29 December 1943; reported safe in United Kingdom, 8 June 1944 (NOTE: the Record of Service may have a typographical error regarding the date he went missing as he may also have been reported missing on 8 June 1944, reported safe at uncertain date); to No.1 Personnel Holding Unit, 14 August 1944; to Headquarters, Transport Command, 12 September 1944; to No.1332 Heavy Conversion Unit, 16 September 1944; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 25 September 1944; transferred to RCAF, 14 May 1945 (C94043); repatriated 8 May 1946; released 1 June 1946.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 confirms identity as Canadian airman in the RAF (January 1940).  AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945 (announcing the Bar to his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force.  Air Ministry Bulletin 13190/AL.773 refers.  Biography published by his son, titled DFC and Bar.

 


This officer was pilot of an aircraft which attacked Berlin on a recent occasion. During the operation the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and sustained damage. Some petrol was lost but in spite of this Flying Officer Greenburgh went on to make a successful attack. Before reaching England on the return flight the petrol supply became exhausted. Flying Officer Greenburgh brought his aircraft safely down on to the sea, however, and he and his crew got safely aboard the dinghy, from which they were rescued the following morning. Whilst they were adrift, Flying Officer Greenburgh did everything possible to cheer his crew, all of whom suffered severely through being buffeted by the heavy seas.  Since then this officer has made two more attacks on the German capital, pressing home his attacks with his usual thoroughness.

 

GREENBURGH, F/O Louis (49803) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.514 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 October 1944.

 

This officer has displayed the highest standard of skill, bravery and fortitude in air operations.

 

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GREENSLADE, F/O William Roy (45202) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1941. Born in Canada, 1917; enlisted in RAF as aircraft apprentice, 1933; trained as an NCO pilot in Middle East, 1936-1938 (service number 566673); commissioned 10 January 1941 with seniority from 1 January 1941.  Killed in action with No.149 Squadron, 2 October 1942.  AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of AFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF, as did AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942 (reporting DFC award), AFRO 1870/42 dated 20 November 1942 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943 (confirming his death).

 

GREENSLADE, F/L William Roy (45202) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.

 

GREENSLADE, S/L William Roy (45202) - Air Force Cross - No.21 OTU - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. Public Records Office has citation as presented to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee; rank given as Flight Lieutenant when recommended.

 

At present Flight Lieutenant Greenslade is flight commander in the Navigation Flight and performs his duties with great efficiency. During his period of instructing he has performed over 1,000 landings with pupils without any serious mishap. During the past six months, Flight Lieutenant Greenslade has performed 256 hours flying by day and 102 hours by night.

 

GREENSLADE, S/L William Roy (45202) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.149 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 August 1942.  Air Ministry Bulletin 7848 refers.

 


One night in July 1942 this officer was captain of an aircraft detailed to attack Hamburg. Whilst over the target the aircraft was held in the beams of searchlights and subjected to heavy anti-aircraft fire. One engine was put out of action and the astro hatch shattered. In spite of this Flight Lieutenant Greenslade pressed home his attack. On the return flight searchlight positions and gun emplacements were machine-gunned from a low level. This officer, who invariably completes his operational tasks with skill and determination, displayed great devotion to duty throughout.

 

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GRIFFIN, F/L William Mackenzie Roderick (70267) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Born in Toronto, 9 November 1909; his uncle was Count Jacques de Lessups. In RCAF (C402), 25 June 1928 until 1 April 1931 (attended RMC and took training at Camp Borden as a Provisional Pilot Officer, 25 June to 31 August 1928, 24 June to 28 August 1929 and 23 June 1930 to 1 April 1931 when he resigned his commission. He was placed on Reserve of Officers but resigned from that as well on 26 June 1933.  Applied for a Permanent Commission in the RAF in 1932 but failed to gain admission, apparently because the Canadian quota of two a year was filled, at which point he inquired about Short Service Commissions (27 December 1932). Although Air Ministry Bulletin 8639 says he was later in Royal Armoured Corps, he was commissioned in RAFO as of late 1933 or early 1934 (or was it 1941 as AMB 8639 suggests ?).  Killed in action, 26 November 1942. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF, as did AFRO 84/43 dated 22 January 1943 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 1522/43 dated 6 August 1943 (reporting him as being killed).

 

GRIFFIN, F/L William Mackenzie Roderick (70267) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.268 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 December 1942.  Air Ministry Bulletin 8639 refers.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/9606 has a citation; subsequently published in Air Ministry Bulletin 8639.

 

This officer has had a varied operational career. He has led many sea level reconnaissances in every type of weather, and covering the entire length of the Dutch coastline. These operations have involved extremely accurate navigation and flying skill, and have resulted in much valuable enemy shipping information being obtained. He has also led two attacks on shipping and locomotives over Northern Holland. This officer's courage, leadership and flying skill have been beyond praise.

 

NOTE: Hamilton Spectator of 9 March 1943 wrote of him as:

 

...one of the Army Co-Operation Command's most skilful reconnaissance pilots. An aggressive fighting man who turned to the air when he found life as a soldier in the army too dull, Griffin made a specialty in his varied flying career of low-level spotting of enemy vessels which slink along the coast of occupied Europe in foul weather.

 

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GRIFFITHS, W/C John Francis (24037) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.99 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 January 1940.  Born in Stamford City (now part of Niagara Falls, Ontario), 21 July 1905; attended Royal Military College, 1924-1926, while taking flying training at Camp Borden as a Provisional Pilot Officer (C403).  He was at Borden 17 June to 3 September 1924, 17 June to 29 August 1925, and 28 June to 31 August 1926, on which latter date he qualified for his flying badge and graduated fifth in his class.  DHist card indicates that at completion of Camp Borden courses he had flown 29 hours 45 minutes dual, 31 hours 25 minutes solo, of which all but 20 minutes had been on Avro 504K machines. e then accepted a commission in the RAF. Graded as Pilot Officer on Probation, 3 December 1926; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 3 June 1927 with seniority from 3 December 1925; an undated RCAF press release states that he celebrated his commissioning "by doing a loop over the Tower Bridge in Lindon" (highly unlikely).  Promoted to Flying Officer, 3 June 1928; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 5 November 1930; Squadron Leader, 1937; Acting Wing Commander, 28 September 1939; Group Captain, 1 June 1940.  His postings before the war were: Digby (February 1927, training on Bristol Fighters); to No.13 Army Cooperation Squadron (May 1927);India (February 1928; he joined No.28 Squadron, and remained at Ambala until June 1930 when he became Adjutant of the Aircraft Park, Lahore; next joined No.31 Squadron at Quetta, 1931): returned to Britain in 1932 (six-month Russian language course at King's College); Tallin, Esthonia (remained until 1934); Britain to help form No.22 Squadron (torpedo bombers); Ethiopia (1935); Malta (until August 1936) and back to Scotland.  With No.99 Squadron from outbreak of war to 15 June 1940; with No.311 (Czech) Squadron, 15 June to 15 November 1940. In early 1941 he was attached to Ferry Command, delivering two Liberators to Britain (AM918 in May 1941 and AL525 in October 1941). Numerous staff appointments and commands during war; the RCAF press release says they included service in the United States test flying American aircraft intended for Britain (it is not clear whether this included type evuation or mere acceptance flights on machines coming off production lines).  Killed in a road accident, 9 May 1945.  The citation refers to an operation on 14 December 1939 - the least disastrous of daylight Wellington penetrations of German North Sea airspace.  This award, together with P/O Selby R. Henderson's DFC (gazetted the same day) constitute the first Canadian gallantry decorations of the Second World War.  Air Ministry Bulletin 276 refers.  See also Epic Deeds of the RAF. pp.14-15.

 

During December 1939, in spite of adverse weather and strong enemy opposition by anti-aircraft guns and enemy fighters, this officer led his squadron of twelve aircraft and carried out a successful reconnaissance over strong naval enemy forces. The determination with which he pressed home this reconnaissance enabled him to bring back information of vital importance. In the course of this operation his formation accounted for no less than five enemy aircraft. By his personal example and thoroughness he has been largely instrumental in maintaining his unit's high standard of efficiency.

 

NOTE: The Air Officer Commanding No.3 Group recommended Griffiths for an immediate DFC on 17 December 1939 (Public Record Office Air 2/4094).  The text of the recommendation bears comparison with the final text:

 


In connection with the operations carried out by No.99 Squadron on the 14th December 1939 over the Schilling Roads, I have the honour to make the following recommendation for an award to the officer mentioned above, who was leading the squadron:-

 

For his courage and keen devotion to duty in the face of the enemy.

 

In spite of adverse weather and strong enemy opposition by anti-aircraft guns and enemy fighters, he led his squadron of twelve aircraft, and carried out a successful reconnaissance over strong naval enemy forces in the Schilling Roads.

 

The determination with which he pressed home this reconnaissance enabled him to bring back information of vital importance.

 

In the course of this operation his formation accounted for no less than five enemy aircraft. Almost throughout the entire engagement he kept a most accurate log of the various incidents, which has formed the basis of most useful information with regard to enemy tactics, and has enabled action to be taken to counter these in future operations.

 

By his personal example and thoroughness he has been largely instrumental in maintaining his unit's high stand dard of efficiency.

 

GRIFFITHS, W/C John Francis (24037) - Mention in Despatches - authority and date uncertain.

 

GRIFFITHS, W/C John Francis (24037) - Czech Military Cross of 1939 - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 January 1941, "in recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war."

 

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GRINDLAY, F/L Glen Edward (75693) - Member, Order of the British Empire - No.25 OTU - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Born 20 May 1912.  From Vancouver.  Pupil Pilot with RAF, 8 August to 20 September 1939; granted emergency commission as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 5 November 1939; graded as Pilot Officer on Probation, 17 December 1939; confirmd in rank and promoted Flying Officer, 17 December 1940; Acting Flight Lieuteant, 1 November 1941; confrmed as Flight Lieuteannt, 17 December 1941; Acting Squadron leader, 1 March 1943; rlinquished Acting Squadron leader, 1 April 1944; transferred to RCAF 23 April 1945 (C94025).  At Gunnery School, Manby, 4 November to 4 December 1939; OTU course at Heyford, 4 December 1939 to 3 January 1940; with No.44 Squadron, Waddington, 14 March 1940 to 4 May (Flight and Squadron Gunnery Leader); No.25 OTU, Warmwell, 5 May 1941 5 February 1942; at Parnell, July and August 1941 (groud school, Frazer-Nash turrets); posted to Canada in March 1942; with AFHQ, March 1942 writing gunnery syllabus; No.4 Training Command, April-May 1942 (lecture tour); No.8 BGS, Lethbridge, August 1942 to March 1944; returned to England, April 1944; with No.14 OTU, 16 May to 23 Aigust 1944; served with No.189 Sqadron, 18 March to 27 April 1945.  1943; Assigned to Canada, he was taken on strength of RCAF Headquarters on 6 February 1942 and to No.8 Bombing and Gunery School on 22 February 1942; promoted to Squaron Leader, 1 March 1943; to No.31 Personnel Depot (Moncton) on 30 March 1944 and returned to Britain on 10 April 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 23 April 1945 (C94025, later 20498) and repatriated to Canada on 30 August 1946.  Reverted to Flight Lieutenant on 1 October 1946 but regained Squadron Leader rank on 1 June 1949; remustered from Gunnery Officer to pilot on 21 June 1948.  Career centred upon Training Command stations. Released from the RCAF on 5 November 1959.  Died in London, Ontario, 18 September 1992. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of MBE) confirms that he was a Canadian in the RAF, although it indicates he was then on the strength of RCAF Headquarters in Ottawa.   Public Records Office Air 2/8910 has recommendation as submitted to Air Ministry Honour and Awards Committee.

 

This officer has been in charge of air gunnery at No.25 Operational Training Unit and by his initiative, original thinking and hard work he built up this section in an exceptionally efficient manner. His complete knowledge of air gunnery, coupled with his energy and operational experience have resulted in a very high standard of gunnery instruction at the station.

 

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GUY, Sergeant Wilfred Francis (798562) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.97 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 19 May 1943.  From Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland. Enlisted 10 September 1940; left that colony on 12 September 1940; graduated as Wireless Air Gunner under BCATP, 26 May 1941; left for United Kingdom, 18 June 1941; demobilized as a Pilot Officer (171285), 24 November 1946.  See Kerri Button, The Forgotten Years: The Formation of the 125th (Newfoundland) Squadron, Royal Air Force, 1938-1941 (university paper, institution not mentioned; copy held by National Aviation Museum). His identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). Citation published in Flight, 24 June 1943.

 

This airman has completed numerous operational sorties over such strongly defended targets as Berlin and Essen. He has also flown as Wireless Operator/Air Gunner on long range attacks on Gyndia and Italian industrial centres.

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/8951, drafted 26 March 1943, in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000); when recommended he had flown 35 sorties (203 hours 20 minutes):

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer has completed many successful sorties as rear gunner and as Wireless Operator. His targets have included Essen, Berlin and many other heavily defended German targets. He has also taken part in long rage attacks on Gyndia and Italian towns.  Sergeant Guy's courage and devotion to duty have been an example to all.

 

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HALLEY, F/L Leonard Joseph (156622) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.115 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1944.  Born 1913 at Petty Harbour, Newfoundland.  Home in Montreal, Quebec.  Educated at Roman Catholic schools (Petty Harbour), St.Bonaventure College (St.John's), St.Mary's College (Halifax), University College (Dublin).  Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 lists him as a Newfoundlader in the RAF; enlisted 4 October 1941 (1492521). Served in the ranks; trained in Canada; demobilized as a Flight Lieutenant, 4 August 1948.  His identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969).  Air Ministry Bulletin 12543/AL.793 refers.

 

This officer has participated in very many sorties against targets in Germany, including nine attacks on Berlin.  On one occasion, when detailed to attack the German capital, the mid-upper and rear turrets became unserviceable before reaching the enemy coast.  Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Halley went on to this strongly defended target and bombed t.  His action was typical of the determina­tion he has shown to make every sortie a success.

 

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HARNETT, F/L Thomas Patrick (41347) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.33 Service Flying Training School, Carberry, Manitoba - Awarded  as per London Gazette dated 16 April 1943 AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943.  Born in Moncton, New Brunswick, 30 April 1917.  Enlisted in RCAF, 3 January 1938 as P/P/O (C799) and trained at Trenton.  Awarded wings 18 October 1938.  Resigned RCAF commission on acceptance of RAF commission, 5 November 1938.  Attended refreser course at 11 FTS, RAF Shawbury, November-December 1938.  Flew in Battle of Britain, No.19 Squadron, November 1939 to Deceber 1940; staff pilot, No.10 SFTS, Cranfieeld, December 1940; to Canada, January 1941; joined No.33 SFTS, Carberry, February 1941 (staff pilot, examining officer, instructor and flight commander).  To General Reconnaissance School, Chlottetown, February-May 1943; en route to Britain, 26 May to 3 June 1943; No.120 Squadron, Iceland, August to November 1943 (supernuerary); No.7 (C) OTU, November 1943 to Januay 1944 (conversion); No.4 (C) OTU, Chief Instructor, January to August 1944. AFRO 751/41 dated 27 June 1941 reported his promotion to Flight Lieutenant while with an RAF school in Canada; AFRO 1401/43 dated 23 July 1943 reported his promotion to Squadron Leader, effective 1 July 1943, and still in Canada. Posted back to Britain at uncertain date. Transferred to RCAF, 7 November 1943 (regaining C798 number) while in London.  Subsequently flew with (and commanded with rank of Wing Commander) No.435 Squadron, Burma, for which he was awarded the DFC; see RCAF awards data base for DFC citation. Repatriated to Canada, 13 Nivember 1945; on staff of Northwst Air Command for some months; retired 6 November 1948. Governor General's Records (RG.7 Group 26 Volume 57, file 190-I, dossier 2) has citation for Commendation.

 


During the time Flight Lieutenant Harnett has been at this Station he has carried out the duties of a Flying Instructor, Flight Commander and Examining Officer most efficiently and has assumed the duties of his Squadron Commander in the latter's absence.  He has shown marked enthusiasm and devotion to duty at all times.  He has completed 1,492 flying hours of which 921 are instructional given over a period of approximately two years.

 

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HARPER, F/L Clifton Watt (42221) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.113 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 April 1942.  Born at Snow Road, Ontario, 1915; home in Brighton, Ontario.  Educated at Brighton and Peterborough, Ontario.  Enlisted as signaller, Northumberland Fusiliers (Canadian Militia), 1932. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation,  10 June 1939.  Reported in No.34 Squadron (23 December 1941).  Later to No.113 Squadron.  Killed with that unit in Far East, 18 June 1942, while holding rank of Squadron Leader. London Gazette has no citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Citation published in Flight, 23 April 1942 and in RAF Quarterly, September 1942.  AFRO 649/42 dated 1 May 1942 (announcing DFC) and AFRO 1189/42 dated 31 July 1942 reporting him missing) identify him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 6598 (found in DHist file 181.009 D.3053, RG.24 Volume 20634) refers and is the source of the following which is also in Public Record Office Air 2/8754:

 

For the past five months this officer has been engaged on operational flying in Blenheim aircraft and throughout he has shown the greatest determination,  He has carried out several long and dangerous low level bombing and machine gunning attacks, some of them at night.  On one occasion despite intense anti-aircraft fire and searchlight activity he made four runs over Benghazi harbour at a height of twenty feet in a determined attempt to bomb an enemy ship.  His keenness and courage have proved a source of inspiration.

 

NOTE: DHist cards give a slightly different account from AFRO 649/42; this version is also one appearing elsewhere in Public Record Office Air 2/8754, which variously identifies his unit as No.113 and No.133 Squadron (it is No.113 Squadron).

 

This officer has carried out several long and dangerous low level bombing and machine gunning attacks, some of them at night.  On one occasion in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire and searchlight activity he made four runs over Benghazi harbour at a height of twenty feet in a determined attempt to bomb an enemy ship.  His keenness and courage have proved a source of inspiration.

 

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HARPER, Corporal Hubert Painting (622165) - Mention in Despatches - No.72 Operational Training Unit - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Also published in AFRO 1000/1001/42 where name is spelled "Hyaper".  Although identified as a Canadian in lists of Canadians in RAF (DHist files 181.005 D.270 and 181.005 D.271), his next of kin (father) is described as living in England.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, gave his birth as 22 April 1911 in Toronto and identified the unit associated with his award.  As of June 1941, AC.1 Harper (his rank at the time) was a Fitter with No.35 Squadron. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

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HARPER, P/O Robert Howard (41177) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.206 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1940 (fourth Canadian decorated).  Born in Scott, Saskatchewan, 17 August 1915.  Father living in Bassano, Alberta.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 17 September 1938. Served in No.206 Squadron, 1 September 1939 to 2 August 1940 with S.R. Henderson.  Many sorties recorded in CAN/RAF cards including engagement with German seaplanes, 8 November 1939.  Promoted to Flying Officer, 3 September 1940, to Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941 (AFRO 1129/41 dated 3 October 1941 reported his promotion from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant while with an RAF Special School in Canada), and Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944.  Lost over sea, 12 December 1944; name on Runneymede Memorial.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  AFRO 873/45 dated 25 May 1945 (reporting his death) identifies him as a Canadian in the Royal Air Force.  Air Ministry Bulletin 396 refers.

 

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HARRIS, S/L Charles Edwin (37878) - Mention in Despatches - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Born in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, 20 September 1911; home in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.  Educated at Tower Road School (Halifax), King's Collegiate (Windsor, 1922-28), Dalhousie University (1928-30, no degree).  Took civilian pilot's license at Halifax airport, 1931-32.  Reported to Civil Flying School, Filton, 4 May 1936; appointed Pilot Officer on Probation and reported to Uxbridge, 28 June 1936; posted to No.101 Squadron, Bicester, 7 July 1936; to No.90 Squadron, Bicester, 15 April 1937; attached Manston on navigation course, 10 October 1938; returned to No.90 Squadron and was a Flying Officer (Flight Commander) at West Raynham on 3 September 1939.  Posted to No.17 OTU, Upwood on its formation in November 1939; posted to No.18 Squadron, Great Massingham, 15 September 1940 (Flight Lieutenant).  Crashed on operations, 28 November 1940.  Reported to No.3 AONS, Bobbington, May 1941 for instructional duties; posted to No.88 Squadron, Ottlebridge, 15 August 1941 as Squadron Leader and Flight Commander; Acting Wing Commander and Commanding Officer of No.88 Squadron, 13 November 1941; posted to General Headquarters, Home Forces, June 1942 (reverting to Squadron Leader); to No.22 OTU, Wellesbourne, 25 September 1942 (crewing up); to No.1659 Heavy Conversion Unit, Topcliffe, 10 April 1943 (heavy conversion, still a Squadron Leader);  to No.405 Squadron, Gransden Lodge, 25 April 1943 (Squadron Leader and Flight Commander); posted to No.419 Squadron, Middleton-St.George, 15 May 1943; promoted to Wing Commander and given command of No.434 Squadron, Tholthorpe, 3 July 1943; posted to No.82 OTU, Ossington, 10 March 1944 (reverting to Squadron Leader to be Flight Comander); to No.22 OTU, Gaydon, 7 March 1945 (to command with rank of Wing Commander); to No. 1659 Heavy Conversion Unit, Topcliffe, July 1945 (Chief Flying Instructor); to No.433 Squadron, Skipton, to command, 13 September 1945.  London Gazette gived earlier confirmed promotions as follows: Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1940 (although he held acting rank earlier); Squadron Leader, 1 December 1941 (although he was in acting rank in August 1941); Acting Wing Commander as of 13 November 1941.  With No.18 Squadron, 22 November to 29 November 1940 (injured). With No.405 Squadron (unknown date to 6 May 1943), No.419 Squadron (6 May 1943 to 15 June 1943 as OC, "A" Flight) and No.434 Squadron (15 June 1943 to 7 February 1944, CO, posted).  AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944 (announcing his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Transferred to RCAF, 19 December 1944 (C89525). Remained in postwar RCAF (service number 26518), reverting to Squadron Leader on 1 October 1946; major postings as follows: Station Goose Bay, 25 September to 10 December 1946; Eastern Air Command, Halifax, 11 December 1946 to 18 March 1947; RCAF Staff College, Toronto, 19 March to 20 September 1947; No.413 (Photo) Sqadron, Rocklciffe, 21 September to 20 October 1947; No.9 (Transort) Group, Rockclffe, 21 October 1947 to 1 July 1948 (formation renamed Air Transport Command during his posting); RCAF Detachment Churchill, 2 July 1948 to 22 August 1950; Northwest Air Command Headquarters, Edmonton, 23 August 1950 to 31 July 1951; No.121 "K" Flight, Sea Island, 1-31 August 1951; Air Defence Command, St.Hubert, 1 September to 10 December 1951; Station North Bay, 11 December 1951 to 30 September 1952; No.5 Ground Observer Corps Unit, North Bay, 1 November 1952 to 17 Aril 1955; Air Defence Command Headquarters, St.Hubert, 18 April 1955 to retirement on 25 December 1958.  Died in Chester, Nova Scotia, 23 August 1973.  No citation.

 

HARRIS, W/C Charles Edwin (37878) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14007/AL.805 refers.

 

This officer has completed many successful operations against the enemy in which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9149 has recommendation dated 28 January 1944, stating that he had flown 23 sorties on first tour and nine on second tour, and giving operational time as 142 hours 35 minutes.  Although ORB notes transcribed by W/C F.H. Hitchins state that Harris suffered a severe Blenheim crash on 28/29 November 1940, the PRO document describes his first tour as follows:

 

September 1939                   Sea sweeps, Blenheims                                      5 sorties (15.15)

 

Sept-Nov 1940                      Low levels to France,                                           4 sorties

severely injured in crash                                       (20.30)

landing at night, 15 Nov 40.

 

July 1941                                Sea sweeps, attacks on Dutch                           10 sorties

coast, shipping, France,                                      (31.05)

5,000 ton tanker sunk; flak

sustained; cree members

killed and wounded.


Sept 41-June 1942               Sea sweeps, convoy attacks,                              three sorties

(Boston aircraft), attacked                                   (12.30)

by FW.190.

 

                                                             Second Tour

 

12 Feb 42          Orleans (4.05)  Given the date, listing this is as part of his second tour is     very odd and suggests a typing error in the form.

26 Apr 43           Duisburg (5.20)                 11 June 43      Dusseldorf (5.20, hit by flak)

4 May 43            Dortmund (6.30)               5 Sept 43        Mannheim (7.55)

23 May 43          Dortmund (5.25)               25 Nov 43       Frankfurt (8.15)

27 May 43          Essen (5.15)                     8 Dec 43         Milan (9.30, hit by flak)

 

This officer has a long record of operations dating from the earliest operations of the present war and interrupted only by a period in hospital recovering from a serious crash after an operational flight.  He has carried out operations in Blenheims, Wellingtons, Bostons and Halifax aircraft and in addition to convoy work and sea sweeps has bombed some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany such as Duisburg, Essen, Dusseldorf, Mannheim and Frankfurt.

 

As a member of a squadron, a flight commander and now as a squadron commander he has exhibited a devotion to duty and energy which has been a source of strength and inspiration to his squadrons.  His courage and tenacity of purpose in the face of enemy opposition is amply illustrated in his record and I consider that his flying and aggressive spirit are distinguished.  It is recommended that he be considered for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

HARRIS, W/C Charles Edwin (37878) - Mention in Despatches - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1946.

 

NOTE: In a form dated 3 January 1946 he reported having flown two opeational and three non-operational tours; he had logged 560 operational hours and 1,330 non-operational hours (total of 1,890).  He claimed 56 sorties and reported he had sunk one 5,000-ton tanker.  The types flown were as follows: Hind, Overstrand and Anson (300 hours), Blenheim (800), Boston (260), Halifax (300) and Wellington (230).

 

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HARRISON, W/C Graeme Elliott (37012) - Siver Star (United States) - No.149 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1943.  Born in Waterford, Ontario, 1915.  Educated at Northcliffe House, Bognor, Kings School (Ely) and Chelsea Polytechnical; Commonwealth War Graves Commission records him as "son of Leonard and E. Mary Harrison, Rustington, Sussex" so his Canadian connections must have been tenuous.  Commissioned 1938; Wing Commander, 1942; Commanding No.149 Squadron, 1943.  Killed in action at Arnhem on No.190 Squadron (Stirlings).  Public Record Office Air 2/9599 has citation as it appeared in Eighth Air Force General Order No.104 dated 16 July 1943.

 

For gallantry in action while leading his Heavy Bombardment Squadron on eleven highly successful raids over enemy occupied Europe.  The excellent results achieved on each of these missions, which were flown against fierce enemy opposition, are a tribute to Wing Commander Harrison's courage, skill and outstanding qualities of leadership.  His gallantry on all occasions serves as an example for all members of his command and reflects the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of His Majesty's government.

 

HARRISON, W/C Graeme Elliott (37012) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1944.  No citation other than that he had "completed many successful operations against the enemy, in which (he has) displayed high skill, fortitude, and devotion to duty.  Air Ministry Bulletin 13588/AL.769 refers.

 

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HARRISON, G/C Henry Willesly (40910) - Distinguished Flying Cross (Greece) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942.  Although Allison says he was born Fort Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Gillingham, Kent.  However, they added, "It appears from his record that Group Captain Harrison resided in Fort Qu'Appelle during the 1920s/1930s".  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 July 1938.  Served in No.33 and 112 Squadrons in Mediterranean.  Later instructed in South Africa and Canada.  No details of decoration.

 

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HART, S/L John Stewart (41696) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.112 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 June 1945. Born in Sackville, New Brunswick, 1916.  Learned to fly at Halifax Flying Club while attending Mount Allison University, 1936-1938.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 4 March 1939.  Originally flew Lysanders on anti-invasion patrols.  Flew in Battle of Britain with No.602 Squadron (see cards for victories) and then to No.91 Squadron.  To India, August 1942.  See Wings Abroad 14 July 1943.  Air Ministry Bulletin 19055/AL.1043 refers.

 


This officer has participated in a large number of varied sorties, including many attacks on heavily defended targets such as road and rail bridges, gun positions, strong points and mechanical transport.  Throughout he has displayed skilful leadership, great determination and devotion to duty.  In April 1945, Squadron Leader Hart took part in an armed reconnaissance during which eleven locomotives were successfully attacked.  Some days later Squadron Leader Hart participated in another sortie during which a number of locomotives and trucks were most effectively attacked.  This officer has invariably displayed the greatest keenness and has set a fine example to all.

 

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HARVEY, W/C Robert Bourne (37172) - Mention in Despatches - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 September 1941.   Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Vancouver in 1915.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 10 April 1935. Killed 29 August 1942, aged 27, while serving with No.45 Squadron; buried in Delhi War Cemetery. Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry confirms he was a pilot but is ambiguous as to Canadian status, describing him as "Son of Robert B. Harvey and Elsie Mary Harvey; husband of Natalie John Harvey".

 

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HEDLEY, F/O Christopher Hetherton (56141) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.358 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 October 1945. Born in Alberta, 1921; educated at Kirby Revensworth Grammar School and Ryson School, Yorkshire. Enlisted in September 1937; commissioned May 1944.  AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945 (announcing his DFC) describes him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 19829/AL.1087 refers.

 

This officer has completed two tours of operational duty in the Far Eastern theatre of war. During his second tour he has taken part in numerous supply dropping operations which have involved flying by day and night, at a low altitude and often during very adverse weather. Flying Officer Hedley has proved to be a courageous and skilled captain of aircraft who has materially contributed to the successful completion of many difficult missions.

 

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HENDERSON, P/O Selby Roger (40826) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.206 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 January 1940.  Born in Winnipeg, 24 April 1918.  Member of Fort Garry Horse Cadets, 1931-1936; educated in Winnipeg.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 4 June 1938. Cards prepared by W/C F.H. Hitchins on CAN/RAF personnel (held by Directorate of History and Heritage) state he was detached from No.206 Squadron, Bircham Newton, to No.149 Squadron, Mildenhall, on 1 September 1939; from there he was detached to No.110 Squadron, Wattisham.  He was lead navigator with the Blenheim strike force that attacked German warships at Wilhelmshaven on 4 September 1939.  Returned to No.206 Squadron, 11 September 1939 to resume duties of maritime patrol on Ansons.  Many sorties with P/O R.H. Harper (which see). Engaged a Do.18 on 7 September 1939.  On 8 November 1939 engaged at least two Do.18s and the team credited with destruction of one.  Attacked a submarine without effect, 3 December 1939.  Continued to fly patrols on Ansons to 11 May 1940; made his first sortie on Hudsons, 13 June 1940.  Attacked enemy airfields on 18, 19 and 24 June 1940 and bombed a gas works in Holland, 29 June 1940. Missing, presumed dead, 4 July 1940.


During November 1939, when pilot of a reconnaissance aircraft on duty over the North Sea, Pilot Officer Henderson encountered two large enemy flying boats.  He engaged the leading boat with the utmost resolution; bursts were seen to enter the engines and after part of the flying's boat's hull, the enemy rear gunner was incapacitated and eventually the flying boat went down partially out of control.  Pilot Officer Henderson then attacked the second enemy aircraft with equal determination and silenced its fire before exhausting all his ammunition.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/4078 has recommendation  dated 16 November 1939 which is of much greater length, and a letters to Dominions Office, 19 December 1939, indicating that announcement of award had been delayed because Canada itself had failed to respond to a communication seeking approval of his award.

 

At 1145 hours on 8th November 1939, an aircraft on reconnaissance duty over the North Sea, piloted by Pilot Officer S.R. Henderson, encountered two Dornier 18 flying boats.  He immediately approached the leading one and after attempting to bomb it, carried out four attacks using his front gun and turning to allow his rear gun to fire at the end of each dive.  Bursts were seen to enter the engines and after part of the hull, and during the third dive the rear gunner of the Dornier was seen to be incapacitated.  At the conclusion of the fourth dive the front gun jammed and Pilot Officer Henderson withdrew from the action and rectified the stoppage.  At this stage the second pilot, Pilot Officer R.H. Harper, took over the controls and continued the attack until the ammunition of the front gun was expended.  He then withdrew from the action and Pilot Officer Henderson again took over the controls.  He at once returned to the attack using his rear gun only, and several bursts were seen to enter the wings and engines of the Dornier flying boat.  The aircraft then withdrew from the action and returned to base.

 

This officer had no previous experience in air fighting tactics and yet, besides showing considerable flying ability, also showed coolness, and great determination in pressing home his attacks so long as his ammunition lasted.  It should be pointed out that this officer was navigator in the aircraft flown by Squadron  Leader Doran in the raid on Wilhelmshaven on 4th September 1939.

 

Air 2/4078 has a further report by the Commanding Officer, No.206 Squadron, dated 9 November 1939 about the battle with Do.18s:

 


At 1145 hours two Dornier Do.18 flying boats were sighted about one mile apart.  The Anson approached one of these boats which did not appear to notice him.  When nearly overhead, Pilot Officer Henderson did a dive-bombing attack, attempting to drop a 100-pound anti-submarine bomb ahead of the enemy.  As it was known that a second enemy aircraft was in the vicinity, Pilot Officer Henderson did not wait to seethe result of the bombing attack, but turned away to locate the other enemy.  I would like to point out that this method of attack has been suggested by Pilot Officer Henderson himself, in view of the low altitude at which enemy aircraft usually fly, and the fact that it is frequently possible to approach unseen.  On seeing the second enemy was not joining in the action, Pilot Officer Henderson made four dives on the first, and bursts from the front gun were seen to enter the enemy engines and after part of the fuselage, the rear gunner also firing when his gun could be brought to bear on the enemy aircraft.  During the first two dives fire was returned from the enemy's front and rear guns, but during the third dive the Anson rear gunner put a long burst into the enemy rear gunner's cockpit and after this the cockpit was apparently empty.  After the fourth dive the front gun jammed due to the broken lock spring and Pilot Officer Henderson withdrew from the action and fitted a new lock.  At the same time Pilot Officer Harper took over the controls.  As soon as the gun was serviceable, the Anson again joined combat, and a fifth dive was made when the enemy was seen to be going down, apparently partially out of control and wobbling considerably, with smoke coming from the starboard wing.  Unfortunately the aircraft could not be followed down to the water as the second enemy had arrived and had commenced to attack.  A steep dive was made to attack the second enemy aircraft and during two dive attacks bursts were seen to enter the nose of the aircraft, after which no fire was observed from the front gun.  Having now run out of front gun ammunition, the Anson was put into a steep dive to give the rear gunner a shot, and the latter, 521694 LAC Foreman, A.E. put several bursts into the wing and engines of the enemy aircraft.  The Anson then withdrew from the action and returned to base.

 

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HILL, F/L George Drake (39986) - Mention in Despatches - No.40 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.  Born 20 May 1915 in Weyburn, Saskatchewan.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 identiies as a Canadian in the RAF a P/O G.D. Hill; next-of-kin (father) living in Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan. Appointed Pupil Pilot, RAF, 32 May to 8 August 1937; granted Short Service Commission for four years as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 August 1937; confirmed in appointment and graded Pilot Officer, 31 May 1938; Acting Flying Officer, 7 November 1938; relinquished Acting Flying Officer, 25 January 1939; Flying Officer, 31 December 1939; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 14 June 1940; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942. At Civil Flying School, Perth, 31 May to 7 August 1937; RAF Depot, Uxbridge, 7-16 August 1937; No.8 FTS, Montrose, 16 August 1937 to 23 March 1938; No.5 ATS, Penrose, 26 March 1938 to 25 January 1939; No.40 Squadron, Abingdon, 25 January to 20 February 1939; Airworks Ltd. Hamble (for navigation coursee), 20 February to 13 May 1939; No.40 Squadron, Abingdon, 13 May 1939; moved to Betheneville, 2 September 1939 and to Wyton on 2 December 1939; remianed with that unit to 17 August 1940.  Ferry Flight to Malta and Egypt, 17 August to 1 September 1940; No.113 Squadron, Maaten Bagusa, 1-6 September 1940; No.14 Squadron, 17 September 1940 to 31 May 1941 (at Port Sudan to 9 April 1941 and at LG.21, Daaba thereafter); to Headquarters, Palestine and Jewish Territory, 31 May-10 November 1941; No.72 OTU, Wadi Gazouza, 10 November 1941 to 28 January 1942; No.1 Depot, Uxbridge, 3 April to 25 May 1942.  Arrived in Canada (No.31 Personnel Depot), 27 June 1942, initially for Ferry Command assignment; to No.34 OTU, 29 July 1942 to 20 April 1942; to No.35 SFTS, 21 April 1943, possibly on attachment only); returned to Britain, 22 September 1943; RAF Station Ipswich, 27 November 1943 to 10 January 1944; to No.1 Air Delivery Flight, Croydon, 10 January 1944; to No.85 Group, Uxbridge, 20 May 1944; to School of Administration, Stannington, 3-29 August 1944; to No.1 ADF, Gatwick and Redhill; to No.116 Squadron, 21 December 1944. Transferred to RCAF, 8 March 1945 (C89593) while in London; repatriated to Canada 10 July 1946; released 20 August 1946.  On 12 March 1945 he filed a form describing his service career as follows: FIRST TOUR: No.40 Squadron, 3 September 1939 to 16 August 1940; two sorties on Battles (4.10 hours) and 22 sorties on Blenheims (62.15 hour); SECOND TOUR: No.14 Squadron, 17 September 1940 to 31 May 1941; 28 sorties on Blenheims (103.15 hours). In another document, dated 21 April 1945, he claimed 910.30 hours flown including 171.30 on operations. He described operations as "Bombing airfield, road traffic, bridges, docks, etc. - photo and visual reconnaissance, anti-submarine patrols and shipping reconnaisances".  On 5 December 1945 he summarized his flying thus: Tiger Moth (62.00), Wallace (130.00), Battle (4.10 operations, 105 non-operations), Blenheim (171.30 operations, 150 non-operations), Ventura (6.40), Oxford (48.00) and Hart (97.00). Under the heading of successes he recorded, "One Me.109 damaged; one obseration balloon destroyed". As of 1950 he was living in Swift Current.  Two brothers, Lawrence S. Hill (navigator) and Edward H. Hill (pilot) were killed in action.  RCAF Education Officer, 21 April 1955 to 31 October 1957.

 

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HODGKINSON, S/L David Beatty (41410) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.179 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943.  Born in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, 28 June 1918; home there or in Chaplin, Saskatchewan (Ferry Command crew cards, Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3).  Educated at Moose Jaw College and University of Saskatchewan. Granted a Short Service Commission as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 December 1938; graded as Pilot Officer on probation, 3 September 1939; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 6 October 1939; promoted Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941; Acting Squadron leader, 24 July 1942; confirmed as Squadron Leader, 1 July 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 2 May 1945 (C94041).  At Elementary Flying Training School, 6 October to 14 December 1938; No.12 Flying Training School, 14 December 1938 to 29 August 1939; No.206 Squadron, 16 October to 25 April 1940 (operations); No.502 Squadron, 25 April 1940 to 3 June 1941 (operations); attached to Ministry of Aircraft Production, 3 June to 26 July 1941 for ferry duties; ferrying Hudson AM866 to Britain, July 1941; to No.3 OTU, 10 August 1941; to No.179 Squadron, 19 August 1943; to No.6 OTU, 10 May 1944; to Staff College, 19 June 1944; to Headquarters, Transport Command, 18 September 1944; to No.511 Squadron, 19 September 1944; repatriated 16 November 1945; released 20 July 1946.  Air Ministry Bulletin 11746 refers.

 

One night in September 1943, this officer captained an aircraft which successfully attacked a U-Boat in the Mediterranian Sea. Despite heavy anti-aircraft fire from the submarine's guns, Sqquadron Leader Hodgkinson pressed home his attack with accuracy and determination.  This officer has completed numerous sorties and has displayed inspiring leadership, great courage and devotion to duty.

 


NOTE: The exact date of his attack is not stated.  In September 1943 No.179 Squadron made several attacks, notably as follows:

 

3 September 1943 - J/179, no result

6 September 1943 - C/179, U.760 sunk

9 September 1943 - P/179, no result

11 September 1943 - J/179 and P/179, U.617 sunk

24 September 1943 - P/179, no result

24/25 September 1943 - D/179 and R/179, U.667 damaged

25 September 1943 - Q/179, no result

26 September 1943 - X/179, U.667 further damaged.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

HODGKINSON, Flight Sergeant Victor (1072877) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.138 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943. Born in Toronto, 1912; home in Stockport.  Former railway clerk; enlisted in RAF, 1940.  Citation published in Flight, 26 August 1943.  Air Ministry Bulletin 10775 refers.

 

Sergeant Hodgkinson has completed a large number of operations. On several occasions he has been instrumental in the safe return of his aircraft to base.

 

DHist cards summarize what appears to have been a slight longer text.

 

...has completed large number of operations. On several occasions has been instrumental in safe return of aircraft to base...as Wireless Operator has been valuable member of crew.

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/8964, drafted 20 May 1943, in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000); when recommended he had flown 38 sorties (240 hours 30 minutes):

 

Flight Sergeant Hodgkinson has now completed 38 operations. He has proved to be a keen and most efficient Wireless Operator. His ability has greatly contributed to the efficiency of his crew and he has set a fine example to other Wireless Operators in the squadron.  On the night of 14th May 1943, Flight Sergeant Hodgkinson calmly carried on and obtained W/T fixes which were instrumental in the safe return of the aircraft.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


HOOEY, F/O Gilbert Campbell (65525) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.97 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 April 1942.  Born in Trenton, Ontario, 1909; home in Toronto.  Professional golfer in California before the war; enlisted in RAF, 1940; commis­sioned 20 April 1941.  Participated in several raids including low level attack on Brest. Killed in action, 24 August 1942.  Award made following daylight attack on Augsburg, 17 April 1942, resulting in following awards: one Victoria Cross (S/L J.D. Nettleton), one DSO, eight DFCs and ten DFMs.  AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 272/43 dated 19 February 1943 (confirming his death) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 6773 refers and carried the following text:

 

On the 17th April 1942, a force of twelve Lancaster heavy bombers was detailed to deliver an attack in daylight on the diesel engine factory at Augsburg in Southern Germany. To reach this highly important military target and return, a most daring flight of some 1,000 miles over hostile country was necessary.  Soon after entering enemy territory and whilst flying at a very low level the force was engaged by 25 to 30 enemy fighters. Later, the most intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire was encountered.  Despite this formidible opposition, eight of the bombers succeeded in reaching the target and in delivering a successful attack on the factory. The follwing officers and airmen who participated in various capacities as members of the aircraft crews displayed courage, fortitude and skill of the highest order.

 

This was followed by a list for one DSO, eight DFCs and ten DFMs.  Curiously, the AFRO entry (which usually follows Air Ministry Bulletin texts), differed in some details from that given above:

 

A force of Lancaster heavy bombers was detailed to deliver an attack in daylight on the Diesel Engine Factory at Augsburg in southern Germany. To reach this highly important military target and return, a most daring flight of some 900 miles over hostile territory was necessary.  Soon after entering enemy territory and whilst flying at a very low level the force was engaged by a superior number of enemy fighters. Later most intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire was encountered; despite this formidible opposition and the violent evasive tactics which it necessitated a considerable proportion of the force succeeded in reaching the target and in delivering a successful attack on the factory almost at the time which had been planned. [These] officers and airmen who participated in various capacities as members of the aircraft crews displayed courage, fortitude and skill of the highest order.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

HUGHES, F/O Richard Emlyn (169135) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.51 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 1915.  Canadian roots rather sparse; listed as having been educated at Holyhead County School; home in Taunton. Enlisted for aircrew training, 1940; commissioned 1943.  No citation other than "completed many successful operations, during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944 (announcing his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15550/AL.875 refers.

 


                                                                        * * * * *

 

HYAPER, Corporal H.P. (622165) - See HARPER, H.P

 

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ILLSLEY, F/O David Milledge (41349) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.14 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 November 1941.   Born in Leonminster, Massachusetts, 27 October 1916; attended Leonminster High School, September 1928 to June 1931 and McDonald High School, Middleton, Nova Scotia, October 1931 to June 1933.  He also took correspondence courses in accounting from La Salle Extention University, Chicago (Diploma in Accounting).  Home in Nictaux Falls, Nova Scotia. Employed, April to October 1936, as a hydro electric power house operator and underground mucker (Guysboro Minees Limited, Goldenville, Nova Scotia) and bank clerk with Bank of Commerce, Halifax, 9 December 1936 onwards.  In applying for RCAF (8 October 1937) he stated, under "Hobbies", "interested in things mechanical" and stated that he had been active in Scouting (Rover Scout, Scoutmaster, Assistant Camp Chief) but as to previous flying experience he could claim only "five short flights as passenger" that totalled about one hour.  Appointed Provisional Pilot Officer, Non-Permanent General List, RCAF, 3 January 1938 (C804); qualified for pilot's flying badge, 17 October 1938; relinquished commission on appointment to RAF commission, 5 November 1938.  At outbreak of war, 2 September 1939, he was with No.14 Squadron but detached to No.55 Squadron to train on Blenheims.  As of 16 June 1940 he was back with No.14 Squadron at Port Sudan.  Notes by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage, NDHQ) list many sorties in East Africa and Libya.  Attained rank of Squadron Leader; killed 14 November 1941.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Hitchins notes quote a document identified as Air Ministry Bulletin 5486; the final citation is also found in Public Record Office Air 2/8907.

 

This officer has distinguished himself on reconnaissances both in the Western Desert and during the Eritrean campaign. On one occasion, in bad weather, he flew down to 500 feet over Massawa to obtain necessary  photographs for a naval operation.  Since the beginning of hostilities in the Middle East, Flight Lieutenant Illsley has carried out 70 sorties with great dash and leadership.  He has invariably displayed a spirit of bravery and tenacity whilst on operations and has proved an inspiration to all.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/4782 (Non-Immediate Awards, Middle East, 1941-1943) has recommendation telegraphed from RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry, 12 October 1941:

 

This officer has shown a continuous spirit of bravery and tenacity whilst on operations against the enemy.  He has been with No.14 Squadron and on operations continuously since the beginning of hostilities in the Middle East and has thus completed over 70 sorties.

 


In particular he has distinguished himself on reconnaissances both in the Western Desert and during the Eritrean campaign, on one occasion through bad weather going down to 500 feet over Massawa to obtain necessary photographs for a naval operation.  Throughout all his bombing raids also his dash and leadership are a real guide and inspiration to his flight and squadron.

 

NOTE: His flying training at Trenton in 1938 is typical of that for the period and may be described as an example of the programme.  As of 18 March 1938 he had flown 12 hours 30 minutes dual and 25 minutes solo; as of 14 October 1938 he had flown 59 hours dual and 68 hours solo.  The only untoward incident had been a crash in an orchard four miles west of Trenton on 18 September 1938 when he sustained lacerations to his right eyebrow and multiple facial lacerations.  It would appear that actual instruction had concluded as of 16 September 1938, at which time he had flown 59 hours dual and 66 hours 20 minutes solo.  He had begun on Fleet trainers, logging ten hours 30 minutes before his first solo, after which he had logged 45 hours 45 minutes "advanced dual" on Fleets, two hours 45 minutes "advanced dual" on Moths, 48 hours 35 minutes solo on Fleets, and 17 hours 45 minutes solo on Moths.  He had also logged 12 hours 45 minutes as a passenger or observer.  He had experienced no night flying.

 

The list of courses he took (and his marks) are also worth noting as typical of the instruction given.  These were as follows:

 

Maximum Marks        Marks Attained

 

Air Navigation                        200                             172

Meteorology                           40                               33

Airmanship                            170                             138

Engines (Written)                  200                             159

Engines (Practical)               300                             240

Rigging (Practical)                300                             200

Administration                       100                             79

Organization                          50                               35

Law                                         100                             86

History                                    25                               23

Theory of Flight                      50                               35

Armament (Written)              65                               51

Armament (Practical)           200                             154

Signals (Practical)                100                             99

Drill (Practical)                       100                             66

 

With an average of 75 percent he was 7th in a class of 18.  The instrument flying course had begun on 2 June 1938 and he was examined about 29 September by F/O Robert C. Ripley.  In the course he had flown 20 hours (all dual in Fleets); Ripley wrote of him, "This officer flies with average accuracy and with confidence on instruments. Spin recovery, steady flight and endurance good. Turns normally good".  The Chief Flying Instructor (F/L J.G. Kerr) wrote on 18 October 1938 that Illsley was "a good average pilot in all respects"; as an officer he was "keen, intelligent and ambitious".


On 3 January 1938 he had signed an agreement which demonstrates the terms under which he was both trained by the RCAF and accepted by the RAF.  It read thus:

 

I agree, if selected, to accept a Short Service Commission in the Royal Air Force.

 

I also agree that, on completion of a total of five years' service in the Royal Air Force, and unless selected for a Permanent of Medium Service Commission or permitted to transfer to the RAF Reserve, to be repatriated to Canada and commissioned in the RCAF (Non-Permanent) or Reserve, in which I am liable to serve four (4) years.

 

I further agree that if, with the consent of National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, I elect to remain in the United Kingdom and be transferred to the RAF Reserve, I will refund the cost of my original journey from Canada and waive my claim to a return passage to Canada.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

ISON, S/L Thomas Eric (40915) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 July 1944. Born in Derby, England; educated there but gave home town as Kingston, Ontario when appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 9 July 1938.  Appears to have spent the early part of the war on instructional duties.  Confirmed as Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; as Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941; as Squadron Leader, 1 January 1944; later promoted to Win Commander.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14637/AL.848 refers.

 

In June 1944 Squadron Leader Ison was captain of an aircraft engaged in an attack on an airfield at Le Mans.  Weather was adverse and much cloud was encoun­tered. Despite this handicap Squadron Leader Ison descended below the cloud when approaching the target and thus secured the success of the attack. Two nights previously he had taken part in a similar attack on railway sidings at Versailles. On that occasion through his aircraft was damaged by anti-aircraft fire, he also fulfilled his duties with skill and efficiency.  He has completed many sorties, always displaying skill, courage and determination.

 

ISON, W/C Thomas Eric (40915) - Distinguished Service Order - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 January 1945. Air Ministry Bulletin 17228/AL.955 refers.

 


This officer has completed many sorties against dangerous and difficult targets since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He has consistently displayed the highest qualities of skill and courage and his determination to make every sortie a success has won great praise. In September 1944 he flew with great distinction in an attack on Gelsenkirchen. His aircraft was hit several times by anti-aircraft fire, but he pressed home a successful attack. In November 1944 Wing Commander Ison took part in an attack against Freiburg. The weather was bad. Nevertheless this officer displayed the greatest determination throughout the operation and his skilful work contributed materially to the success of the mission. Wing Commander Ison has set a fine example to all.

 

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JACKSON, F/L Arthur Senior (41293) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.119 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943.  Born in Fort William, Ontario, 1917; educated in Vancouver.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 29 October 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 29 October 1939; confirmed as Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; as Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941.  AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Citation published in Flight, 12 August 1943.

 

Flight Lieutenant Jackson, now on his third tour of operational duty, has been continuously engaged on flying duties since the beginning of the war. He has displayed a fine sense of duty.

 

NOTE: Cards at DHist give a slighly longer text; Air Ministry Bulletin 10770 refers.

 

Flight Lieutenant Jackson, now on his third tour of operational duty, has been continuously engaged on flying duties since the beginning of the war. He has displayed a fine sense of duty. The successes achieved and the high morale of the squadron are largely due to this officer's magnificent example and discipline.

 

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JARDINE, S/L Alexander Myles (37560) - Air Force Cross - No.205 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  Born 16 March 1904;  home in Vancouver; joined RAF, November 1935, undergoing initial training on Tiger Moths at Phillips Powis Civil Training School, Reading, 25 November 1935 to 31 January 1936; at Station Uxbridge, 1-14 February 1936 (service indoctrination, uniform fitting); No.11 FTS, Wittering, 15 February to 20 August 1936 (Audax and Hart aircraft; commissioned 4 May 1936); Station North Coates, 20-28 August 1936 (bombing and gunnery instruction); to Station Manston for General Reconnaissance course, 29 August to 28 November 1936; Ansons, Saro Cloud; recommended for flying boats); Station Calshot, 29 November 1936 to 26 March 1937 (conversion to flying boats on Saro Cloud, Short Scapa and Short Singapore); No.205 Squadron, Station Selatar, Singapore, 26 April 1937 to 31 January 1942 (initially on Singapore III flying boats).  This period included a variety of duties.  From May 1937 to February 1938 he was second pilot serving as relief pilot and navigator on flights between Singapore and Karachi via Burma in Vickers Valentia aircraft.  For much of 1938 he was an aircraft captain and squadron adjutant with duties that included operations in Borneo, lower Burma and along both Malayan coasts. In 1938 he was also the unit's Equipment Officer.  From August to October 1939 he was learning and teaching navigation at Station Tengan (Singapore) on Blenheim Is. In May 1940 he took the squadron's only Sunderland and began instructing others on type; he finally delivered this machine in May 1940 to No.230 Squadron (Ceylon).  From then until March 1941 he was in charge of detachments at various bases (Borneo, Burma, Penag, Nicoba Islands), on anti-submarine patrols, convoy escorts and searches, still flying the Singapore IIIs.  From April to November 1941 he was on detached duties at Koggala Lake (Ceylon) on Catalinas on searches, convoy escorts plus surveying and establishing bases in the Maldive Islands, Chagos Archipelago, Seychelles, Mauritius, and the East African coast.  These included photography, soundings and siting checks; he claimed to have been the first aircraft (other than carrier-borne) to visit Mauritius.  From November 1941 onwards he held the rank of Squadron Leader and was second-in-command of the unit.  When the Pacific war began he conducted bombing attacks on Japanese aerodromes, searches and patrols in the China Sea (all on Catalinas). From 31 January to 8 March 1942 he operated from Oesthaven, Sumatra and Java over the Indian Ocean and Java Sea.  His aircraft was unserviceable when the Dutch East Indies capitulated.  Joining an RAF group at Tasikmala aerodrome, he attempted to escape in a Glen Martin aircraft, but it had been sabotaged.  From 31 March to 15 May he and thirteen others sought escape from the south Java coast; they had begun building a boat when the Japanese arrived and he became a prisoner of war.  He was held in camps at Garoet, Bandoeng and Batavia, responsible for various groups of officers, assistant to the British Camp Commandant (a Wing Commander) and instructed in navigation when possible.  He was finally liberated on 19 September 1945 and hospitalized in Ceylon before return to England (Topcliffe) and POW leave in Canada.  Transferred to RCAF in 1946 with effect from 24 November 1944 with rank of Squadron Leader; promoted to Wing Commander, 1 January 1949; to Group Captain, 1 July 1954; retired in 1965.  His postwar appointments included staff duties at Royal Military College (1947-1950), Training Command Headquarters at Trenton (1950-1953), Commanding Officer of Station Rockcliffe (1953-55), Commanding Officer of Station St.Hubert (1955-1959) and Air Attache in Prague (1960-1963).  Citation to AFC found in Public Record Office Air 2/6269.

 

This officer was captain of one of two Catalina flying boats despatched to Ceylon in April 1941. During the next three months the two flying boats opened up four advanced bases in Maldive, Chagos, Seychelles and Mauritius and carried out operational searches under extremely difficult conditions. Squadron Leader Jardine displayed outstanding zeal, enthusiasm and devotion to duty and his navigation, airmanship and flying under all conditions of sea and weather commanded respect.

 

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JOHNSON, S/L Stephen Nicholas (40228) - Air Force Cross - No.38 Movements Unit - award effective 1 January 1946 as per AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Home in Vancouver; obtained private pilot's license in Winnipeg, 1934. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 24 October 1937.  Died in Victoria, 28 January 1977.  Public Records Office Air 2/9144 has recommendation but the paper is badly damaged and missing some text.  He had flown 2,100 hours (80 in previous six months).

 


This officer joined 41 Group in 1942.  He is a [text missing] and steady test pilot who has completed 2,100 hours on [text missing] of aircraft.  On all modern aircraft he has proved highly [text missing] in his capacity as senior test pilot he has set a fine [example ? - text missing].

 

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JONES, F/O Albert Henry (158742) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.97 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 August 1944.  Born in Thurso, Quebec, 1905; home in Montreal; enrolled in RAF, 1943; commissioned as Air Gunner, 30 October 1943; promoted to Flying Officer, 30 April 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15183/AL.869 refers.  Cited with F/L G.F. Baker (RAAF 412356) and Warrant Officer R.M. Clark (RAF 77895), both awarded DFC:

 

Flying Officer Jones and Warrant Officer Clark were mid-upper and rear gunners respectively of an aircraft piloted by Flight Lieutenant Baker. Whilst over the target the aircraft was illuminated in a concentration of searchlights. At that moment Warrant Officer Clark sighted a Junkers 88 closing in. He promptly warned his pilot who manoeuvred to a good position. These gunners were then able to bring their guns to bear with good effect.  Following their accurate bursts of fire the enemy aircraft caught fire and fell to the ground. Almost immediately another enemy aircraft closed in but excellent cooperation between Flight Lieutenant Baker and his gunners frustrated the attacker which was finally shot down. A third fighter took up the attack but it was driven off. In their determined fights, Flight Lieutenant Baker and his gunners displayed great skill, coolness and resolution.

 

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JONES, P/O Lawrence Latham (40542) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 May 1940.  Also known as "Slim" - born in Saskatoon, 21 June 1917.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 19 February 1938; confirmed in rank February 1939. Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage document 84/44-3) first show him delivering a PBY to Britain in December 1940; he is thereafter almost constantly in motion with Ferry Command, chiefly engaged in PBY deliveries but also Coronado JX490 in June 1944; his last entry on these cards is August 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 15 May 1945 while at Dorval (C53090); released 11 October 1945. Rejoined the RCAF as an Administratve Officer, 14 January 1952 (131742); released 3 July 1956. With de Havilland (Canada), 1966-1973.  Died 26 August 1989;  see Outbound: Canadian Aviation Historical Society Newsletter, Autumn 1989.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 269/42 dated 20 February 1942 (reporting AFC) singled him out as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 685 dated 18 May 1940 (found in DHist Hist 181.009 D.2053, RG.24 Volume 20634) has citation.  An earlier draft, found in Public Record Office Air 2/4096, gave the date as 27 April 1940.

 


This officer was second pilot and navigator of a flying boat engaged on a special journey to Norway in April 1940. During the temporary absence of his captain, after a landing had been made, Pilot Officer Jones assumed command and successfully maneouvred his aircraft on the water to avoid the intense bombing attacks by enemy aircraft. Subsequently it became necessary to take off, but he was attacked by an enemy fighter shortly afterwards. By skilful tactics he brought his tail guns to bear and the enemy was shot down. This officer showed skill annd gallantry of a very high order.

 

NOTE: Also decorated at this time was his captain, F/L Robert Edward Craven (awarded) DFC whose citation (as found in Air 2/4096) read as follows:

 

This officer was captain and pilot of a flying boat which proceeded on a special journey to Norway in very bad weather on the 27th April 1940.  On arrival at his destination, he handled his aircraft with great skill and gallantry, and disembarked his passengers in the face of persistent enemy bombing attacks. The return journey was successfully accomplished on the following day in spite of adverse weather conditions.  Flight Lieutenant Craven displayed great determination, courage and perseverance in carrying out this hazardous mission.

 

The full story is detailed in a document drafted by F/L Craven, "Report on action in Romesdale Fjord by Sunderland N.9025" (Air 2/4096); the aircraft letter code was "Y":

 


Sunderland N.9025 left Invergordon at 1230 hours on the 27th bound for Aandalsnes with two passengers.  Extremely bad weather was encountered for the first three hours but this finally cleared and the coast of Norway was sighted in clear weather with no clouds at 1616 hours.  An enemy aircraft was at once sighted bombing the wireless station at Sula Island, apparently with incendiary bombs.  We carried on our course, which carried us past the wireless station, but the enemy aircraft did not appear (Photographs were taken).  A Norwegian merchant vessel was anchored off Brandal.  On leaving Norway a.m. 28/4 this vessel was observed to have been bombed and on fire.  We then turned up Molde Fjord and when between Drynsund and the mainland flying close to the water to avoid a high tension cable, three enemy aircraft were observed vertically overhead in formation.  At almost the same moment two large bombs were dropped close to our machine and burst 50 to 100 feet astern.  Avoiding action was taken.  We then proceeded up the fjord to a position about one mil south of Molde and alighted alongside HMS Witherington and requested a boat to disembark our passengers.  As Captain of the Sunderland, I [Craven] would not have exposed my machine to the hazards of the action except that it had been impressed on me in Scotland that it was highly important that these passengers should be landed at almost any cost.  On alighting, the three enemy aircraft which had now been joined by three other formations of three aircraft, proceeded to bomb the town of Molde, the destroyer and the Sunderland with great accuracy and impartiality.  I proceeded with the passengers in the whaler sent by the destroyer back to her and in the 50 yards there, no bomb fell nearer than about 150 feet, but immediately on disembarking, the whaler was sunk by a bomb and two ratings were injured by splinters.  The bombers appeared to be dropping one stick per aircraft on each run, each stick apparently consisting of about wight bombs so 24 bombs from the formation were dropped.  During the middle of this action a Fleet Air Arm aircraft, believed to be a Skua, flew near, fired a recognition signal and then disappeared in an easterly direction.  At 1735 hours the aircraft took off to cool its engines which were over-heated by continuous taxying and when only 150 feet from the water was attacked from astern by a machine believed to be a Me.110.  Bursts were exchanged at close range, our aircraft firing about 700 rounds and the enemy was seen continuing its glide or shallow dive, apparently in difficulties.  It was then lost sight of behind a headland.  Mr. Whitney Strait later telephoned from Molde to Aandalsnes and informed us that the aircraft had crashed and that he was on his way to investigate the crash.  We left before he had time to inspect the remains of the machine.  At 1805 the aircraft arrived at Aandalsnes and finally anchored up at 1945 hours.  Watch was kept all night but nothing eventful happened.  No good anchorage was available so the aircraft was allowed to drift about in the middle of the fjord, which was illuminated by the burning pier and ammunition dump in the town.  More passengers were loaded during the night and the aircraft was airborne at 0305/29 and proceeded to Shetlands where bad weather was encountered, but a landing was carried out at 0708 hours and on the return journey to Invergordon a U-boat was sighted in position JSWS 3122 at 1231 hours on a course of 320 degrees, submerged; unfortunately the aircraft was unable to bomb through lack of bombs.  The aircraft finally laded at 1315 hours, 25 [sic] hours after leaving Norway.

 

Craven wrote a letter on 30 April 1940 to the Commanding Officer, RAF Station Invergordon, which read:

 

I have the honour to draw your attention to the behaviour of Pilot Officer L.L. Jones, 40542 and Sergeant H.J. Baxter, 565139, on the occasion of our recent action in Norway by Sunderland N.9025 (see attached report).

 

Pilot Officer Jones was throughout the operation outstanding as an example of coolness and resourcefulness and it was largely due to his invaluable assistance that we were enabled to bring this action to a successful conclusion.

 

Sergeant J. Baxter has been notable throughout the detachment for his continual keenness, reliability and aggressive spirit and has been entirely responsible for excellent navigation under difficult conditions.  His behaviour has been a fine example to the remainder of the crew.

 

JONES, F/L Lawrence Latham (40542) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.

 

JONES, S/L Lawrence Latham (40542) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942. AFRO 269/42 dated 20 February 1942 stated that the award was in accordance with Special Order of the Day dated 1 January 1942 issued by Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Ferry Command.  Citation found in Public Record Office Air 2/6269.


This officer is employed on ferry duties and has set a very fine example to all pilots in the command. He has completed seven delivery flights with Catalinas and Hudsons and, owing to difficulty in turning our civilian pilots round, he made a complete return journey from Prestwick to Prestwick in 62 hours, a very fine performance.

 

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JORDEN, F/L Percival James (47631) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.18 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 June 1944. Born in Penhalt, Monmouthshire, 23 July 1916; home in Nova Scotia ?.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, reported "no apparent link with Canada."  Enlisted 1936; commissioned 1942.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14245/AL.828 refers.  London Gazette spells name as "Jordan" but Air Force List gives "Jorden".

 

Since July 1943, this officer has taken part in many operational sorties throughout which he has always displayed a fine fighting spirit and great determination to complete his missions successfully. In August 1943 owing to very adverse weather, he was unable to land at his base in Sicily. Flight Lieutenant Jorden thereupon set course for Africa and on reaching the coast instructed his navigator to abandon the aircraft, the petrol supply being very low.  He then made a masterly forced landing. Two months later this officer's aircraft was severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire during an attack on Vasto. Although his navigator was seriously injured and very heavy opposition was encountered, Flight Lieutenant Jorden pressed on and successfully completed the attack.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9629 has the original recommendation drafted 3 April 1944 when he had flown 1,767 hours (110 in previous six months) including 193 operational hours (65 sorties).  He was described as being a Deputy Flight Commander.

 

Flight Lieutenant Jorden starting operating with No.18 Squadron on 16th July, 1943, and on his first operation at night, displayed the offensive spirit which subsequently characterized all his work in this squadron by bombing Biancavilla from 1,500 feet and machine-gunning a convoy of motor transport.

 

Whilst operating from Comiso, Sicily on 9th August 1943, on returning to base, he found the beacon and flarepath unserviceable.  Weather conditions were bad and there were no radio aids in Sicily at the time.  He set course for Africa, and on reaching the coast instructed the navigator to abandon the aircraft as petrol was low.  Flight Lieutenant Jorden successfully force-landed the aircraft.

 

On 15th October 1943, while attacking Vasto, his aircraft was severely holed by anti-aircraft fire and his navigator seriously injured.  Despite heavy opposition, he completed the attack successfully.


Throughout his tour, Flight Lieutenant Jorden was sent out in dubious weather to ascertain conditions over the target area.  The offensive spirit displayed, particularly in machine-gunning motor transport convoys at night, has been an inspiration to all other aircrews.

 

The Officer Commanding, No.232 Wing, minuted the form on 8 April 1944:

 

Flight Lieutenant Jorden has proved himself to be a first-class operational pilot, well above the average in ability and determination.  The above award is most strongly recommended.

 

This was duly supported by the Air Officer Commanding, Desert Air Force, on 12 April 1944, and by Mediterranean Air Forces Command on 15 April 1944.

 

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JORDON, Warrant Officer Ian Allan (1555058) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.90 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945.  Born 1923 in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, but educated at St.Aloyias College, Glasgow and gave home as Worcester Park, Surrey, so Canadian affiliation may be slight.  Member of Glasgow University Air Squadron; called up July 1941.  Air Ministry Bulletin 20087/AL.1099 refers.  No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty". Navigator.

 

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KAYE, S/L Thomas Chisholm (50584) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943.  Born in Winnipeg, 12 March 1916; educated there.  Enlisted 17 January 1939; commissioned 26 November 1942.  As of 22 July 1944 he was reported as having served 35 months in Canada and 32 months in Britain.  DHist file 181.005.D.270 identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF early in 1940 when he was an AC2 (RAF number 631283; father living in St.Vital, Manitoba; identified in late 1941 as a Leading Aircraftman, Fitter (Engines) at No.6 ITW (DHist file 181.005 D.271; not clear what "ITW" signified).  Commissioned 1942. Posted to No.1666 Conversion unit. Transferred to RCAF 9 January 1945 (C89538).  Repatriated to Canada, 1 June 1945; remained in postwar RCAF, reverting to Flight Lieutenant, 1 October 1946 but regaining Squadron Leader rank on 26 June 1951. Awarded AFC as a member of the RCAF (see RCAF awards data base).  Citation published in Flight, 17 June 1943:

 

This officer has piloted aircraft, in face of intense enemy opposition, to most of the heavily defended targets in Germany including Dusseldorf, Bremen, Wilhelmshaven and Cologne. He has also participated in attacks against targets at Lorient, St.Nazaire and Turin and has secured some excellent photographs.

 

NOTE: DHist cards summarize a slightly different account, apparently from Air Ministry Bulletin 10225.


...has piloted aircraft in face of intense enemy opposition to most heavily defended targets in Germany including Dusseldorf, Bremen, Wilhelmshaven and Cologne...also participated in attacks against targets at Lorient, St.Nazaire and Turin and has secured excellent photographs...has always displayed great courage, skill and determination...Under a calm, quiet manner he has a fine fighting spirit which inspires confidence in his crew.

 

NOTE:  DHist file 181.009 D.2617 (National Archives RG.24 Volume 20627) had recommenda­tion dated 8 March 1943 when he had flown 23 sorties (135 hours 45 minutes), 2 June 1942 to 5 March 1943.

 

Since joining this squadron in May 1942, this officer has carried out 23 operational sorties against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany in the face of intense enemy defences. These operations included sorties to Rennes (1), Dieppe (2), Emden (1), Gardening (4), Mainz (1), Osnabruck (1), Flensburg (1), Kassel (1), Frankfort (1), Dusseldorf (1), Bremen (1), Lorient (3), Turin (1), Wilhelmshaven (2), Cologne (1), St.Nazaire (1).

 

On several of these operations, this officer has piloted his aircraft in such a manner as to bring back pictures of the actual target. He has always displayed great courage, skill and determination and under a calm, quiet manner, and he has a fine offensive spirit in action which inspires confidence from the rest of his crew.

 

KAYE, F/L Thomas Chisholm, DFC (50584) - Mention in Despatches - No.1666 Heavy Conversion Unit - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.  DHist file 181.009 D.2813 (National Archives of Canada Record Group 24 Volume 20632) has recommendation by G/C N.S. MacGregor dated 22 July 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Kaye is an outstanding Pilot Instructor of four-engines aircraft.  He was especially picked from No.1659 Conversion Unit as their best instructor to be posted to No.1666 Heavy Conversion Unit Instructor School.  Since his arrival he has proved himself to be an exceptional pilot whose experience and outstanding ability has been an inspiration to the instructors being trained at the school.

 

On September 15th he had a port outer engine cease in the air.  The two top bearers broke and the engine slipped forward on its mountings, causing so much drag that Flight Lieutenant Kaye was unable to hold the aircraft straight.  In spite of this Flight Lieutenant Kaye showed exceptional skill and executed a perfect "Wheels Up" landing.  It is strongly recommended that this officer's devotion to duty may be mention in despatches.

 

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KEDDY, S/L Walter Bernard (39535) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 September 1941.  Born in Burnside, Nova Scotia (possibly Manitoba ?) 1916; educated in Cornwall, Ontario.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 8 March 1937; Acting Squadron Leader 8 June 1941.  Posted to No.102 Squadron, 19 March 1941; to No.405 Squadron, 30 May 1941; killed in action, 17/18 January 1942, aged 25, with No.405 Squadron; body cremated at Hull, Yorkshire.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission entry is ambiguous as to Canadian status; "Son of Charles Alfred and Eleanor Keddy; husband of Muriel Keddy, of Douglas, Isle of Man."  Award part of a general distribution of honours; one citation covered five DSOs, 26 DFCs and 20 DFMs.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  Air Ministry Bulletin 4907 refers.

 

In July 1941 large scale attacks were made on German warships at Brest and La Pallice (including the Gneisenau, Scharnhorst and Prinz Eugen).  A smaller attack was made on Cherbourg.  The operations were carried our in daylight and extremely heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire and fighter opposition were encountered  by all aircraft when approaching the targets, which at Brest were protected by balloon barrages.  The air crews engaged succeeded, nevertheless, in securing direct hits on their objectives and in inflicting very severe damage in the target area.  During the combats with enemy fighters 21 hostile aircraft were destroyed.  The precise timing of attack by the various formations of aircraft and their correct approach  to and accurate bombing of the objectives in the face of such powerful opposition demanded great skill and high courage.  The great success of these operations was largely due to the bravery, determination and resource displayed by the following officers and airmen who participated in various capacities as leaders and members of the aircraft crews.

 

Public Record Office Air 2/8899 has recommendation drafted when he had flown 14 sorties (95 hours 50 minutes) which elaborates on his role:

 

Squadron Leader Keddy led his section of three aircraft on the first daylight operation undertaken by his squadron, the target being the Gneisenau at Brest.  The navigation of the formation to the target was carried out with great precision, and the section opened out and bombed in spite of heavy anti-aircraft fire and the presence of enemy fighters.  Squadron Leader Keddy by his discipline, leadership and determination ensured a successful attack on the target by his formation.  I recommend that his services be recognized by the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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KEITH, G/C Claude Hilton (number ?) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941.  Born in Saskatchewan, 21 October 1890; educated at St.Lawrence College, Thanet; on the engineering staff of Marconi, 1907-1915; qualified as an RNAS pilot, 1916; served on anti-submarine patrols in 1918; air staff officer, 1918-1919; in Iraq and Egypt, 1926-1930; appointed Director, Armament Research and Development, 1933. These details from 1935 edition of Who's Who in British Aviation.  Promoted from Wing Commander to Group Captain, 1 July 1937. DHist cards on First World War Canadians include this man, but with no background material; he is described as an electrical engineer with next-of-kin living in Cornwall, England; his civil employer was given as Marconi in London, England.  There is a reference to National Archives of Canada, Record Group 9, C.14, folder 7.  Evidently he had very little connection with Canada as his education and career are in Britain.

 

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KEITH, Lieutenant Lloyd Kenneth - Distinguished Service Cross - No.813 Squadron, Royal Navay Fleet Air Arm - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 January 1942.  Home in Calgary; lost 26 June 1941 off Tobruk in a Swordfish of No.813 Squadron.  Flight, 22 January 1942 reported the award as "for outstanding gallantry, fortitude and resolution during the Battle of Crete."

 

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KENNEDY, W/C Alexander Judd (RAF 05229) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.1 Training Command Headquarters, Toronto - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945.  Born in Toronto, 3 March 1911; attended RMC, Kingston, 1928-1932, training at Camp Borden and qualifying for pilot's flying badge, 18 August 1931.  Accepted RAF commission, 1933.  Seconded to RCAF, 26 April 1939 and posted to Trenton, 4 May 1939.  Ferried Mitchell FL-215 to Britain, July 1942 (Ferry Command delivery cards held by Directorate of History as Document 84/44-3). Retired from RAF as Wing Commander, 29 August 1947.  RCAF Reserve, December 1948 to June 1957 (service number 205103).  On  November 17, 1961, presented RCAF wings to his son, F/O A.J. Kennedy at Portage la Prairie.

 

This officer has been an armament specialist serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force for the past few years.  As Chief Instructor, Commanding Officer of a Bombing and Gunnery School, and a command staff officer, he has displayed exceptional resourcefulness and ability.  He is a most energetic leader and by his own outstanding example, skill and devotion to duty has been an excellent example to those working with him.  His contribution to the flying training plan has been most praiseworthy.

 

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KENT, F/O John Alexander (37106) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 January 1939.  Born in Winnipeg, 23 June 1914; educated there. Obtained his Private Pilot License at the Winnipeg Flying Club at age 17.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 15 March 1935 (same time as D.K. Banks and A.L. Bocking); confirmed as Pilot Officer, 1936; as Flight Lieutenant, 15 September 1937; Acting Squadron Leader, 17 October 1940.  Served at Royal Aircraft Establishment, Farnborough as a test pilot.  Posted to Photographic Development Unit, May 1940.  Flew with No.303 Squadron during Battle of Britain; subsequently posted to command No.92 Squadron.  In March 1941 he was appointed Chief Flying Instructor, No.53 Operational Training Unit.  Returned to flying operations as Wing Commander (Flying) at Northolt, June 1941; took up similar duties as Kenley, July 1941; posted again to No.53 OTU as Chief Flying Instructor, October 1941.  In December 1941 sent on lecture tour to North America early in 1942; to Air Ministry (June 1942) and then given command of Church Fenton.  In September 1942 sent to Headquarters, Fighter Command as Group Captain (Training).  To Mediterranean in December 1942; commanded No.17 Sector (Benghazi) to August 1943, when he took over No.234 Wing.  Returned to Britain in March 1944; to No.7 (P) Flying Instructors School and then in command of No.3 (P) Advanced Flying Unit. In the postwar years he was active in British Air Forces of Occupation, at Farnborough (Chief Test Pilot), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Station Odiham and Tangmere.  Retired in December 1956 to join Kelvin-Hughes Aviation Limited as sales manager;  died 7 October 1985.  Gave talk on BBC, 23 December 1940 and reprinted in Winged Words; author of an autobiography, One of the Few; see also Michel Lavigne, Canadian Wing Commanders (with George Brown) and Hugh Halliday, The Tumbling Sky.  Chris Shores, in Aces High, records the following aerial victories: 3 September 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed plus one Ju.88 probably destroyed (Hurricane V6665); 23 September 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed and one FW.58 damaged (Hurricane V6681); 27 September 1940, one Ju.88 destroyed (Hurricane V6684); 1 October 1940. one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Hurricane V6681); 1 November 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire, No.92 Squadron); 2 November 1940, two Bf.109s destroyed (separate engagements) plus one Bf.109 probably destroyed; 21 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire P8189, Northolt Wing); 27 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed on ground; 3 July 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire P8518, Northolt Wing); 20 July 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed; 7 August 1941 (one Bf.109 destroyed, Kenley Wing); 16 August 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Kenley Wing); 25 January 1943, one Ju.88 damaged (Hurricane DG-H of No.17 Sector).   Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  Recommendation dated 23 September 1938 (prepared by W/C M. McEntegart, Commanding Officer, Experimental Section, Royal Aeronautical Establishment) in Public Record Office, Air 2/9315:

 

Flying Officer Kent has, during the last six months, made approximately 60 flights involving collision with a wire cable in connection with the special defence experiments being carried out at this Establishment.  The experiment is one which is accompanied by a considerable element of risk to the pilot and calls for determination and a high degree of skill in piloting.  Flying Officer Kent has at all times carried out these duties in a most efficient manner.  He is fully aware of the nature of the risks he is taking but has never allowed this in any way to diminish the marked willingness and zeal with which he carries out these duties.

 

Also on 23 September 1938, A.H. Hall (Chief Superintendent, Royal Aeronautical Establishment) supported this with the following remarks:

 


I endorse the remarks above. As far as comparisons are possible I regard the work done by Flying Officer Kent as being at least as difficult and trying as work done in previous years for which awards have been made.

 

On 1 November 1938 A/C Roderick Hill (Director of Technical Developments) added:

 

I fully endorse the recommendation of the Officer Commanding, Experimental Section and the Chief Superintendent, Royal Aeronautical Establishment. I consider Flying Officer Kent has shown gallantry and determination in experimental flying which has not only set a fine example, but has produced very valuable results.  I consider him suitable for the award of the Air Force Cross.

 

KENT, F/L John Alexander (37106) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.303 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 October 1940.

 

Early in October 1940 this officer when entirely alone, attacked 40 Messerschmitt 109s and shot down two of them. He has personally destroyed at least four enemy aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Kent has been responsible in a large measure for the fighting efficiency of his squadron and has materially contributed to its successes. He has proved himself a born leader.

 

KENT, F/L John Alexander (37106) - Virtuti Militare, 5th Class - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1941.

 

KENT, W/C John Alexander (37106) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - Kenley Wing awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 October 1941.    The following is from Royal Air Force Quarterly, December 1941.

 

This officer has led his wing in an efficient and fearless manner on many operational sorties within the last two months. He hahs now destroted a further six enemy aicraft, bringing his total success to thirteen destroyed and three probably destroyed. Wing Commander Kent has set a grand example.

 

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KERBY, G/C Harold Spencer, DSC, AFC (02201) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.  Born in Hamilton, 14 May 1893; home in Calgary where his father was mayor (mechanical engineer); attended University of Toronto; joined RNAS, February 1915; at Hendon, 21 March 1915; Chingford, 4 May 1915; taken on strength of No.3 (N) Squadron in Dardenelles, 12 June 1915; wounded there, 26 November 1915; Flight Lieutenant, December 1915.  To Cranwell, 27 November 1916. To France, December 1916; to Dover Air Station, 19 January 1917; to Dunkirk (No.9 Naval Squadron), 28 January 1917; to No.3 (N) Squadron, 29 March 1917.  To AG and FS, Midlands Area, 18 May 1918; to Air Ministry, 20 November 1918; to No.4 Flying School, 20 November 1918 (commanding ?); to BEF, 23 March 1919; to No.4 Flying School, 8 April 1919.  Reported once to have thrown his life preserver to a downed German pilot following scrap with eight.  Also reported to have taken a brief medical discharge in 1917 before getting back in.  Awarded DSC (2 November 1917, "For the great courage and initiative shown by him on many occasions, notably on the 12th August, 1917, when he attacked hostile machines returning from a raid on England.  One hostile machine was driven down by him to the water, where it was observed to turn over" and AFC (1 January 1919, no citation).  Remained in RAF postwar.  Promoted to Group Captain, 1 January 1939 and to Air Commodore, 1 March 1941; to Air Vice-Marshal, 5 March 1943. Commanded No.72 Wing, Advanced Air Striking Force, September 1939 and No.71 Wing, AASF, from 16 March 1940 onwards.  Later AOC Air Headquarters, East Africa and Coastal Command; retired 1946; died 8 January 1963.  Air Ministry Bulletin 2636 refers. AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943 (reporting CB) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

KERBY, A/V/M Harold Spencer (02201) - Companion, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943.

 

KERBY, A/M Harold Spencer (02201) - Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer (United States) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1946.

 

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KEY, F/L George Basil Cooper (62323) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Born in Calgary, 1914; home in Kent; RAF, April 1940; commissioned March 1941. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

KEY, F/L George Basil Cooper (62323) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.547 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 May 1945.  Air Ministry Bulletin 18876/AL.1031 refers.

 

This officer has proved a most valuable asset to the squadron.  He has taken part in a large number of sorties and throughout has set a fine example of skill, determination and devotion to duty.  His last sortie during his present tour of operational duty was an attack on enemy shipping in March 1945.  During the operation Flight Lieutenant Key executed a good attack on an enemy U-Boat.  This officer is a fine captain, whose example both in the air and on the ground has impressed all.

 

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KILNER, F/L Joseph Richard (63783) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.21 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 September 1944.  Citation copied from Gazette.  Although a card for him is in DHIst CAN/RAF cards, there are no accompanying details, nor is there an awards card.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, stated that his wife was living in Canada, although he was not married in Canada.

 


This officer has completed very many sorties and has sot down seven and assisted in the destruction of four more enemy aircraft. He has displayed great skill, courage and tenacity, qualities which were well illustrated on a recent occasion when he pressed home a most determined attack on an ammunition train in a railway siding. Considerable anti-aircraft fire was directed at his aircraft which was hot and an engine rendered useless. Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Kilner flew to an airfield in this country and effected a safe landing.

 

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KILPATRICK, S/L Peter John Walter. (83418) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.   Commissioned as a Flight Lieutenant, Administration and Special Duties Officer, 8 August 1940.  Curiously, the London Gazette of 19 September 1941 confirms him in the rank of Flying Officer, effective 18 June 1941 or 8 August 1941 (same man, different pages, different dates). AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 February 2000, stated he was born in Toronto, 5 January 1905.

 

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KING, G/C Charles Ley, MC, DFC - Air Force Cross - No.8 Air Gunners School - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  See First World War data base for biographical details.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5952 refers.  Citation found in Public Record Office Air 2/6269.

 

This officer commands No.8 Air Gunners School and, during the conversion of the unit to Botha aircraft, he has performed outstanding service as a flying instructor in giving dual control to his pilots on a new type. In a period of three months he carried out 142 hours instructional flying, in one month of which his flying time reached the high figure of 62 hours. His work in the air justifies special recognition and he has set an excellent example.

 

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KNOWLES, F/O Philip Henry (40306) - Mention in Despatches - No.3 SFTS - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.  Born Vancouver, 1 April 1913; educated in Victoria; served in Canadian Scottish.  AFRO 503/41 dated 2 May 1941 reported him attached to the RCAF, effective 1 May 1941; AFRO 658/41 dated 6 June 1941 reported his promotion to Flight Lieutenant, effective 27 March 1941, while serving with an RAF school in Canada. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date; AFRO 844/42 dated 5 June 1942 reported that he had ceased to be attached to RCAF effective 14 April 1942.  Ferry Command delivery cards held by Directorate of History as Document 84/44-3 list him (home given as Victoria); involved in ferrying Hudson FH240 to Britain in April 1942.  On strength of No.10 SFTS in Canada, 15 May 1941 to 10 March 1942; to Ferry Command, 11 March 1942; returned to Canada via No.31 Personnel Depot, 9 July 1943; to No.39 SFTS, 14 August 1943; to No.32 SFTS, 24 March 1944; to Headquarters, No.4 Training Command, 17 October 1944; to No.31 Personnel Depot, 18 October 1944; to No.2 Flying Instructor School, 3 November 1944; to No.2 SFTS, date uncertain. Transferred to RCAF, 1 February 1945 while stationed at No.10 SFTS (C51214) and holding rank of Squadron Leader.  Promoted to Wing Commander, 1 March 1945.  To No.2 Air Command Headquarters, 5 April 1945; to No. 1 Instructors Flying School, 9 November 1945; to No.3 Release Centre, 4 February 1946; retired 6 February 1946. Public Records Office Air 2/6116 has a recommen­dation (drafted in 1940) for an AFC which appears to have been downgraded to this award.

 

This officer has shown outstanding ability and has displayed cheerful keenness under all circumstances.  His pupils have always attained a high state of efficiency.

 

KNOWLES, F/O Philip Henry (40306) - Air Force Cross - No.3 SFTS (No.23 Training Group) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 April 1941.  According to Public Record Office Air 2/8887, he was unsuccessfully nominated for an award in September 1940.  Air Ministry Bulletin 3436 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8891 has recommendation dated 2 January 1941, although he had moved on to instructing in Canada.

 

During the period that Flying Officer Knowles served at this unit he proved to be an instructor of outstanding ability and his pupils always attained a high state of efficiency.  He at all times displayed cheerful keenness under all circumstances.

 

To this the AOC of No.23 Training Group (A/V/M K.R. Park) added, 12 January 1941:

 

The outstanding ability of this officer as an instructor has contributed largely to the high state of efficiency of his pupils.  Recommended for the award of the Air Force Cross.

 

This was further refined for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

During the period that Flying Officer Knowles served with No.3 Service Flying Training School, he proved to be an instructor of outstanding ability, and his pupils always attained a high standard of efficiency.  He has displayed cheerful keenness under all conditions.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


LAMBERT, F/O Frederick Frank (37858) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1939. Born in Wilkie, Saskatchewan, 28 June 1914; Able Seaman in RCN Reserve, Saskatoon; 27 December 1933 to 11 April 1945; discharged as unable to attend drills; reported on 11 April 1935 as having gone to England some time earlier to obtain an apprenticeship in Merchant Marine.   Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 18 May 1936.  Confirmed in appointment and graded as Pilot Officer, 23 March 1937 with effect from 23 March 1936; Flying Officer, 23 October 1938; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1940; promoted Squadron Leader, 1 December 1941; promoted Wing Commander, 1 July 1944.  At Civil Flying School, Hamble, 23 March to 18 May 1936; at RAF Depot, Uxbridge, 18 May to 20 June 1936 (supernumerary, short discipline course); at No.11 Flying Training School, 20 June 1936 to 10 January 1937; with No.220 Squadron, 10 January to 11 February 1937 (flying and ground gunnery course); at No.3 School of Technical Training, 18-23 January 1937 (parachute course); No.27 (B) Squadron, India, 11 February 1937 to 8 January 1940 (flying North-West Frontier Patrol operations - bombing and proscriptive action in Wapiti, Lysander, Hart and Valentia aircraft); with No.5 Flight, Indian Air Force, 9 January to 1 July 1940 (to command flying operations from Cochin); Senior Officers Naval Liaison Course, 10 June to 1 July 1940; with Headquarters, No.2 Group, India, 1 July 1940 to 5 February 1941 (SASO and administrative duties); with No.5 Squadron, India, 5 February to 18 August 1941 (flying air gunnery course); with No.2 Group Headquarters, India, 18 August to 8 December 1941 (flying, SASO, DC-2 and DC-3 aircraft); with No.2 (Fighter) Wing, Bengal and Burma, 8 December 1941 to 23 February 1942 (flying and SASO during operations against Japanese including evacuation from Burma); No.20 Squadron, 23 February to 30 July 1942 (commanding, Blenheims and Lysanders); with No.110 (H) Squadron, 30 July 1942 to 8 March 1943 (commanding; Vengeance dive-bombers in Bengal and Burma); No.1 PDC, 8 March to 18 March 1943 (supernumerary pending posting to Britain); No.12 (P) AFU, 22 June to 10 August 1943 (conversion training); No.54 OTU, 8 August to 12 October 1943; No.141 Squadron, 12 October 1943 to 26 January 1944 (flight commander, intruder operations - Serrate, Beaufighters and Mosquitos); No.515 Squadron, 26 January 1944 to 19 January 1945 (Mosquito intruding, special bombing and flak attacks); Station Twinwood Farm, 19 January to 17 May 1945 (commanding). Confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1940; confirmed as Squadron Leader, 1 December 1941; confirmed as Wing Commander, 1 July 1944.  AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. XX Transferred to RCAF, 1 March 1945 (C89587); repatriated to Canada, 14 May 1945 and assigned to Eastern Air Command; served in Interim Force and then joined the Regular Force, 1 October 1946 (service number 20078).  Commanding Officer, Station Torbay, December 1945 to April 1946; Director of Intelligence, AFHQ, May 1946 to November 1948; Senior Air Staff Officer, No,1 Air Defence Group Headquarters, December 1948 to October 1949; Senior Air Staff Officer, No.12 Air Defence Group, Vancouver, August 1950 to October 1951; attended Aircraft Controller Course, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, November 1951 to January 1952; Commanding Officer, No.2 Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron (later No.21 ACW Squadron), Chatham, New Brunswick, February 1952 to January 1953; Exchange Officer with USAF (Staff Officer, Directorate of Plans and Requirements, Northeast Air Command, Pepperell AFB, Newfoundland), January 1953 to February 1955; Intelligence Staff Officer, No.1 Air Division Headquarters, France, February 1955 to January 1956; Staff Officer, Intelligence Division, Allied Air Forces, Central Europe, France, January 1956 to March 1960; Director of Intelligence, Northern NORAD Headquarters, St.Hubert, March 1960 to August 1961; on rehabilitation leave, 19 December 1961 to 16 June 1962 (released).  Wing Commander throughout his RCAF service.  Retired to England where he died 10 August 1998.  Awarded Croix de Guerre with Vermilion Star (France), as per Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947 and AFRO 710/48 dated 3 December 1948.  No citation to Mention in Despatches other than "for valuable services rendered in connection with the operations in Waziristan during the period 16th December 1937 to 31st December 1938."


LAMBERT, W/C Frederick Frank (37858) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.515 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1944. Air Ministry Bulletin 14982/AL.860 refers.  Cited with F/L Edward William Noel Morgan.

 

Flight Lieutenant Morgan and Wing Commander Lambert as navigator and pilot respectively have completed a large number of sorties and have displayed courage and determination of a high order. The successes achieved reflect the greatest credit on the skill and resolution shown by these officers. They have set an excellent example.

 

LAMBERT, W/C Frederick Frank (37858) - Distinguished Service Order - No.515 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1945.  Air Ministry Bulletin 17030/AL.948 refers.

 

This officer has completed much operational flying and has displayed the highest standard of determination and devotion to duty throughout. His assignments have been many and varied and the successes obtained are an excellent testimony to his great skill and fine fighting qualities. Wing Commander Lambert is an excellent squadron commander whose gallant and skilful leadership has greatly inspired the formation he commands.

 

NOTE: Chris Shores provides the following information about his aerial victories with No.515 Squadron:

 

5 March 1944  -one He 177 destroyed, Bretigny-Melun, Mosquito II with F/L E.W.M Morgan as navigator.

 

6/7 September 1944 - one Bf 109 destroyed,  Odder, Denmark, Mosquito VI PZ338 'A, F/O R.J.Lake, AFC., navigator.

 

Bomber Command intelligence reports give the following synopsis of the latter victory:

 

100 Group aircraft Mosquito A of 515 Squadron, position 5558N 1009E at 2328 hours, height 3,000 feet when Mosquito gave chase to a ME.109.  Fire was opened at 300 yards with a long burst of cannon.  The enemy aircraft went into a steep dive and a piece of wing was seen to fly off.  The enemy aircraft continued through cloud, and four seconds later a vivid orange-coloured explosion and a fire burning was seen between clouds.  The Me.109 is claimed as destroyed.Both these claims were made whilst with 515 Squadron.

 

 

                                                                        * * * * *


LATTA, P/O John Blandford (42008) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.242 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette date 8 November 1940.  Born in Vancouver, 6 August 1914.  Private in 16th Canadian Scottish Regiment, 5 May 1930 to 16 February 1933.  Pupil Pilot, RAF, 6 March 1939 to 28 April 1939.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 29 April 1939; P/O on Probation, 6 November 1939; conformed in rank, 6 March 1940; promoted to Flying Officer, 6 November 1940.  Served with No.242 Squadron, 6 November 1939 to 12 January 1941 (killed in action).  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins from squadron ORB credit him with the following: 29 May 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (he then landed at Manston with undercarriage retracted following battle damage); 31 May 1940. one Bf.109 destroyed (spun out of control into sea); 21 August 1940, one D.17 destroyed (shared with Sub-Lieutenant Gardner and F/L Powell-Sheddon (it crashed in Norwich area); 9 September 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed in flames (his Hurricane damaged); 15 September 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed in flames; 27 September 1940, two Bf.109s destroyed in flames (his Hurricane damaged in combat).  Statements that he destroyed two enemy aircraft in June 1940 near Paris are not substantiated by documents or contemporary reports.  See H.A. Halliday, No.242 Squadron: The Canadian Years (Canada's Wings, Stittsville, 1987).

 

Pilot Officer Latta has destroyed eight enemy aircraft in operations over France and this country.  On one occasion his squadron attacked a number of Messersch­mitt 109s.  This officer destroyed one and, although his own aircraft had been hit in the wings and tail by cannon shells, attacked and destroyed a second enemy aircraft.  He has displayed the utmost coolness in the midst of fierce combat.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

LAVACK, Flight Sergeant Robert Frank (1027207) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.37 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 September 1943.  Born in Vancouver, 1920; home there; enlisted in RAF, 1940.  Killed in action, Tunisia, 20 September 1943.  AFRO 2198/43 dated 29 October 1943 (reporting DFM) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 11583 refers.

 

This airman has completed many sorties including several attacks on important marshalling yards which he has bombed with great success, afterwards diving to a low level to rake the target with machine-gun fire.  In all is operations this airman has displayed great skill and dash, setting a very courageous example.  He has rendered most valuable service.

 

NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/5002 drafted 1 September 1943, in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000); when recommended he had flown 38 sorties (234 hours):

 


Flight Sergeant Lavack is a captain of aircraft of No.37 Squadron who has completed 234 hours operational flying and a total of 38 sorties.  He has during this period always displayed the highest degree of devotion to duty and has pressed home his attacks with dash and a complete disregard for his own personal safety. On 20th May 1943 he attacked Messina marshalling yards with a 4,000 pound bomb and started six small fires which quickly marched [merged ?] into one and which remained visible for 100 miles on the homeward leg. On 8th July 1943 he was ordered to attack Comiso landing ground but, due to thick haze, was [unable ?] to identify it after searching for three-quarters of an hour. He then decided to set course for Catania which he knew would divulge its position by its defences.  On reaching the town area, he was immediately engaged by the defences and was hit by anti-aircraft fire.  In spite of this, however, he continued with his plans and released his bombs over the target.  On 20th July 1943, he was ordered to attack Crotome landing ground and after dropping two sticks of bombs on the hangar building and one on dispersal huts, he descended to 500 feet and fired 320 rounds into the huts.  Again, on 3rd August 1943, after he had bombed the marshalling yards at Marina Di Catanzaro with three sticks of bombs, he descended to 500 feet and flew home along the road firing 600 rounds at motor transport.  On 13th August 1943, he was ordered to attack the marshalling yards at Lamezia and noticed during the quarter of an hour that he was dropping his bombs that there was a solitary gun position about half a mile from the target. He immediately swooped down to 100 feet, opening up with his machine guns, and although the gun ceased firing almost at once, he continued to circle round and round and fired at it until he was sure the position was effectively silenced.  He expended 1,500 rounds during this attack.  The above are incidents which well illustrate the spirit with which Flight Sergeant Lavack has carried out his operations. He has on several occasions taken Operational Training Unit crews on their first operations and his modest manner, coupled with his complete mastery of his aircraft and dash have made him exceptionally suitable for this task. His unselfish attitude and zealous devotion to duty have set an excellent example in the squadron which is having an untold effect on the other less experienced pilots.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

LAWRENCE, P/O Kenneth Aubyn Hassel (41031) - Mention in Despatches - No.8 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941. Born in Halifax, 1917; home in Ottawa; joined RAF as pupil pilot, 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 20 August 1938.  AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944 (announcing Bar to his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF; same note in AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945.  NOTE:  This man has been confused with 42133 Keith Ashley Lawrence of New Zealand, who served with No.234 Squadron in the Battle of Britain.  The Canadian Lawrence flew Blenheims from Aden against targets in East Africa during the 1940-41 campaign in that theatre (described by Chris Shores in Air Pictorial (issues of October 1983 to December 1984).  His 28th sortie, on January 16, 1941, interrupted his career.  Despatched for a solo high-level raid on an Eritrean target, he flew on to strafe a CR.32 at an airfield.  The Italian pilot was clearly a "gung-ho" type, for although his fighter was damaged, he managed to take off and execute a firing pass at Lawrence before breaking away.  The Blenheim looked to be intact (the Fiat pilot made no claim), but it had been hit.  The crew force-landed in French Somaliland where they were interned for three months.  They were set free as Allied forces retook the region.

 


LAWRENCE, S/L Kenneth Aubyn Hassel (41031) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.15 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 12623/AL.730 refers. Acting Squadron Leader when announced but recommended as a Flight Lieutenant.  The following text found in Public Record Office Air 2/9152:

 

This officer has completed an outstanding tour of operations in the Middle East and is now engaged in his second tour in this country.  While over Mannheim one night in November 1943, he was unable to release his bombs and remained in the target area, undeterred by heavy anti-aircraft fire, until he succeeded in releasing the missiles manually.  Invariably displaying initiative of a high order, Flight Lieutenant Lawrence is a thoroughly reliable captain who has always shown courage and determination in the face of the enemy.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9153 has recommendation dated 26 November 1943 when he had flown 52 sorties (180 hours 20 minutes), 12 June 1940 to 15 June 1941 (45 trips, 144 hours ten minutes on Blenheims; imprisoned three months in French Somaliland. January to March 1941), 12 August 1943 (Nickel raid, Wellingtons, five hours 25 minutes) and 27 September  to 19 November 1943 (six trips on Stirlings).

 

As a captain of operational aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Lawrence has completed 52 sorties totalling 180.20 hours. His first tour consisted of 45 sorties on Blenheims in the Middle East. His second tour has consisted of seven sorties on Wellington and Stirlings.

 

While over Mannheim on the night of 18th November 1943 he could not release his bombs electrically. He remained in the target area under fire from the enemy defences until he succeeded in releasing his load manually.

 

He has shown initiative of a high order, is a thoroughly reliable captain of his aircraft, and most determined in pressing home his attacks.

 

LAWRENCE, S/L Kenneth Aubyn Hassel (41031) - Bar Distinguished Flying Cross - No.7 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15555/AL.875 refers.

 

Squadron Leader Lawrence has completed a large number of sorties during which he has attacked a wide rage of strongly defended targets. He has maintained a high standard of operational flying and his leadership has been outstanding.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9276 has recommendation dated 21 June 1944 which is more detailed and lists all his sorties (73 trips, 281 hours 20 minutes).  All sorties from 24 February 1944 onwards were as Pathfinder.

 

First Tour                                                                    Second Tour

 

11 June 40    Aden (5.05)                             12 Aug 43  Nickling, Laon (5.25)

13 June 40    Assab District (2.30)              27 Sept 43 Hanover (4.50)


15 June 40    British Somaliland (2.45)       2 Oct 43     GARDENING, Frisians

16 June 40    British Somaliland (3.10)                           (3.05)

17 June 40    British Somaliland (3.45)       3 Oct 43     Kassel (5.30)

23 June 40    Macacca (2.30)                      4 Oct 43     Frankfurt (2.35)

8 July 40        Assab (2.40)                           8 Oct 43     GARDENING, La

17 July 40     Aden (2.50)                                                 Rochelle (6.20)

18 July 40     Berbera (2.20)                        18 Nov 43  Mannheim-Ludwigshafen

22 July 40     Dira Dana Hangars (3.55)                        (6.20)

26 July 40     Assab (2.00)                           19 Nov 43  Leverkusen (4.40)

30 July 40     Aden (1.50)                             24 Feb 44  Schweinfurt (6.45)

18 Aug 40     M.T. convoy (2.50)                  25 Feb 44  Augsburg (7.15)

24 Aug 40     Berbera (2.30)                        1 Mar 44     Stuttgart (7.15)

27 Aug 40     Dessie M.T. (4.55)                 15 Mar 44  Stuttgart (6.40)

29 Aug 40     Tandeho Fires (3.25)             18 Mar 44  Frankfurt (4.40)

1 Sept 40      Assab (2.10)                           22 Mar 44  Frankfurt (5.30)

2 Sept 40      Assab (2.15)                           24 Mar 44  Berlin (6.40)

18 Sept 40    Dire Daua (4.15)                    26 Mar 44  Essen (4.15)

19 Sept 40    Assab (2.50)                           24 Apr 44   Karlsruhe (5.15)

24 Set 40      Berbera (3.05)                        26 Apr 44   Essen (4.10)

28 Sept 40    Dessie Hangars (4.50)          27 Apr 44   Friedrichshafen (6.40)

4 Oct 40        Aisha R'way Stn (2.35)          1 May 44    Chambly (3.15)

13 Oct 40      Aden (3.30)                             7 May 44    Nantes (5.05)

14 Oct 40      Aden (3.35)                             10 May 44  Courtrai (2.25)

16 Oct 40      Perim (3.45)                            19 May 44  Le Mans (4.00)

22 Oct 40      Perim (4.00)                            22 May 44  Le Mans (3.50)

31 Oct 40      Aden (2.45)                             27 May 44  Nantes (3.55)

15 Nov 40     Dire Daua (4.30)                    31 May 44  Trappes (3.55)

21 Nov 40     Aden (4.20)                             20 June 44 Dreux (3.55)

28 Nov 40     Assab (2.25, AA ship sunk)  14 June 44 Le Havre (2.15)

14 Dec 40     Assab (2.50)                           16 June 44 Remescure (2.15)

21 Dec 40     Assab Waterworks (2.30)

23 Dec 440  Assab Waterworks (3.10)

31 Dec 40     Assab (2.20)

13 Jan 41      Diredaws (4.10)

16 Jan 41      Dessie (4.55)

5 May 41       Assab area (3.45)

8 May 41       Jibui (2.00)

10 May 41     Tatura Bay (3.50)

12 May 41     Assab area (3.45)

3 June 41      Assab (3.15)

11 June 41    Assab (3.10)

12 June 41    Assab (2.40)

 


Squadron Leader Lawrence has now completed over 70 operational sorties, 21 with the Pathfinder Force, 16 of which have been as Marker.  At all times this officer has displayed courage, skill and determination of a high order and has been an inspiration to his crew and also to the Flight which he has commanded.  He has taken part in many attacks on the most heavily defended enemy targets. His offensive spirit has been well marked, and he has always shown a great desire to attack the enemy.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

LEAVITT, F/O Robert Frederick (42238) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Photo Reconnaissance Unit, Heston - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 May 1941.  Born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 17 June 1916; family living in Regina in 1941.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 10 June 1939.  Cards compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (held by Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ) state that he first appeared in the records of the Photo Development Unit, Heston on 5 June 1940 (flying a Blenheim) and subsequently records many sorties to France and Norway on Blenheims and Hudsons.  A newsclipping (undated but circa 1941) states that he also flew Tiger Moths to France during the defeat of that country; he (and others) burned the Tiger Moths and flew more valuable aircraft back to Britain (Spitfires - more likely Hurricanes - and Battles).  Hitchins first records him on a Spitfire on 26 January 1941 (photos of Haugesund) with numerous sorties on that type afterwards.  His most adventurous sortie was 26 April 1941 (described in citation).  Missing, believed drowned, ferrying Hudson AE545 to United Kingdom, 21 September 1941.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.

 

In April 1941, this officer was detailed to carry out an extensive reconnaissance of the Norwegian coast.  He made a successful reconnaissance of two towns, but later his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and damaged. The aircraft immedi­ately went into a spin but after losing height of about 5,000 feet, Flying Officer Leavitt regained control and, although the engine was running intermittently and the blind flying instruments were useless, he carried out a visual reconnaissance of a third town.  In spite of the damage to his engine Flying Officer Leavitt succeeded in maintaining height above cloud in order that it might be possible to glide to land should the engine fail completely.  He eventually succeeded in regaining his base, returning with much valuable information.  Flying Officer Leavitt was subsequently found to be suffering from concussion and an injured skull.  He displayed great fortitude and devotion to duty throughout.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8752 has original recommendation which is much more detailed:

 


Flying Officer R.F. Leavitt was detailed to take the only "D" type Spitfire to Wick with a view to carrying out a photographic reconnaissance as far north in Norway as possible. On the 26th April 1941 he took off from Wick to carry out a reconnaissance of Namsos and Trondheim.  He succeeded in photographing Namsos and part of Folden Fiord, but returned over Stenkjaer and Vernes. When over the latter place anti-aircraft fire opened up and his aircraft was immediately put out of control. He lost 5,000 feet in a spit, and when he came out the engine was cutting out with very considerable vibration, to the extent that the luminous paint came off the instruments. None of the blind flying instruments worked, and the engine continued to cut out every 30 seconds.  Nevertheless, he carried out  a visual reconnaissance of Trondheim, and then, in view of the state of his aircraft, he made for Sweden with a view to abandoning his aircraft.

 

He succeeded in improving the running of his engine by using very low boost and engine revolutions, and decided to save the films and aircraft by returning home. He kept to the coast as far as Stadlandet, and then set out for the Shetlands.  The whole of this time his engine continued to cut out about every minute, but he maintained his height above cloud in order to have some possibility of gliding to land if he engine finally stopped. He therefore missed the Shetlands, but picked up Foula and returned successfully to Wick.

 

Subsequent investigation showed that the engine had a valve and a number of ignition leads broken, while numerous starting plugs were unserviceable.  This was apparently caused when the aircraft was out of control and the engine over-revved.  The aircraft had its flaps damaged by the anti-aircraft fire. Its instruments were shown to be out of action.

 

I consider that this is a magnificent example of devotion to duty, in that Flying Officer Leavitt well knew that his aircraft was the only "D" type Spitfire in the airforce, and he was determined at all costs to save it if humanly possible.  Since this flight he is found to be suffering from concussion and a cracked skull caused when the anti-aircraft fire hit the aircraft.  He is still in hospital.

 

The award was communicated to No.1 Photographic Reconnaissance Unit on 16 May 1941 (telegram from Headquarters, Coastal Command on that date).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

LEESE, Flight Sergant Richard Mark Vernon - Mention in Despatches - West Africa - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943.  Born 29 June 1920 at Powell River, British Columbia; joined the RAF as an Apprentice, trainingat Halton from 24 August 1937 to 1939; posted to Freetown, West Africa, 26 June 1941; to No.95 Squadron (Sunderlands), 27 June 1941; posted to No.40 Squadron, 15 July 1941, but may have been returned to No.95 Squadron soon afterwards, as he was on the strengtyh of No.95 Squadron when hospitalized beriefly in 1942; sent to Home Establishment, 15 February 1943; with No.414 Squadron, 3 March to 14 April 1943; to Station Talberry, 10 April to 10 June 1943; with Coastal Command Development Unit, 10 June 1943 to uncertain date; transferred to RCAF, 11 January 1945 (R225551) and duly retured to Canada for release.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


LEWIS, P/O Raymond Grant (41852) - Mention in Despatches - No.1 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941. Home in Vancouver.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 1 April 1939.  To No.1 Squadron (then in France), 26 November 1939.  On 12 May 1940 shot down a Bf.109 but was himself shot down; parachuting to safety, he was nevertheless imprisoned by French civilians who mistook him for a German; he was let go after several hours. Destroyed one Ju.88, 30 October 1940.  Killed in action, 5 February 1941, still with No.1 Squadron; name on Runnymede Memorial.

 

NOTE:  Public Record Office Air 2/8884 has a recommendation for a DFC which apparently did not go through.  The same document has the quota formula for Advanced Air Striking Force non-immediate awards for May 1940.  There had ben 1,444 flying hours carried over from April 1940, to which were added 2,223 hours in May (total of 2,667). Application of a divisor (150) gave a figure of 24 awards, but there had already been 17 immediate awards plus two Victoria Cross awards made, leaving only five.  The Advanced Air Striking Force was, on this occasion, recommending 38 awards (one Bar to DFC, 17 DFCs, 17 DFMs, one MM and two Military Medals). It may well be that his DFC did not go through because the quota was so restricted on this occasion.

 

Since 10th May 1940, this officer has been involved in four combats with, two of which were against a much superior force of enemy fighters and each time heshot down one enemy aircraft.  On the latter occasion he had to land by parachute.  His courage is undauntable and no odds are too great for him.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


LEWIS, P/O Wilfred John (41188) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.44 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 October 1940. Born in Durham Country, Ontario, 24 March 1918; home in Port Hope. Served in Durham Militia, 1936-28 (machine gunner). First applied to join RAF, 1 May 1937; interviewed in Kingston by militia officers; report sent to Ottawa, 22 November 1937; tentatively selected fr Short Service Commission, 29 June 1938 subject to passing a militia medical examination. Instructed to take SS Alaunia to England, 15 July 1938. Pupil pilot, 25 July 1938 to 13 May 1939 (3 Elementary Flying Training School, Hamble, to 16 September 1938; 5 Flying Training School. Sealand, to 30 May 1939); to RAF School of Air Navigation, 31 May to 3 August 1939 (qualified as 2nd class navigator); with same school, 11 October to 11 November 1939 (astro-navigation course); to No.44 Squadron, 14 May 1940; Commissioned 17 September 1938; confirmed as Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; confirmed as Flight Lieutenant 3 September 1941. Served in No.44 Squadron, 4 December 1939 (first recorded sortie) to 1 December 1940; with No.207 Squadron, 1 December 1940 to 26 February 1941; with No.97 Squadron, 27 February to 2 April 1941; with No.207 Squadron, 2 April to 8 September 1941 (shot down and taken prisoner; held in Stalag Luft III).  Gave BBC talk on 26 September 1940; reprinted in Winged Words.  Invested with DFC by King George VI at Waddington, 27 January 1941.  Many sorties listed by W/C F.H. Hitchins on cards held by DHist; DFC incident was probably 17/18 August 1940 while attacking barges.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2035 refers.  Transferred to RCAF, 24 November 1944 (C94001); repatriated to Canada, 8 July 1945; released on 1 October 1945.  Recalled to RCAF service, 11 October 1946 to 25 December 1965, rising to Wing Commander (15 May 1961).

 

One night in September 1940, this officer successfully pressed home, in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire and searchlight glare, a dive-bombing attack on a concentration of barges in Antwerp Docks. During the dive his aircraft was severely damaged by gunfire from the ground defences and was rendered temporarily out of control. Since March 1940 Pilot Officer Lewis has taken part in 38 operational flights over enemy territory, and as a captain of aircraft has displayed outstanding coolness, determination and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9489 has a recommendation for a DFC dated 27 August 1940.

Since 1 March 1940 this officer has carried out 35 operational flights over enemy territory with conspicuous success and gallantry, totalling over 200 hours operational flying. Some of the missions undertaken have been of an arduous nature and have necessitated sea crossing of over 800 miles.

 

He has always displayed the utmost coolness and determination in pressing home his attacks, often in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire. To his fellow pilots, his consistency has set an example of resourcefulness and determination to do his duty.

 

This was minuted on 30 August 1940 by Air Vice-Marshal A.T. Harris, Air Officer Commanding, No.5 Group, who wrote, "Very Strongly Recommended".  However, no action was apparently forthcoming, for on 18 September 1940 the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Waddington, submitted a further recommendation (Public Record Office Air 2/9456):

 

On the night 17th/18th September 1940, Pilot Officer Lewis successfully pressed home a dive bombing attack on a concentration of barges in Antwerp docks.

 

During the preliminary reconnaissance over the target area, the aircraft was subject to intense and accurate enemy anti-aircraft fire and searchlights. During the dive bombing attack, intense anti-aircraft fire and tracer severely damaged the tailplane in seven places, the starboard engine and the fuselage, causing the aircraft to be temporarily out of control.

 

Since 1 March 1940, Pilot Officer Lewis has taken part in 38 operational flights over enemy territory and has completed over 200 hours operational flying. As captain of aircraft he has displayed outstanding tenacity, determination and devotion to duty, and in pressing home his attacks he has shown the utmost coolness and determination, often in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire.

 

On 19 September 1940, Air Vice Marshal A.T. Harris added his comments:

 

Strongly recommended. This pilot has done consistently good work.


The citation placed before the Air Ministry Honours Committee more closely resembled this draft than the text appearing in the London Gazette.

 

Since March 1940, this officer has carried out 35 [sic] operational flights over enemy territory, totalling over 200 hours flying. Some of the missions undertaken have been of an arduous nature and necessitated sea crossing of over 800 miles. Pilot Officer Lewis has carried out these flights with conspicuous gallantry and success; he has displayed the utmost coolness, pressing home his attacks, often in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire, with a determination which has proved an inspiring example to his fellow pilots.

 

NOTE: Approximately March 1947 he estimated his flying time as follows: Avro Cadet (62.00); Hawker Hart (25 minutes); Oxford (83.35); Anson (109.10); Hampden (392.45), Magister (5,45); Harvard (20 minutes); Manchester (221.05); Battle (2.25); Wellington (15 minutes); Hurricane (30 minutes); Tiger Moth (20 minutes), Whitley Straight (3.45); Beaufighter (20 minutes); Blenheim I (30 minutes); Expeditor (74.20); Norseman (one hour); Goose (7.10); Lodestar (14.10); Dakota (238.40); he was credited with 57 sorties

 

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LEWIS, F/O William Maurice (42465) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.39 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 August 1941. Born in Angusville, Manitoba, 8 February 1921; educated at Saskatoon (1928-1932), Chipewyn, Alberta (1932-35), Winnipeg (1935-36), Edmonton (1936-37) and Battleford (1937-38); obtained a Private Pilot's License before joining RAF.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 5 August 1939. Father living in Battleford, Saskatchewan in 1941. Enlisted in RAF, 12 June 1939; confirmed as Flying Office, 24 March 1941; confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 24 June 1942. Took Elementary Flying Training at DeHavilland in the summer of 1939; in July 1939 he went to Little Rissington to learn on Ansons. To No.35 Squadron (Blenheims), March 1940.  With No.40 Squadron, 7 June to 17 August 1940; with No.39 Squadron, September 1940 to June 1941. Shot down 14 June 1940 (Blenheim R3693, attacking roads between Breteuil-Bamsville-Louviera-Elbert) but returned to his unit on 17 June 1940, resuming operations on the 19th. In August 1940 he flew one of the first Blenheims from Britain to Malta.  With No.203 Squadron, Aden, August-September 1940; with No.39 Squadron, September 1940.  Wounded again on 3 June 1941 while attacking an oil plant at Beirut during Syrian campaign.  Posted to Canada in the spring of 1942 to instruct at No.38 SFTS, Estevan; returned to Britain in the autumn of 1942 for a second tour (No.88 Squadron), but returned to Canada to instruct at Penhold in June 1943; claimed 67 sorties in all; he also gave his operational time as 250 hours on Blenheims, 200 hours on Marylands, and 100 hours on Bostons.  Transferred to RCAF, 26 June 1944 (C46464) while serving at No.36 SFTS; remained in postwar RCAF, spending much time as an instructor (notably on transports) and with No.426 Squadron; retired on 9 December 1964.  When retiring, it was noted he had flown 3,923 hours on North Stars, 1,309 hours on Expeditors, 405 hours on Dakotas. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 4812 refers.  No citation published, but W/C F.H. Hitchins' cards held at DHist include a summary from Air Ministry:

 

...has completed more than 40 sorties in Europe and Africa. Since joining No.39 Squadron has carried out bombing duties with determination and vigour. Recently did excellent work on reconnaissance duties over Libya and Crete, particularly in Benghazi and Derna areas. After successful attack on oil storage depot at Beirut flew back to base and made a safe landing although wounded in the head. Repeatedly displayed courage and determination in the face of the enemy.

 

NOTE: An undated newsclipping in DHist files, describing him as Pilot Officer Lewis, read:

 

He is one of the ace reconnaissance pilots of the Western Egyptian Desert. He has had many close calls in fights over France, England, Libya, Greece, Crete and Syria. At Dunkirk [sic] he successfully parachuted to earth from only 300 feet. Recently he shot down an Italian Savoia bomber and on his return to base, remarked, "I hope it was crammed with generals".

 

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LITTLE, Sergeant Frank Bernard (581557) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.70 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 November 1941. Born in Tuskett, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, 9 February 1921; home there. Worked on father's farm; attended Radio College of Canada.  Enlisted in RAF, 21 August 1939 as air observer.  Classified as Leading Aircraftman, 22 August 1939; appointed Sergeant and Acting Air Observer, 19 January 1940; confirmed in rank, 19 July 1940; promoted to Flight Sergeant, 1 April 1941; promoted to Warrant Officer, 1 April 1942; commissioned, 1 May 1942; promoted to Flying Officer, 1 November 1942; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 1 May 1944.  Remustered for pilot training in late 1942; trained in Canada at No. 13 EFTS (1 June to 27 July 1943), No.8 SFTS (26 July to 12 November 1943) and No.1 GRS (29 November 1943 to 4 February 1944).  Returned to UK on 24 March 1944; employed at No.20 (P) AFU as a staff pilot, July 1944 onwards.  Transferred to RCAF, 8 February 1945 (C89568).  Released 5 November 1945.  Rejoined 26 February 1952 as a Ground Observer Corps Officer, retiring 25 February 1960 with rank of Flight Lieutenant.No citation published other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  AFRO 1340/41 dated 14 November 1941 (announcing DFM) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.   Air Ministry Bulletin 5486 refers.  Public Record Office Air 2/8907 has citation.

 

This airman has completed 40 operational sorties as observer, including a number of long and difficult missions in adverse weather conditions.  Throughout, he has displayed great skill in the performance of his duties and has always navigated his aircraft back to base.  Although at various intervals he has been posted to different crews he has always instilled confidence in his colleagues.

 


NOTE: Ian Tavender records his recommendation dated 17 October 1941 (found in unstated source) in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register for the Second World War (London, Savannah Publications, 2000).

 

Sergeant Little was an observer in No.70 Squadron. He carried out 40 sorties against the enemy and always displayed great skill in his duties.  He was posted at intervals to different crews and always instilled confidence in his colleagues. He went on some very long and difficult raids in weather conditions that were bad and by his skill he always navigated his aircraft to base.

 

FURTHER NOTE: On 8 September 1945 he signed a report on his activities, but figures were approximate as he had lost his log book.  He claimed to have flown about 40 sorties or 220 hours on operations as a navigator (last sortie was in May 1941) and about 240 hours non-operational. Yet on the same form he gave his types (again with approximate figures) as follows: Anson, 250 hours; Heyford, 30 hours; Wellington, 420 hours (all as navigator) plus Tiger Moth 30 hours 20 minutes; Oxford, 138 hours; Wellington, 72 hours 20 minutes (all as pilot).  Had been a navigational instructor from July 1941 to November 1942.

 

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LITTLEWOOD, F/O Peter Ronald Benjamin (126814) - Mention in Despatches - No.410 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1944.  As navigator he was involved in the following victories: 16 July 1943, one Bv.138 destroyed (shared with four other crews); 25/26 July 1943, one Do.217 destroyed.  Killed with F/L E.A. Murray, 30 July 1943, aged 22, still with No.410 Squadron; buried in Scopwick Church Burial Ground, Lincolnshire.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission states he was a navigator; "Son of Lancelot E. Littlewood and Edith Gladys Littlewood of Saanichton, Vancouver Island".

 

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LIVINGSTON, W/C Philip Clermont - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 June 1938.  Born at Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island, 2 March 1893.  Educated at Cambridge University and London Hospital.  Cambridge Rowing Blue. Royal Navy surgeon during First World War.  Commissioned in RAF, 1 May 1919; consultant in opthamology from 1934 to 1946. Principal Medical Officer, RAF Far East, 1946-47; Director-General of RAF Medical Services, 1948-1951. Confirmed as Group Captain, 23 April 1940; confirmed as Air Commodore, 1 January 1946; Air Vice-Marshal, 10 February 1948; Air Marshal, 1 July 1949. Made a Commander of the Order of St.John of Jerusalem and appointed King's Honourary Surgeon.  Retired to Duncan, Vancouver Island, 28 August 1951 where he continued to practice. Died 14 February 1982.  AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of AFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

LIVINGSTON, G/C Philip Clermont, OBE - Air Force Cross - Central Medical Establishment, Halton - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Public Records Office Air 2/8910 has citation:

 


This officer is consultant in opthamology, and has rendered most valuable services to the Royal Air Force not only in the visual examination of personnel but on vision problems in general, in particular those related to flying. He has given considerable help in improving our night flying and interception by devising means for testing the night visual acuity of personnel, as well as in developing a pre-adaptation goggle to night-adapt our fighter personnel before taking off, so that their night vision is equivalent to the enemy's who have already become night-adapted during flight to this country at night. In addition he has designed and developed anti-searchlight devices for bomb aimers and pilots as well as developing devices to improve aircraft recognition. In all his researches he has spent many hours in the air, both by day and night, to design and prove the practical value of the various devices he has introduced. Furthermore, he has carried out many tests in the low pressure chamber at Farnborough to assess the relation of oxygen-want at varying altitudes to night blindness, as well as the effect of certain drugs on visual acuity, later proving his point by actual flight in the air.

 

LIVINGSTON, A/C Philip Clermont, OBE, AFC, FRCS, CRCS (E), LRCP, DPM, DOMS - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 June 1946.  Public Records Office Air 2/9667 has recommendation.  NOTE: This document also includes CBE nominations for A/C F.W. Rocques (Consultant in Gynaecology), A/C G.L.M. McElligott (Consultant in Venereology) and A/C R.R. Trail (Consultant in Mass Radiography and Tuberculosis), all supported by Director General Medical Services - evidently a war's end distribution of honours to the medical section.

 

This officer has been Consultant in Opthamology to the Royal Air Force since 1934. He has performed a considerable amount of research work for aviation and his contributions in this respect have been of material help to air crew.  One of his most noteworthy efforts is that connected with night vision in air crew.  His researches included the use of the Hexagon to estimate individual night vision capacity and the measuring of night vision acuity. By the improvement in the night vision of air crews which resulted from this work it is reasonable to suppose that not only was the accuracy of visual recognition improved but that the casualty rate in night flying was lessened. His work covered a wide field including the development of flying goggles and spectacles and of corrected spectacles for visual defectives. Another most important contribution has been the treatment of eye muscle defects incidental to the handling of aircraft near the ground. He has an amazing capacity for work, never sparing himself in order to further service interests.

 

LIVINGSTON, A/V/M Philip Clermont, CBE, AFC, FRCS, CRCS (E), LRCP, DPM, DOMS - Commander, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1948.

 

LIVINGSTON, A/M Philip Clermont, CB, CBE, AFC, FRCS, CRCS (E), LRCP, DPM, DOMS -Knight, Order of the British Empire - bestowed as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1950.

 


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LONGHURST, F/L William Sydney (42852) - Air Force Cross - Ferry Command - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 August 1943.  Born in Outlook, Saskatchewan, 17 January 1919; educated at Outlook (Public and High School) and Toronto (Central Technical School, aeronautical engineering).  Employed by Gillies Flying Club for two months, while taking pilot course (1938).  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, RAF, 23 October 1939; confirmed as Flying Officer, 18 May 1941; as Flight Lieutenant, 18 May 1942.  Ferry Command delivery cards (Directorate of History and Heritage) show him delivering a Hudson to Britain in July and August 1941, and then constantly engaged on this work until November 1944, including taking a Liberator to the Pacific, touching down in China, New Zealand and Australia before returning via California. Transferred to RCAF, 2 May 1945 (C94040); released 23 October 1945.   Employed by Worldwide Aviation as a pilot to April 1946 and Wheeler Airlines to February 1947 when he joined Canadair as a test pilot (Chief Test Pilot and Chief of Flight Operations from January 1953 onwards. .  Cited with S/L F.M. Gobeil (RCAF) and W/C R.G. Seys (RAF); Air Ministry Bulletin 11245 refers.

 

These officers made the first tug-and-glider crossing of the North Atlantic from Canada to the United Kingdom, landing on the 1st July 1843.  Wing Commander Seys and Squadron Leader Gobeil were pilot and co-pilot respectively of the glider and Flight Lieutenant Longhurst piloted the towing aircraft.  Both aircraft carried useful loads, the cargo of the glider being nearly one and one half tons and including serum and vital aircraft spares.  The flight involved landings in Newfoundland, Greenland (an exceptionally difficult one) and Iceland.  Adverse weather was encountered at times and, as the glider could not ascend higher than 13,000 feet, the aircraft were frequently buffeted about and might have broken adrift but for the skilful flying of the glider pilots.  They also showed great skill in overcoming the difficulties of flying in clouds.

 

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