CANADIANS IN THE RAF

 

 CANADIANS DECORATED WHILE SERVING AS ENLISTED OR

COMMISSIONED MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL AIR FORCE AND OTHER COMMONWEALTH AIR FORCES

 

This data base was prepared with generous assistance and editing on the part of Surgeon Commander (ex F/O) John Blatherwick, CM, CD, MD, New Westminster, British Columbia.

 

                                                                       NOTES

 

This data base is drawn primarily from two card files now held by the Directorate of History and Heritage, Canadian Forces Headquarters, one dealing with wartime honours and awards to Canadian flying personnel, the other compiled by the late Wing Commander F.H. Hitchins.  As a historical officer in Britain in 1940-41, Hitchins compiled extensive notes on Canadians who had enrolled directly in the RAF, a task which he appears to have allowed to lapse as increasing RCAF strength overseas demanded more of his time.  Other documents are cited when relevant throughout the text, as well as assorted publications.

 

Two factors have complicated this project.  One is defining "Canadian", given that Canadian citizenship (as distinct from "British subject") was not created until 1947.  A careful reading of these notes will indicate that some persons previously described as "Canadian" had very slight connections with Canada, and general rules about what defines a Canadian would exclude some.  Thus, if P.S. Turner (born in Britain, raised in Canada, postwar career in Canada) is accepted as a Canadian, then Max Aitkin (born in Canada, raised in Britain, postwar career in Britain) is more likely defined as British rather than Canadian.  Another borderline case is that of G.B. Rand, who was born in Britain and lived there until the age of 14; nevertheless, he worked in Canada for a decade before joining the RAF, and as the war drew to a close he transferred to the RCAF, came back to Canada, and lived here the rest of his life.  Other instances will become apparent throughout this data base.

 

The other complicating factor has been a well-known book, Canadians in the RAF, by Les Allison.  This was, in large measure, based on the Hitchins cards (as was this data base), but it also relied heavily on second-hand accounts and interviews years after events.  Some of his "Canadians" turned out to be British personnel whose only connection with Canada was to have been posted to this country for various duties between in 1940 and 1945.  Other statements of "fact" proved to be incorrect (see H.E. Angell, whose "DSO" was never awarded).  Spurious "Canadians in the RAF" are listed separately at the end of this data base.

 

From time to time RCAF Air Force Routine Orders (AFROs) announced honours and casualties under a specific heading - "Canadians in the Royal Air Force" - and mention of these may be taken as fairly conclusive proof that somebody in RCAF Overseas Headquarters had concluded these people were "Canadian".  It is difficult to say what we should conclude when an person was not so identified (George G. Scott, for example), but when a Canadian connection appears tenuous, the absence of such an AFRO entry suggests origins other than Canadian.



ABBOTT, F/O Lyman Carl (155130) - Croix de Guerre with Gold Star - awarded with effect from 21 October 1946. Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 lists him as a Newfoundlander in the RAF; enlisted 7 January 1941 (number 798644); demobilized 9 November 1945. G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969) states (pp.444-445) that Abbott was a navigator in a Halifax shot down over France in the summer of 1944 and evaded capture.  He had earlier flown bombers in the Mediterranean theatre.  A search through London Gazettes from 1944 to the end of 1948 has failed to turn up his name or the date of the award.  However, RAF Personnel Management Agency, in letter to H.A. Halliday dated 24 July 2000, confirms the award and effective date.

 

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AITKIN, S/L The Honourable Max (901288) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.601 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1940.  Born in Montreal, 15 February 1910, the son of Max Aitkin (later Lord Beaverbrook); educated at Westminster School, Pembrook College, Cambridge; joined Royal Auxiliary Air Force in 1935, flying Demons, Gauntlets and Blenheim Is with No.601 Squadron.  He was influential (through his father) in having it re-equipped with Hurricanes.  Served in the Battles of France and Britain; posted to non-operational duties on 20 July 1940; promoted Wing Commander, he assumed charge of No.68 Squadron (Blenheims, converting to Beaufighters) in February 1941.  Posted to Mediterranean as a Group Captain; managed to fly some sorties with No.46 Squadron.  On 5/6 March 1944, piloting Beaufighter LZ330 "F", he destroyed two Ju.52s, probably destroyed one and damaged one; his radar observer, F/L G.A. Muir, RCAF, was awarded a DFC. Late in 1944 returned to United Kingdom where he commanded the Banff Strike Wing (Coastal Command Mosquitoes) in Norwegian waters.  Also Mentioned in Despatches and awarded Czech Military Medal (dates not known to compiler as of April 1999; Chris Shores, Aces High, 2nd edition says the Czech award came three days before his DSO).  Renounced his father's title immediately upon inheriting it.  Died 1 May 1985.

 

In May 1940, whilst leading a section of aircraft on patrol over Brussels, this officer attacked one of twelve Heinkel 111s which was finally seen to be losing height with one of its wings on fire with black smoke pouring from the other. The next day when leading a section on another patrol, a large number of Heinkel 111 and Junkers 87 aircraft, escorted by Messerschmitt 110s, were sighted. Squadron Leader Aitkin attacked and succeeded in destroying one Heinkel and one Junkers aircraft. During a night in June 1940, in difficult circumstances, he destroyed yet another enemy aircraft.  He has displayed great dash and gallantry.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/4095 has the original recommendation, prepared about 25 June 1940 which, with additional comments, makes interesting comparison with the above and demonstrates how honours were processed and edited.

 


On 18 May 1940 Flight Lieutenant Aitken whilst leading a section of the Composite Squadron 601 and 145 on parol over Brussels attacked one of twelve Heinkel 111 aircraft, which was last seen losing height with one plane on fire and the other belching black smoke.

 

On 19 May 1940, whilst leading a section of the Composite Squadron 601 and 145 on patrol Cambrai-Douai, 50-70 Heinkel 111 and Junkers 87 aircraft escorted by Messerschmitt 110s were sighted.  Flight Lieutenant Aitken attacked a Heinkel 111 which was sen to crash. After following the aircraft down he sighted a Junkers 87 flying at 100 feet which he attacked.  This officer was recommended for "Mention in Despatches" in connection with the low flying attack on Borkum on 28 November 1939 (Copy attached). This recognition was not approved.

 

The gallantry and dash displayed by this officer is considered worthy of immediate recognition.

 

The copy of the Borkum raid document is either missing from the file or was not copied in the course of this research, but the recommendation just quoted is followed by a long comment dated 27 June 1940 by Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park, Air Officer Commanding, 11 Group:

 

This officer as a Flight Lieutenant led his section with dash and determination.  As such he took part in the Borkum raid in November 1939, when his flight, on a low-flying attack, machine gunned the enemy. He has since personally shot down four enemy aircraft - the last one on the night of 26/27 June 1940, in difficult circumstances as the enemy aircraft was not illuminated. Since taking over command of his squadron he has put new spirit and energy into his pilots.

 

I have been considering this officer for some time and I now recommend him for the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This document was noted as "Approved" by Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding on 29 June 1940.

 

AITKIN, W/C The Honourable Max (901288) - Distinguished Service Order - No.68 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 August 1942.

 

A brilliant pilot and a gallant leader, this officer has set a most inspiring example.  By his exceptional skill and unswerving devotion to duty he has contributed largely to the high standard of operational efficiency of his squadron and to the successes it has achieved.  One night in July 1942 the squadron destroyed three hostile aircraft, two of which were destroyed by Wing Commander Aitkin himself.  His total victories number twelve.

 

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ANDERSON, W/C Frank (10021) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Public Records Office  Air 2/9130 has recommended citation.  Although he was not listed in Hitchins CAN/RAF cards, AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946 (respecting his OBE) describes him as a "Canadian in the RAF" (see also S/L William Eric Chadwick).  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Toronto in 1880.

 

This officer has charge of the Planning Branch at this Headquarters. He has been responsible for the planning and development of stockholding and supply, postwar planning and the development of the efficiency of the Group as a whole. At all times he has shown great energy and drive and has handled the many problems connected with planning with marked success.  Wing Commander Anderson has a strong and pleasing personality which, combined with the general help he is always willing to give to those who seek his advice, have won the respect and admiration of all with whom he has come in contact.  Wing Commander Anderson is a man of 64 years of age who has held a permanent commission since 1920.  Throughout his long career he has always devoted himself to the needs of the service.

 

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ANDERSON, S/L Leonard John (41358) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.114 Squadron - Award effective as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944.  Born 19 April 1916 in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan where his father, Albert Anderson, was reported living in 1940 (DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing CAN/RAF personnel about 1940); home in Arvida, Quebec (but as of September 1944 his wife was residing in Pointe Claire, Quebec).  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 December 1938.  It is not clear when he took his discharge, but on 10 April 1951 he joined the RCAF as a pilot. He took his release on 9 April 1956; all his time appears to have been in Canada, chiefly as an instructor.  AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 16815/AL.950 refers.

 

This officer has now completed a considerable number of operational sorties on his second tour of operational duty.  His first tour was completed on Hurricane aircraft in the Western Desert.  As a flight commander he has shown the greatest enthusiasm at all times and has set an extremely high standard of operational flying.  Squadron Leader Anderson has operated entirely by night and in all types of weather.  On one occasion during the Battle of Rome he flew his aircraft to attack large concentrations of enemy transport north of the city.  Having bombed successfully he attacked the columns in spite of opposition, persisting until his ammunition was exhausted.  He has always displayed a fine fighting spirit and has set a fine example to his crews.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9033 has recommendation dated 26 September 1944 giving much more detail.  He had flown a total of 1,088 hours 40 minutes (172 hours 15 minutes in previous six months), and 271 hours 25 minutes on operations (107 sorties).  He was a Flight Commander.

 


This officer has now completed over 50 operational sorties on this, his second tour, his first tour being performed on Hurricane aircraft in the Desert.  As a Flight Commander and operationally he has, at all times, shown the greatest enthusiasm and keenness and set an extremely high standard of operational flying.  He has been operating entirely at night, in all types of weather, and has never lost a chance of getting to grips with the Hun, as can be well illustrated by one of many raids he did during the Battle for Rome in an A.20G, a nine-gun aircraft carrying no navigator. On the night in question he flew his aircraft to attack large concentrations of enemy transport moving north of Rome; having bombed these he again and again successfully attacked the columns, in spite of opposition, and only returned to base when his ammunition was exhausted.

 

Squadron Leader Anderson has at all times shown the greatest devotion to duty and is an excellent example to the crews under his command, and I highly recommend this award.

 

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ANDERSON, Warrant Officer William Muir (776068) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.18 Squadron - Award effective 23 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 3 March 1944 and AFRO 766/44.  Born in Victoria, British Columbia; home in Kericho, Kenya.  Former electrician, enlisted 1940.  DHist files 181.005 D.270 and D.271 do not list him. However, AFRO 766/44 dated 6 April 1944 (announcing award) describes him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 13098/AL.760 refers.

 

Warrant Officer Anderson has completed numerous operational sorties both by day and by night.  He has at all times shown great keenness in the performance of his duties as pilot.  His airmanship has always been exemplary and he has given loyal service and commendable devotion to his squadron over a long period.

 

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ANGELL, W/C Henry Ellis (39050) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.295 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 August 1945.  Born 1916 in Calgary; home in Lakeburn (near Moncton), New Brunswick; educated at Bassano, Calgary and University of Alberta.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, Royal Air Force, 24 August 1936.  AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force.  Air Ministry Bulletin 19448/AL.1­069 refers. NOTE: Notwithstanding Les Allison, Canadians in the Royal Air Force, there is no evidence that he was awarded a DSO as well.

 

Wing Commander Angell has completed a tour of operational duty during which he has been mainly engaged on airborne operations.  During 1944-45 he led his flight on three major airborne assaults launched from this country.  This officer is an outstanding squadron commander and under his courageous and inspired leadership his squadron has reached a high standard of operational efficiency.

 


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ANGUS, F/O Allan Benjamin (40281) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.85 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940.  Born in Winnipeg, 10 May 1918; home in McCreary, Manitoba; enlisted in RAF, 27 September 1937; commissioned with effect from 28 November 1937.  Joined No.85 Squadron, 9 July 1938; served with that unit (save for two week Gas Defence Course, February 1939) until his death.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing CAN/RAF personnel about 1940 gives his next-of-kin as Benjamin Angus (father), McCreary, Manitoba.  Killed in action 16 May 1940.  Victories listed in Directorate of History Combat Cards were as follows:  10 May 1940, one Ju.88 destroyed (although citation suggests otherwise); 14 May 1940, two unidentified enemy aircraft destroyed (He.111s ?); 16 May 1940, two unidentified enemy aircraft destroyed.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.

 

This officer has shown great determination in taking every opportunity of engaging the enemy and pressing home his attacks.  He took part in an inconclus­ive attack on a Junkers 88 which resulted in serious damage to the enemy aircraft.  His own aircraft was hit and as a result he had to fore land in Belgium.  Acting on his own initiative he rejoined the squadron in a few hours.  In May, while on patrol, he intercepted and shot down in flames a Heinkel 111, and on the same patrol took part in shooting down a second enemy aircraft of the same type with Flying Officer [W.G.] David.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/6075 has recommendation dated 13 May 1940 which differs only in minor detail; it cleared G/C P.F. Fullard (Commanding Officer, 14 Group) on 13 May and cleared A/V/M C.H.B. Blount (Commanding Air Component) on 16 May 1940.

 

This officer has shown great determination in taking every opportunity of engaging the enemy and pressing home his attacks.  He took part in an inconclus­ive attack on a Junkers 88 on the 10th May which resulted in serious damage to the enemy aircraft.  His own aircraft was hit and as a result he had to fore land in Belgium.  Acting on his own initiative he rejoined the squadron in a few hours.  On 12th May, while on patrol, he intercepted and shot down in flames a Heinkel 111, and on the same patrol took part in shooting down a second enemy aircraft of the same type with Flying Officer David of No.87 Squadron.

 

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APPLETON, S/L James Ronald (39773) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943.  Identified as a Canadian in DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing CAN/RAF personnel about 1940 (wife living at Barry Hotel, Barry, apparently a British address). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Canford Cliffs, Poole, England in 1910 but that he had lived in Canada.   Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 31 May 1937; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 5 April 1938. Flight, issue of 3 March 1938, stated he had received a distinguished pass at No.6 Flying Training School while still an Acting Pilot Officer.

 

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APPS, F/O William Gordon (120404) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.61 Squadron - Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1334/43. His Canadian background is uncertain; AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943 describes him and P/O D.B. Gaunt as "Canadians who are members of the Royal Air Force".  However, AFRO 1522/43 dated 6 August 1943 reports the award again, this time describing him as a member of the RAF "who trained in Canada under the CTE" (attended No.31 BGS). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Woolwich (London) in 1916.

 

This officer has flown on a large number of successful operational sorties during which his navigation to targets at Turin, Milan, Nuremburg, Spezia and Berlin has been of the highest order, while his fine co-operation with the air bomber has enabled many excellent photographs to be obtained.  Flying Officer Apps has always displayed great courage and devotion to duty in the face of heavy and concentrated anti-aircraft fire.

 

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ARNOLD, F/L Keith Fergus (39012) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Photo Reconnaissance Unit, St.Eval - Award effective 25 April 1941 as per London Gazette of that date.  Born in Kindersley, Saskatchewan, 1 April 1911; educated Saskatoon and University of Saskatchewan.  Trumpeter in Canadian Light Horse; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, Royal Air Force, 24 August 1936.  Killed in crash of a Hudson, 25 July 1941 at Mull of Kintyre.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing CAN/RAF personnel about 1940 listed him with next of kin being Mrs. Mary Arnold (wife) then living at Sloan Gardens, London.  Ferry Command crew cards held by Directorate of History and Heritage (Document 84/44-3) give his permanent address (and that of his wife) as Littlestock Manor, Oxon, England; he departed Montreal on 24 July 1941 to ferry Hudson AE640 overseas; this was probably the machine on which he was killed.  No published citation, "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 3680 refers.

 

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ARTHUR, S/L Charles Ian Rose (41241) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.72 Squadron - Award effective 9 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date.  Born 4 June 1918 in Fort Garry, Manitoba; educated at Kelvin High School, Winnipeg. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the RAF, 29 October 1938.  Reported to No.141 Squadron, 10 October 1939; posted to No.242 Squadron, 3 December 1940; posted to No.145 Squadron, 23 May 1941; posted to Central Flying School, Upavon, 18 October 1941. Instructor, No.5 (P) Advanced Flying Unit, Ternhill, December 1941; instructor, No.7 (P) Advanced Flying Unit, Peterborogh; to No.411 Squadron, November 1942; to No.122 Squadron, January 1943; to No.81 Squadron (North Africa), March 1943; to No.242 Squadron (Flight Commander), March 1943; to No.232 Squadron (to command), 1 June 1943; remained until December 1943; posted to Aleppo, December 1943; to No.72 Squadron (to command), April 1944; to No.5 Refresher Flying Unit, Perugia (as Wing Commander), November 1944; to No.239 Wing (Mustangs) as Wing Leader, July 1945. Returned to UK, 1946, reverting to Squadron Leader. No.19 Squadron (in command), April 1946 to August 1948. Retired from RAF, November 1954 and settled in Canada.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14231/AL.829 refers. See Michel Lavigne, Canadian Wing Commanders.  Known victories as follows: 25 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed, Le Touquet (Circus 23); 30 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with F/O St.Pierre, RAF), Le Touquet area, Circus; 29 June 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with another pilot), Comiso; 17 July 1943, one Bf.109 damaged, Sicily; 12 August 1943, one MC.202 damaged, northwest of Milazzo; 7 May 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed, Lake Bracciano area; 16 May 1944, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with another pilot), Lake Bracciano area; 14 October 1944, one Me.410 destroyed (shared with five other pilots), Bergamo area.

 

In May 1944 this officer flew the leading aircraft of a formation which engaged a force of eighteen enemy aircraft, nine of which were shot down without loss.  By his skilful and determined leadership, Squadron Leader Arthur played a worthy part in this brilliant success.  This officer has taken part in a very large number of sorties and has displayed outstanding devotion to duty.  He has destroyed two enemy aircraft.

 

ARTHUR, S/L Charles Ian Rose (41241) - Bar Distinguished Flying Cross - No.72 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944.

 

Squadron Leader Arthur has continued to lead his squadron with skill and determination.  Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross he has completed many sorties and has destroyed at least one enemy aircraft.  During the invasion of the south of France he has led his squadron in many sorties which resulted in the destruction of 37 mechanical transport and other vehicles and damaged many others.  His coolness, determination and outstanding leadership have largely contributed to the successes achieved by the squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9033 has recommendation for this award dated 25 October 1944.  It stated he had flown 81 operational hours since previous award, had flown a total of 1,645 hours (145 in previous six months) and had flown a total of 717 operational hours (437 sorties).  Text differs little from the published citation:

 

Squadron Leader Arthur has continued to lead his squadron with skill and determination.  Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has completed many sorties and has destroyed one enemy aircraft and shared in the destruction of another.


During the invasion of the south of France he lead [sic] led his squadron on many sorties resulting in the destruction of some 37 mechanical transport and other vehicles besides damaging many others.  His coolness and determination contributed largely to the success of his squadron.  Squadron Leader Arthur has now completed over 700 hours operational flying.

 

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ASH, F/O George Henry (129520) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.138 Squadron - Award effective 18 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date. Born in St.Catharines, Ontario; home there.  RAFVR, 1941, commissioned in 1942.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations. The following is from DHist cards, themselves based on Air Ministry Bulletin 12623/AL.730.

 

...an efficient and courageous air gunner who has completed a large number of operations, this officer's ability has gained him the full confidence of his crew and has greatly contributed to the many successes achieved.  On one occasion during June 1943, while crossing enemy coast, his aircraft was subjected to intense fire from coastal defences.  Although aircraft was repeatedly hit in tailplane and rear of fuselage, Flying Officer Ash cooly returned fire and succeeded in silencing enemy guns, thereby greatly contributing to safe return of aircraft.  On this, as on all occasions, he showed a high degree of initiative and devotion to duty.

 

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ATKINSON, F/L Leslie Vero Everest (39407) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.82 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 July 1940.  Born in Crief, Perthshire, 1916; educated in Vancouver; Bombardier, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1930-32; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the RAF, 28 January 1937.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Air Ministry Bulletin 3874 refers.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing CAN/RAF personnel about 1940 gives next-of-kin in 1940 as Major Leslie Atkinson, MC, in Dulwich, England.   Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommendation dated 28 June 1940 giving his name as Leonard Vere Everest:

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant Atkinson was the pilot of an aircraft which was detailed to attack enemy forces in the Dunkirk area on 3rd June 1940.

 

In spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and owing to the pall of smoke over the target he was forced to fly at less than 1,000 feet.  He remained over the Dunkirk area for 25 minutes dropping his bombs singly in order to  harass the enemy as much as possible.

 


On 13th June 1940, when leading his squadron, he was attacked by enemy fighters when about to attack his target.  In spite of this fighter opposition he displayed great courage before evading the enemy fighters in cloud.

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant Atkinson has carried out twenty-two operational flights since the outbreak of war, during which he has displayed great courage and determination and has proved himself a leader of outstanding ability.

 

Same document has final citation as submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee which corrects spelling of name and refines citation to the following:

 

On 3rd June 1940, in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and being forced by a pall of smoke over the target to fly at less than 1,000 feet, this officer remained over the Dunkirk area for 25 minutes dropping his bombs singly in order to harass the enemy as much as possible.  On 13th June, in spite of severe fighter opposition, he displayed great courage and determination and dropped his bombs on the target before evading the enemy fighters in cloud.  Flight Lieutenant Atkinson has carried out 22 operational flights since the outbreak of war and has proved himself a leader of outstanding ability.

 

This same document also details how Bomber Command awards were allocated for June 1940.  Total flying for that month had been 16,090 hours, to which were added 506 hours that had been held over from May (total of 16,596 hours).  A divisor of 150 was applied, making 110 awards, from which ten immediate awards were subtracted for a total of 100.  The submission covered 65 awards - one DSO, 27 DFCs, one Bar to DFC, 35 DFMs and one Bar to DFM.

 

ATKINSON, S/L Leslie Vero Everest (39407) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.21 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 May 1941.

 

In April 1941, this officer led a formation in an attack on a large and strongly escorted enemy convoy.  Despite intense anti-aircraft fire from the escorting vessels, Squadron Leader Atkinson delivered his attack on the largest merchant vessel, scoring two direct hits on the stern of the ship.  The formation, which had followed in to attack, completed a decisive action in which three or four ships were set on fire and left in a sinking condition.  Squadron Leader Atkinson displayed great courage and tactical ability throughout the entire operation.  He has completed numerous operational missions and has displayed leadership and efficiency of the highest order.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8752 has a draft citation which is much more detailed and explicit about the nature of the attack for which he was decorated.

 


On 18th April 1941, this officer was detailed to lead a formation in an attack against the German naval base at Heligoland.  Nearing his objective, he observed a large and strongly escorted enemy convoy, and with unerring appreciation of the situation, decided to attack.  Despite intense anti-aircraft fire from the escorting vessels, Squadron Leader Atkinson delivered his attack on the largest merchant vessel, scoring two direct hits on the stern of the ship, which was seen to disintegrate.  The formation, which had followed in to attack, completed a decisive action in which three or four ships were set on fire and left in a sinking condition.  Squadron Leader Atkinson displayed great courage and tactical ability throughout the entire operation.  He has completed numerous operational missions and has displayed leadership and efficiency of the highest order.

 

The same file has the original recommendation dated 21 April 1941, submitted by the Air Officer Commanding, No.2 Group:

 

On 18th April 1941, Squadron Leader Atkinson led a formation of eight aircraft in an attack on a large and well defended convoy, resulting in grave loss to the enemy.

 

The task of his force was a low flying attack on the German naval base at Heligoland.  Close to the objective, he sighted a large enemy convoy, strongly escorted.  With unerring appreciation of the situation, he decided to attack the convoy and abandoned his raid on Heligoland.

 

With great dash he led his squadron in to the attack.  The fill force of the anti-aircraft defences of the escorting vessels was directed against them.  This officer nevertheless delivered his attack on the largest merchant vessel in the convoy, on which he dropped two bomb direct hits on the stern of the ship.  The stern of the ship was seen to disintegrate.  This was confirmed by other crews taking part.  The squadron following their leader in completing a decisive action in which three or four enemy vessels were set on fire and left sinking.  Photographs taken by Squadron Leader Atkinson confirm this.

 

With coolness and devotion to duty this officer then circled the convoy, and when the action was finished reformed his force in formation and returned to base.  This was a polished tactical action of outstanding merit which holds my admiration.

 

Squadron Leader Atkinson has now completed 13 sorties totalling 40 hours flying, during his second tour of operational duty in this group, having completed 22 sorties in his first tour.  During both these tours Squadron leader Atkinson has displayed determination and courage to a marked degree and has also proved himself to be possessed of outstanding qualities of leadership by which he has brought his flight up to a high pitch of efficiency.  I recommend the immediate award of the first Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

ATKINSON, W/C Leslie Vero Everest (39407) - Distinguished Service Order - No.82 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 August 1941.

 


In June 1941, this officer carried out a low flying attack on the Tripoli-Homs road, demolishing a large factory.  The following day he led a most determined attack on shipping in Tripoli harbour.  As a result a 20,000 ton liner and a 12,500 ton motor vessel were severely damaged while the complete harbour organization was disrupted; the remaining ships sailed away later in the day.

 

Wing Commander Atkinson also led a successful attack on an aerodrome ten miles west of Tripoli, causing large fires and explosions.  Amongst other damage inflicted, five aircraft were destroyed on the ground.

 

This officer has proved himself to be a fearless operational pilot, and has been responsible for the destruction of many thousands of tons of enemy shipping.  He is a magnificent leader whose courage and determination have been of the highest order.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8858 has original recommendation drafted 20 July 1941 (provided through the courtesy of Sean Morrison, Tewksbury).  Atkinson has flown 41 sorties (118 hours five minutes); text as follows:

 

On the 13th June 1941, Wing Commander Atkinson was detailed to take No.82 Squadron to Malta to operate against enemy shipping convoys reinforcing Cyrenaica.  The flight out was completed successfully and on June 19th the squadron commenced operating.  Few convoys were found and those that were. were heavily escorted by destroyers.  Alternative targets on the African coast and shipping in Tripoli Harbour were, however, subjected to highly successful and determined attacks.

 

On June 29th Wing Commander Atkinson carried out a low flying attack on the Tripoli/Homs road demolishing a large factory; on the following day he led a most determined attack on the shipping in Tripoli Harbour, as a result of which a 20,000 ton liver and a 12,000 ton motor vessel were severely damaged, and the complete harbour organisation disrupted, all the remaining ships sailing away that day.  He also led a most successful attack on an enemy fighter aerodrome ten miles west of Tripoli causing large fires and explosions, five enemy aircraft were burnt out apart from other damage.  Many further successful sorties were carried out by his squadron both under his own leadership and that of his Flight Commanders.

 


Wing Commander Atkinson has proved himself to be not only a fearless operational pilot but also a great leader of men.  In the summer of 1940 he showed his ability to fight in the capacity of a junior officer; he also proved himself to be loyal and conscientious.  When in March 1941 he returned to operational flying he put his previous experience to great use and in a very short space of time had made his presence felt in No.2 Group.  In April 1941 he was given the honour of taking to Malta the first flight loaned to the Middle East from this Group.  The magnificent work carried out by him there has been the subject of a separate report and earned him the award of a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

By his personal courage and very great experience of operations he has added fresh laurels to No.82 Squadron's outstanding record; furthermore the unbounded confidence he has instilled in his officers and crews has raised the efficiency and morale of his squadron to the very highest level.  In my opinion there can be few finer officers and leaders of men than Wing Commander Atkinson and few squadrons that have such a fine record and such a high standard of morale and sense of duty.

 

It is therefore most strongly recommended that this officer be awarded the Distinguished Service Order for the highly courageous and most efficient manner in which he conducted these most difficult operations in Malta.

 

ATKINSON, W/C Leslie Vero Everest (39407) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated  1 January 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

AVENT, S/L John (37929) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.269 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 July 1940.  Born in Hartney, Manitoba.  Granted Short Service Commission in RAF, 13 July 1936, training at No.5 FTS (Sealand) and No.7 FTS (Peterhead). Promoted to Acting Flying Officer, 20 May 1938.  Serving in No.269 Squadron as of 3 September 1939 and posted away, 5 March 1941.  Gave a talk on BBC, 24 July 1940 which was reprinted in Winged Words.  Cards in Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ list many sorties bombing Norwegian targets in the spring of 1940 and subsequent Coastal Command reconnaissance patrols.  No citation to DFC other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Public Records Office Air 2/9434 has recommendation, circa 1 July 1940:

 

Since the outbreak of hostilities this officer has flown 290 hours, comprising 60 operational flights over the sea and enemy territory.  During this time he has carried out five bombing raids against enemy objectives.  On the night of the 15th June 1940 he was leader of a bombing raid and, in spite of very heavy anti-aircraft fire, he pressed home the attack from a low altitude, blew up a large ammunition dump and severely damaged the docks. This officer is the Senior Flight Commander in the squadron, and by his leadership has set an excellent example to all members of his flight.

 

This was approved by the Commanding Officer, Station Wick, circa 1 July 1940:

 


I cannot speak too highly of the work that this officer has carried out whilst commanding a flight in the squadron and entirely endorse his Squadron Commander's remarks.

 

Approved by Air Officer Commanding, No.18 Group, 1 July 1940:

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant Avent has supported the Commander of 269 Squadron in the most able manner possible and the high standard of this squadron in both morale and achievement is due in no small measure to his inspiration and example.

 

He tackles the many tasks which come to him with determination and a sound judgement achieving the best possible results from himself and those of his flight who follow him.

 

Very strongly recommended for the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

To which the AOC, Coastal Command (A/C/M Sir Frederick Bowhill) adds, on 3 July 1940:

 

 Concur.  Very strongly recommended.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has final recommended citation:

 

Since the commencement of hostilities this officer has completed 290 hours flying, comprising 60 operational flights over the sea and enemy territory.  On one occasion in June 1940, he was leader in a bombing attack and, in spite of heavy anti-aircraft fire, he pressed home the attack from a low altitude, blowing up a large ammunition dump and severely damaging the docks.  By his leadership and determination Flight Lieutenant Avent has set an excellent example to all members of his flight.

 

AVENT, S/L John (37929) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette date 24 September 1941.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BACON, Sergeant Ernest Augustus Holmes (RAF 903381) - Air Force Medal - No.34 Service Flying Training School, Medicine Hat, Alberta - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 185/43 dated 5 February 1943. Born 11 March 1919 in Canora, Saskatchewan; moved to Medicine Hat as a boy and completed his education in North Vancouver High School.  He travelled to Kent, England to take an aircraft engineer apprenticeship; joined the RAF in 1939; awarded wings in 1940 and sent to Canada to instruct. Subsequently commissioned, 22 April 1941 (108853, reported in London Gazette dated 11 November 1941; promoted to Flying Officer 21 June 1942) and was still in Canada as of mid-1943 when AFRO 1522/43 dated 6 August 1943 described him as RAF attached to RCAF, promoted to Flight Lieutenant as of 21 June 1943. When posted overseas he flew in Coastal Command.  Remained in RAF to 1947, returning to Canada to pursue civil aviation in the Medicine Hat area.  Joined RCAF at Suffield, Alberta, 1 October 1948 as a pilot (instructor; service number 30219); promoted to Flight Lieutenant. 1 June 1951; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 January 1954; released 2 August 1966, settling in Medicine Hat. 

 

On the night of 28th April, 1941, a crash occurred at Holsom Relief Landing Ground and the aircraft, a Harvard, caught fire.  Sergeant Bacon in company with others ran to the scene, across a ploughed field, through barbed wire fences, for a distance of about half a mile.  Sergeant Bacon outstripped the others and without any protection immediately proceeded to extricate the instructor and pupil from the burning aircraft.  In spite of the fierceness of the fire he managed he managed to get both clear.  He then remained  and comforted the pilot, an officer, until he died on the way to hospital.  Sergeant Bacon has shown similar courage and devotion to duty together with initiative on subsequent occasions.  He has shown exceptional ability as an instructor and has shown great devotion to duty while flying.  His tireless energy in that direction is outstanding.  He well deserves recognition not only for his gallant act but also for the great and exceptional services rendered as a flying instructor.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BAGGS, Flight Sergeant Robert Kelvin (798674) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.97 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 December 1943. Home in Grand Falls, Newfoundland; his identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969). Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 lists him as a Newfoundlander in the RAF; enlisted 25 March 1941; demobilized as a Pilot Officer (196609), 15 May 1946.  Wireless operator.  No published citation and no recommendation found by Ian Tavender, whose book, The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000) is an important work on this award at this period.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BAIN, Sergeant (later P/O) James (755030) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.44 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 September 1941.  Born in Hamilton, Ontario, 1919; joined RAFVR, 1939; father living in Ashford, Kent.  First operating with No.44 Squadron on 15/16 December 1940 as a Sergeant; commissioned August 1941.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Air Ministry Bulletin 5103 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8900 has recommendation dated 30 July 1941.  The main form states he had flown 28 sorties (165 hours 55 minutes) but the sortie sheet lists only 24 trips:

 

15 Dec 40        Lorient                                           9 Apr 41            Berlin

19 Dec 40        Lorient                                           12 Apr 41         Brest


11 Jan 41         Wilhelmshaven                             30 Apr 41         Kiel

16 Jan 41         Emden                                           3 May 41           Cologne

1 Mar 41           Wilhelmshaven                             8 May 41           Hamburg

2 Mar 41           Brest                                              17 May 41        Cologne

10 Mar 41         Cologne                                        26 May 41        GARDENING

12 Mar 41         Berlin                                             23 June 41       Dusseldorf, DNCO

18 Mar 41         Kiel, DNCO                                   29 June 41       Bremen, DNCO

29 Mar 41         GARDENING                                6 July 41           Brest

4 Apr 41            Brest                                              19 July 41         GARDENING

7 Apr 41            Kiel                                                24 July 41         Brest

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer was the wireless operator in the leading aircraft of the second V formation which carried out a daylight attack on Brest on 24th July 1941. Whilst over the target area an enemy fighter was seen to approach from below and astern. It then eased up until level with Sergeant Bain's aircraft.  This gunner waited until the range dropped to approximately 200 yards when he fired a burst.  The enemy [aircraft] was seen to turn on its back and fall away. Sergeant Bain is an excellent wireless operator and air gunner.  He has carried out a total of 28 operational flights and has largely been responsible for the success of a great many of these flights.

 

This was edited for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee to read:

 

Sergeant Bain was the wireless operator/air gunner in the leading aircraft of one of the formations which attacked Brest in daylight on 24th July 1941. Whilst over the target an enemy fighter approached from below and astern.  Holding his fire until the enemy had reduced the range to about 200 yards, Sergeant Bain then fired a burst which destroyed the hostile aircraft.  The skill and courage displayed by this airman has contributed much to the success of many operations in which he has participated.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

BAKER, Flight Sergeant Alex William John (903530) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.149 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1942.  Born in Pickering, Ontario, 1915; home there (labourer); joined RAF in 1939; air gunner.  Air Ministry Bulletin 8793 refers.

 

Flight Sergeant Baker has participated in many operational sorties as rear gunner.  Throughout he has shown the greatest determination and efficiency both on the ground and in the air.  On two occasions his clear and precise instructions to his pilot have been largely responsible for the safe return of his aircraft. At all times he has displayed great courage and devotion to duty.

 


NOTE: The original recommendation, dated 22 October 1942 when he had flown 72 sorties, was found in Public Record Office Air 2/16183 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000) which is an important work on this award at this period.

 

Flight Sergeant Baker has been flying with this squadron as rear gunner since 25th October 1941, during which he has successfully taken part in 33 operational sorties. Previous to this, he had completed 30 sorties with this squadron in 1940 and eleven sorties with No.148 Squadron in the Middle East, making a total of 72 operational flights against the enemy.  During all this time he has shown the greatest determination and efficiency both on the ground and in the air. Though he has not actually shot down an enemy aircraft, he has undoubtedly been responsible for the safe return of his aircraft on two occasions by driving off enemy fighters and giving clear and concise instructions to his pilot.  Flight Sergeant Baker's long record of operational flying, personal courage and devotion to duty are strongly recommended for recognition by the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BAKER, Flight Sergeant John Harvey (776057) - Mention in Despatches - No.422 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943.  RAF Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage, Document 84/44-3) state he was born 19 November 1916 in Saskatchewan, but give his permanent address as Geita, Tanganyika, British East Africa; his wife was living in Toronto. The crew card identifies him as a pilot, and shows him departing Montreal on 5 November 1942 to take Catalina FP180 overseas.  Award for gallantry when a Sunderland crashed, 19 December 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BAKER, F/L John Wakeling, MC - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.60 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 November 1925 for services in Waritistan.  Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, 23 October 1897; educated at Eastbourne College and Royal Military Academy, Woolich.  Served in Royal Artillery, transferring to the Royal Flying Corps as an observer, 1917. No card for him can be found among DHist records of Canadians in the First World War flying services, which suggests that he was only briefly in Canada even before the war.  This impression is further borne out by the announcement of his engagement (Aeroplane, 9 February 1927) which descibes him as the "eldest son of the Rev.S.V. Baker, Rector of St.Peter's, Holburn".  With No.60 Squadron, India, 1923-28; Royal Air Force Staff College, 1931; Directorate of Air Staff Duties, Air Ministry, 1932-35; commanded No.33 Squadron, 1935-36; Air Staff Training Command, 1936-38; Imperial Defence College, 1938; Deputy Director of Plans and Director of Bomber Operations in Air Ministry, 1939-42 (notes accompanying his CB state he was appointed to Directorate of Plans, Air Ministry, August 1939 and appointed Director of Bombing Operations, Air Ministry, February 1941); Senior Air Staff Officer, Air Command, Southeast Asia, 1943-44; Air Officer Commanding, No.12 Group, Fighter Command, 1945-46; Director General of Personnel, Air Ministry, 1946-48; Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Coastal Command, 1948-50; Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Middle East Air Force, 1950-52; Vice-Chief of the Air Staff, 1952-1953.  Awarded GBE as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1954 as Controller of Aircraft, Ministry of Supply).  For further details of Waritistan operations see London Gazette of the same date which carries a long despatch. AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942 (reporting CB award) described him as a Canadian in the RAF but included "VC" among his postnominal letters !

 

This officer showed devotion to duty throughout the operations and set a high example to all ranks. He performed 69 hours of war flying as a pilot, which included 35 raids.

 

BAKER, A/C John Wakeling, MC, DFC - Companion, Order of the Bath - Air Ministry - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  Recommendation found in Public Record Office Air 2/8909.

 

This officer has served as Director of Bomber Operations since February 1941. He has shown great zeal, exceptional enthusiasm, outstanding ability and exceptional devotion to duty, and his work in connection with the strategic planning of bombing operations and the development of bombing technique and tactics has been characterized by careful organization, great initiative, sound judgement and outstanding professional ability.

 

BAKER, A/M John Wakeling, CB, MC, DFC - Knight Commander, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1949 (Air Officer Commanding in Chief, Coastal Command).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BANKS, S/L David Kynvin (37077) - Air Force Cross - No.209 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 15 March 1935 (same time as Al Bocking and J.A. Kent); attained rank of Wing Commander, 1 March 1942.  Serving with MAEE (whatever that is) at time award announced; periodic award for services in Coastal Command.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5952 refers (no career details).  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in "Gaysborough", Nova Scotia in 1916 (this clearly should read Guysborough).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BARRETT, F/L Daniel Angus (48690) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.44 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944.  Born in Kincardine, Scotland, 1919; home in Lincoln; educated in Montreal.  RAF 1937; retrained as aircrew; commissioned 1942.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 confirms identity as a Canadian airman in RAF, January 1940.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations. The following is from DHist cards, themselves based on Air Ministry Bulletin 12623/AL.730:

 


...has displayed high sense of duty and great skill during operational career.  In September 1943 took part in attack on Mannheim.  Before reaching objective, starboard inner engine caught fire and while this was being brought under control an enemy aircraft attacked.  In these harassing circumstances, Flight Lieutenant Barrett was of utmost assistance to pilot and his skill was largely responsible for the successful evasion of the attack.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BARTLETT, F/L Christopher Smales (39928) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.216 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 August 1941.  Born 1917; home in Qu'appelle, Saskatchewan; Pilot Officer (RAF), 12 July 1937. In No.216 Squadron as of September 1939 until approximately June 1941; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942; with No.428 Squadron, 10 October 1943 to 9 February 1943; No.434 Squadron, 9 February to 12/13 June 1944 (killed in action).  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 1605/44 dated 28 July 1944 (reporting his death) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 4707 refers.

 

One night in May 1941, this officer carried out a flight which necessitated transporting a party of Royal Engineers and landing them beside a highly strategical bridge which it was intended to destroy. Much of the complete success of this daring and difficult operation can be attributed to the skill displayed by this officer. Flight Lieutenant Bartlett has also executed eleven successful night raids.

 

BARTLETT, W/C Christopher Smales (39928) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 25 July 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 14798/AL.854 refers.

 

In the course of his second tour of operations has attacked many strongly defended targets, including several attacks on Berlin and numerous others on industrial centres in the Ruhr.  He is a forceful and courageous leader whose example has inspired all.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BARTLETT, Flight Sergeant Jocelyn Coyte (AUS 406801) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No. 142 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 September 1943.  Born Winnipeg, 29 November 1915; however, he could note have lived in Canada long, for upon enlistment he stated he was born in "Winnipeg, Saskatchewan";  home in Inglewood, South Australia (clerk); enlisted in RAAF, 26 April 1941 at No.4 Recruiting Centre, Perth; to No.2 BAGS, Port Piere (date uncertain; Fairey Battles); promoted Sergeant, 8 January 1942; to No.5 Embarkation Depot, 30 January 1942; to No.2 Embarkation Depot, 16 March 1942; embarked from Australia, 30 March 1942; taken on strength, No.3 Personnel Reception Centre, 11 May 1942; to No.7 AGS, Stormy Downs, 20 June 1942; to No.27 OTU, 21 July 1942; to No.142 Squadron, 17 October 1942; to EAC, Africa with that unit, 19 December 1942; commissioned 30 June 1943; from No.142 Squadron to No.2 BPD, 15 August 1943; to UK, 25 August 1943; to No.27 OTU, 26 September 1943; to No.11 PDRC, 19 August 1944; to No.1 PD, 2 November 1944; to No.5 PD, 1 December 1944; to No.70 OTU, 2 January 1945; to AGS, 12 February 1945; to No.5 PD, 19 March 1945; released 21 March 1945.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations. The following is from DHist cards, themselves based on Air Ministry Bulletin 11564:

 

...has invariably displayed very keen spirit and great eagerness to engage the enemy.  On completion of first tour of duty he volunteered for further operations and continued to display most commendable courage and determination.  Gallantry and devotion to duty have set an outstanding example to squadron.

 

NOTE: The original recommendation, dated 30 June 1943 when he had flown 48 sorties (276 hours), was found in Public Record Office Air 2/8981 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000).

 

Flight Sergeant Bartlett has completed one tour and half of a second tour of operations with this squadron, making a total of 48 operations involving 276 hours operational flying.  This Non-Commissioned Officer has always shown a very keen spirit and has been an example to the remainder of the squadron.  When he had finished a tour of operations and replacements were very scarce, Flight Sergeant Bartlett volunteered to carry on for a second tour after a short rest at the request of the Squadron Commander.  Recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BARTON, F/L Robert Alexander (37664) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 October 1940.  Born in Kamloops, British Columbia, 7 June 1916; enrolled in RAF, 27 January 1936; posted to No.41 Squadron, 11 October 1936; served with No.249 Squadron in Battle of Britain and Malta, 15 May 1940 to 8 December 1941, commanding the unit from December 1940 onwards.  Took the squadron to Malta, 21 May 1941, flying from deck of HMS Ark Royal. Crash-landed and sustained second-degree burns on 1 August 1941 but remained on Malta and returned to action.  Returned to Britain in December 1941 to serve at an Operational Training Unit.  Subsequently a staff officer in Fighter Command, commanded Skeabrae (Orkneys).  Early 1945 given command of North Weald; posted to India in August 1945.  On return to Britain in 1948 he served in staff appointments including Germany, retiring in 1959.  See H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky, for a chapter on his career.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5435 refers.  Chris Shores, Aces High (2nd edition) lists his victories as follows: 15 August 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed and one Bf.110 damaged, Middle Wallop; 24 August 1940, two Bf.109s destroyed, Isle of Wight (one shared with another pilot); 2 September 1940, one Do.17 destroyed, Rochford (shared with another pilot); 11 September 1940, four He.111s damaged southeast of London (squadron claim); 15 September 1940, two Do.17s destroyed, Thames Estuary (one shared with another pilot); 18 September 1940, one He.111 damaged, Thames Estuary; 27 September 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed, North Weald; 29 October 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed and two Bf.109s damaged, North Weald; 7 November 1940, one Bf.109 probably destroyed over sea, Clacton; 11 November 1940, one Ju.86 destroyed over Channel; 4 February 1941, two Bf.110s destroyed, Kentish Knock Lightship (one shared with another pilot); 3 June 1941, one SM.79 destroyed off Gozo; 7/8 June 1941, one BD.20 destroyed off Malta at night; 17 July 1941, one MC.200 destroyed, Malta; 25 July 1941, one MC.200 destroyed, Malta; 4 September 1941, one MC.200 probably destroyed and one MC.200 damaged off Cap Passero; 19 October 1941, one SM.81 destroyed south of Lampedusa (shared with another pilot); 22 November 1941, one MC.202 destroyed northeast of Gozo.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date; AFRO 1340/41 dated 14 November 1941 (announcing Bar to DFC) also stated he was a Canadian in the RAF.

 

This officer has displayed outstanding leadership.  His skill was particularly displayed on September 28, when his squadron destroyed twenty enemy aircraft.  Flight Lieutenant Barton has destroyed four enemy machines and shared in the destruction of others.

 

NOTE: The citation is erroneous in that it should specify September 27, not September 28.

 

BARTON, S/L Robert Alexander, DFC (37664) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.249 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 October 1941; no citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/4782 (Non-Immediate Awards, Middle East, 1941-1943) has following recommendation communicated by RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee, 2 October 1941:

 

Squadron Leader Barton is Officer Commanding No.249 Squadron.  During his period of service in the United Kingdom this officer shot down seven and one-half enemy aircraft confirmed and since his arrival in Malta has show down four and one-half enemy aircraft including one enemy bomber at night.  He shows a high standard of courage and initiative and his excellent leadership has been a tonic to his flight commanders and fellow pilots and to the station in general.  He leads his squadron on all interceptions and offensive fighter patrols which entails being on "Standby" every other day.  In addition to this he performs night fighter duties which on many occasions have entailed being on watch for the entire 24 hours without a break.  The results obtained by the fighter effort on the island of Malta can be largely credited to the efforts of this officer in the manner in which he inspires the pilots under his command.

 

This was edited down for the Honours and Awards Committee at Air Ministry:

 


This officer destroyed seven hostile aircraft during a period of service in the United Kingdom.  Since his arrival in Malta he has led his squadron on all interceptions and fighter patrols during which he has destroyed four hostile aircraft, including one at night.  Squadron Leader Barton has, throughout, shown a high standard of courage, leadership and initiative and has contributed materially to the results obtained by the fighter effort on the island.

 

BARTON, W/C Robert Alexander, DFC (37664) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 June 1945.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BARTON, F/L Wallace Stanley (39484) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.4 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 July 1940.   Born in Hindley, Lancashire, 1918; educated in Canada; DHist file 181.005 D.270 listed him as a "Royal Air Force Office, ex-Canada" in 1940; commissioned A/P/O, 8 March 1937; served with No.4 Squadron (Lysanders); AFRO 472/40 dated 2 August 1940 stated he was attached for duty with the RCAF, effective 25 July 1940; AFRO 603/41 dated 23 May 1941 reported that he would cease to be attached to the RCAF as of 24 May 1941.  AFRO 142/42 dated 30 January 1942 reported his promotion to Squadron Leader, effective 1 December 1941, while with an RAF school in Canada.  AFRO 2101/43 dated 15 October 1943 (reporting him missing on active service) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Rose to Wing Commander; missing in action, 21 July 1943.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Air Ministry Bulletin 1203 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/6075 (Non-Immediate Awards, Air Component of the Field Force, 1940) has recommendation by W/C G.P. Charles, Commanding Officer, No.4 Squadron, 14 May 1940.

 

At the commencement of the enemy advance into Belgium this officer carried out the tactical reconnaissance over the enemy.  At this time very little information regarding the enemy air defences was available but by his skill and determination this officer escaped detection by enemy fighters and carried out valuable reconnaissances to a depth of 20 miles over the enemy leading troops in the face of heavy fire.  His concise and accurate reports, which were transmitted by wireless, were of the greatest value to our land forces.

 

This was further refined for submission to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

At the commencement of the enemy advance into Belgium when little was known of the enemy air defences, this officer carried out valuable reconnaissances to a depth of 20 miles over the enemy leading troops in the face of heavy fire, and by his skill and determination escaped detection by enemy fighters.  His concise and accurate reports which  were transmitted by wireless, were of the greatest value to our land forces.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BASTOW, F/L Gerald Hugh (124697) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.16 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 January 1945.  Born 18 November 1922 in St.John's, Newfoundland; educated at Springdale Street School, 1929-1936 and Bishop's College (St.John's), 1936-1939; machinery salesman before the war. Identified as being from St.John's, Newfoundland by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969).  Directorate of History and Heritage document 79/201 lists him as a Newfoundlander in the RAF; enlisted 22 September 1941 (number 798728) as Aircraftman 2nd Class (Aircraft Hand, Pilot); reclassified Leading Aircraftman and remustered Pilot Standard Group, 19 December 1941; promoted Temporary Sergeant and remustered Airman Pilot Special Group, 17 June 1942; commissioned 19 June 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 19 December 1942; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 19 June 1944; release authorized 7 March 1946 but last day of service recorded as 24 June 1946, resigning his commission on 25 June 1946. Postings listed as follows: No.21 EFTS, Chatham, December 1941 to February 1942; No.9 SFTS, Summerside, Prince Edward Island, March to June 1942; No.1 OTU, Bagotville, July to September 1942; No.16 Squadron, March 1943 to August 1944; Nos.53 and 61 OTUs, December 1944 to September 1945; Empire Navigation School, September 1945 to January 1946.  No citation.  Reported to have been slightly injured in crash of a Spitfire (no details). Appointed to Command No.514 Air Cadet Squadron, St.John's Newfoundland, 24 November 1949 while still residing in St.John's (service number 300559) in rank of Flight Lieutenant; promoted Squadron Leader, 1 November 1951; assumed command of No.10 Wing, Royal Canadian Air Cadets, May 1955; promoted Wing Commander, 1 November 1955; awarded Canadian Forces Decoration, May 1958; appointed Honorary Aide-de-Camp to the Governor General, 15 September 1959;  relinquished Air Cadet duties, 31 August 1962 and transferred to Supplementary Reserve, effective that date.

 

Although no details of his operational career have come to light as of 17 August 2000, his record as an Air Cadet Officer is worthy of note.  A report compiled at an uncertain date (but apparently around August 1950) noted that No.514 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Cadets was sponsored by the St.John's Kinsman Club, which had recommended him for the position in May 1950.  He was described as a "spark plug" and a fine administrator, whose accomplishments included acquisition of a 15-piece band, arranging weekly swimming at the Kinsman Pool, and initiation of an annual field day using the Kinsman Boys Camp, some eight miles from St.John's.  On 28 September 1955, Mr. B.E. Higgins (Chairman, Newfoundland Provincial Committee, Royal Canadian Air Cadets, wrote of him:

 

I cannot speak too highly of this officer.  He has been of inestimable value to the Newfoundland Provincial Committee with whom he cooperates fully.  He is deeply interested in the Air Cadet movement and to my personal knowledge devotes time to it far in excess of that required by his Wing duties.

 

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BATCHELOR, F/L Alexander William (134045) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.109 Squadron - awarded 13 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945.  Born 22 July 1920 in Saskatoon; educated in Saskatchewan.  Enlisted in RAF as 926590 Aircraftsman 2nd Class (Aircraft Hand), Air Observer, 21 May 1940; mobilised 15 July 1940. Remustered to LAC and Observer Under Training, 29 December 1940; classified as Sergeant and Air Observer, 27 June 1941; promoted to Flight Sergeant, 1 June 1942; remustered as Navigator (B), 23 July 1942; Commissioned 17 September 1942 (134045); graded as Flying Officer on Probation, 17 March 1943; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 17 September 1944. Transferred to RCAF, 18 January 1945. His wartime postings were as follows: No.1 Recruits Centre, Uxbridge, 21 May 1940; Placed on Reserve, 22 May 1940; No.9 Recruits Centre, Blackpool, 15 July 1940; Station Leuchars, 31 July 1940 (ground defence); No.5 Initial Training Wing, 19 Oct 1940; No.50 Group Pool, 18 January 1941; No.5 Bombing and Gunnery School, 2 May 1941; No.10 OTU, 5 July 1941; No.78 Squadron, Middleton St. George, 10 September 1941 (first sortie, 30 November 1941); No.76 Squadron, 30 June 1942; No.462 Squadron, 12 August 1942 (NOTE: with these squadrons he was on operations in Middle East from 12 July 1942 to 31 December 1942; first sortie in that theatre was on 15 July 1942); No.23 Personnel Transit Centre, Middle East, 2 January 1943; No.22 Personnel Transit Centre, Middle East, 3 January 1943; No.1 Personnel Despatch Centre, UK, 26 March 1943; No.1652 Conversion Unit (Navigator/B, Instructor), 25 April 1943; No.23 OTU, Pershore (Instructor), 29 May 1943 (Wellintons); No.20 OTU (Instructor), 15 March 1944; No.1655 Mosquito Training Unit (for Pathfinder training), 31 July 1944; No.109 Squadron (Navigator/B, operations), 15 September 1944 (first sorties 1 October 1944); Little Staughton, 27 May 1945; No.63 Base, 2 July 1945; to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, 30 July 1945; released in Victoria, 9 October 1945   Awarded Bar to DFC as RCAF officer.  As of 18 January 1945 he claimed 2 1/2 operational tours and one non-operational. Claimed 380 operational hours and 500 non-operations.  Times on types: Anson (84), Blenheim (65), Whitley (100), Halifax (256), Wellington (100), Oxford (37), Mosquito (238).  Another form (no date but soon after transfer to RCAF) claims 82 sorties including 54 on current tour.  Re-engaged in RCAF on 24 February 1946; reverted to Flying Officer, 1 October 1946; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 1 June 1949.  Postings were as follows: WAC "K" Flight, 25 November 1946; Station Patricia Bay, 27 January 1947; JAS Rivers, 10 May 1947; NWAC "K" Flight, Edmonton, 14 September 1947; Station Summerside, 10 May 1949 (Air Navigation School). As of 20 Nov 1950 he gave flying times thus:  Anson (81.45), Blenheim (9.45), Whitley (170.30), Halifax (171.40), Wellington (167.15), Oxford (33.40), Mosquito (235.05), Canso (207), Dakota (446.50), Lancaster (25.00), Beechcraft (5.10), Norseman (8.25), Harvard (5.10).  To Air Ministry, London, 25 April 1951; attached to No.1 Air Navigation School, Hullavington.  Killed in crash of Wellington T.10 RB383 during training exercise to Malta (seven killed), crashed on a mountain peak in southern France; aircraft not found for 16 days.  As of 20 Nov 1950 he gave flying times thus:  Anson (81.45), Blenheim (9.45), Whitley (170.30), Halifax (171.40), Wellington (167.15), Oxford (33.40), Mosquito (235.05), Canso (207), Dakota (446.50), Lancaster (25.00), Beechcraft (5.10), Norseman (8.25), Harvard (5.10).  An article on him, "Batch", subsequently appeared in Roundel, written by S/L N.W. Emmott, DFC who described him as "the best natural navigator I ever knew."    No citation to DFC other than that he had "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty".  Air Ministry Bulletin 18302/AL.1007 refers.

 

NOTE: There was an interesting assessment of him at ANS, 25 August 1949 - S/L W.R. Gillespie wrote:

 


F/L Batchelor has a good navigational background and a better than average technical knowledge of most subjects. His interest in navigation is above the average and his preference seems to lie in the instrument field.  Unfortunately he lets his own ideas assume more importance than the authorized and accepted theory and practices.  This fault has been particularly noticeable in his log work and in certain lectures.  He has the personality and the ability to make an excellent instructor if he can subject his own whims, and teach approved techniques.  If this fault is overcome, he is capable to assuming any navigation post commensurate with his rank.

 

To which W/C D.A. Willis added:

 

F/L Batchelor is an individualist by nature. As long as he uses his knowledge and ability to advance air navigation, rather than to decry proven practices, his potential in the navigation field will be well above average.

 

And at 1 ANS in UK, S/L T.P. McGarry wrote on 30 September 1951:

 

Batchelor has settled down very well to his job as a Course Commander at this school.  He displays a very fine sense of responsibility to his work and puts a lot of effort into it.  He has the interest of his Course at heart always.  Although not always in agreement with RAF methods of instruction, he nevertheless readily appreciates the reasoning behind them, and accepts them without question.  He moves and speaks slowly but is mentally wide awake and very alert.  He takes little interest in sporting activities in this country but that is probably understandable.  I am very pleased to have him as an instructor and I rate him as an above average and valuable officer.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BAUDOUX, F/L Everett Large (42095) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 January 1941.  Born in Stellerton, Nova Scotia, 14 January 1919; educated there and Pictou; pupil pilot in RAF, 1938; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 13 May 1939.  Reported to No.233 Squadron, 7 February 1940; posted out about November 1940.  Gave BBC talk on 3 December 1940, reprinted in Winged Words.  Transferred to RCAF, 3 May 1945 (C94033).  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in execution of air operations."  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date; AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943 (reporting his DSO) also identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 2784 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8869 has recommendation (no date but circa 15 November 1940), drafted when he was a Pilot Officer:

 

This officer has completed 400 hours operational flying since the 3rd of September 1939.  He has done his work in a most efficient manner and has shown great devotion to duty.

 


On 25 October 1940 he was navigator in Hudson P5156 which was leading two other Hudsons on an offensive patrol on the Norwegian coast. When flying at 6,000 feet a submarine was sighted and was immediately attacked, bombs being dropped from a height of 500 feet.  At least one bomb scored a direct hit and the submarine was seen to sink.  The attack was pressed home in spite of very accurate anti-aircraft and machine gun fire which put the aileron control completely out of use.  The aircraft was brought back and landed safely on the elevator trimming taps.  This officer has now done 15 offensive patrols.

 

This is seconded by the Station Commander:

 

I concur in the Squadron Commander's remarks.  Baudoux is outstanding in personality and keenness amongst the newer pilots.  He makes every endeavour to improve his efficiency, and sets a fine example in cheerfulness as well as courage.  I strongly recommend that his joint success on this occasion be recognized if only because of the encouragement it will give to the newer pilots to follow his outstanding example.

 

The Air Officer Commanding his Group adds on 21 November 1940:

 

An outstanding young pilot who by his keenness, resolution and fine offensive spirit is setting the very b est example to the other less experienced pilots who have taken the places of the older war stressed ones in this squadron.

 

On 11th November 1940 he encountered a Wellington which had lost its way and was out of W/T communication far over the North Sea.  He spoke to it and led it back to a safe landing at Montrose just before its petrol was exhausted (Report on Form Orange attached).

 

He has completed 92 sorties on operational tasks, 32 of which were offensive patrols.

 

Pilot Officer Baudoux's conduct is exceptional and eminently of the type for which the Distinguished Flying Cross was instituted.

 

To this, on 4 December 1940, A/C/M Sir Frederick Bowhill (AOC in Chief, Coastal Command) writes, "Fully concur".

 

The incident of the Wellington was about 0845 of 11 November following his own Hudson's W/T failure; communicated with lost aircraft by lamp which signalled "In distress - short of fuel - how far to land ?" and he replied, "Follow Us", making landfall at 0940 hours between Aberdeen and Montrose.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9251 has final draft of citation as cleared by Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 


Since September 1939, this officer has completed 400 hours on operational flying, involving 92 missions against the enemy.  In October 1940 he was the navigator of an aircraft which attacked a submarine.  Bombs were dropped from a height of 500 feet and, in spite of accurate anti-aircraft and machine-gun fire, a direct hit was scored.  He has displayed outstanding keenness and skill, and set a splendid example to his fellow pilots.

 

BAUDOUX, S/L Everett Large (42095) - Distinguished Service Order - No.233 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943.

 

This officer has completed a second tour of operations.  He has made two excellent attacks on U-Boats.  On the first day of the North African operations he undertook a flight dropping leaflets. This officer has always undertaken the more dangerous and unpleasant tasks and displayed high courage and unswerving devotion to duty in keeping with the highest traditions of the service.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BAVERSTOCK, F/L Ernest Ballantyne (123716) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  Corporal Baverstock (1155238) was commissioned in the RAF Regiment as a Pilot Officer on Probation, 28 July 1942; confirmed in rank and promoted to Flying Officer, 26 December 1942. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

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BAZALGETTE, F/L Ian Willoughby (11831) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.115 Squadron - Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943. Born in Calgary, 1918; family returned to England, 1927; home in New Malden, Surrey.  Commissioned in 51st Regiment (Anti-Aircraft) as 2nd Lieutenant, 1940; transferred to RAFVR in September 1941, going to No.115 Squadron a year later; to an OTU as instructor, September 1943; in April 1944 to No.635 Squadron; killed in action, 4 August 1944.  A mountain in the Moberly Creek area of Jasper National Park was named for him in 1949.  AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945 (reporting his VC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

This officer has at all times displayed the greatest keenness for operational flying.  He has taken part in many sorties and attacked heavily defended targets such as Duisburg, Berlin, Essen and Turin.  His gallantry and devotion to duty have at all times been exceptional and his record commands the respect of all of his squadron.

 

BAZALGETTE, S/L Ian Willoughby (11831) - Victoria Cross - No.635 Squadron - Award effective 17 August 1945 as per London Gazette of that date.

 


On 4th August 1944 Squadron Leader Bazalgette was "Master Bomber" of a Pathfinder squadron detailed to mark an important target at Trossy St.Maximim for the main bomber force.  When nearing the target his Lancaster came under heavy anti-aircraft fire.  Both starboard engines were put out of action and serious fires broke out in the fuselage and the starboard main plane.  The bomb aimer was badly wounded.  As the Deputy Master Bomber had already been shot down the success of the attack depended on Squadron Leader Bazalgette, and this he knew.  Despite the appalling conditions in his burning aircraft he pressed on gallantly to the target, marking and bombing it accurately.  That the attack was successful was due to his magnificent effort.  After the bombs had been dropped the Lancaster dived practically out of control.  By expert airmanship and great exertion Squadron Leader Bazalgette regained control, but the port inner engine then failed, and the whole of the starboard mainplane became a mass of flames.  Squadron Leader Bazalgette fought bravely to bring his aircraft and crew to safety.  The mid-upper gunner was overcome by fumes.  Squadron Leader Bazalgette ordered those of his crew who were able to leave by parachute to do so.  He remained at the controls and attempted the almost hopeless task of landing the crippled and blazing aircraft in a last effort to save the wounded bomb aimer and helpless air gunner.  With superb skill and taking great care to avoid a small French village nearby, he brought the aircraft down safely.  Unfortunately it then exploded and this gallant officer and his two comrades perished.  His heroic sacrifice marked the climax of a long career of operations against the enemy.  He always chose the more dangerous and exacting roles. His courage and devotion to duty were beyond praise.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BEAKE, S/L Percival Harold (84923) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944.  Born in Quebec, 1917; RAF, 1939; served in Nos.92 and 601 Squadrons; commanded No.64 Squadron, May to August 1944.  AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944 (announcing his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF.

 

BEAKE, S/L Percival Harold (84923) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.64 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 September 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15478/AL.878 refers.

 

This officer has commanded the squadron for several months and during the period has led his formation on many sorties against heavily defended targets with good results. He is a first class leader whose great skill, thoroughness and untiring efforts have contributed materially to the successes obtained.  Squadron Leader Beake has destroyed two enemy aircraft.

 

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BEALL, F/O Hugo Russell MacDougall (39161) - Mention in Despatches - No.150 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.  Born in Lindsay, Ontario, 1915; home there; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 12 October 1936; with No.150 Squadron (Advanced Air Striking Force) at outbreak of war to 16 April 1941; posted to Canada in December 1941 as Chief Gunnery Instructor at one of the schools.  AFRO 142/42 dated 30 January 1942 reported his promotion to Squadron Leader, effective 1 December 1941, while with an RAF school in Canada. To No.356 Squadron early in 1944.  AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945 (reporting his DSO) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

BEALL, F/L Hugo Russell MacDougall (39161) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.

 

BEALL, W/C Hugo Russell MacDougall (39161) - Distinguished Service Order - No.356 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 May 1945.  Air Ministry Bulletin 18875/AL.1034 refers.

 

Wing Commander Beall took over command of No.356 Squadron during its formation and has been entirely responsible for the build up of this unit into a high standard of operational efficiency.  He has completed two tours of operational duties and has flown on a large number of sorties both in the European and Far Eastern theatres of war.  This officer has always displayed leadership of a high order and has invariably pressed home his attacks with determination and skill.  The excellent results achieved by the squadron is largely owing to the enthusiasm and brilliant leadership of this officer.

 

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BEGY, F/L William Bilton (59429) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 March 1950 - Born in Toronto, 14 March 1921; enlisted in the RCAF on 24 June 1940 (R66041); trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 29 August 1940; promoted LAC, 1 September 1940), No.3 EFTS (graduated 17 March 1941) and No.1 SFTS (awarded  wings on 6 June 1941; promoted Sergeant).  Posted overseas in June 1941, promoted Flight Sergeant on 6 December 1941; commissioned 13 October 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 13 April 1943; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 13 October 1944.  He flew with No.58 Squadron (6 October 1941 to 2 December 1942) and No.86 Squadron (7 January 1943 to 14 March 1944); returned to Canada 28 March 1944; to No.111 OTU, 28 April 1944; returned to Canada for release in June 1945.  Subsequently joined RAF, 8 August 1947 (Extended Short Service Commission as Flying Officer, General Duties Branch, four years Active, four years Reserve, seniority from 12 September 1945 and granted War substantive rank Flight Lieutenant, with seniority from 12 September 1946); relinquished War substantive rank, on appointment but promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 January 1948.  RAF postings as follows: Transport Initial Conversion Unit, Bircham Newton, 16 September 1947; placed on No.122 M.R. Course at that unit, 23 September 1947; No.1382 Transport Conversion Unit, 11 November 1947; North Luffenham, 10 December 1947; Waterbeach (supernumerary), 10 March 1948; Netheravon (No.126 MR Course), 6 April 1948; No.5 Personnel Despatch Centre, 3 May 1948; No.48 Squadron, Far East Air Force, 18 June 1948; No.5 Personnel Despatch Centre, United Kingdom, 9 January 1951; Shawbury (flying duty in Long Range Navigation Flight), 7 March 1951; Air Ministry, 21 June to 26 July 1951. On his return to England he was briefly employed as VIP pilot to Admiral Sir Patrick Baird (Commander-in-Chief, Northern Command, NATO).  Rejoined RCAF, 28 September 1951 (service number 48083); with Air Defence Command, St.Hubert, 6 October 1951 to 18 February 1952; No. 104 K Flight, St.Hubert, 19 February to 31 October 1952; No.3 (All-Weather) OTU, North Bay, 1 November 1952 to 1 April 1953; No.445 Squadron, 2 April 1953 to 15 July 1954; CEPE AAE Detachment, Cold Lake, 16 July 1954 to 15 March 1956. Released 15 March 1956.

 

BEGY, F/L William Bilton (59429) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1951; invested with this award by Air Vice-Marshal A.L. James at Station St.Hubert, 8 May 1952; no published citation other than "for distinguished service in Malaya during the period June 1 to November 30, 1950".  However, RAF Records supplied to RCAF Records the following text, noting that he had flown 1,407 hours on Malayan operations:

 

Flight Lieutenant Begy has served with No.48 Squadron since July 1948. During this period, the squadron has been engaged on operational duties in support of the Army in the Far Eastern theatre.  In April 1949 this officer became Flight Commander and, in this capacity, his undaunted devotion to duty, both on the ground and in the air, has set a very high example to those under his command.  As captain and pilot of aircraft he has, on many occasions, displayed great presence of mind, coolness and skill.  Whilst on a flight on the 15th December 1948, soon after he had joined the squadron, a fire broke out in the starboard engine of the aircraft he was flying.  On 13th June 1949, a fire broke out in the port engine of his aircraft.  A month later, when he was taking off a heavily loaded aircraft from Kuala Lumpur, one engine failed completely immediately after the aircraft left the ground.  On the 29th March 1950, during a flight over the sea, the aircraft he was flying developed a violent oil leak through the Constant Speed Unit of one of the propellers; the feathering mechanism was put out of action due to the loss of oil and it was necessary to make a landing, with a loaded aircraft on one engine, with the propeller in the powerless side "windmilling".  In each of these cases Flight Lieutenant Begy brought his aircraft safely in to land without damage or injury to the machines or persons in them.  Flight Lieutenant Begy has proved himself an outstandingly capable, sound and courageous captain of Dakota aircraft. He has been employed for lengthy periods on supply dropping to the Army and Police in the Malayan jungle during the present campaign.  This work is tricky, and requires most accurate flying if supplies are to be dropped with accuracy in this mountainous and jungle-covered country.  The weather is frequently far from favourable and this often involves descent through cloud in hilly country in order to find the dropping zone.  Flight Lieutenant Begy has set an excellent example to his squadron and his work has been of the highest order.

 

NOTE:  On a form dated 31 December 1952 he gave his flying to that date as follows:

 

Fleet Finch:                50 hours 55 minutes

Yale:                            38 hours 20 minutes

Harvard:                     52 hours 25 minutes

Whitley:                       474 hours 30 minutes

Liberator:                   530 hours 40 minutes

Mitchell:                      635 hours 15 minutes


Dakota:                      1,799 hours 15 minutes

Wellington:                 112 hours

Lancaster:                  56 hours 15 minutes

Expeditor:                  349 hours 50 minutes

Anson:                        10 hours five minutes

Goose:                       7 hours 30 minutes

Lysander:                   20 minutes

T-33:                           45 hours 35 minutes

CF-100:                      one hour

 

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BELDAM, Flight Sergeant Phillip William (621166) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942.  DHist file 181.005 D.271 lists him as a "Canadian Airman Serving in the RAF" about June 1941.  At that time he was a Sergeant, Wireless Operator (Aircrew) with No.240 Squadron.  Next of kin given as "Mr. H. Beldam, father, 'Sardes', British Columbia.  Award card spells name as "Beldam", but Hitchins card spells it "Beldham". AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF (and spells it "Beldham"). Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Vancouver in 1917, confirmed his name as Beldam, gave his Christian names (which did not appear in London Gazette) and gave his trade as Wireless Operator/Air Gunner.

 

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BENNETT, P/O Richard Henry Montague (41656) - Mention in Despatches - No.107 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.  From Pincher Creek, Alberta.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation (RAF), 4 March 1939; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 30 September 1939. Flew many sorties with No.107 Squadron during Battle of France; killed in action 30 June 1940, aged 21. Commonwealth War Graves Commission records confirm he was with No.107 Squadron and state that he was the son of Harry Montague Bennett and Jean Claire Bennet of Blairmore, Alberta.

 

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BETTS, F/L William Arthur (108881) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.199 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 April 1944. Born in Calgary, 28 March 1920; home there; educated in Cardston and Olds, Alberta.  Enlisted 1939; reported to No.34 SFTS in Canada, 9 March 1941 for advanced training; commissioned 21 June 1941;  retained as an instructor at No.35 SFTS, 12 November 1941 to 17 September 1942; at No.35 EFTS, 18 September 1942 to 15 February 1943; at No.35 SFTS again, 16 February to 29 June 1943; posted to No.31 Personnel Depot, Moncton, 30 June 1943 and posted overseas 24 July 1943.   Transferred to RCAF 11 December 1944 (C89516); repatriated 22 May 1945; on strength of No.2 Air Command until released, 24 October 1945. Returned to RCAF service, 8 September 1946, serving at Joint Air Training Centre, Rivers July 1947 to August 1948), No.435 Squadron (August 1948 to July 1950), Northwest Air Command Communications and Rescue Flight (25 July 1950 to July 1951), Station Edmonton (26 July 1951 to release, 30 September 1954). Air Ministry Bulletin 13473/AL.790 refers.  Photo portrait PL-35904.

 

One night in March 1944 this officer piloted an aircraft detailed for a sortie over southern France.  When nearing the objective the aircraft was attacked by a fighter and sustained serious damage.  The throttle controls to both the port engines were affected, thus making the engines uncontrollable.  A number of instruments were rendered useless.  The pilot's escape hatch was shot away, the mid-upper turret was damaged.  One of the petrol tanks was set alight but a little later the flames died away.  The aircraft gradually lost height.  Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Betts set course for home and displaying superb airmanship, eventually reached an airfield where he effected a masterly landing.  In harassing circumstances, this officer displayed exceptional skill, great courage and devotion to duty.

 

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BEURLING, Sergeant George Frederick (128707) - Distinguished Flying Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 28 July 1942.  Born 6 December 1921 in Montreal;  enlisted in RAF, 20 September 1940; awarded wings, 9 September 1941.  Served in Nos.403 and 41 Squadrons.  To No.249 Squadron, 9 June 1942 via HMS Eagle. Wounded, 14 October 1942.  To No.1 Depot, UK, 31 October 1942.  On loan to RCAF, 8 November 1942. To No.61 OTU (instructing), 6 July 1943; transferred to RCAF, 1 September 1943; with No.403 Squadron, 5 September to 8 November 1943; No.126 Wing, 8-29 November 1943;  No.412 Squadron, 20 November 1943 to 8 April 1944; to Canada, 30 April 1944; arrived in Canada, 8 May 1944; released from RCAF, 16 October 1944.  Killed in crash of a Norseman, Rome, Italy, 20 May 1948.  Ranks held at various times: AC2 - 20 September 1940; LAC - 28 February 1941; Sergeant - 9 September 1941; P/O - 30 July 1942; F/O - 1 January 1943; F/L - 28 October 1943.

 

Sergeant Beurling has displayed great skill and courage in the face of the enemy.  One day in July 1942 he engaged a number of enemy fighters which were escorting a formation of Junkers 88, and destroyed one fighter.  Later, during the same day, he engaged ten enemy fighters and shot two of them down into the sea bringing his total victories to eight.

 

BEURLING, Sergeant George Frederick, DFM (128707) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Medal - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 September 1942.

 

Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal in July 1942, Sergeant Beurling has destroyed a further nine enemy aircraft, bringing his total victories to seventeen. One of his exploits was the destruction of four enemy fighters in one day.  During his brief combats he also damaged a further two hostile aircraft.  His courage and determination are a source of inspiration to all.


BEURLING, P/O George Frederick, DFM (128707) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 October 1942.

 

Since being awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Medal, this officer has shot down a further three hostile aircraft, bringing his total victories to twenty.  One day in September 1942 he and another pilot engaged four enemy fighters.  In the ensuing combat Pilot Officer Beurling destroyed two of them.  A relentless fighter, whose determination and will has won admiration of his colleagues.  This officer has set an example in keeping with the highest traditions of the Royal Air Force.

 

BEURLING, P/O George Frederick, DFC, DFM (128707) - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 3 November 1942.

 

Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Pilot Officer Beurling has destroyed a further six enemy aircraft, bringing his total victories to 28.  During one sortie on October 13, 1942, he shot down a Junkers 88 and two Messerschmitt 109s.  The following day, in a head-on attack on enemy bombers, he destroyed one of them before he observed his leader being attacked by an enemy fighter.  Although wounded, Pilot Officer Beurling destroyed the fighter,  Then, climbing again, although his aircraft was hit by enemy fire, he shot down another fighter before his own aircraft was so damaged that he was forced to abandon it.  He descended safely on to the sea and was rescued. This officer's skill and daring are unexcelled.

 

NOTE:  Beurling has been the subject of considerable writing. His 1943 book, Malta Spitfire, was actually written by Leslie Roberts, although in close collaboration with Beurling.  He has been a chapter in E.C.R. Baker's Aces of the Royal Air Force and in Hugh Halliday's The Tumbling Sky.  In addition, there is a full-length biography, Hero, by Brian Nolan.

 


Victories:  NOTE:  Although generally credited with 31 enemy aircraft destroyed, Beurling's victories are unclear on some points.  The following is a detailed accounting in an attempt to give a definitive assessment of his claims.  W/C F.H. Hitchins made notes comparing Air Ministry documents with Beurling's book, Malta Spitfire; additional insights are from books by Chris Shores:  1 May 1942 - one FW.190 destroyed, Calais; 3 May 1942 - one FW.190 probably destroyed, Calais.  In Malta Spitfire, Beurling stated that his original claim was upgraded to "destroyed" three weeks later.  There is nothing in documents to confirm this; the Combat Report bears no annotation that would have accompanied upgrading; 12 June 1942 - one Bf.109 damaged.  Shores writes that Beurling claimed to have blown the tail of this machine, but it was not seen to crash and hence was accounted only as damaged (Malta: The Spitfire Year, 1942, p.315). 6 July 1942 - one CANT.1007 damaged plus one Bf.109 destroyed plus two MC.202s destroyed; 8 July 1942 - one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 probably destroyed plus one Ju.88 damaged - This claim does not appear in Air Ministry documents, which do show him with a Ju.88 damaged on 10 July 1942.  Shores, however, agrees that the date was 8 July 1942; 10 July 1942 - one Bf.109 destroyed plus one MC.202 destroyed;  13 July 1942 - one Re.2001 destroyed (identified by Beurling as an MC.202) plus two MC.202 destroyed; Beurling stated that all these were on 12 July 1942 but Air Ministry and Shores give the date as 13 July;  23 July 1942 - one Re.2001 destroyed plus one Ju.88 damaged; Hitchins noted that Air Ministry credited Beurling with 1/4 credit, Beurling in his book said he damaged a Ju.88 (no mention of others) and Shores gives him credit for half-shares in two damaged Ju.88s (Malta: The Spitfire Year, p.426); 27 July 1942 - two MC.202s destroyed plus two Bf.109s destroyed plus two Bf.109s damaged; 29 July 1942 - one Bf.109 destroyed;  8 August 1942 - one Bf.109 destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged (not substantiated by Air Ministry or Shores; Beurling may have felt that anything he fired at he hit, one way or another); 13 August 1942 - 1/3 Ju.88 destroyed; 25 September 1942 - two Bf.109s destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged; 10 October 1942 - two Bf.109s destroyed - Beurling gave the date as 9 October 1942 but Air Ministry information showed no claims that day; Shores (p.573) confirms the kills but dates them as 10 October 1942; 13 October 1942 - two Bf.109s destroyed plus one Ju.88 destroyed plus one Ju.88 damaged; 14 October 1942 - one Ju.88 destroyed plus two Bf.109s destroyed; 24 September 1943 - one FW.190 destroyed; 30 December 1943 - one FW.190 destroyed.

 

Photographs:             PL-14039, studio portrait

PL-22170, painting victory crosses on his Spitfire

WRF-720, with Ted Rogers (pre-war instructor)

WRF-723, in front of CBC microphones

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BIGELOW, F/L Alan Eaton (42788) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.101 Squadron -  awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943.  Born in Regina, 1918; home there; educated at Dalhousie University.  RAF, 1939.  AFRO 2138/43 dated 22 October 1943 (reporting DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 11391 refers.

 

This officer throughout his operational tour has displayed great keenness and determination to complete his tasks.  His consistency and reliability have only been equalled by his skilful airmanship.  He has participated in attacks on many of the major targets in Germany, including Berlin, Hamburg and the Ruhr Valley.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BIRCHFIELD, S/L Frank Edward Walter (39777) - Air Force Cross - No.5 SFTS - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 September 1941.  Born in New Westminster; educated there; served in local militia; appointed Provisional Pilot Officer on Probation, 31 May 1937; confirmed in that rank, 31 May 1938.  In 1942 he was with No.234 Squadron and credited with the following: 26 May 1942, one Ju.88 probably destroyed; 23 June 1942, one FW.190 probably destroyed. Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Public Records Office Air 2/9544 has recommendation dated 2 June 1941 when he held the appointment of Flying Instructor, Course Commander "A" Flying Squadron.  The signature of the Group Captain making the recommendation is illegible.

 


This officer is a Canadian and has served in Flying Training Command since May 1938.  During this period he has rendered most loyal and devoted service and has set an excellent example as a Flight and Course Commander.  He is a first class pilot and instructor and has done approximately 1,000 hours flying.

 

He is a very sound and dependable officer, has a good power of command and is a good organizer. He has given me valuable assistance in special departments of Station Administration, to which work he has devoted much spare time and energy.

 

He has for long been pressing for more active service and has at last achieved his ardent desire - posting for operational training with a Fighter Squadron.

 

I have a very high opinion of this officer's qualities and I strongly recommend him for the award of the Air Force Cross.

 

This was in turn refined for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer has completed about 1,000 flying hours since May 198, and he has set an excellent example as a flight commander.  He has shown notable devotion to his flying duties.

 

BIRCHFIELD, S/L Frank Edward Walter (39777) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Headquarters, Allied Expeditionary Air Force - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.  Public Record Office Air 2/8872 has recommended citation.

 

Wing Commander Birchfield has been employed on the Staff of Allied Expeditionary Air Force since its inception, being employed on Air Staff Plans.  His work has covered both current and future operations, but in particular he has been associated with the preparation of specially secret Inter-Service and Inter-Allied Schemes of the utmost importance to the success of the entire operations on the continent.  This work has called for a spirit of cooperation, long hours and much initiative.  His work has greatly contributed to the success of the Normandy landings on D Day.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BISHOP, F/O Ian Prior (45492) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.150 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 26 May 1942.  Born in Kobe, Japan, 1919; home in Coole [?]; educated at Sir James Douglas School, Victoria, British Columbia and at the Victoria High School; RAF, 1938; commissioned 1941.  No citation in Gazette; summary from Air Ministry Bulletin 7072 said:

 


Flying Officer Bishop has participated in many successful operations against objectives in Germany and in France and the other occupied countries.  His coolness and skill as a navigator, combined with courage and fearlessness, have contributed largely to the successes achieved by his squadron.  When in France, he took part in eight daylight sorties.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BISHOP, Flight Sergeant John Franklin (621179) - Air Force Medal - No.12 OTU - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  Born 2 December 1913 in Calgary; home there, although DHist file 181.005 D.270 gives next of kin as father (J.W. Bishop) living in Victoria.  Educated in Alberta including Provincial Institute of Technology, 1930-1932 (Automobile Engineering); mechanic and stock clerk with a Packard dealer in Calgary, 1933-1937.  Enlisted in Royal Air Force, 21 September 1938 when posted to RAF Depot, Uxbridge; to No.1 Electrical and Wireless School, 25 November 1938; remustered to Air Gunner, 20 June 1939; to No.52 (Bomber) Squadron, 21 June 1939; promoted Aircraftman, First Class, 31 December 1939; remustered to Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, 4 April 1940; to No.12 OTU, 12 April 1940; promoted Sergeant, 31 December 1940; promoted Flight Sergeant, 1 April 1941; injured in aircraft crash, Upper Heyford, 19 August 1941; to Uxbridge, 27 November 1941; remustered to Wireless Operator, 16 December 1941; reverted to Corporal, 24 December 1941; to Farnborough, 7 January 1942; promoted Acting Sergeant, 1 April 1942; invested with AFM at Buckingham Palace, 28 April 1942; to West Walton, 29 April 1942; to India, 7 May 1942. Confirmed as Sergeant, 31 December 1942; promoted Acting Flight Sergeant, 1 July 1943 (confirmed in rank, 10 September 1943).  Postings are unclear in Asia, although he was with No.3 Wireless Unit, No.221 Group as of December 1942 and June 1943 and was diagnosed with malaria, 19 September 1943 while with Headquarters Special Forces, Qwalior (attached 111th Brigade); returned to Special Forces, 29 December 1943; in his application for the Burma Star he stated that he had been "behind Japanese Lines with Wingate Chindits from March 10 1944 to July 29, 1944". posted to No.151 OTU, 12 November 1944; to Home Establishment, 17 May 1945; to No.108 OTU, 12 August 1945.  DHist file 181.005 D.271 listing him as a Canadian airman serving in the RAF about June 1941 confirms this information; it adds that Sergeant Bishop (as he was when document compiled) was a Wireless Operator (Aircrew) with No.52 Squadron.  Transferred to RCAF as R225894, 13 August 1945 in London while still a Flight Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner); repatriated 29 August 1945; released 16 October 1945 in Victoria.  Died in Surrey, British Columbia, 11 February 1999.  His brother, George Bastow, was killed as a member of the RCAF (25 July 1944, No.406 Squadron; name on Runnymede Memorial).

 

BISHOP, Flight Sergeant John Franklin (621179) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BISSET, S/L Robert Claire (39778) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.51 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 22 October 1940.  Born Edmonton, 1913.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 31 May 1937; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 31 May 1938.  In No.102 Squadron, September 1939; to No.51 Squadron 20 May 1940; to No.405 Squadron, 26 May 1941. Killed in action, 30 November 1941. AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942 (reporting his Bar to the DFC) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 2035 refers.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty displayed in the execution of air operations."  Public Record Office Air 2/9489, has recommendation dated 19 August 1940 by Wing Commander A.H. Owen, Commanding Officer, No.51 Squadron.

 

This officer has now completed 30 operational sorties. He has always shown patience in finding his targets and determination in attack.  He has set a very good example.

 

A Group Captain Ward minuted this on 20 August 1940:

 

I concur in the Squadron Commander's remarks and strongly recommend the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

On 29 August 1940 a staff officer at Headquarters, No.4 Group added:

 

This captain of aircraft has shown consistent skill and determination in many flights over enemy territory. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

The final citation sent to Air Ministry Awards Committee was identical to the original text submitted by his Commanding Officer.

 

BISSET, S/L Robert Claire (39778) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 October 1942, with effect from 23 November 1941.

 

In recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations.  Led flight in an exemplary manner in most difficult and lengthy sorties.  Outstanding qualities of leadership.  Set a fine example by skill and courage.  In many raids on German industrial targets and in two raids on Turin.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9578 has recommendation drafted about 20 November 1941.  He had flown 39 sorties (284 hours five minutes); the document goes into considerable detail describing his operations:

 

1 Sept 39   Ruhr (7.00)                     Whitley II; iced up at 16,000 feet; recovered control at 7,000 feet; landed Dieppe.

20 Dec 39  Sylt-Borkum (7.05)        Security patrol; bombed lights, 6,000 feet in harbour at Sylt; landed base.

9 Jan 40     Sylt-Borkum (5.45)        Bombed Borkum harbour, 6,000 feet; landed base.

9 Mar 40     Prague (7.40)                Clear night; no difficulty, 9,000 feet; landed base.


17 Apr 40   Trondheim (8.35)          Very bad weather; unable to locate target, 18,000 feet; landed base.

29 Apr 40   Oslo (7.40)                     Flak intense; bombed aerodrome at Oslo, 5,000 feet; good trip; landed base.

18 May 40  Hanover (7.30)              Good trip; landed base; 8,000 feet.

21 May 40  Givet (6.20)                    Bombed supplies in forest; 4,000 feet; light flak.

22 May 40  Cologne (7.00)              Very good night; intense flak; 8,500 feet; navigation perfect; BFX to Tangmere.

24 May 40  Cologne (6.00)              Good trip; wireless unserviceable; 9,000 feet; light flak.

25 May 40  Essen (7.10)                  Intense flak and searchlight concentrations; bombed target, 10,000 feet; landed base.

27 May 40  Dusseldorf (6.00)          Intense flak; bombed docks, 10,000 feet; landed base.

1 June 40   Bremen (5.05)               Very heavy flak; landed base; 9,000 feet.

3 June 40   Duisberg (5.55)             Good trip; accurate flak; 8,000 feet; landed base.

6 June 40   Duren (6.25)                  Good trip; landed base; 5,000 feet.

8 June 40   Occupied France (7.05)           Bombed transport column; landed base; machine-gunned column, 2,000 feet.

9 June 40   Ruhr Valley (6.10)         Unsatisfactory; bombed searchlight concentration; landed base; 11,000 feet.

11 June 40 Turin (7.30)                    Unable to locate target; heavy icing and snowstorms. Operated from Guernsey; 18,000 feet.

17 June 40 Ruhr (6.20)                     Guns unserviceable; bombed searchlights; 9,000 feet; landed base.

18 June 40 Frankfurt (7.45)              Good trip; 8,000 feet; landed base.

20 June 40 Hamm (7.30)                 Very good trip; bombed 2,000 feet; machine gunned flak; landed base.

21 June 40 Hamburg (6.25)             Very heavy flak; bombed docks, 6,000 feet; landed base.

23 June 40 Cologne (6.15)              Unable to locate target; 5,000 feet; landed base.

27 June 40 Duisberg (6.30)             Bombed target; 10,000 feet; landed base.

30 June 40 Brem (6.35)                   Bombed target; 9,000 feet; landed base.

3 July 40     Merville (5.15)                Bombs brought back; target not found; landed base.

12 July 40   Osnabruck (7.15)          Bombed railway yards, 5,000 feet; landed base.

2 Aug 40    Salzbergen (7.25)         Bombs brought back; 4,000 feet; landed base.

5 Aug 40    Wismar (8.20)               Very good trip; slight flak; 8,000 feet; landed base.


13 Aug 40  Turin (9.55)                    Excellent trip; direct hits obtained; 7,000 feet; landed base.

16 Aug 40  Leipzig (8.25)                Good trip; 5,000 feet; landed base.

19 Aug 40  Zchorwitz (10.15)          Bombed target, 4,000 feet; several direct hits; explosions and huge fires; machine gunned flak, 1,000 feet; landed base.

25 Aug 40  Berlin (10.25)                 Unable to locate target; bombed Hamburg, 9,000 feet; landed base.

16 June 41 Cologne (5.15)              Very quiet; good trip; 11,000 feet; landed base.

24 July 41   Brest (6.30)                    Daylight raid; very good trip; good pictures obtained; 12,000 feet; landed base.

9 Sept 41   Frankfurt (6.40)              Good trip; flak concentration; coned by searchlights four times; landed base; 8,000 feet.

30 Sept 41 Stettin (7.35)                  Excellent trip; 1,000 feet [should this read 10,000 feet ?]; landed base.

10 Oct 41   Nuremburg (8.05)          Good trip; large fires seen; confirmed by pictures; 9,000 feet.

14 Oct 41   Nuremburg (8.00)          Very bad weather; broke cloud in target area; 3,000 feet; bombed flak; BFX to Horsham.

 

This Canadian officer has returned for his second tour of operations and has been on his second tour for six months; during this time he has helped to form a new squadron, and has led his flight in an exemplary manner, taking part in the most difficult and lengthy sorties.  His cheerful enthusiasm has been an inspiration to those under his command.  I strongly recommend that this officer be awarded a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

The Officer Commanding the station added his remarks on 23 November 1941:

 

I agree entirely with the foregoing remarks; this officer has outstanding qualities of leadership, and in his capacity as Flight Commander has set a fine example by his skill and courage which is reflected in the determination of other captains and crews to reach their objectives under the most difficult conditions on many occasions.

 

The Air Officer Commanding his group concurred on 29 November 1941 - the day before Bisset went missing.

 

BISSET, S/L Robert Claire (39778) - Czechoslovak Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 January 1943.

 

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BLACKMORE, LAC George Franklin (1009038) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Toronto in 1913 and that he eventually rose to the rank of Sergeant.  He was employed in airfield construction.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BLAKE, W/C Edward Arthur, MM (03146) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Headquarters, No.200 Group - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 March 1941.  Home in Walton, Ontario ? Enlisted in Vancouver in the 29th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 30 April 1915; MM awarded 9 April 1917, Bar to MM awarded 5 November 1917 (reported to have been a runner and guide in the front lines for 18 months).  Seconded from Canadian Expeditionary Force to Royal Flying Corps as a 2nd Lieutenant, effective 28 January 1918; confirmed in that rank, 25 October 1918.  However, the card at DHist for First World War Canadian aviators gives his profession as "Student of Agriculture" and his address as Enfield Lock, Middlesex. DHist card says that in the early 1920s he was with No.60 Squadron in India; retired with rank of Group Captain. Public Record Office Air 2/9489 has recommended citation, giving present unit as No.200 Group Headquarters, although his earlier work had clearly been decisive to this submission.

 

This officer has displayed exceptional loyalty and devotion to duty and has commanded No.202 Squadron with outstanding success. During his command, the operations of the squadron were continued frequently under very difficult conditions, with such regularity, success and despatch as to occasion most favourable comment from both of the Admirals who have commanded Gibraltar Station. The efficiency of No.202 Squadron is largely due to Wing Commander Blake's personal example, hard work and unremitting attention to the details of internal organization.

 

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BLATCHFORD, F/L Howard Peter (37715) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.257 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 6 December 1940.  Born in Edmonton, 25 February 1912; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in the RAF, 6 January 1937. With No.41 Squadron at outbreak of war; joined No.212 Squadron, 20 April 1940 and saw service in France; to Photo Development Unit, 20 June 1940; to No.17 Squadron, 30 September 1940; to No.257 Squadron, 4 October 1940 (Commanding Officer, 6 July 1941 to 8 September 1941); became Wing Commander Flying at Digby.  Killed in action 3 May 1943.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. AFRO 1187/43 dated 25 June 1943 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 2610/43 dated 17 December 1943 (confirming his death) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 2429 refers.  Aerial victories as follows: 17 October 1939, one He.111 destroyed 20-30 miles east of Whitby (No.41 Squadron, shared with three others); 2 October 1940, one Do.17 destroyed off Harwich (No.17 Squadron, shared with one other pilot); 11 November 1940, one BR.20 destroyed singly, one BR.20 destroyed in company with another pilot, two CR.42s damaged, all of Harwich (No.257 Squadron, during Italian Air Force raids on Britain); 17 November 1940, one BF.109E destroyed southeast of Harwich (No.257 Squadron); 19 March 1941, one Ju.88 probably destroyed east of Southbold (No.257 Squadron); 11/12 May 1941, one He.111 destroyed northeast of Happisburgh (No.257 Squadron); 18 February 1942, one Do.217 damaged east of Withernsea (Digby Wing, shared with another pilot); 25 April 1942, one FW.190 destroyed northwest of Le Treport (Digby Wing); 18 March 1943, one FW.190 destroyed off Voorne, Holland (Coltishall Wing), 4 April 1943, two FW.190s damaged off Dutch coast (Coltishall Wing); 2 May 1943, one FW.190 destroyed off Dutch coast (Coltishall Wing).

 

In November 1940 this officer was the leader of a squadron which destroyed eight and damaged a further five enemy aircraft in one day.  In the course of the combat he rammed and damaged a hostile fighter when his ammunition was expended, and the made two determined head-on feint attacks on enemy fighters which drove them off.  He has shown magnificent leadership and outstanding courage.

 

                                                                           * * * * *

 

BLYTHE, F/L Alexander Conway (66567) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.437 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944.  Born in Winnipeg, 1921; home in Swindon, Wiltshire; enlisted for aircrew, 1940, commissioned 1941.  AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 16815/AL.950 refers.

 

Flight Lieutenant Blythe has completed numerous sorties supplying troops in Burma.  He also took part in the invasion of Normandy and Holland.  On one occasion this officer was captain of an aircraft detailed to supply the 1st Airborne Division in the Arnhem area.  Despite intense and accurate antiaircraft fire, he pressed home his attack and accurately dropped the supplied.  Throughout his career, Flight Lieutenant Blythe's cool valour, efficiency and devotion to duty have been worthy of high praise.

 

BLYTHE, S/L Alexander Conway (66567) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.45 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1951, "in recognition of distinguished services in Malaya".

 

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BOCKING, F/L Alfred Llewellyn (37079) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.30 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 December 1939.  Born in Belfast, 10 October 1915; educated in St.Boniface and Norwood, Manitoba.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 15 March 1935 (same time as D.K. Banks and J.A. Kent); to Middle East, 1936; to Iraq, August 1939.  Transferred to RCAF with rank of Wing Commander, 26 June 1944 while in Halifax; remained in postwar force and promoted to Group Captain, 15 June 1960.  Extensive recollections, "Memories of a Canadian in the RAF", published in Roundel.  No citation other than "for gallant and distinguished services rendered in connection with the operations in Palestine during the period 1st April to 30th July 1939."

 

BOCKING, W/C Alfred Llewellyn (37079) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.11 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 10 October 1941.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Air Ministry Bulletin 5260 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/4782 (Non-Immediate Awards, Middle East, 1941-1943) has following recommendation dated 16 September 1941 on transmission from RAFHQ Middle East to Air Ministry:

 

Wing Commander Bocking was sent to take over No.11 [Squadron] at the beginning of the Syrian campaign. No.11 Squadron was then in the process of reconstruction with new pilots, crews and aircraft and at the same time had to operate with anything available.  By his zeal and energy Wing Commander Bocking moulded the squadron into shape and himself led them on all big raids both by day and night.  The majority of his pilots had at that time had no operational flying experience but due to his leadership excellent results were obtained and the bombing in the raids led by him was often exceptionally accurate, two raids, both long and with the very difficult target of Heredere railway bridge in which the formation was being fired on by machine gun posts in the hills above them on either side being typical of the work carried out.  By his enthusiasm and leadership the squadron has obtained an esprit de corps and efficiency which cannot but augur well for future operations in which it may be employed.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BODMAN, F/L James Mail (39649) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Edmonton in 1915.   Appointed Acting Pilot Officer, 9 May 1937; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 21 December 1937; promoted to Flying Officer, 17 November 1938; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 11 February 1939; to Squadron Leader, 1 December 1941; to Wing Commander at uncertain date.

 

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BOULD, S/L George Edward (40203) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.622 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 August 1944.  Born in Kingston, 27 August 1912; educated there, 1918 to 1931.  Employed as blast furnace labourer by International Nickel, January to June 1936 (but on another form he states he was with International Nickel in 1932-33 and with Crown Dairy, Kingston, 1934-35); left to obtain a private pilot license at Kingston Flying Club and football coach for Queens University.  Member of the Non-Permanent Active Militia, 30 April 1928 to 6 July 1936 (Princess of Wales Own Regiment; attended annual training camps each year).  RAF Pupil Pilot at Scottish Aviation Limited, Prestwick, 23 August to 22 October 1937; at No.1 RAF Depot, Uxbridge, 23 October to 6 November 1937 (discipline course); Pupil Pilot, No.7 SFTS, Peterborough, 7 November 1937 to 12 June 1938 (wings awarded 6 March 1938); School of Navigation, Manston, 13 June to 20 August 1938 (2nd in class; confirmed in rank of Pilot Officer, 23 August 1938); No.104 Squadron, Bassingbourne, 21 August 1938 to 10 September 1939 (adjutant and pilot); No.104 Squadron, Bicester, 11 September 1939 to 8 April 1940 (instructing); No.13 OTU, Bicester, 9 April to 19 August 1940 (instructor; promoted to Flying Officer, 23 April 1940); No.82 OTU, Watton, 20 August to 22 September 1940 (operations); CFS, Upavon, 23 September to 18 October 1940 (instructor); No.10 SFTS, 19 October to 11 November 1940 (instructor); No.32 SFTS, Moose Jaw, 12 November 1940 to 27 December 1941 (instructor; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 23 April 1941); No.31 SFTS, Kingston, 28 December 1941 to 24 October 1942 (category raised 14 October 1942); No.31 PDC, Moncton, 25-28 October 1942; No.2 PDC, 29 October to 20 November 1942 (return to England); No.13 OTU, Bicester (21 November 1942 to 4 April 1943 (conversion course); No.11 OTU, Westcott, 6 April to 10 June 1943 (conversion course); No.1651 Conversion Unit, Waterbeach, 11-24 June 1943 (conversion course); No.1655 Conversion Unit, Woolfox Lodge, 15 June to 18 July 1943 (conversion course; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 July 1943); No.15 Squadron, Mildenhall, 19 July to 9 August 1943 (operations); No.622 Squadron, Mildenhall, 10 August 1943 to 27 May 1944 (operations); to No.3 Lancaster Finishing School, Feltwell, 28 May to 31 January 1945 (Chief Flying Instructor to 23 November 1944 and Chief Instructor thereafter; promoted to Wing Commander, 16 November 1944).  Transferred to RCAF (C89508), 17 November 1944; posted to No.3 Group, 1 February 1945.  Embarked for Canada 19 June 1945; on strength of No.8 OTU, Greenwood to 31 July 1945; on strength of Station Greenwood Headquarters from then until 27 July 1946; released 1 September 1946.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15067/AL.853 refers.  AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944 (announcing his DFC) specifically identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Photographs PL-15790 (in front of an OTU Blenheim); PL-21645 (formal portrait).  No published citation.  Public Record Office Air 2/9652 has recommendation dated 18 May 1944 when he had flown 27 sorties (165 hours 30 minutes) as follows:

 

24 July 43  Hamburg (6.00)                          16 Sept 43     Modane (7.20)

27 July 43  Hamburg (3.55)                          22 Sept 43     Hanover (5.30)

28 July 43  GARDENING, Nectarines         23 Sept 43     Mannheim (6.05)

                            (3.20)                                  8 Oct 43     Bremen (4.35)

29 July 43  Hamburg (5.15)

2 Aug 43    Hamburg (4.35)                          21 Jan 44  Magdeburg (7.00)

6 Aug 43    GARDENING, Deodars            27 Jan 44  Berlin (8.10)

                           (5.55)                                   15 Feb 44 Berlin (5.50)

10 Aug 43 Nuremburg (7.35)                       20 Feb 44 Stuttgart (7.10)

12 Aug 43 Turin (8.25)                                 24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt (8.20)

16 Aug 43 Turin (7.45)                                 25 Feb 44 Augsburg (7.10)

27 Aug 43 Nuremburg (7.10)                       30 Mar 44  Nuremburg (7.20)

30 Aug 43 Munchen-Gladbach (3.55)        10 Apr 44  Laon (5.00)

31 Aug 43 Berlin (7.25)                                18 Apr 44  Rouen (4.15)

5 Sept 43  Mannheim (6.00)                        22 Apr 44  Dusseldorf (4.10)

 


This officer has completed 27 operational sorties involving attacks against most of the heavily defended targets in Germany.  As a Flight Commander he has always shown the greatest determination to hit the aiming point, often in the face of intense opposition, and throughout he has set a high standard of courage and devotion to duty which has been reflected in the fine fighting spirit of his Flight.

 

On 19 May 1944 the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Mildenhall, added his comments:

 

A keen, determined and resourceful captain who has at all times pressed home his attacks against the enemy with the utmost vigour. He has proved himself to be a first class Flight Commander and his leadership, initiative and courage have gained him the respect and admiration of all.

 

This was duly approved and forwarded by the Air Officer Commanding, No.3 Group on 21 May 1944.

 

NOTE: He signed a form on 1 October 1945 stating he had flown 27 sorties (167 operational hours) plus 1,936 non-operational hours.  His time on types was as follows: Gypsy Moth, 20 hours; Tiger Moth, 65 hours; Hart/Audax, 100 hours; Anson, 40 hours; Blenheim I/IV, 400 hours, Oxford, 20 hours; Tutor, ten hours; Harvard, 1,050 hours; Yale, two hours; Lysander, one hour; Wellington, 40 hours, Stirling I/III, 140 hours, Lancaster I/III, 200 hours.  On 10 October 1943 the Commanding Officer of No.622 Squadron (W/C G.H.N. Gibson) reported that Bould had flown 1,996 hours 20 minutes to date (255 hours 20 minutes in previous six months) and stated, "This officer is keen and hard working and makes a good flight commander".  The Base Commander, G/C R.H. Young, concurred; "He has impressed me as very keen, capable and intelligent and a very sound pilot.  He is well mannered and courteous and possesses a very likable personality".

 

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BOULTER, F/L Herbert Edward (174875) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.163 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 July 1945).  Born in Theodore, Saskatchewan, 1923; educated there; enlisted April 1941; trained in Canada; commissioned April 1944.  AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF  Air Ministry Bulletin 19245/AL.1062 refers.  Citation published in AFRO 1558/45.

 

This officer has participated in many operational sorties against such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Hanover, Duisburg, and Frankfurt.  He has on two occasions had to leave his aircraft by parachute but undeterred by this and other hazardous experiences he has continued to operate with outstanding courage and determination which have contributed largely to the success of many missions.

 

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BOYCE, A/C George Harold, AFC - Companion, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.  Born 26 April 1894; home in Ottawa; joined RNAS in Ottawa, 19 January 1917; arrived in UK, 11 February 1917; with No.6 Wing, 18 October 1917; to HMS Furious, 30 July 1918; to HMS Argus, 7 November 1918, and awarded AFC.  Remained in RAF (reported posting to Air Ministry, 10 July 1929, as S/L); was an Air Commodore as of 1 March 1941.

 

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BRADLEY, F/L Arthur James (41547) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. Born in British Columbia, 1920; home in Vernon, British Columbia (educated there); appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 14 January 1939.  AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF, as did AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942 (reporting DFC award).

 

BRADLEY, F/L Arthur James (41547) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.202 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1942.  Air Ministry Bulletin 7515 refers.  F/L R.Y. Powell of No.202 Squadron received DFC at same time for effecting two rescues in May 1942, one of which appears to have involved Bradley.

 

In May 1942 was captain of flying boat which during operational flight in Mediterranean area was attacked by two fighters.  He and fellow pilot were both seriously wounded by opening fire.  In spite of grave injuries he remained at controls and although vision already obscured by blood succeeded in landing on sea before he fainted.  After short time he regained consciousness and resumed command, gave detailed orders to crew to make flying boat seaworthy as possible.  Aware crew needed guidance  he refused morphine to alleviate injuries until rescue was effected two hours later.  Displayed great courage, leadership and devotion to duty in very difficult circumstances.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BREADNER, Sergeant John Arnold (536800, deceased) - British Empire Medal - No.409 Repair and Servicing Unit - awarded as per London Gazette dated 5 January 1945.  Born 1913 in Winnipeg; home in Niagara-on-the-Lake (motor mechanic). RAF, December 1936 as a fitter.  Killed in action, 27 July 1944.  Identified as a Canadian in the RAF, January 1940, in DHist file 181.005 D.270.  AFRO 2001/44 dated 15 September 1944 (reporting him killed on active service) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 16888/AL.938 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/9029 has recommended citation.  The process had been initiated 13 July 1944.  Additioal documentation is found in Air 2/9229 which does not add materially to the following other than that he was killed in company with 1389783 LAC G.T. Forgham.

 


While in charge of 409 E.L.S. Echelon, which landed in Normandy early on D Day, this airman displayed outstanding courage, coolness and devotion to duty at all times and was undoubtedly personally responsible for the efficient and successful work of the Echelon under conditions of exceptional difficulty and danger.  This airman was killed on 27th July, 1944, while salvaging a crashed aircraft within range of enemy fire.  He had ordered his party to disperse to safety but continued working himself with one other airman.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BROWN, F/L Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.53 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 July 1940.  Born in Winnipeg, 9 August 1913; educated there; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 19 October 1934; promoted to Flying Officer, 19 April 1937; to Acting Flight Lieutenant, 17 September 1938; confirmed as Flight Lieutenant, 1939; Squadron Leader as of 1 September 1940; Wing Commander as of 1 March 1942; Group Captain, 1 July 1954.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  AFRO 2069/42 dated 18 December 1942 (reporting DSO) also describes him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 1203 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/6075 (Non-Immediate Awards, Air Component of the Field Force, 1940) has recommendation dated 29 May 1940:

 

On May 13th, 1940, this officer as the pilot of an aircraft carried out [an] important and successful reconnaissance over strongly defended enemy areas. In spite of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire which resulted in his aircraft being severely damaged and his rear gunner being wounded, he continued the reconnaissance.  His personal disregard of danger, his determination, and his skill in the handling of his damaged aircraft were largely responsible for the success of this reconnaissance which obtained valuable information.

 

This was further refined for submission to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

On 13th May, 1940, in spite of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire which resulted in his aircraft being severely damaged and his air gunner being wounded, this officer successfully completed a reconnaissance over strongly defended enemy areas. His personal disregard of danger, his determination, and his skill in handling his damaged aircraft were largely responsible for his success in obtaining valuable information.

 

BROWN, W/C Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Distinguished Service Order - No.407 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 4 December 1942.

 


This officer, by his personal tact and example, has been largely responsible for the sound morale and efficiency of his squadron.  He has led the squadron on all its heavy raids including one on Bremen on the night of June 25th.  His calm demeanour under all circumstances, his organizing ability and determination to press home the attack have set a magnificent example. Wing Commander Brown has displayed outstanding leadership and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9606 has the original recommendation dated 13 October 1942 and prepared by the Commanding Officer, RAF Station Bircham Newton:

 

This officer took over command of No.407 Squadron in January this year, when the squadron's morale was at its lowest, and just before they were withdrawn from the front line to reform.

 

By his personal tact and example, he pulled his squadron together in an extremely efficient manner, and as a result, although they had in the mean time been on three operational trips at Thorney Island, they came back to full operation [sic] duties on 1st April, and were moved to this station.

 

They very soon met with a number of successes, and since the 1st April, 78 individual attacks have been made on ships, out of which 33 were claimed as having been hit, and 25 have been officially acknowledged by Headquarters, Coastal Command as being damaged, seriously damaged or a total loss.

 

As Commanding Officer of the squadron, this officer cannot be expected, and in fact is discouraged from taking part in as many operations as some of the more junior crews. Nevertheless he has carried out 19 operational trips - 15 by night and four by day - and it has been officially acknowledged by Headquarters, Coastal Command that five direct hits have been obtained, in addition to one near miss.

 

Wing Commander Brown has led his squadron on all their bigger raids, including that on Bremen on the night of 25th/26th June. On all occasions when weather conditions are doubtful, or when heavy opposition is to be expected, he insists on going with them.

 

By his calm demeanour under all circumstances, his organizing ability, his determination to press home his attacks, and his efforts to ensure that all those serving under him were equally determined, he set a magnificent example.  In addition to this, if there is anything new to be tried out, he himself has always done it. A typical example of this is the recent innovation of the "rooster" aircraft, at which he was so successful.

 

To the great loss, not only of his squadron, but of his Station, this officer has now been posted to the Staff College, and I cannot too strongly recommend that the magnificent services he has rendered as Officer Commanding, No.407 Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron be acknowledged by an award as below.

 


BROWN, W/C Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943.

 

BROWN, G/C Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1946.

 

BROWN, W/C Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Order of Leopold with Palme - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 June 1947.

 

BROWN, W/C Alan Coatsworth (37033) - Croix de Guerre (1940) with Palm - awarded as per London Gazette dated 27 June 1947.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BROWN, F/O Edward Raymond (182357) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945.  Born 1922 at Riverside, Ontario; educated at Headstone Lane Council School; home in North Wenillby [?], Middlesex; enlisted 1940; trained in Canada; commissioned August 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 20218/AL.1104 refers.

 

...is a resolute and courageous captain of aircraft who has taken part in a large number of operational sorties.  On one occasion in March 1945 he was detailed for target marking duties. On approaching the target area his aircraft was engaged by heavy anti-aircraft fire and hit in many places.  Undaunted, this officer calmly flew on and dropped his flares accurately on the target.  The incident is typical of the determination and devotion to duty displayed by Flight Lieutenant Brown throughout his operational career.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BROWN, S/L Jack Clement Robert (40287) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.12 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944.  Born in Toronto, 17 February 1918; educated there.  Enlisted in RAF, 1937; present in Canada, September 1941, with No.31 SFTS; returned to Britain, October 1943; transferred to RCAF, 29 December 1944 (C89535) and awarded Bar to DFC (London Gazette dated 26 October 1945).  Repatriated to Canada, 2 August 1946; remained in postwar RCAF (20757), spending most of his time at Air Force Headquarters until released, 18 June 1952.  No citation other than that he had "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty".  AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF (wife living in Kingston). Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 refers.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BROWN, F/L James Edward (177621) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.582 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945.  Allison find, but not in Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ award cards.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Rotherham, Yorkshire in 1921. 

 

BROWN, F/L James Edward (177621) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.582 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945.  Citation in Public Record Office Air 2/9137 noting he had flown 55 sorties and 287 operational hours; of these, 20 trips had been made since earlier recommendation, three sorties and 16 hours had been logged since his previous award.

 

Flight Lieutenant Brown has completed a most distinguished and extended tour of duty. The majority of his sorties have been flown with the Pathfinder Force.  Since being recommended for the Distinguished Flying Cross he has completed many target marking sorties as captain of aircraft. Throughout he has shown excellent capabilities as a captain of aircraft, a fine fighting spirit and a strong devotion to duty

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BROWN, F/L Mark Henry (37904) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.1 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 30 July 1940 - See H.A. Halliday, "The Amazing 'Hilly' Brown, Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society, Summer 1971 and Michel Lavigne, Canadian Wing Commanders.  Born in Portage la Prairie, 9 October 1911; RAF, 11 May 1936; No.1 Squadron, 13 October 1938 to 17 May 1941; to Mediterranean, 21 October 1941; killed in action over Sicily, 12 November 1941.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 3890 refers.  No published citation.  Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommendation:

 

Since the beginning of the war Flight Lieutenant Brown has destroyed at least sixteen enemy aircraft.  On 14th June, when leading his flight on patrol, he encountered nine enemy bombers, two of which were destroyed.  Later he attacked nine Messerschmitt 109s, destroying one and driving the remainder off.  As a result of bullets entering his aircraft he force landed near Caen, and was unable to rejoin the squadron before it withdrew from France.  Flight Lieutenant Brown has shown courage of the highest order, and has led many flights with great success and determination when consistently outnumbered by enemy aircraft.

 

Air 2/8065 also has the formula for computing Advanced Air Striking Force awards for June 1940.  The force had logged 2,775 hours; the operative divisor was 150.  This gave a figure of 18 allowable awards, but as thirteen had already been granted (immediate awards), only five additional awards were deemed feasible.  Nevertheless, authorities were advancing the names of 14 flying nominees (eleven DFCs and three DFMs) plus five periodic awards (one MC, one EGM and three MMs).

 

BROWN, S/L Mark Henry (37904) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.1 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 23 May 1941.

 


This officer has commanded the squadron with outstanding success.  He has destroyed a further two enemy aircraft bringing his total victories to at least 18.  His splendid leadership and dauntless spirit have been largely instrumental in maintaining a high standard of efficiency throughout the squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8752 has the original recommendation, prepared by the Officer Commanding, Station Kenley, on 18 April 1941:

 

This officer has commanded his squadron with outstanding success since November 1940. His dauntless spirit and outstanding qualities of leadership have maintained his squadron at a high standard of efficiency.  He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross in August 1940 for his outstanding work in France where he destroyed at least 16 enemy aircraft. Since then he has accounted for at least two more enemy aircraft.  During August 1940 he was shot down into the sea and suffered severe burns to his face, but in spite of this he resumed flying in ten days, having refused to take sick leave.  Squadron Leader Brown has set an inspired example of devotion to duty and determination to destroy the enemy and I strongly recommend that on handing over command he should be awarded the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross in recognition of his distinguished services whilst serving with this squadron.

 

BROWN, W/C Mark Henry (37904) - Czech Military Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 12 January 1943.

 


NOTE: It is difficult to reconcile records with the figure of 18 mentioned in the citation to the Bar to his DFC.  Chris Shores, in the second edition to Aces High, gives a detailed breakdown which comes close (15 destroyed, four shared destroyed, one probable and two damaged).  Even so, Shores points out that many victories were poorly documented; six destroyed and the one "probable" came from a reconstruction of No.1 Squadron's claims upon their return to England from France, and were unsupported by either a contemporary diary or combat reports; another, claimed as "destroyed" in the reconstructed list, was covered by a surviving combat report which suggested that "probably destroyed" would have been a more realistic assessment. In more normal circumstances an Intelligence Officer would doubtless have reduced the claims to "probable" or "damaged" status many of No.1 Squadron's claims.  For the record, Shores lists the following claims: 23 November 1939, one Do.17 destroyed (flying Hurricane L1971; shared with another pilot); 3 March 1940, one He.111 destroyed (Hurricane L1843, shared with another pilot); 20 April 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed (Hurricane P2678); 10 May 1940, one Do.17 destroyed (shared with four other pilots); 11 May 1940, two Bf.109s destroyed; 14 May 1940, one Bf.109 and one Ju.87 destroyed (no documentation); 15 May 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed (no documentation); 17 May 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed plus one He.111 destroyed (no documentation for the He.111 and possibly not for the Bf.110 either); 18 May 1940, one Hs.126 destroyed (surviving combat report suggests a "probable"; 19 May 1940, one He.111 destroyed and one probably destroyed (no documentation for either); 21 May 1940, one He.111 destroyed; 1 June 1940, one Bf.109 damaged; 5 June 1940, one Do.17 destroyed; 14 June 1940, one He.111 destroyed and one Bf.109 destroyed (no documentation for either); 11 August 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed (Hurricane P3047); 6 September 1940, one Ju.88 damaged (Hurricane L1934); 24 September 1940, one Do.17 destroyed (Hurricane V7379, shared with three other pilots).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BROWN, F/O Reginald Wiseman (104694) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.218 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1942.  From Antler, Saskatchewan; Sergeant in RAFVR; commissioned 1941 after training in Canada (graduated from No.4 BGS, Fingal, 16 March 1941); killed in action 24 June 1944, aged 30, while a Squadron Leader with No.7 Squadron; buried in Warhem Communal Cemetery, France (information supplied by Common­wealth War Graves Commission which noted that he was the son of Alvin and Agnes Brown, Antler, Saskatchewan).  Cited with S/L A.W. Oldroyd, AFC.  AFRO 880-881 dated 12 June 1942 merely identified him as RAF trained in Canada, but AFRO 1660/44 dated 4 August 1944 (announcing him missing on 24 June 1944) and AFRO 1036/45 dated 22 June 1945 (confirming his death) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 7045 refers,

 

Squadron Leader Oldroyd and Flying Officer Brown were captain and navigator respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack the Skoda works at Pilsen. Dense cloud was experienced in the last 200 miles to the target but, owing to the navigational skill of Flying Officer Brown, the objective was reached and located five minutes before the estimated time. Very heavy anti-aircraft fire was encountered and the aircraft was repeatedly hit. Despite this, Squadron Leader Oldroyd remained over the target for a considerable time. On the return journey the aircraft was held by searchlights and subjected to further anti-aircraft fire, which was evaded successfully. Later, the aircraft was engaged by a Junkers 88, fire from which caused damage to the oil system, the port landing wheel and the petrol tanks. Throughout this combat, Squadron Leader Oldroyd displayed skill and courage of a high standard which contributed largely to the safe return of his aircraft and crew. Flying Officer Brown has continually displayed great skill and courage, and has always identified his targets under extremely difficult and hazardous conditions.

 

BROWN, F/L Reginald Wiseman (104694) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 14 January 1944.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BURBRIDGE, F/L John Leonard (80606) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Commissioned 7 April 1940. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Toronto in 1915.

 

                                                                        * * * * *


BURGESS, Sergeant Ernest William (978860) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.77 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 23 December 1941.  Born in Vancouver; DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists his next-of-kin (father) and living in Montreal;  enlisted February 1941.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Air Ministry Bulletin 5883 refers. Public Records Office Air 2/9572 has citation and notes that he was recommended when he had flown 27 sorties (206 operational hours). Document gives his name as "Ernest Wilson".

 

Sergeant Burgess is a wireless operator air gunner who has done consistently good work.  On many occasions his skill has been the deciding factor in the safe return of his aircraft to base.  Sergeant Burgess has shown devotion of a high order in very difficult conditions.

 

NOTE: The above was also published in Flight, 15 January 1942.  The original recommendation, dated 21 October 1941 when he had flown 27 sorties (206 hours 34 minutes) was found in Public Record Office Air 2/9572 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000).

 

Since he joined the squadron on 19th May 1941, this Non-Commissioned Officer has been a very sound Wireless Operator and has put up consistently good work. He has never had a wireless failure and his skill has frequently been the cause of his captain being able to bring the aeroplane back safely under extremely difficult circumstances.  I consider this Non-Commissioned Officer's unfailing courage and devotion to duty merit my recommendation for the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BURGESS, LAC J.E. (service number ?) - Mentioned in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943.  No details in CAN/RAF cards.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


BURNELL, S/L Harold Hamlyn (39299) - Air Force Cross - No.3 Lancaster Finishing School - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 September 1944.  Home in Weyburn and Swift Current, although Commonwealth War Graves Commission recorded him as "son of Edgar Phillip and Jean May Burnell; husband of Lillian Irene Burnell of Kelowna, British Columbia"; the latter may simply record where his widow was living rather than his origins; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 21 December 1936.  AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944 (announcing his award) and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945 (reporting his death) described him as a Canadian in the RAF;  the former stated he had trained at No.33 SFTS, but given his date of enlistment it seems more logical that he may have instructed there (as indicated by the citation). Killed on air operations 14 November 1945 (aged 37; date confirmed by Commonwealth War Graves Commission); buried in Caserta War Cemetery, Italy.  Public Record Office Air 2/9019 has citation drafted when he had flown 1,600 hours.

 

This officer has been chief instructor at the school since its formation in November 1943. He has worked unceasingly to improve the standard of flying training and to develop the syllabus of the school. Wing Commander Burnell has, by his personal supervision, solved many instructional problems. Before being posted to No.3 Lancaster Finishing School, this officer's service included two years in a flying training appointment in Canada.

 

BURNELL, W/C Harold Hamlyn (39299) - Distinguished Service Order - No.223 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945.  No citation in that publication; following citation from Flight, 11 October 1945.

 

This officer has had a long and varied operational career, and has commanded a squadron since September 1944.  His present command entailed the formation of a new squadron, its equipment with American aircraft and the training of suitable crews.  This duty has demanded much initiative and organization combined with the most arduous attention to detail.  Wing Commander Burnell has completed this task with distinction and has, in addition, flown regularly on operations.  Under his leadership his squadron has achieved great success on bomber support missions, particularly arduous operations, which this officer has completed with commendable thoroughness and enthusiasm.

 

NOTE:  Public Record Office Air 2/8149 has recommendation drafted by G/C. T.C. Dickens on 17 April 1945 when he had flown 50 sorties (275 hours 55 minutes); eight sorties (45 hours 50 minutes) since previous award.

 

First Tour

 

17 Nov 1939  Shipping, North Sea (4.30), "B" bombs on convoy

21 Nov 1939  Heligoland Harbour (5.20), combat with Bf.109

24 Nov 1939  Shipping, North Sea (5.00)

5 Jan 1940     Shipping, Heligoland Bight (5.10)

21 Jan 1940  Shipping (5.15)

22 Jan 1940  Shipping, Sylt (4.40)

27 Feb 1940  Pamphlets, Bremen (6.00)

1 Mar 1940    Pamphlets, Bremen (5.40)

15 Mar 1940  North Sea patrol (4.40)

20 Mar 1940  North Sea patrol (3.50, early return)

21 Mar 1940  Pamphlets, Hanover (7.10)

23 Mar 1940  Pamphlets, Kiel (6.05)

25 Mar 1940  Security patrol, Frisians (6.10)

21 Apr 1940  Stavanger, Norway (8.05), hit by flak


9 May 1940    Security patrol, Frisians (5.00)

15 May 1940 Hamborn, Germany (4.40), 1st night bombing attack by Bomber Command

18 May 1940 Road targets, Gembloux, Belgium (3.45)

20 May 1940 Road bridge, Hannades, France (4.15)

23 May 1940 Road targets, Brussels area (4.20)

26 May 1940 Motor transport and tank convoy, Audenarde, Belgium (3.55)

28 May 1940 Tank park, St.Omer (3.50)

1 June 1940   Road targets, Dunkirk (3.30)

3 June 1940   Road bridge, Cravelline (4.50)

5 June 1940   Cologne (5.20)

8 June 1940   St.Valley road and canal bridge (4.20)

10 June 1940            Airfield, Brussels (4.35)

13 June 1940            Seine bridges, Paris area (4.20), not carried out, unable to pinpoint)

15 June 1940            Incendiary leaf attack, Black Forest (6.10)

 

Second Tour

 

19 Feb 1943  Wilhelmshaven (4.55)

27 Mar 1943  Berlin (8.00)

28 Mar 1943  St.Nazaire (5.35)

29 Mar 1943  Berlin (8.25), hit by heavy fly; lost starboard inner engine

4 Apr 1943     Kiel (6.05)

10 Apr 1943  Frankfurt (6.35)

14 Apr 1943  Stuttgart (7.05), combat with Ju.88, no claim

16 Apr 1943  Mannheim (6.10)

17 Apr 1943  Stettin (6.55)

25 May 1943 Dusseldorf (4.50)

21 June 1943            Krefeld (4.30)

27 July 1943  Hamburg (4.55)

12 Aug 1943  Milan (8.30)

17 Aug 1943  Peenemunde (7.10)

 

Third Tour

 

27 Nov 1944  Bomber support, North Germany (4.50)

29 Nov 1944  Window Patrol, Ruhr (4.45)

5 Jan 1945     Jostle Patrol, Houggalaise (5.10)

5 Feb 1945    Jostle Patrol, Cleve (5.00)

20 Feb 45      Jostle Patrol, Reinholm (6.15)

1 Mar 1945    Window Patrol, Stuttgart (6.35)

20 Mar 1945  Jostle Patrol, Heide (5.25)

16 Apr 1945  Window Patrol, South Germany (7.30)

 

This officer has a long and varied operational career, and since 22nd September 1944 has commanded a Special Duties squadron.


His present command entailed the reformation of a new squadron, its equipment with American type aircraft and their modification for night flying, the training of crews for a special duty role, and now the successful culmination of several months of sustained operations.

 

This duty has demanded much initiative and detailed organization combined with the most arduous attention to detail.  Wing Commander Burnell has completed this task with distinction and in addition has flown regularly on operations.

 

The personal example of this officer has been exceptional, and by his brilliant leadership a splendid spirit of squadron morale has been created and maintained.

 

The squadron this officer commands has achieved much success and has afforded great support to Bomber Command operations, which success is a tribute to the qualities of this officer, and recognition of his distinguished services is most strongly recommended.

 

On 28 April 1945 the Air Officer Commanding, No.100 Group, added his comments:

 

This squadron commander has set a fine example of devotion to duty.  Since his employment on Bomber Support duties he has had a particularly difficult task which he has accomplished with commendable thoroughness and enthusiasm.  He has achieved a fine operational record.  I consider he well deserves the award of the DSO.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BURNETT, F/O Wilfred Jasper (40076) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.49 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 October 1940.  Born Garden Creek, New Brunswick, 1915; home in Fort Francis; served in New Brunswick Dragoons.  RAF, 1937; confirmed in rank as Pilot Officer, 12 July 1938.  Promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942. Served in postwar RAF, commanded Valiants during Suez Operation (1956).  Air Ministry Bulletin 2035 refers.  No published DFC citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Record Office Air 2/9489 has recommendation dated 28 August 1940.

 

This officer has carried out a total of 32 operational flights against the enemy during which he has completed 187 hours of flying as a first pilot.  Throughout these operations Flying Officer Burnett has shown outstanding ability, determination and devotion to duty, and has always pressed home his attacks in spite of enemy opposition.

 


He has carried out numerous mining operations and bombing attacks, both from low and high level, and in spite of his aircraft being hit on many occasions all his attacks have been notable for their thoroughness, coolness and complete disregard for personal safety.

 

This officer is always an enthusiastic volunteer for any task that is offered to him, and he has at all times set an excellent example to other pilots in his squadron.

 

On 30 August 1940, Air Vice-Marshall A.T. Harris (Air Officer Commanding, No.5 Group) minuted the document:

 

Strongly recommended. This officer is a fine type of bomber captain who does consistent;y excellent work.

 

This was edited to a citation submitted to Air Ministry Awards Committee:

 

This officer, as first pilot, has carried out 32 operational flights including numerous bombing attacks from high and low levels, and in spite of his aircraft being hit on many occasions all his attacks have been notable for their thoroughness and coolness. This officer is always an enthusiastic volunteer for any task offered him and by his outstanding ability, determination and devotion to duty he has at all times set an excellent example to other pilots in his squadron.

 

BURNETT, W/C Wilfred Jasper, DFC (40076) - Distinguished Service Order - No.138 Squadron.  Awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945.

 

This officer has commanded his squadron with outstanding success for a considerable period.  During this time, the squadron has been engaged in intensive operations.  In addition to proving himself an efficient and capable commander, Wing Commander Burnett has, at all times, displayed keenness to fly on operations, irrespective of the hazards involved.  On several occasions he has had combats with enemy fighters.  His courage and determination have always been an inspiration to those under his command.

 

BURNETT, W/C Wilfred Jasper, DSO, DFC (40076) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1956; Arctic flights in Canberra Aeries IV.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9262 has the text for a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross dated 27 January 1942, for services as an Acting Squadron Leader with No.408 Squadron; credited with 44 sorties (264 operational hours).  Although apparently not awarded (for reasons unknown), the text is worth recording for the record:

 


This officer has flown a total number of 44 sortie on operations involving some 264 hours flying. He has flown eight sorties involving some 44 hours flying since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He was posted to No.408 Squadron (RCAF) in July of last year. Details of the sorties flown by him since that date are shown on the reverse of this form.  Unfortunately this officer crashed returning from his last sortie and was injured.

 

On all occasions this officer has shown great determination and leadership.  This has been directly responsible for the successful results he has obtained. In particular, on the 17th and 21st September, 1941, he led a sub-formation of three Hampdens on daylight raids over northern France, one on Marquise and one on Lille respectively. The raid on Lille was most successful. Although he encountered heavy flak and fighter opposition, this officer kept his section in perfect formation and returned without loss. At all times he has set a fine example by his courage and devotion to duty to the personnel of his flight.

 

This officer is a Canadian serving with the Royal Air Force.

 

The sortie sheet actually mentions ten trips of which three are described as unsuccessful. They are:

 

12/13 Aug 41 Hanover          Night   Successful

22/23 Aug 41 Mannheim      Night   Successful

11 Sept 41                 Marquise        Day     Unsuccessful

21 Sept 41                 Lille                 Day     Successful

29/30 Sept 41           Hamburg        Night   Successful

20/21 Oct 41              Bremen          Night   Successful

23/24 Oct 41              Lorient            Night   Successful

14/15 Dec 41                        Brest               Night   Unsuccessful

8/9 Jan 42                  Brest               Night   Unsuccessful

15/16 Jan 42             Hamburg        Night   Successful

 

It would appear this went forward as it is found in edited version in the same document:

 

Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, this officer has carried out eight sorties involving some 44 hours flying. On all occasions Squadron Leader Burnett has displayed great determination and leadership.  In particular, on the 17th and 21st September 1941, he led a sub-formation of three Hampdens on daylight raids on Marquise and on Lille. The raid on Lille was most successful. Despite heavy anti-aircraft fire and fighter opposition, Squadron Leader Burnett kept his section in perfect formation and returned without loss. Other targets attacked since August 1941 include Hanover, Mannheim, Hamburg, Brest and Lorient. This officer has at all times set a fine example of courage and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8769 has a recommendation dated 20 September 1944 for a French Croix de Guerre in connection with No.138 Squadron activities. It is not known if this was granted but should be noted for the record.

 

As a Squadron Commander over a period of five months, this officer has completed twelve operations of a special nature in France.


His determination and skill have undoubtedly set an example which has been emulated by other members of his squadron. He has played no small part in contributing to the war effort in France, and has inspired his whole squadron by his good leadership and the fin example he has set.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

BUSSELL, A/C Edward Irvine (03169) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists him as Canadian in the RAF although his wife was living in Simla, India.  AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Promoted to Wing Commander, 1 April 1937.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CAMPBELL, F/L Colin Francis (102986) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 February 1943.  Born in Margrave, Nova Scotia, 1913; educated at St.Francis Xavier University; RAF, September 1939; P/O 26 July 1941; F/O 26 July 1942; F/L 26 July 1943.  For services with No.109 Squadron; cited with F/L J. Turnbull (RAF, awarded DFC).  AFRO 513/43 dated 26 March 1943 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO 462/44 dated 3 March 1944 (announcing DSO) described him as Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 9370 refers.

 

One night in January 1943, Flight Lieutenants Campbell and Turnbull were captain and navigator respectively of an aircraft attacking Dusseldorf.  During the run up to the target the aircraft commenced to vibrate violently but, in the face of great difficulties, Flight Lieutenant Campbell resolutely completed his attack.  Immediately afterwards the starboard engine caught fire and became unserviceable.  On the homeward flight when nearing the Dutch coast, the port engine lost some power, causing the aircraft to lose height.  Despite this, Flight Lieutenant Campbell flew the aircraft back and made a safe landing at an airfield in this country.  Throughout, Flight Lieutenant Turnbull displayed navigation of the highest order which contributed materially to the safe return of the aircraft.  Both these officers set a fine example of courage and devotion to duty.

 

CAMPBELL, S/L Colin Francis (102986) - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 7 January 1944.  Air Ministry Bulletin 12507/AL.733 refers.

 

Squadron Leader Campbell has been engaged on operational work which has demanded great skill.  His appreciation of the responsibilities with which he has been entrusted, combined with his great determination to complete his tasks, have contributed much to the success of operations in which he has participated.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CAMPBELL, S/L Graham Cox (41252) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 20 November 1942.  Born Stewiacke, Nova Scotia, 3 May 1914; home in Alberta; commissioned 1938; F/O 3 September 1940; F/L, 3 September 1941; missing (POW), 8/9 May 1942.  Transferred to RCAF, 24 November 1944 (C97021; this was likely initiated after liberation but backdated to that date); safe in United Kingdom, 1 May 1945; repatriated to Canada, 26 September 1945; remained in postwar RCAF, reverting to Flight Lieutenant (1 October 1946) but regaining rank of Squadron Leader on 1 January 1951; retired 1961. Died in Ottawa, 14 May 1998. AFRO 1962/42 dated 4 December 1942 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF, as did AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945 (reporting his liberation). No citation in London Gazette but AFRO 1962/42 gives the following:

 

This pilot has displayed great courage and resourcefulness on all his sorties and sets a splendid example to the squadron by his cheerful readiness to accept any task, however arduous.  He has participated in numerous attacks on important enemy targets and in mine laying in enemy waters.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/8775 has recommendation dated 11 April 1942.  The text does not differ materially from that given above; the sortie list (22 trips, 145 hours 50 minutes) is as follows:

 

8 Sept 41  GARDENING (7.50)                  16 Dec 42 Brest (7.05)

11 Sept 41                                                     GARDENING (5.50) 23 Dec 42      Cologne (7.50)

15 Sept 41                                                     Wilhelmshaven (8.55)           27 Dec 42      Dusseldorf (5.45)

10 Oct 41  Essen (6.15)                               28 Dec 42 Huls (6.15)

12 Oct 41  Huls (6.15)                                  2 Jan 42    GARDENING, Bordeaux (8.10)

20 Oct 41  Bremen (7.55)                            31 Jan 42  Brest, cruisers (5.45)

22 Oct 41  Mannheim (6.20)                        3 Mar 42    Renault works (5.40)

1 Nov 41    Kiel (7.05)                                   10 Mar 42  Ruhr area (6.00)

5 Nov 41    GARDENING, Kiel (7.45)          24 Mar 42  GARDENING, Artichokes (4.40)

7 Nov 41    Cologne (4.40)                           26 Mar 42  GARDENING, Deodars (7.35)

27 Nov 41  Dusseldorf (5.50)                       3 Apr 42    GARDENING, Gorse (6.20)

 

NOTE: This officer is one of several who seemingly transferred to the RCAF whilst still in captivity; the mechanism by which this was done is not clear to this compiler as of 5 July 1999.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CAMPBELL, S/L Gray Alexander (87434) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.576 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945.  Born in Ottawa, 4 February 1912.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 8 March 1937. This officer was present in Canada (apparently as an instructor), being on the strength of No.37 SFTS from 10 October 1941 to 20 March 1942, and with No.39 SFTS until 24 March 1944 when he was posted overseas. In this period he was promoted to Flight Lieutenant (1 February 1942) and Squadron Leader (5 Octobr 1943).  Transferred to RCAF on 12 March 1945 (C89599).  Postwar member of the RCMP, twelve years ranching, then book publisher and journalist.  Died on Vancouver Island, 10 June 2000.  It is clear from the sortie list that the award was for services rendered both as a member of the RAF and of the RCAF - although it was gazetted when he was in the RCAF.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/9137 has recommendation dated 15 May 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (193 hours 30 minutes).

 

5 Oct 44         Saarbrucken                                      3 Feb 45       Bottrop

15 Oct 44       Wilhelmshaven                                  13 Feb 45     Dresden

19 Oct 44       Stuttgart                                              20 Feb 45     Dortmund

23 Oct 44       Essen                                                 21 Feb 45     Duisburg

25 Oct 44       Essen                                                 28 Feb 45     Neuss

28 Oct 44       Cologne (flak damage)                    2 Mar 45       Cologne

30 Oct 44       Cologne (flak damage)                    31 Mar 45     Hamburg (mid-upper

2 Nov 44         Dusseldorf                                                                gunner injured by flak)

4 Nov 44         Bochum                                              3 Apr 45        Nordhausen

27 Nov 44      Freiburg                                             4 Apr 45        Lutzkendorf

6 Dec 44        Merseburg                                         9 Apr 45        Kiel

12 Dec 44      Essen                                                 14 Apr 45      Cuxhaven

15 Dec 44      Ludwigshaven                                   18 Apr 45      Heligoland

28 Dec 44      Bonn                                                   22 Apr 45 Bremen (bombs brought back

29 Dec 44      Gelsenkirchen                                                          on Master Bomber's orders)

5 Jan 45         Royan                                                 25 Apr 45      Berchtesgaden

14 Jan 45       Merseburg

 

Flight Lieutenant Campbell, a Canadian officer, has completed 31 operational sorties as captain of a Lancaster heavy bomber operating in Bomber Command.  He has attacked successfully many heavily defended targets including Stuttgart, Hamburg and Kiel. He has also attacked many targets in the Ruhr area and made deep penetrations into Germany where fighters have been active.

 

His determination to press home his attacks in the face of the heaviest odds has been a tribute to his courage and endurance. By such untiring efforts he has inspired an exceptionally high standard of morale in his crew.  On three occasions his aircraft has been damaged by anti-aircraft fire, but this has in no way deterred him carrying out the duty in hand with fortitude and skill.

 

Flight Lieutenant Campbell has acted as Deputy Flight Commander and has shown a very high standard of leadership which is worthy of the highest praise.  His personal example whilst operating has done much to maintain the high standard of morale in his flight, and I very strongly recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CAMPBELL, P/O Hanlan Donald Richard Leroy (87059) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 February 1942. Born in Regina, 1918; home in Vancouver.  RAF, October 1939; P/O, 19 October 1940.  Joined No.408 Squadron, June 1941.  Killed in action 14 May 1943.  AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943 (reporting him missing) and AFRO 1/44 dated 7 January 1944 (confirming his death) described him as Canadian in the RAF.  No citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Royal Air Force Quarterly (June 1942) gives the following:

 

This officer has shown great courage and persistence in attacking heavily defended targets in enemy territory.  In September 1941 he participated in three daylight raids over France.  On each occasion his aircraft sustained damage from the enemy's fire, but despite this he carried out his missions successfully.  Pilot Officer Campbell has consistently shown a high standard of keenness and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CAMPBELL, F/O James Alexander (39492) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.87 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940.  Born in Nelson, British Columbia, 16 February 1913; RAF, 1937.  Served with No.87 Squadron in Battle of France; killed in action 12 May 1940.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  Originally recommended on 13 May 1940.  Public Records Office Air 2/6075 has recommenda­tion submitted to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer succeeded to the temporary command of a flight just before the German invasion of Holland and Belgium and during the two following days led it with great courage and determination.  He set a fine example by destroying four enemy aircraft.  On one occasion, when leading a flight of seven aircraft in protection of Blenheim bombers, he showed great personal gallantry in leading his squadron to an attack agaist forty enemy aircraft.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CAMPBELL, F/L William Weir (37835) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.230 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 13 September 1940.  Born in Revelstoke, 28 February 1912; DHist file 181.005 D.270 listed him as Canadian in the RAF; next-of-kin (mother) living in Victoria; joined RAF 29 June 1936; F/L 3 September 1940; S/L 1 December 1941; W/C 1 July 1941.  In No.230 Squadron from outbreak of war to March 1941.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  RAF Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage, Document 84/44-3) confirm his Canadian birth and show him involved in three PBY ferry flights, Ju;y to October 1943.  No published citation; Public Records Office Air 2/6102 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940) has the following recommendation in a block of awards submitted in July 1940: the original recommendation (dated 29 June 1940) is in Public Record Office Air 2/6099 and differs in no significant detail from what follows.


While commanding a flying boat in the Eastern Mediterranean, Acting Flight Lieutenant Campbell showed skill and initiative in surprising and attacking enemy submarines, sinking two with bombs and machine-gunning personnel in the conning tower of a third submarine.  The bomb explosions on one of these submarines resulted in wreckage and a number of the crew coming to the surface. Although in the open sea and in the face of an approaching storm, Acting Flight Lieutenant Campbell alighted and taxied the flying boat about the wreckage from which he recovered four survivors.  Owing to shock and injuries, the state of the sea and lack of a suitable boat, the manoeuvring of the flying boar and the recovering of the survivors demanded the greatest skill and patience. After the survivors were safely on board Acting Flight Lieutenant Campbell made a further search and then resumed patrol, handing over his prisoners at the end of the day.

 

NOTE: Although no citation was published in the London Gazette, the Air Ministry Bulletin 1693 was accompanied by a message sent "en clair" from Headquarters, Middle East to Air Ministry on 7 October 1940, apparently in conjunction with a press release and photograph being issued that day.  This read in part:

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant William Weir Campbell, pilot of a flying boat, Middle East Command, [has] been awarded Distinguished Flying Cross for skill, initiative and devotion to duty.  Behind announcement lies story, destruction two Italian submarines with bombs and attack on another with machine gun fire.

 

Flying boat which Flight Lieutenant Campbell in charge early weeks war. Attacks took place two successive days. One case Flight Lieutenant Campbell returned scene, rescued four survivors, then calmly resumed his patrol before handing over Italians, three Lieutenants and one Petty Officer, end of day.  First of submarines destroyed .

 


Dive bombing attack. Periscope sighted, Flight Lieutenant Campbell at once dived and released special anti-submarine bombs.  Two burst abaft conning tower and immediately nose of submarine rose sharply towards surface afterwards appearing slide vertically to bottom.  Air bubbles and oil at once began appear surface, two hours later large patch 300 by 500 yards.  Tail gunner reported seeing debris floating in area for some time after bombs burst.  Next day same flying boat again sighted Italian submarine  on surface and again the Flight Lieutenant dived to attack scoring direct hits beside conning tower.  Although in open sea and in face of approaching storm, Flight Lieutenant Campbell alighted, taxied flying boat about wreckage from which he recovered four survivors owing [showing ?] shock and injuries, state of sea, lack of suitable boat, manoeuvring of boat and recovering survivors commanded greatest skill and patience.  After survivors safely aboard Flight Lieutenant Campbell made further search, then resumed patrol handing over prisoners end of day.  On return journey to base, pilot sighted yet another submarine on surface. This he machine gunned as he ad no bombs left. After second attack submarine crash dived. His special aptitude dealing with submarines has earned for him sobriquet "Dead Eye Dick" among fellow pilots.

 

Notes compiled by W/C F.H. Hitchins (cards held by Directorate of History and Heritage, NDHQ) state that he was with No.230 Squadron, Seletar at the outbreak of war.  By June 1940 he was at Alexandria and on 27 June 1940 flew a Sunderland from Alexandria to Malta.  On 28 June 1940, flying L5804, he sank the Italian submarine Argonauta. On 29 June 1940, on reconnaissance in L5804, he was in approaches to Gulf of Taranto when he sank the Italian submarine Rubino, picked up four survivors and machine-gunned another submarine.  On 26 August 1940, on patrol, he force-landed in Greek neutral territory (St.Nikolas Bay, Kithera) following engine trouble and was interned, from which he was released on 1 November 1940 when Italy attacked Greece

 

CAMPBELL, W/C William Weir (37835) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - No.302 Ferry Training Unit - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.  Public Record Office Air 2/8872 has recommended citation.

 

This officer has been in command of No.302 Ferry Training Unit since March 1943.  During his tenure of command, 200 aircraft have been despatched overseas.  In March 1944, No.302 Ferry Training Unit absorbed another Ferry Training Unit equipped with Sunderland aircraft with the result that training had to be adjusted in include Sunderlands as well as Catalinas.  The numbers of crews to be trained and aircraft to be despatched rose sharply.  Owing to various difficulties the Ferry Training Unit found itself seriously behind schedule in its commitments for aircraft by the spring of 1944. A conference was held to clear up the situation and Wing Commander Campbell, acting vigorously on its recommendations, cleared the arrears by June 1944.  A steady flow of aircraft is now maintained and the Unit has since kept ahead of schedule.  The success of this achievement has been due principally to the energy, soundness and remarkable hard working qualities of Wing Commander Campbell, who has truly devoted himself to his responsible duties.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CANNON, P/O Jack Vernon (177163) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.626 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 17 October 1944.  Born in Manitoba 2 November 1922 but may have been raised in England (next of kin - his father - in Leystonstone); commissioned 1944. No published citation other than "completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 15917/AL.902 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation for a DFM (he was then a Sergeant, 1804019; commissioned with effect from 4 June 1944) dated 5 July 1944 when he had flown 27 sorties (169 operational hours).

 

16 Dec 43     Berlin                                       20 Apr 44       Cologne

20 Dec 43     Mannheim                               22 Apr 44       Dusseldorf


2 Jan 44        Berlin                                       24 Apr 44       Karlsruhe

5 Jan 44        Stettin                                      26 Apr 44       Essen

20 Jan 44      Berlin                                       6 May 44        Aubigne-Ragan

21 Jan 44      Magdeburg                             7 May 44        Bruz

28 Jan 44      Berlin                                       10 May 44      Dieppe

30 Jan 44      Berlin                                       19 May 44      Orleans

15 Feb 44     Berlin                                       22 May 44      Dortmund

20 Feb 44     Stuttgart                                   26 May 44      Aachen

24 Feb 44     Schweinfurt                             27 May 44      Aachen

25 Feb 44     Augsburg                                 1 June 44       Tergnier

15 Mar 44     Stuttgart                                   3 June 44       Berneville

11 Apr 44      Aachen

 

Sergeant Cannon as Rear Gunner has carried out 27 operational sorties against the enemy, many of these being against distant and heavily defended targets such as Leipzig, Stettin, Brunswick and Berlin, the latter being the target on six occasions.

 

Throughout this long and successful tour of operations, Sergeant Cannon has proved himself to be an outstanding Rear Gunner.  His technical knowledge and exceptional fearlessness in the face of danger has inspired a confidence in his crew and ensured a maximum safety for his aircraft by repelling enemy attacks with cool and skilful directions to his crew and determination in handling his guns.

 

I strongly recommend that the outstanding service performed by this Non-Commissioned Officer be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                                  * * * * *

 

CARLYON, F/L Paul Winstanley Manners (42672) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.150 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 September 1941.  Born Cumberland, British Columbia, 1912; educated at Oxford.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 2 September 1939;  missing 16 January 1943.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 listed him as Canadian in the RAF, although his next-of-kin (brother) was living in Wales.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  No citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Air Ministry Bulletin 5103 refers.  Public Records Office Air 2/8900 has recommendation dated 21 July 1941 when he was Deputy Commander of "A" Flight and had flown 30 sorties (166 hours) as follows:

 

17 Sept 40    Ostend (2.15)                          3 May 41        Cologne (5.25)

22 Sept 40    Calais (2.40)                           5 May 41        Mannheim (6.35)

24 Sept 40    Le Havre (4.40)                      7 May 41        St.Nazaire (5.55)

27 Sept 40    Hamm (6.05)                           8 May 41        Bremen (6.00)


9 Jan 41        Rotterdam (3.15)                    10 May 41      Hamburg (6.55)

10 Feb 41     Hannover (6.35)                      12 May 41      Mannheim (6.35)

12 Mar 41     Hamburg (6.05)                      2 June 41       Duisburg (4.55)

14 Mar 41     Gelsenkirchen (6.10)             16 June 41     Duisburg (5.35)

21 Mar 41     Lorient (5.45)                          17 June 41     Duisburg (4.45)

30 Mar 41     Brest (6.20)                             23 June 41     Cologne (5.35)

8 Apr 41        Rotterdam (3.25)                    30 June 41     Dusseldorf (4.45)

13 Apr 41      Brest (4.50)                             3 July 41         Bremen (5.40)

15 Apr 41      Kiel (6.10)                               7 July 41         Cologne (5.40)

17 Apr 41      Mannheim (6.20, bombed     10 July 41       Cologne (5.20)

Aerodrome in Holland)          17 July 41       Vegesack (7.10)

30 Apr 41      Kiel (7.40)

 

Flight Lieutenant Carlyon has been with 150 Squadron since operations on Wellington aircraft began and throughout this period has been captain of one of the squadron's keenest and most successful crews.  Flight Lieutenant Carlyon's leadership and courage have been the basis of the fine spirit shown by all members of the crew.  He has coupled great determination in reaching and identifying his target with equal thoroughness in pressing home his attack. During attacks he has shown complete indifference to danger in securing the best possible run up for his observer, Flight Sergeant Thomas, and they have proved a most successful bombing team.

 

On one occasion he bombed Hamburg from 8,000 feet and secured direct hits on the station although held by a searchlight cone and subject to intense accurate anti-aircraft fire.  On a recent flight to Vegesack one engine gave trouble over the Dutch coast. Although severe icing and loss of power forced him down as low as 5,000 feet on occasions, he continued to ETA [Estimated Time of Arrival], finding still 10/10 cloud and as the aircraft would not maintain height he dropped his bombs, returned and landed safely away from base after a flight of over seven hours , for five hours of which one engine was giving trouble. On another flight over Cologne in the face of very accurate ground fire he not only secured hits near his point of aim, but obtained an excellent photograph of the bursts.

 

This was edited for purposes of Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee to the following:

 


On one occasion Flight Lieutenant Carlyon bombed Hamburg from 8,000 feet and secured direct hits on the station, through his aircraft was held in searchlights and subjected to intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire. On a flight over Cologne in the face of accurate ground fire he secured hits near the target and obtained an excellent photograph of the bursts. On a recent occasion, when one engine gave trouble and the aircraft failed to maintain height, he dropped his bombs and returned to base after a flight of over seven hours.  This officer's leadership and courage have been the basis of the fine spirit shown by all members of his crew.  He has shown complete indifference to danger and has coupled great determina­tion in reaching his target with equal thoroughness in pressing home his attack.

 

CARLYON, S/L Paul Winstanley Manners (42672) - Mention in Despatches awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942. AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942 (award of Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CARMICHAEL, F/O Frederick Ernest George (139386) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.98 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 October 1943.  Born in Ontario, 26 February 1911; home in London when decorated; Air Ministry Bulletin 11859 refers. AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943 (reporting his DFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Transferred to RCAF in London, 15 March 1945 (C94011) with rank of Flight Lieutenant. Repatriated to Canada, 5 September 1945; released 18 October 1945. Much of his postwar life was spent around Sudbury.  Died in Ottawa, 28 August 1993.

 

In September 1943, this officer was the navigator bomb aimer of the leading aircraft of a formation which attacked a number of E-boats in Boulogne Harbour.  In the run-up to the target Flying Officer Carmichael's aircraft was repeatedly hit by anti-aircraft fire, the windscreen of his compartment was shattered and the oxygen supply failed.  Flying Officer Carmichael was saturated by liquid from a burst pipe while his goggles were ripped away by a fragment of shrapnel.  In spite of this he cooly and skilfully directed an accurate bombing attack.  Although the aircraft was badly damaged the pilot flew it back to an airfield and effected a crash landing.  The aircraft caught fire and the pilot was wedged in the escape hatch but Flying Officer Carmichael pushed him clear.  One of the gunners had become entangled in the wreckage and was unable to get clear, but Flying Officer Carmichael at once re-entered the blazing bomber and dragged his comrade free.  This officer displayed courage and determination of a high order.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CARRIERE, F/L Jean Charles (41825) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.140 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1942.  Born in Quebec, 21 January 1915; home there (father living in Montreal in 1940 as per DHist file 181.005 D.270).  Prewar he was an office worker for Catelli Food.  Served in Regiment de Chateauguay, 1933-35 (attended three summer camps); with RCAF Auxiliary, 18 September 1937 to 31 January 1939 (No.118 Squadron, General Duties with rank of AC2); Granted Short Service Commission for Four Years as Acting Pilot Oficer, RAF, 1 April 1939 with effect from 23 January 1939; graded as Pilot Officer on Probation, 23 October 1939; confirmed in appointment, 23 January 1940; promoted Flying Officer, 23 October 1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 23 January 1942. Attended Hanworth Civil School from 23 January to 1 April 1939; RAF Depot, Uxbridge, 1-15 April 1939 and No.11 Flying Training School, England, 17 April to 21 October 1939; No.219 Squadron, October 1939 to May 1941 (twin engined fighting, day and night); AFDU, June to November 1941 (aircraft test and development); No.140 Squadron, November 1941 to March 1943 (photo reconnaissance and survey; however, a document dated 30 September 1942 states that he had joined No.140 Squadron on 1 August 1941); No.83 Group Headquarters, April 1943 to June 1944 (staff officer, photography); No.511 Squadron, July to December 1944; No.1332 HCU (pilot converting to heavy type); No.45 Group, March to July 1945 (ferry pilot). To RCAF (C19240), 18 January 1944.  Repatraited to Canada, 13 July 1945; released 28 November 1945.  AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943 (reporting his DFC) identifies him as a Canadian in the RAF. No citation in London Gazette but AFRO 1294/43  and Air Ministry Bulletin 8443 have following:

 

This officer who for the past six months has commanded a flight, is a courageous pilot and skilful leader. Although some of his missions have been undertaken in appalling weather, Flight Lieutenant Carriere has always pressed on to achieve his purpose.  In each case he has obtained outstanding results.

 

NOTE: A report of his initial training is interesting as an illustration of the process.  At Civil Flying School (No.5 ?) he was on a B.II trainer (further identification needed); flew 11 hours 20 minutes before solo, had 19 hours 55 minutes advanced dual (total dual, 31 hours 15 minutes) and flew 30 hours 45 minutes solo.  At Intermediate Training School he flew 6.05 on Oxford before solo (14.40 dual total and 25.05 solo on Oxford by day, 2.40 dual and .30 solo on Oxfordby night); he also flew 25 minutes dual before solo on Hart.  At the Advanced School he flew 4.35 day dual on Oxford, 1.45 night dual on Oxford, 46.30 day solo and 1.15 night solo on Oxford.

 

NOTE: On 30 September 1942 his Commanding Officer, W/C F. LeMeusier, wrote of him, "This officer has an investigative mind and has carried out a very valuable experiement for his Unit" - although the nature of the experiment was not stated. Also written was "An exceptionally good pilot who has taken considerably more interert in flying than in administration, but who nevertheless has run his flight very well and has obtained very fine results with it. As of 1945 he summarized his flying as follows: Operational Hours: Spitfires (150), Blenheim (750), Beaufighter (75); Non-Operational Hours, Spitfires (199), Blenheim (675), Beaufighter (25), Miscellaneous types (1,101).  It would appear that his brother, J41813 Joseph Charles Lionel Carriere, was killed in a flying accident on 31 July 1944. (if Ernest Carrierre is father to both).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CARTER, P/O Henry James (104474) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942.  Born in Willowmeer or Willlowdale (Allison), Ontario; educated in Enfield; P/O August 1941. Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Willowmoor in 1915.  No citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Air Ministry Bulletin 8119 refers and is the source for the following:

 


This officer has displayed outstanding ability as a navigator.  He has participated in numerous sorties over heavily defended areas including Essen, Bremen and Cologne; he has completed several minelaying operations.  By his technical skill and devotion to duty he has contributed materially to the successes achieved.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9598 has the same recommended citation, it notes that he had flown 32 sorties (184 operational hours).

 

CARTER, S/L Henry James (104474) - Member, Order of the British Empire - mentioned in Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999; no details as to date or unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CARTWRIGHT, Sergeant Wiliiam (569663) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 17 September 1943.  AFRO 2194/43 mentions this and gives unit as Mediterranean Air Command.  DHist file 181.005 D.270 listing Canadian airmen in RAF about January 1940 includes him; father living in Revelstoke, British Columbia.  DHist file 181.005 D.271 lists him as Corporal Fitter, January 1941, serving in No.260 Squadron.  AFRO 2198/43 dated 29 October 1943 (reporting Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF and stated that the award was "for distinguished service in the Mediterranean Air Command".  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Revelstoke, British Columbia in 1919 and gave his trade as Fitter.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHADWICK, F/L William Eric (102154) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946 (respecting his OBE) also described him as as "Canadian in the RAF" (see also W/C Frank Anderson).  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Manitoba in 1914.

 

CHADWICK, S/L William Eric (102154) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - No.9 Ferry Unit (AFRO says only "Overseas"- Award effective 1 January 1946 as per AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Public Records Office Air 2/9139 gives unit and recommended citation:

 


This officer has been employed as Squadron Leader, Flying Post, No.9 Ferry Unit.  During the year he served with this unit it has passed through a difficult period of rapid expansion. Although the flow of aircraft to squadrons and Forward Reserve Pools increased over 500 percent, the strength of ferry crews did not increase accordingly and on many occasions the difficulties of meeting the increased flow appeared almost insuperable.  Nevertheless, Squadron Leader Chadwick, by the exercise of his exceptional energy, organizing ability and resourcefulness, succeeded in maintaining the flow of aircraft until the unit was reinforced with more ferry crews.  At the same time many new pilots were arriving at the unit, a large proportion of whom were unskilled and inexperienced with little or no knowledge of the ferry routes which they were to fly.  Squadron Leader Chadwick was mainly responsible for training these men to the high standard required to enable them to carry out their duties satisfactorily.  In spite of such disheartening setbacks as the posting to other units of newly-trained crews, this fine officer continued to carry out his duties with unflagging energy and enthusiasm.  His splendid morale and cheerfulness throughout this trying period set an encouraging example to all ranks in the unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHALKLEY, P/O Dennis Edward John (189362) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.625 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945.  Born 1922 in Turtleford, Saskatchewan; educated at Stroud School, Elm Park, Brixton; home in West Norwood; served in ranks; commissioned December 1944.  AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945 (reporting his DFC) described him as Canadian in the Royal Air Force. Air Ministry Bulletin 17982/AL.990 refers.

 

As pilot and captain of aircraft, this officer has participated in a good number of attacks against enemy targets. One night in February 1945 he was detailed for an operation against the oil refinery at Politz. The target was successfully attacked but later, on the return flight, Pilot Officer Chalkley's aircraft was badly hit. It became difficult to control.  Nevertheless, Pilot Officer Chalkley held to his homeward course. When nearing the English coast a second engine gave trouble and the propeller had to be feathered. Even so, this resolute and skilful pilot went on to reach base where he effected a safe landing. His determination was typical of that which he has shown on all occasions.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHALLEN, Flight Sergeant Grenfell Stephen William (937815) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.108 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 May 1942 and AFRO 809/42.  Born in Hamilton, 2 December 1919; home there; educated at Hamilton technical Institute; enlisted as Air Gunner, 25 September 1939; promoted to Sergeant, 29 June 1940; Flight Sergeant, 1 April 1941; remustered to Pilot Under Training, 5 January 1943; classified as Leading Aircraftman (Pilot Trainee), 7 May 1944; commissioned as Pilot Officer, 11 June 1944; promoted to Flying Officer, 11 December 1944.  Application for Atlantic Star states he flew with No.201 Squadron, Sullom Voe, 27 August to 11 November 1940 (first patrol on 3 October 1940); application for Aircrew Europe Star stated he flew with No.40 Squadron, Wyton, 13 November 1940 to 9 June 1941 (first sortie on 27 December 1940, target Le Havre); application for Africa Star claimed operations with No.108 Squadron, dates not given but wounded 25 September 1941 on raiding Benghazi (see citation); he appears to have returned briefly to operations from March to May 1942.  Retrained as a pilot at Grosse Ile, Michegan (9 September to 12 December 1943) and Pensacols, Florida (13 December 1943 to 10 June 1944) although he does not appear to have flown on operations thereafter; at wars end he claimed to have been on 44 sorties (although the citation credited him with at least 70) and 430 operational hours; he also claimed 446 non-operational hours as a gunner and pilot. Commissioned 11 June 1944 (180085); transferred to RCAF (C94005), 14 March 1945; repatriated to Canada, 22 July 1945; Released 3 September 1945. Served again (206064), May 1951 to June 1955, apparently as a Chipmunk instructor in the Reserve (Hamilton).  AFRO 809/42 dated 29 May 1942 (reporting DFM) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.  No citation in London Gazette other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations", but Royal Air Force Quarterly (September 1942) gives the following (repeated in Air Ministry Bulletin 6957):

 

This airman has participated in 70 raids including attacks on important targets in Germany and the Middle East. As rear gunner he has displayed great courage and determination.  On one occasion, when over Benghazi, he was wounded in throat by a piece of shrapnel which punctured the larynx.  Covered with blood and unable to speak, but continued using his guns on anti-aircraft defences and searchlights until his aircraft escaped from the fire zone.

 

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CHARLES, F/O Edward Francis John (36198) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.54 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1941.  Born in Coventry, 6 February 1919; His father had been a member of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and subsequently a member of the Royal Air Force. Home in Lashburn, Saskatchewan. Trooper in Saskatchewan Horse, June 1937.  Applied to join RAF and was interviewed in Regina early in October 1937.  Took Provisional Pilot Officer training with the RCAF, Trenton, with flying instruction from 10 January to 12 April 1938 (11 hours 55 minutes dual before solo on Fleet Finch; seven hours advanced dual, one hour 35 minutes solo; followed by an instrument flying training course on Fleet aircraft, 19 hours 45 minutes dual; described by F/L D.A.R. Bradshaw on 18 January 1939 as "Above the average. He flies accurately and with confidence on instruments").  His graduation was delayed five months because of a crash while attempting a forced landing approach in a strange field, resulting in injuries. (Moth 246, 9 August 1938) but authorized to wear wings from 23 February 1939.  With RCAF until 3 May 1939 when he went to Britain to join RAF.  Ranks and appointments as follows: granted Short Service Commission as Pilot Officer, 15 May 1939; Flying Officer, 3 September 1940; Flight Lieutenant, 12 July 1941; Acting Squadron Leader, 22 April 1943; Acting Wing Commander, 9 August 1943.  Posting as follows: at No.1 RAF Depot, 15 May 1939; No.5 Flying Training School, 26 May 1939; No.3 Flying Training School,  28 June 1939; School of Army Cooperation, 23 September 1939 (supernumerary until 4 October 1939 when placed on course; to No.81 Squadron, 18 December 1939; No.2 Squadron, 4 June 1940; No.7 OTU, 21 August 1940; No.54 Squadron, 2 September 1940; to Station Southend, 6 May 1941; to No.54 Squadron, 6 June 1941; to Central Flying School, Upavon, on course, 18 October 1941; to No.9 SFTS as instructor, 13 December 1941; to No.52 OTU, 8 December 1942; to No.64 Squadron, 10 January 1943; to Station Wittering as Wing Commander (Flying), 26 September 1943; to Canada for lecture tour, 23 January 1944; to Tangmere as Wing Commander (Flying), 26 May 1944; transferred to RCAF as Wing Commander, 15 May 1944 (C86891).  Repatriated to Canada, 9 November 1944; remained in postwar RCAF (19505, reverted to Squadron Leader on 1 October 1946) until 31 May 1950, having spent most of his time on air transport duties at St.Hubert and in No.426 Squadron.  Died in Vancouver, 5 November 1986. See Hugh A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky (Canada's Wings, Stittsville, 1977).  Chris Shores, in second edition of Aces High, gives the following list of victories: 17 April 1941, one Bf.110 destroyed (Spitfire P7756); 17 June 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire R7303); 21 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire R7279); 24 June 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire R7303); 27 June 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire R7303); 30 June 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire R7279); 4 July 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one probably destroyed (Spitfire R7279); 8 July 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire R7303, shared with another pilot); 9 July 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire R7303); 20 July 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire W3437); 23 July 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire W3446); 17 September 1941, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Spitfire P8797); 27 September 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (Spitfire P8797, shared with another pilot); 12 March 1943, one FW.190 damaged (Spitfire BR370); 18 April 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire EN529); 4 May 1943, one FW.190 damaged (Spitfire EN557); 7 May 1943, one Bf.109 damaged (Spitfire EN557); 14 May 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire EN554); 15 May 1943, two FW.190s destroyed (Spitfire EN554); 17 May 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire EN554); 23 June 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire coded FY-S); 5 July 1943, one FW.190 damaged (Spitfire AR884); 25 July 1943, one Bf.109 damaged plus one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire AR610); 31 August 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (Spitfire coded JE-C);  24 September 1943, one Bf.110 destroyed (Spitfire BL631).  AFRO 1949/43 dated 24 September 1943 (reporting his Bar to the DFC), AFRO 2049/43 dated 8 October 1943 (reporting American Silver Star) and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943 (reporting his DSO) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 4508 refers.

 

This officer has displayed exceptional zeal and immense enthusiasm during the many offensive sweeps carried out by his unit. He has destroyed at least three enemy aircraft.

 

CHARLES, S/L Edward Francis John (36198) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 July 1943.

 

This officer is a first class fighter whose fine leadership, cool judgement and efficiency have set an admirable example. He has destroyed thirteen enemy aircraft and damaged several more.

 

CHARLES, S/L Edward Francis John (36198) - Silver Star (United States) - No.611 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1943.  Public Record Office Air 2/9599 has citation as published in General Order No.104, Eighth Air Force, 16 July 1943.

 


For gallantry in action while escorting United States Army Air Force bombers on ten bombardment missions over enemy occupied territory.  Squadron Leader Charles has led his squadron brilliantly and with utter disregard for his own personal safety.  His actions on all these occasions reflect the highest credit upon himself and the armed forces of His Majesty's government.

 

CHARLES, W/C Edward Francis John (36198) - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 29 October 1943.

 

Wing Commander Charles is an inspiring leader whose great skill and tenacity have contributed materially to the successes obtained by the formations with which he has flown. In Septembere 1943 he led a formation of fighters which acted as escort to a bomber force detailed to attack an airfield in northern France. During the operations twelve enemy fighters were engaged and in the ensuing combat four of the hostile aircraft were shot down, one of them by Wing Commander Charles. This oficer, who has destroyed at least fifteen enemy aircraft, has displayed great courage and unflagging devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: On a form dated 11 September 1944 he gave his flying hours as 200 on Lysanders, 50 on Hurricanes, 700 on Spitfires, 100 on Master, 50 on Auster, Proctor and light types, total of 1,100 (approximately).

 

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CHRISTIE, F/O George Patterson (40081) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Photo Development Unit (although with No.242 Squadron when announced) - awarded as per London Gazette dated 16 August 1940.  Born in Westmount, Quebec, 1 October 1917; educated at McGill and in Hove, Sussex.  Enlisted, July 1937; confirmed in rank as Pilot Officer, 12 July 1938.  Training completed as of May 1938 when he was posted to No.43 Squadron.  Transferred in April 1940 to No.212 Squadron (photo reconnaisance Spitfires). Chris Shores, Aces High (2nd edition) writes that his first victory was gained in a unarmed Spitfire by forcing a Fiat BR.20 into the Mediterranean during a long range reconnaissance - victory confirmed by his taking pictures of the wreckage.  Posted to No.242 Squadron in July 1940; to No.66 Squadron Squadron, September 1940.  To Canada early in 1941, joining Ferry Command.  Promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942. RAF Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage, Document 84/44-3) give the following hours (evidently compiled when he arrived): training types, 100 hours; Hawker Fury, 100 hours; Hurricane, 400 hours; Spitfire, 200 hours; Wellington, one hour; Blenheim, eight hours; Beaufort, one hour; Hudson, 12 hours; Anson, 24 hours; Catalina, 22 hours.  He was both an instructor and ferry pilot; the cards are detailed, showing him making a delivery of Liberator AM916 in April and May 1941; he was active thereafter in flying Hudsons and Liberatprs to Britain, but also flew Bolingbroke 9067 to Vamcouver in December 1941 and Kittyhawk AL136 to Moose Jaw in February 1942.  The cards also carry his photograph.  He was rated as a Liberator captain on 28 November 1941.    Killed in a flying accident at Lac St.Louis, 5 July 1942 (Hudson FH395). Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2722 refers.  Victories as listed by Shores as follows:  13 June 1940, one BR.20 destroyed in Mediterranean; 1 August 1940, one He.111 probably destroyed, 25 miles east of Lowestoft; 30 August 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed west of Enfield; 4 September 1940, one Bf.109E destroyed plud one Bf.109E probably destroyed wesr of Folkstone; 14 November 1940, one Ju.87 destroyed plus one Ju.87 probably destroyed and one Bf.109E damaged, Deal-Dover area; 26 November 1940, one Bf.109E destroyed, southest of Hastings; 27 November 1940, one Bf.109E destroyed east of Manston (this machine crash-landed; Christie alighted beside it and gave the pilot, Lieutenant Wolfgang Teumer, "Black 12" of I/JG.51, a cigarette; the aircraft is now in the RAF Museum, Hendon); 29 December 1940, one Do.17 probably destroyed (shared with another pilot).  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Public Records Office Air 2/6085 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940-1941) has recommended citation:

 

On 13th June 1940, this officer, in  an unarmed aircraft, attacked a Breda bomber off the coast of Monaco, and by repeatedly diving at it, forced it to land in the sea.  The five occupants of the machine climbed out and swam for the shore, and the aircraft sank almost immediately.  Flying Officer Christie has obtained valuable information concerning enemy movements and concentrations by daylight reconnaissance flights over enemy territory.

 

CHRISTIE, F/L George Patterson (40081) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.66 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1941.

 

This officer has shown outstanding ability and leadership over a long period of air operations.  He is a keen and determined pilot and has destroyed at least seven enemy aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/10175 has recommendation dated 18 December by Group Captain F.O. Soden, Officer Commanding, RAF Station Biggin Hill. The document has been torn; words in brackets are missing but presumed from context:

 

Flight Lieutenant Christie was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for outstanding [work] whilst in the Photographic Development Unit, and since [then] has destroyed six enemy aircraft. He has shown great keenness and determination and [exhibited] his undoubted ability as a skilful leader.

 

On 20 December 1940 the Air Officer Commanding, No.11 Group (Air Vice-Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory) added his comments:

 

This gallant young officer was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for outstanding work in France. Since returning to this country he has shown undoubted ability and skill as a leader, combined with great keenness and determination as a fighter pilot.  Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross he has personally destroyed six enemy aircraft. This brings his total to seven enemy aircraft destroyed.  I strongly recommend him for the immediate award of a Bar to his Distinguished Flying Cross.


On 21 December 1940 Air Marshall William Sholto Douglas (Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Fighter Command) wrote "Approved" on the form.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, F/O John Stewart (157629) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.410 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1944.  Born in Montreal, 1921; educated in England and gave home as London.  RAF, 1941, commissioned 1943. Air Ministry Bulletin 15676/AL.887 refers.

 

This officer has participated in many sorties as observer involving attacks against enemy airfield, locomotives and barges.  On a recent occasion Flying Officer Christie assisted in the destruction of a Junkers 88 which exploded in the air with such violence that hs own aircraft was so severely damaged that it could no longer be flown.  Flying Officer Christie descended safely by parachute and was rescued from his dinghy six hours later.  This oficer has invariably displayed a high degree of courage and determination.

 

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CLARK, P/O Hubert Percival (43106) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.44 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 November 1940.  Born in Moose Jaw, 1918; educated in Brandon and Forest, Manitoba; RAF, May 1939.  Shot down (POW) 14 August 1940.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2311 refers.  Public Record Office Air 2/9489 has recommendation dated 27 August 1940:

 

This pilot has successfully carried out 168 hours operational flying. He has always displayed the utmost coolness and determination in pressing home his attacks.  Some of the missions undertaken have been of an arduous nature and under adverse weather conditions.

 

This officer was reported missing on 14th August 1940, and according to the German broadcast, on the night of 18th/19th August 1940, he was reported a Prisoner of War.

 

This document was minuted "Very strongly recommended" on 30 August 1940 by Air Vice-Marshal A.T. Harris, Air Officer Commanding, No.5 Group.

 

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CLAYTON, F/O Arthur Chamberlain Pitt (41664) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 24 December 1940.  Born in Victoria, 21 February 1916; educated in Vancouver.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 4 March 1939.  Served with No.83 Squadron from 7 December 1939 to 12 July 1941 when posted to No.408 Squadron; left that unit, June 1942 when posted at OTU, Alammogordo, New Mexico as Chief Instructor; to No.405 Squadron, December 1942; later attended RAF Staff College.  Transferred to RCAF (C18639), 12 October 1943.  Later in charge of RCAF rehabilitation.  Repatriated to Canada, 29 January 1945. Released 22 January 1946. For more on his career, see RCAF Honours and Awards data base.  No published citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2548 and Air Ministry Bulletin 6298 refer. Public Records Office Air 2/9327 has recommendation dated 27 October 1940:

 

This officer has carried out a total of 30 operational flights against the enemy during the course of which he has completed 207 hours flying.  Throughout these operations Pilot Officer Clayton has shown outstanding skill, courage and devotion to duty.  He has always pressed home his attack in spite of enemy opposition or adverse weather conditions.  Amongst other notable operations he has carried out four successful attacks on targets in Berlin, and a number of mining and other low level attacks.  His aircraft has been badly damaged on several occasions by enemy action, but this has never deterred him, on future occasions, from pressing home his attacks.

 

This was later refined for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee to read as follows:

 

Pilot Officer Clayton has carried out four successful attacks on targets in Berlin and, throughout a total of some 30 operational flights, has shown outstanding skill, courage and devotion to duty.  He presses home his attacks in spite of adverse weather, enemy opposition, or damage to his aircraft.

 

CLAYTON, S/L Arthur Chamberlain Pitt (41664) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 13 February 1942.  No Gazette citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the exection of air operations."    Royal Air Force Quarterly (June 1942) gives the following:

 

This officer has carried out a number of further sorties since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. On all occasions he has shown great determination and leadership and he has contributed largely to the successes obtained. In September 1941 Squadron Leader Clayton led a sub-formation on daylight raids on targets in northern France.  One raid on Lille was particularly successful and reflected much credit on the skill and leadership of this officer.  Throughout he has set a fine example.

 

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CLELAND, AC2 Charles Coburn Elliott (615352) - Distinguished Flying Medal - awarded as per London Gazette 6 August 1940.  Born 1 February 1914 in Ormstown, Quebec; educated at Franklin (1921-1929), Huntingdon Academy (1929-1933) and Canadian School of Electricity, Montreal (1933-1934); worked as a store clerk in Montreal, 1934-1936 and in Val Dor gold mines, 1936-1937 when work terminated. Enlisted in RAF, 12 July 1938.  Trained at No.1 Wireless School, September 1938 to June 1939; Gunnery Course at Andover, Juneto October 1939.  In action with No.59 Squadron from 11 May to 17 June 1940 and again in winter of 1940-41. Served as Gunnery Leader at Central Gunnery School, October to December 1941. Posted to Canada, 11 February 1942.  On 21 November 1942 his logbook was examined by superiors and cerified to show he had flown 67 hours five minutes on operations by day, 48 hours 50 minutes on operations by night, plus the following non-operational flying: 390 hours 55 minutes (day) and ten hours (night). Commissioned 18 December 1942 (51212). Transferred to RCAF, 1 September 1944 while stationed at Mountain View (Flying Officer and Gunney Officer at the time; service number C47916).  Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 September 1944; to No.5 Radio School, Clinton, 18 August 1945; released February 1946.  Served again in RCAF, 17 July 1953 to 2 July 1958 (Air Services Ground Defence, specializing as a Safety Officer with Atomic Energy Commission. Died in Ottawa, 30 September 1988.  No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Records Office Air 2/6075 (Non-Immediate Awards, Air Component of the Field Force, 1940) has recommended citation:

 

On the 12th May, 1940, while acting as air gunner in an aircraft engaged on reconnaissance duties, this airman, by his coolness and steady fire, drove off an attacking enemy aircraft and caused others to break away.  Defensive fire was maintained by Aircraftman Cleland under difficult conditions while his pilot made important observations.  His actions are worthy of the highest recognition.

 

NOTE: His operational time was detailed on 10 November 1944 when he filed an approcation for Operational Wings and listed his flying as follows:

 

 

Prior to 10 May 1940 - approximately seven operational sorties (log book lost in retreat from France)

12 May 1940      2.30       Holland (strategic and tactical recce)

17 May 1940      .35         France     do.

22 May 1940      2.40       Belgium   do.

26 May 1940      .40                         do.

26 May 1940      2.25                        do.

29 May 1940      2.15                        do.

31 May 1940      1.50                        do.

4 June 1940       2.25                        do.

14 June 1940     2.45                        do.

15 June 1940     1.30                        do.

15 June 1940     .30                         do.

15 June 1940     .40                         do.

15 June 1940     1.05                        do.

15 June 1940     .50                         do.

16 June 1940     1.55                        do.


16 June 1940     .25                         do.

17 June 1940     3.35                        do.

 

Crew sent on non-operational duties at an OTU

 

27 Nov 1940      3.00       Shipping patrol, France, English Channel

1 Dec 1940        5.00       Bombing, Lorient

5 Dec 1940        3.45       Bombing, Lorient

7 Dec 1940        3.15       Bombing, Lorient

10 Dec 1940      2.20       Shipping patrol, French coast

17 Dec 1940      3.00       Bombing, Lorient

27 Dec 1940      4.30       Bombing, Lorient

4 Feb 1941        2.10       Bombing, Cherbourg

5 Feb 1941        2.30       Bombing shipping, Holland

10 Feb 1941      1.20       Bombing, Boulogne

10 Feb 1941      1.20       Bombing, Calaise

23 Feb 1941      5.00       Bombing, Brest

30 Mar 1941      2.10       Bombing, North Sea shipping

31 Mar 1941      2.00       Bombing, shipping, Calais

1 April 1941       2.15       Bombing, Caen aerodrome

3 April 1941       2.30       Escort, North Sea

4 April 1941       2.30       Convoy escort, English Channel

4 April 1941       2.40       Patrol for E-Boats, North Sea

10 April 1941     2.30       Patrol, North Sea

12 April 1941     2.40       Patrol, North Sea

13 April 1941     2.45       Patrol, North Sea

14 April 1941     2.10       Air/Sea Rescue, Holland

24 April 1941     2.40       Patrol for E-Boats, North Sea

27 April 1941     3.10       Patrol for E-Boats, Ijmuiden, Holland

28 April 1941     3.35       Convoy escort, English Channel

28 April 1941     3.00       Convoy escort, English Channel

1 May 1941        2.00       Shipping patrol, French coast

27 May 1941      2.20       Bombing Caen aerodrome

29 May 1941      .45         Convoy escort, English Channel

2 June 1941       3.00       Convoy escort, English Channel

 

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COCHRANE, F/L Arthur Charles (42195) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 30 March 1943.  Born in Vernon, British Columbia, 27 April 1919; home there. Initial flying training at Civil School, Hamble, Nos.8 and 14 Service Flying Training Schools.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 24 June 1939; promoted to Flying Officer, 10 April 1941.  Joined No.257 Squadron in May 1940; flew in Battle of Britain until 15 September when injured in motor accident.  Joined No.87 Squadron at the end of August 1942; it moved to North Africa in November.  Missing, presumed dead, 31 March 1943.  AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943 (reporting his DFC), AFRO 925/43 dated 21 May 1943 (reprting him missing) and AFRO 166/44 dated 28 January 1944 (reporting his death) described him as Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 9702 refers.  Chris Shores, Aces High (2nd edition) gives victories as follows: 8 August 1940, one BF.109E destroyed, Portsmouth; 12 August 1940, one He.111 damaged southeast of Martlesham; 18 August 1940, one Do.17 probably destroyed (Thames Estuary) and one Do.17 damaged (south of Clacton); 31 August 1940, one Bf.110 destroyed (Blackwater River); 7 September 1940, one Do.17 destroyed, London; 15 September 1940, one Do.17 destroyed (shared with another pilot, Foulness Point) plus one He.111 destroyed (shared among four pilots, same area); 22 January 1943, one SM.79 destroyed, Bougie, Tunisia.  On his Hurricane he painted six swastikas and one ice cream cone to denote his victories.

 

Since joining the squadron in August 1942, Flight Lieutenant Cochrane has shown himself to be a most capable and keen pilot and flight commander. One night in January 1943, in moonlght, he destroyed a three-engined enemy aircraft, briging his total victories to seven enemy aircraft desroyed. This officer has consistently displayed high courage and great devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8942 has recommendation dated 1 February 1943 submitted by Squadron Leader Measures; it noted he had flown 857 hours (62 in previous six months) of which approximately 150 were operational hours (about 90 sorties).

 

The above-named officer served with No.257 Squadron (Spitfires) from April 1940 to January 1941, during which time he personally destroyed six enemy aircraft: one Messerschmitt 109, one Messerschmitt 110, one Dornier 17, one Heinkel 111K, two Dornier 215s, and damaged seven others.

 

From January 1941 to July 1941 he served as an instructor at No.56 Operational Training Unit, and from July 1941 to July 1942, at No.60 Night Operational Training Unit.

 

In August 1942 he joined No.87 Squadron as a Flight Commander and whilst under my command has shown himself a most capable and keen pilot and Flight Commander.  On the 22nd January 1943 he took off in a Hurricane at 0630 hours by moonlight and destroyed a three-engines enemy aircraft 30 miles north of Bougie. In undertaking a sorties of this nature from a new and somewhat hazardous landing ground, this officer displayed courage of a high degree and the greatest devotion to duty.

 

The Group Captain commanding No.323 Wing concurred on 5 February 1943, and the Air Officer Commanding, Eastern Air Command (RAF) agreed on 22 February 1943.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


COCHRANE, F/L Homer Powell (40991) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 22 August 1941.  Born in Vernon, British Columbia, 1914; educated there. Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation in RAF, 28 August 1938.  Posted to No.112 Squadron, Egypt, July 1939, serving with that unit throughout the early North African and Greek campaigns to November 1941 (Commanding Officer as of 13 October 1941). Confirmed in rank of Flight Lieutenant, 3 September 1941.  Posted to No.204 Group on conclusion of tour; attached to Turkish Air Force, November 1941 to November 1942.  Second tour with No.238 Squadron, December 1942 to August 1943.  This tour included an attack on Crete, 23 July 1943, when his aircraft was heavily damaged by flak.  Posted to Britain, he served in Air Ministry to April 1945, Ferry Command and No.525 Squadron thereafter.  Released 19 November 1946. AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944 (announcing Mention in Despatches) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 4812 refers.  Chris Shores, Aces High (2nd edition) gives victories as follows: 28 February 1941, one CR.42 destroyed, Tepelene coast, Gladiator 5782); 4 March 1942, one G.50 destroyed (Gladiator 5917, RAF counted it as damaged but he wrote "destroyed - unconfirmed" in his logbook); 9 March 1941, one G.50 destroyed, Kelcyre-Tepelene area (not mentioned in his logbook but necessary to make the count of nine mentioned in citation); 11 March 1941, one G.50 destroyed, Bousi area (Gladiator 5917); 13 March 1941, three CR.42s destroyed, Kelcyre area (Gladiator 5916); 14 March 1941, one G.50 destroyed, Kelcyre area (Gladiator 5917; RAF seemed to count it as "probable" while he wrote "confirmed destroyed" in his logbook); 3 October 1941, one Bf.109 destroyed (unconfirmed, Tomahawk AN220).  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. No published citation to DFC other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Record Office Air 2/8899 has recommendation:

 

During the Albanian campaign this officer's squadron encountered a vastly superior force of enemy aircraft. Observing that the squadron leader's aircraft was attacked by four enemy aircraft, Flying Officer Cochrane went to his assistance and by his timely intervention the squadron leader was able to abandon his aircraft safely.  On this occasion Flying Officer Cochrane destroyed two enemy aircraft, bringing his total to nine for the camapign.  His calmness and steadiness sets an excellent example to all.

 

COCHRANE, S/L Homer Powell, DFC (40991) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. 

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


COLES, Flight Sergeant Maxwell Adam (798663) - Distinguished Flying Medal - awarded as per London Gazette 21 April 1944.  Born in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, 20 December 1921; home in Brooklyn, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland; teacher before enlisting, 26 February 1941; his identity as a Newfoundlander is confirmed by G.W.L. Nicholson, More Fighting Newfoundlanders (St.John's, published by the government of Newfoundland in 1969).  Posted to No.4 Manning Depot, 2 March 1941; to No.1 Wireless School, 20 July 1941; to No.4 Bombing and Gunnery School, 6 December 1941; posted to "Y" Depot, Halifax, 6 January 1942; to RAF Overseas, 9 February 1942; assigned to No.45 Group, 23 June 1944. RAF Ferry Command crew cards (Directorate of History and Heritage, Document 84/44-3) also list him, confirming home town (Mitchell delivery flight, June 1944).  Remained in postwar RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 13588/AL.769 refers.

 

This airman has attacked many of the most formidable targets in enemy territory.  In April 1943, while his aircraft was on its bombing run over Stettin, it was attacked by an enemy fighter and set on fire.  All efforts to extinguish the flames proved unavailing and the aircraft was forced to come down on the sea.  Shortly after this hazardous experience, Flight Sergeant Coles resumed his operational duties as wireless operator but on his next sortie was forced to abandon his aircraft by parachute.  Despite such experiences, this airman has continued to display outstanding gallantry and determination.  He is an extremely skilful wireless operator.

 

NOTE: The original recommendation, dated 20 January 1944 when he had flown 45 sorties (297 hours 45 minutes) was found in Public Record Office Air 2/9339 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000).

 

As Wireless Operator of a heavy bomber, Flight Sergeant Coles has now completed 45 night operational sorties against the enemy, 20 of which have been with the Pathfinder Force.  Amongst the formidable targets he has been detailed to attack are Mannheim, Frankfurt, Cologne, Bremen and ten sorties to Berlin.  One night in 1943 he was ordered to attack a target at Stettin and, when the aircraft was making its bombing run, it was attacked by an enemy fighter and set on fire.  All efforts to douse the flames proved unavailing and the aircraft made a forced landing in the sea near Sweden where Flight Sergeant Coles was interned.  Immediately after being repatriated, this Non-Commissioned Officer returned to the squadron and with commendable zeal resumed his operational tour.  On his very next sortie, he had the misfortune to abandon his aircraft by parachute.  Notwithstanding these experiences, the courage and determination of Flight Sergeant Coles were admirably demonstrated by his continuing to operate and, before his tour was completed, he had the further harrowing experience of returning from Berlin on three engines. The outstanding resolution and praiseworthy perseverance of this Non-Commissioned Officer have been an incentive to all and his courage and devotion to duty deserve the highest praise.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


COLLIS, P/O Frank (170422) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.207 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 18 August 1944.  Born in Quebec, 1918; educated in Montreal.  RAF, 1941; commissioned 30 May 1943; F/O 30 May 1944.  No published citation.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15073/AL.853 refers. Public Record Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 18 May 1944 when he had flown 26 sorties (179 hours 55 minutes) as follows:

 

29 Dec 43 Berlin (6.55)                          24 Mar 44  Berlin (6.40)

1 Jan 44    Berlin (8.55)                          26 Mar 44  Essen (4.55)

5 Jan 44    Stettin (5.25)                         30 Mar 44  Nuremburg (7.20)

14 Jan 44  Brunswick (5.25)                  5 Apr 44     Toulouse (7.25)

20 Jan 44  Berlin (6.45)                          9 Apr 44     GARDENING (8.55)

15 Feb 44 Berlin (6.45)                          18 Apr 44   Juvisy (4.50)

19 Feb 44 Leipzig (7.45)                       20 Apr 44   La Chapelle (4.35)

20 Feb 44 Stuttgart (7.10)                      22 Apr 44   Brunswick (6.05)

24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt (8.05)                24 Apr 44   Munich (10.45)

25 Feb 44 Augsburg (7.30)                   26 Apr 44   Schweinfurt (9.10)

1 Mar 44    Stuttgart (8.15)                      7 May 44    Tours (5.05)

10 Mar 44  Clermont-Ferrand (6.10)     9 May 44    Annecy (8.55)

22 Mar 44  Frankfurt (5.00)                     11 May 44  Burgh-Leopold (5.30)

 

This pilot has 26 sorties to his credit, including Berlin (five), Brunswick (two), Schweinfurt (two), Leipzig, Stuttgart and other heavily defended targets in the Third Reich. His accurate flying has enabled his bomb-aimer to obtain an aiming point photograph of Annecy.

 

Pilot Officer Collis is a very efficient and courageous captain of aircraft and has always shown great skill and determination in pressing home his attacks without regard for personal safety. His skill and devotion to duty have been an inspiration to his crew.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COLLISHAW, A/C Raymond, DSO, OBE, DSC, DFC - Companion, Order of the Bath - awarded as per London Gazette dated 4 March 1941, "in recognition of the successful combined operations in the Middle East."

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COMAR, S/L John (43026) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.105 Squadron - Awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 20 June 1915; educated there.  Served in PPCLI, 1934-1939.  Enlisted in RAF, 1939; Pilot Officer in 1940, Flying Officer as of 13 July 1941, Flight Lieutenant as of 13 July 1942.  Served in No.424 Squadron, early 1943 and then No.1535 Beam Approach Training Flight.  With No.105 Squadron, 1943-44 and later in No.15 Squadron (summer 1944)  Transferred to RCAF, 7 February 1945 (C89561).  Awarded Bar to DFC as RCAF officer.  Retired 20 June 1953. AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944 (announcing his DFC) described him as Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15550/AL.875 refers.  The following is a paraphrase of a general citation for his DFC:


In recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations.  Has completed many successful operations during which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CONNOR, P/O Clare Arthur Hovendon (40892) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 8 October 1940.  Born in Toronto, 10 May 1914; educated there; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 July 1938.  Served in No.83 Squadron, 26 August to 3/4 November 1940 (killed in action).  Award for action on night of 15/16 September 1940 (John Hannah awarded Victoria Cross).  Gave a BBC talk on the event, reprinted in Winged Words.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 1839 refers.

 

Pilot Officer Connor was captain of an aircraft detailed to attack enemy barge concentrations at Antwerp one night in September 1940.  His first run over the target was inaccurate, and no bombs were dropped. On the second approach, at 2,000 feet, the aircraft was subjected to intense fire from the ground, but the attack was pressed home successfully.  During this attack the bomb compartment in the aircraft was shattered and a fire started which quickly spread to the wireless operator's and rear gunner's cockpit.  The port mid-wing and the tail boom were damaged.  Shell fire pierced the port rear petrol tank causing grave risk of the fire spreading, and the starboard tank was also pierced.  The navigator and rear gunner abandoned the aircraft, but the wireless operator/air gunner remained and succeeded in controlling and eventually extinguishing the flames.  In spite of the condition of his aircraft and knowing that he had neither a navigator, rear gunner or normal wireless facilities, Pilot Officer Connor succeeded in flying back to his base and landing without further damage.  He displayed the most outstanding coolness, courage and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9456 has recommendation dated 16 September 1940.  The Officer Commanding, RAF Station Scampton, suggested either an immediate Empire Gallantry Medal or Distinguished Flying Cross. The text was:

 

On the night of September 15/16th this officer was the captain of an aircraft detailed to attack enemy barge concentrations at Antwerp.

 

After locating and identifying the target he carried out a run from 2,500 feet, but as the approach was inaccurate, bombs were not released. On the second approach at 2,000 feet the aircraft was subjected to intense opposition from the ground defences. The pilot, however, pressed home his attack which was successful.

 


As a result of the intense anti-aircraft fire the bomb compartment of his aircraft was shattered and a fire was started. This quickly spread and enveloped the wireless operator's and rear gunner's cockpits. The port mid-wing was also damaged by shell fire which pierced the port rear petrol tank, thus causing grave risk of the fire spreading. The starboard tank was also pierced and the tail boom was damaged.

 

The navigator and rear gunner abandoned the aircraft by parachute, but the wireless operator/air gunner remained and succeeded in controlling, and eventually extinguishing, the flames.

 

In spite of the condition of his aircraft, and knowing that he had neither a navigator, rear gunner nor normal wireless facilities, owing to the injuries caused to his wireless operator/air gunner, Pilot Officer Connor flew his aircraft back to its base where he landed successfully, without any further damage.

 

By his action Pilot Officer Connor displayed outstanding coolness, courage and devotion to duty.  He saved the life of his wireless operator/air gunner, whose parachute was completely burned out, and also saved his aircraft. Under the circumstances he might have been justified in abandoning his aircraft by parachute over enemy occupied territory.

 

On 17 September 1940, Air Vice Marshal A.T. Harris wrote on the form:

 

Very strongly recommended for the immediate award of the DFC. The condition of this aircraft has to be seen to be believed.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COOK, Sergeant Roy James (168676) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.625 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 7 January 1944.  Born in Toronto, 1921; home there; however, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission gives his next-of-kin as being William Wood Cook and Dorothy Mary Cook, Vancouver.  Killed in action 28 January 1944. AFRO 568/44 dated 17 March 1944 (noting his death) confirmed him as Canadian in the RAF.  Citation published in AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945 which also described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Although his home is recorded as being Toronto, there is a Memorial Window dedicated to him in St.Luke's Anglican Church, Victoria, British Columbia.

 

This airman was the pilot of an aircraft detailed to attack Frankfurt one night in December 1943. From the very beginning of his mission, one of the bomber's engines partially lost power.  Nevertheless, Sergeant Cook held to his course.  While crossing the enemy coast, flames were bursting from the exhaust manifold.  Although he was unable to climb satisfactorily, Sergeant Cook persisted in his mission and eventually pressed home a successful attack.  This airman has undertaken numerous sorties and has always displayed praiseworthy skill and resolution.

 


NOTE: The original recommendation, dated 23 December 1943, when he had flown 13 sorties (82 hours) was found in Public Record Office Air 2/5027 and reproduced by Ian Tavender in his book The Distinguished Flying Medal Register of the Second World War (London, Savannah Press, 2000).

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer was captain of a Lancaster aircraft which attacked Frankfurt on the night of 20th December 1943.  While taking off, the port outer engine partially lost power resulting in a severe swing to port.  Sergeant Cook managed to turn down a runway not in use, taxi round to take-off position again and took off successfully. This engine was still giving only partial power.  Flame started coming out of the exhaust manifold when the enemy coast was crossed on the way to target.  Despite this and the fact that the aircraft would not climb satisfactorily, Sergeant Cook persisted with this sortie and bombed the target from a height considerably lower than the main force.  During the return flight, the faulty engine was still giving off flames and had to be carefully nursed until a safe landing was made at base.  Then, and not until then, did Sergeant Cook report that the engine was faulty, which it was to such an extent that an engine change was ordered.  The determination of this Non-Commissioned Officer to complete his task is worthy of the highest admiration.  His skill in piloting the aircraft and gallantry in continuing and completing the sortie are extremely praiseworthy.  Even before the moment of take-off, he knew that the engine was faulty but, despite this, he pressed home his attack from a relatively low height and brought his crew and aircraft safely home.  Sergeant Cook has set a high example by his refusal to be turned from the task and his bravery and skill merit the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CORBOULD, F/L Kenneth Bruce (39211) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 4 November 1941 - No.203 Squadron.  Born in New Westminster, 18 March 1913; educated there; home there.  RAF Short Service Commission, 19 October 1936.  Posted to Iraq in February 1939, then to Aden and Middle East.  Carried out 115 sorties (524 hours) in Aden, Ethiopia, Crete.  Appears to have been attached to the RCAF in Canada for a time, as AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943 reports him being promoted to Squadron Leader, effective 1 April 1943.  Ferried a Dakota to England between 1 April and 9 April 1944 (Ferry Command crew cards). Subsequently promoted to Wing Commander; assumed command of No.502 Squadron in October 1944.  Killed in action 26 November 1944 (Halifax II, serial JP319, No.502 Squadron, code letter "J").  As a Wing Commander and Commanding Officer of the squadron, he had taken off from RAF Station Stornoway on an anti-shipping patrol in the Skagerrak. The aircraft was captained by 135500 F/L J.H. Burrough (RAF) and included an RCAF Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, R178763 WO2 F.S. Leech plus a Newfoundland member of the RAF, 798756 Flight Sergeant R. Tibbo.  The Halifax carried six 500-pound Mark II anti-shipping bombs..  It was airborne at 1414 hours; a call-sign signal was received at 1900 hours, after which nothing was ever heard of the aircraft.  Corbould's next-of-kin at the time was his father, Lieutenant-Colonel G.B. Corbould, living in New Westminster.  Ultimately, one crewman's body was found - that of P/O G. Booth (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner, RAF) who was buried at Tonsberg, Norway.  AFRO 1340/41 dated 14 November 1941 (announcing DFC) and AFRO 48/45 dated 12 January 1945 (reporting him missing) described him as a Canadian in the Royal Air Force with the rank of Wing Commander.  Air Ministry Bulletin 5486 refers.  No citation published other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations". Public Record Office Air 2/8907 has the following text:

 

During the three years this officer has been with his squadron, he has carried out 115 operations (involving 524 flying hours) in Aden, Abyssinia, Crete, Red Sea and the Mediterranean.  Flight Lieutenant Corbould has consistently shown courage and devotion to duty and, by his exceptional powers of leadership, has inspired the other members of his flight.

 

CORBOULD, F/L Kenneth Bruce (39211) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette 1 January 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COULL, S/L Norman McLeod (109507) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 15 August 1944.  Born in Westhartlepool, England, 26 November 1914; educated in Montreal including Sir George Williams College, 1929-1931. Was employed as a photographer, Donaldson Atlantic Line, 1938; vessel was SS Athenia, sunk by enemy action on 3 September 1939.  He was landed in Scotland and enlisted in RAF, 27 December 1939; took Wireless Course at No.2 Electrical and Wirelss School, Yatesbury, 1 June to 12 September 1940; classified as Wireless Operator, 16 September 1940.  Gunnery Course, 15 September to 20 October 1940.  Promoted to from Aircraftman 2nd Class to Sergeant (Wireless Operator/Air Gunner), 19 October 1940; took Gunnery Leaders Course, Castle Kennedy, 1-25 August 1941; commissioned 10 October 1941; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 5 November 1941; appointed Acting Squadron Leader, 17 June 1943.  First tour began with No.78 Squadron (Whitleys); posted to No.405 Squadron on 5 November 1941.  Between tours he was on strength of No.6 Group Headquarters; returned to No.405 Squadron, 15 February 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 14 March 1945 (C94007), specifically to speed up his repatriation to Canada at a time of shipping shortages. Posted to Canada, 2 May 1945; on strength of No.1 Air Command, 17 May to 17 June 1945; No.13 EFTS, 18-21 June 1945; Eastern Air Command Headquarters, 22 June to 14 October 1945; released 24 October 1945.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15067/AL.853 refers.  No published citation.  Public Record Office Air 2/9652 has recommendation by Wing Commander R.J. Lane dated 22 May 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (197 hours) as follows:

 

6 Feb 41    Dunkirk (5.15)                       24 July 41  Emden (6.00)

18 Apr 41  Berlin (9.00)                          21 Jan 42   Bremen (4.20)

3 May 41   Dusseldorf (8.00)                 1 June 42   Essen (5.30)

5 May 41   Brest (7.50)                           3 June 42   Bremen (3.00)

15 May 41 Boulogne (6.15)                    25 June 42 Bremen (3.35)

27 May 41 Cologne (7.45)                     29 June 42 Wilhelmshaven (4.20)

7 June 41  Brest (7.45)                           23 Oct 42   Genoa (10.00)


10 June 41                                               Wilhelmshaven (6.50)    28 Oct 42       Sea Patrols (10.00)

20 June 41                                               Kiel (8.05)  6 Nov 42      Sea Patrols (10.50)

23 June 41                                               Cologne (5.30)    24 Feb 44      Schweinfurt (6.35)

26 June 41                                               Cologne (7.10)    22 Mar 44      Frankfurt (5.35)

30 June 41                                               Bremen (8.20)     24 Mar 44      Berlin (6.30)

2 July 41    Cologne (1.00, nil op)          30 Mar 44  Nuremburg (6.10)

5 July 41    Munster (6.50)                      26 Apr 44   Essen (3.45)

8 July 41    Hamm (7.15)                         19 May 44  Mount Couple (2.05)

19 July 41  Hanover (7.15)

 

This officer is a very keen and efficient air gunner who has completed 30 operational sorties against such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Bremen and Hanover. Squadron Leader Coull has on four occasions taken part in actual combats with enemy aircraft, and has been successful in warding off their attacks. The courage, skill and devotion to duty displayed by this officer under these conditions has been most commendable. In addition, the skill and initiative shown by this officer in the performance of his duties as Squadron Gunnery Leader has been outstanding. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This document was favourably endorsed by the Officer Commander, RAF Station Gransden Lodge on 24 May 1944 and by the Air Officer Commanding, No.8 Group on 30 May 1944.

 

NOTE: Further details of his tours are known from applications for Operational Wings.  However, it is puzzling in that some entries from the first tour differ as to date or target from the list given above; the second tour sortie list carries his missions well beyond the date on which his DFC was recommended:

 

First Tour (Nos.78 and 405 Squadrons)    Second Tour (No.405 Squadron)

sorties 21 January 1942 on with No.405

 

6 Feb 41        Dunkirk (5.15)                        24 Feb 44      Schweinfurt (6.35)

18 Apr 41       Berlin (9.00)                           22 Mar 44      Frankfurt (5.35)

3 May 41        Dusseldorf (8.00)                  24 Mar 44      Berlin (6.30)

5 May 41        Brest (7.50)                            30 Mar 44      Nuremburg (6.10)

7 May 41        Brest (7.45)                            26 Apr 44       Essen (3.45)

10 May 41      Wilhelmshaven (6.50)           18 May 44      Mount Couple (2.05)

15 May 41      Boulogne (6.15)                    1 May 44        Le Mans (3.20)

27 May 41      Brest (7.45)                            27 May 44      Rennes (3.45)

20 June 41     Kiel (8.05)                              31 May 44      Trappes (3.45)

23 June 41     Cologne (5.30)                      2 June 44       Trappes (3.30)

26 June 41     Cologne (7.10)                      4 June 44       Calais (1.45)

30 June 41     Bremen (8.20)                       6 June 44       Conde (4.05)

5 July 41         Munster (6.50)                       7 June 44       Paris (3.05)

8 July 41         Hamm (7.15)                         9 June 44       Versailles (3.45)

19 July 41       Hanover (7.15)                      12 June 44     Amiens (2.40)


24 July 41       Emden (6.00)                                    14 June 44     Cambrai (2.35)

15 June 44     Lens (2.30)

21 Jan 42       Bremen (5.20)                       2 July 44         Oisemont (2.10)

1 June 42       Essen (5.30)                          9 July 44         Mount Condon (2.10)

3 June 42       Bremem (3.00)                      12 July 44       Bremont (2.30)

25 June 42     Bremen (3.35)                       14 July 44       Alderbelch (1.40)

29 June 42     Wilhelmshaven (4.20)           20 July 44       Bottrop (3.15)

23 Oct 42       Genoa (10.00)                       23 July 44       Kiel (5.15)

28 Oct 42       Atlantic patrol (10.30)           24 July 44       Stuttgart (6.50)

6 Nov 42         Atlantic patrol (11.00)           5 Aug 44        Bordeaux (7.15)

8 Aug 44        Lucheux (3.00)

10 Aug 44      Le Havre (2.15)

12 Aug 44      Wanne Eickel (3.35)

17 Sept 44     Boulogne (1.50)

25 Sept 44     Calais (2.45)

12 Dec 44      Essen (4.30)

 

On a form dated 2 April 1945 he described his flying as 263 hours 40 minutes operational, 306 hours 20 minutes non-operational; 56 sorties and was No.6 Group Gunnery Leader at the time.  He had flown in the following types - Dominie I (17 hours 40 minutes), Battle (one hour 15 minutes), Hampden (seven hours 20 minutes), Anson (34 hours 50 minutes), Whitley (251 hours 45 minutes), Wellington (nine hours five minutes), Halifax (74 hours 25 minutes) and Lancaster (173 hours 40 minutes); he claimed to have destroyed one FW.190.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COULSON, W/C Stafford Pulleine (33232) - Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette 13 April 1945.  No.35 Squadron. An Allison find; reportedly born in UK but raised in Nova Scotia.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 16 July 1999, stated that he was born in Wincanton, Somerset in 1916 and made no mention of Canadian connections.   No citation other than "completed operations with courage and devotion to duty."

 

COULSON, G/C Stafford Pulleine (33232) - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette 26 October 1945 - No.582 Squadron.

 

As a squadron commander Group Captain Coulson has displayed outstanding ability.  He has done much fine work as a Master Bomber and target marker and excellent results have been obtained by his squadron,  This officer has an impressive record of missions successfully completed and has at all times shown exceptional qualities of leadership and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


COUSENS, S/L Alan George Seymour (44076) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.3 Group Headquarters - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 January 1942.  Public Record Office Air 2/9578 states that his date and place of birth not available, but his father, Lieutenant-Colonel G.B.S. Cousens, MC, was living in Georgetown, Alberta.  Curiously, Squadron Leader Cousens is not listed in any documents recording CAN/RAF personnel.  The following citation (found in Air/9578) was drafted when he had flown 39 sorties (238 operational hours):

 

Three of Squadron Leader Cousens' flights were to Berlin, and when returning from one of these operations, one night in February 1940, fog compelled him to abandon the aircraft by parachute.  In so doing he broke his ankle. Since he was selected in June 1941 as Group Navigation Officer, he has set an admirable example by taking every opportunity to engage in night operations. His skill as a navigator and total disregard for his own safety have been quite outstanding. His flights have been mostly against heavily defended targets in Germany.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COVENTRY, W/C Henry Reginald (33133) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.102 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 13 August 1943. Born in Alberta, 1915; home in Victoria where he was educated.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 17 December 1932; Cranwell cadet, 1933; relinquished Acting Flight Lieutenant, 7 May 1938; restored to Flight Lieutenant, 15 June 1938; Squadron Leader as of 1 June 1940; W/C as of 1 December 1941.  Killed in action, 14 July 1943 (Halifax JD297, DY-Q).  AFRO 1783/43 dated 3 September 1943 (reporting him missing), AFRO 1949/43 dated 24 September 1943 (reporting his DFC) and AFRO 1/44 dated 7 January 1944 (announcing his death) described him as Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 11124 refers.

 

Since commanding this squadron Wing Commander Coventry has proved himself to be an outstanding and skilful captain and an inspiring leader.  The operations in which he has taken part have included attacks on some of the most strongly defended German targets such as Berlin, Duisburg, Dusseldorf and Essen.  His great energy and enthusiasm at all times together with his courage and determina­tion in the face of the strongest enemy opposition have been largely responsible for the repeated successes of his unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COX, Sergeant Andrew Bertram (550925) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.50 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 13 September 1940 - Born in Halifax, 1919; RAF, 1936 as a "boy"; mother living in UK so Canadian connection tenuous.  No citation with announcement other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations".  Public Records Office Air 2/6102 (Non-Immediate Awards, 1940) has recommendation dated 29 July 1940 when he was a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner with the unit.

 


Sergeant Cox has been flying on operations since the beginning of the war.  He has completed 30 successful operational flights.  His consistent devotion to duty has been an example to his comrades.  He has been employed as a Wireless Operator/Air Gunner in which duties he has always shown the greatest skill and confidence.  He is a thoroughly reliable and courageous member of a crew.

 

This was refined for transmission to RAF Honours and Awards Committee as follows:

 

Since the commencement of the war, Sergeant Cox has completed 30 successful operational flights. He has shown great skill and confidence as air gunner/wireless operator and has proved a reliable and couageous member of a crew.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

COX, S/L Richard Morse (41344) - Air Force Cross - Central Flying School and No.7 Flying Instructor School - awarded as per London Gazette 1 September 1942.  Born in Winnipeg, 27 February 1916; home there.  Enlisted in RCAF as a rigger, 1934; trained as a pilot at Trenton, 1938 and joined RAF, being appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 6 November 1938.  Instructor in UK until 1942; commanded No.109 Squadron;  Chief Instructor at a Bomber Commande OTU; later Chief Instructor at the OTU in Comox. Transfered to RCAF, 7 Novmber 1943 (C828) and remained in force to 1968 (19504 and 431-052-018), retiring as an Air Commodore (finally struck off strength on 27 February 1969).  Died ast Sidney, British Columbia, 2 March 1995; see obituary in Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society, Volume 33, No.3 (Fall 1995).  AFRO 1497/42 dated 18 September 1942 (reporting AFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF and published the citation which appears below. Air Ministry Bulletin 7913 refers.

 

This officer has been employed as a flying instructor for four and three quarter years and has been a member of the instructional staff at Central Flying School and No.7 Flying Instructor School since August 1940.  He is a keen and capable flight commander and for the past five months has been employed as Assistant Chief Flying Instructor.  His energy and devotion to duty have been most outstanding.

 

Another citation on Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ card says:

 

...has shown outstanding ability and devotion as flying instructor and has been a source of inspiration to his people.

 

COX, W/C Richard Morse (41344) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.109 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 15 August 1944.  No published citation.  Air Ministry Bulletin 15067/AL.853 refers. Public Record Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation drafted by the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Little Staughton, dated 24 May 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (92 hours 20 minutes) as follows (some references not explained):

 

9 July 43      Gelsenkirchen (marking)           23 Nov 43  Knapsack (bombing)


12 July 43    Aachen (marking)                       16 Dec 43  Special operation (marking)

22 Aug 43    Brauwerler (bombing)                22 Dec 43  Special operation (marking)

23 Aug 43    Berlin (marking)                          30 Dec 43  Special operation (marking)

30 Aug 43    Munchen Gladbach (marking)   1 Jan 44     Hamborn (bombing)

31 Aug 43    Berlin (marking)                          4 Jan 44     Special operation (marking)

23 Sept 43  Special operation (marking)     13 Jan 44   Essen (bombing)

27 Sept 43  Emden (bombing)                      14 Jan 44   Special operation (marking)

29 Sept 43  Bochum (marking)                      21 Jan 44   Special operation (marking)

1 Oct 43       Hagen (marking)                        2 Feb 44    Rheinhausen (bombing)

3 Oct 43       Special operation (marking)     15 Feb 44  Twente (bombing)

7 Oct 43       Emden (bombing "A")               20 Feb 44  Leeuwarden (bombing)

31 Oct 43     North Sea (Aircraft "A"              24 Feb 44  Twente airfield (bombing)

1 Nov 43      Dusseldorf (marking)                 30 Mar 44  Cologne (bombing and marking)

9 Nov 43      Bochum (bombing)                    22 Apr 44   Dusseldorf (marking)

19 Nov 43    Leverkusen (marking)                30 Apr 44   Abencout (bombing, day)

 

This officer has commanded No.109 Squadron with success whilst on his operational tour with the Pathfinder Force. He has also proved himself to be an outstanding captain of aircraft whilst employed on special marking duties, his accuracy and efficiency being a fine example to the rest of the squadron. He possesses morale of the highest order, and I can strongly recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This document was minuted "Strongly recommended" by the Air Officer Commanding, No.8 Group, on 30 May 1944.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

CRAWFORD, W/C Robert Cree (34146) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.194 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 19 October 1945.  Born 11 February 1913 in Montreal; taking engineering at McGill University, 1929-31. A member of the RCAF as a Provisional Pilot Officer, 8 June to 31 August 1931 (C308); flew roughly 15 hours dual and 23 hours solo, all on Avro Avian.  Selected for second term of P/P/O training, 1932, this was cancelled when the RCAF budget was cut. Applied to join RAF, 23 March 1933.  His application was delayed because he held no Civil Air Pilot's license and he had to wait for a vacancy in RAF Short Service Commission as an Acting Pilot Officer on Probation with RAF, 16 March 1934. Promoted from Flying Officer to Flight Lieutenant, 16 September 1938.  With No.26 Squadron (Lysanders) at outbreak of war.  Killed in action 20 June 1945 in India.  Although his award is carried in AFRO 1822/45 as being to a Canadian in the RAF, the Directorate of History and Heritage, CFHQ card also carries a pencilled notation, "PC4 has no record of being Canadian".  On the other hand, DHist file 181.005 D.270 lists him as a Canadian in the RAF with next of kin (father) living in Montreal and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945 (announcing his DFC) describes him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 


This officer has commanded his squadron since October 1944. Under his leadership the unit has attained a high standard of efficiency in the air.  He has completed a large number of sorties across the mountainous jungle country of the Chin hills and the Arakan montains in support of the 14th Army.  All of his missions have been completed in unarmd aircraft within range of enemy fighters and ground fire.  His fearless leadership, determinaton and devotion to duty have always been outstanding.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CRITCHLEY, Air Commodore Alfred Cecil, CMG, DSO - Commander, Order of the British Empire - awarded as per London Gazette 2 June 1943.  Born 23 February 1890.  Home in Winnipeg; formerly in Lord Strathcona Horse; awarded DSO for services with them, London Gazette dated 3 June 1916; seconded to RFC, 4 March 1918, commanding Cadet Brigade, RAF.  Career officer in RAF;  AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943 (reporting CBE) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CROOKS, P/O David Alexander Cummings (40678) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.226 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 25 June 1940.  Born in Toronto, 17 January 1913; educated Upper Canada College and University of Toronto.  Appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation,  7 May 1938. Killed in action 1 April 1941 with No.263 Squadron (Whirlwinds). Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  Air Ministry Bulletin 941 refers. Cited with Sergeant Thomas Clifford Davies and LAC William Reginald John Green (both awarded DFM).  The following from Public Records Office Air 2/4097 (Advanced Air Striking Force Operations, 1940):

 

During a day in May 1940, Pilot Officer Crooks carried out an extensive reconnaissance of the Amiens-Albert road with great determination and gallantry.  At a low altitude and under heavy fire from the ground, he bombed a large convoy of enemy armoured vehicles, obtaining direct hits with his bombs.  Although his aircraft was hit by heavy pom-pom fire he succeeded in reaching his base.  Sergeant Davies, an air observer, has been a member of Pilot Officer Crooks' crew on all missions, and has used his gun most effectively during low flying bombing attacks on convoys.  He has also shown exceptional navigational ability under difficult conditions by day and night.  As Wireless Operator/Air Gunner in Pilot Officer Crooks' aircraft, Leading Aircraftman Green has displayed considerable gallantry in attacking ground targets from a low altitude with his rear gun.  Pilot Officer Crooks and his crew have shown initiative and exceptional devotion to duty in many missions undertaken by night and under adverse weather conditions.  They have pressed home their attacks invariably from low altitudes, in spite of enemy opposition from the ground and from the air.

 


This text (apparently the final draft) may be compared with the first draft submitted on 8 June 1940 by Wing Commander H.C.Parker, Commanding Officer of No.226 Squadron, from Public Records Office Air 8870 (Non-Immediate Awards, Operational Commands):

 

This officer and his crew have shown exceptional devotion to duty and initiative during the past three weeks and they have successfully completed a series of missions, many of which were undertaken at night and under adverse weather conditions.  At all times this crew have pressed on their attacks from low altitude in spite of enemy opposition from the ground and from the air.  In particular great determination and gallantry were displayed on the 28th May when Pilot Officer Crooks carried out an extensive reconnaissance of the Amiens-Albert road at a low altitude under heavy fire from the ground.  During the course of this mission he bombed a large convoy of armoured vehicles from under 1,000 feet, obtaining a direct hit with his bombs. Although his aircraft was hit by heavy pom-pom fire he successfully flew it back to its base.  To date he has carried out eleven raids, which include bombing and machine gunning from low altitude. Pilot Officer Crooks is strongly recommended for an immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.  This officer is a Canadian.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CULLY, G/C Stewart Douglas, DSO - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1942.  Born 23 August 1895 in Omaha, Nebraska of English father and Canadian mother; educated in California and Vermont;  summer home was Dixie, Quebec; joined RNAS in Ottawa, 19 April 1917; in UK 21 May 1917; at Calshot, 10 November 1917; at Falmouth, 23 February 1918; to Felixstowe in autumn of 1918.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CUTHILL, P/O John (175715) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1944.  Born 14 November 1917 at Birch Hills, Saskatchewan; educated there, 1922-1936.  Police constable in Edinburgh, 5 May 1938 to 3 May 1941.  Enlisted in RAF, 28 April 1941.  Basic training in London, 28 April to 6 September 1941; No.8 Initial Training Wing, Norquay, 7 September 1941 to 19 February 1942; No.7 EFTS, Desford, 20 February to 21 March 1942 (ten hours 35 minutes on Tiger Moths); to No.31 PDC, Moncton, 8 February to 15 May 1942; No.31 EFTS, De Winton, 18 May to 16 July 1942 (seven hours on Tiger Moths, 55 hours on Stearmans); No.33 SFTS, Carberry, 17 July to 6 November 1942 (150 hours on Ansons; promoted to Sergeant on 6 November); No.4 EFTS, Browen, 28 January to 26 February 1943 (seven hours on Tiger Moths); No.11 (Pilot) Advanced Flying Unit, Perton, 2 March to 8 April 1943 (48 hours on Oxfords); No.7 FIS, Upavon, 8 April to 6 July 1943 (Standard Beam Approach instructor, 25 hours on Magister, 98 hours on Oxford); No.18 OTU, Finningly, 6 July to 1 September 1943 (89 hours on Wellingtons); No.1667 Heavy Conversion Unit, Faldingowrth, 4 October to 19 November 1943 (17 hours on Halifaxes, 35 hours on Lancasters; promoted Flight Sergeant, 7 November 1943). With No 626 Squadron, Wickenby, 19 November 1943 to 2 January 1944 (45 hours on Lancaster operations); with No.156 Squadron, Warboys, 29 January 1944 to 22 February 1945 (13 hours on Oxfords, 528 hours on Lancasters; promoted to Warrant Officer, 2 May 1944; commisioned 5 May 1944; promoted to Flying Officer, 18 October 1944 although he had been an Acting Flight Lieutenant since 18 July 1944); with Pathfinder Night Training Unit, Warboys, 22 February to 25 May 1945 (ten hours on Oxfords, 112 hours on Lancasters).  Transferred to RCAF, 24 May 1945 (C94050); after time at Repatriation Depot he flew with No.435 Squadron, Down Ampney, 9 November 1945 to 5 May 1946 (133 hours on Dakotas); with No.124 Squadron, Rockcliffe, 21 May to 11 June 1946; NRC Arnprior, 11 June 1946 to 13 January 1947; No.7 (Photo) Squadron, 13 January to 21 March 1947; KTS, Toronto, 21 March to 15 July 1947; No.7 (Photo) Squadron, 17 May to 28 December 1947 (351 hours on Dakotas).  His postwar career was complex; he moved from photo operations to maritime patrol work (November 1949 to January 1955.  He was then active in Intelligence in Europe and London (1955-1959); commanded No.129 Acceptance and Ferry Flight, Trenton, 5 August 1959 to 5 February 1961 when posted to No.6 Repair Depot, Trenton. Retired as a Squadron Leader, 23 June 1965.  Died in Richmond, British Columbia, 24 January 1995.  No citation other than "has completed successful  operations during which he displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."  AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944 (announcing his DFC) and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945 (reporting his DSO) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  On a form dated 1 August 1945 he claimed to have flown 67 sorties (348 operational hours).

 

CUTHILL, F/L John (175715) - Distinguished Service Order - No.156 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 17 July 1945.

 

Flight Lieutenant Cuthill has taken part in many hazardous missions against the enemy.  His fine leadership and efficiency have extricated his crew and aircraft from many perilous situations.  He has operated frequently over some of the most heavily defended objectives in Germany, including Berlin, Leipzig and Schweinfurt.  By his unfailing courage, endurance and determination this officer has proved a most valuable asset to his squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

DARLINGTON, F/L Frank William (80823) - Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 2 April 1943.  Born in Vancouver, 1918; RAF, 1937; commissioned 1940; Flying Officer, 13 June 1941; Flight Lieutenant, 24 April 1942; in postwar RAF.  AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943 (reporting his AFC) described him as a Canadian in the RAF.  Air Ministry Bulletin 9741 refers.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

DAVIDSON, WO John Edward (574706)  - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.7 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 October 1944.  Born in Clive, Alberta, 1922; enlisted 1940 as apprentice.  Cited with S/L A.J. Craig, DSO, DFC.  Air Ministry Bulletin 16043/AL.901 dated 22 October 1944 refers.

 


In September 1944 Squadron Leader Craig and Warrant Officer Davidson were pilot and flight engineer respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack an enemy airfield. Whilst over the target the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire.  The starboard fuel system was damaged causing a serious leakage of petrol.  Despite this, Squadron Leader Craig pressed home his attack.  The two starboard engines were now useless.  Nevertheless, this pilot set course for home.  The enemy coast was safely crossed but, whilst over the sea, height was gradually being lost.  All moveable equipment was jettisoned to assist in maintaining height and finally a landing was made on the nearest airfield.  Throughout the return flight Warrant Officer Davidson well proved his engineering skill and his efforts were of immense value to his captain.  In perilous circumstances these members of aircraft crew displayed the highest standard of coolness, courage and determination.  Squadron Leader Craig has completed a very large number of sorties and has proved himself to be an inspiring leader; Warrant Officer Davidson has also participated in many bombing missions and has always displayed the greatest keenness and devotion to duty.

 

DAVIDSON, F/L John Edward (56092 - new number upon being commissioned) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945.  NOTE: This is not listed in DHist cards.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


DAVIDSON, S/L Robert Tremayne Pillsbury (39968) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.182 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 October 1943.  Born in Vancouver, 10 February 1917.  Educated at Kerrisdale Public School (1922-27), Point Grey Junior High (1928-29) and Magee High School (1930-33, commercial course). Employed by Canadian Pacific Steamships, Vancouver, 1933 to 1936. As of November 1936 he was supplying references to Air Ministry to join the RAF. Attended RAF Ab Initio School, Hanworth, 24 May to 6 August, 1937 (graded above average as pilot). Commissioned as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 9 August 1937; confirmed in appointment and graded as Pilot Officer, 24 May 1938; promoted Flying Officer, 24 February 1940; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 24 February 1941; graded as Temporary Squadron Leader, 1 March 1942; promoted Wing Commander, 11 September 1943.  At No.3 Flying Training School, South Cerney, 24 August 1937 to 13 February 1938;  at No.6 Armament Training Camp, Woodsford, 14 February to 18 March 1939 (gunnery and bombing instruction); at No.3 Flying Training School, South Cerney, 19-25 March 1938 (advanced flying instruction); with No.1 Wing, 26 March to 31 May 1938 (pupil on course for Pilotless Aircraft Test Pilot (Queen Bee); with No.2 AACU, Lee-on-Solent (floatplane course on Swordfish); with No.1 Wing, Henlow, 24 June to 14 July 1938 (continuation of Pilotless Aircraft Test Pilot Course); with No.3 AACU, Malta, 23 July to 22 September 1938 (providing air targets for Mediterranean Fleet); with No.202 Squadron, Egypt, 23 September to 6 October 1938 (Intelligence Officer; fleet had moved to Egypt owing to "Munich flap"); with No.3 AACU, Egypt, 7 October to 4 November 1938 (proving targets for Mediterranean Fleet); with No.3 AACU, Malta, 5 November 1938 to 15 March 1939 (continued fleet target duties); with No.4 Flying Training School, Egypt, 16 March to 1 September 1939 (pilot for navigation pupils on Ansons); with No.267 Squadron, Egypt, 1 September 1939 to 6 October 1940 (transport duties, varies types, often flying VIPs); with Blenheim OTU, Egypt, 7-22 October 1940; with No.30 Squadron, Egypt, 23 October to 2 November 1940 (Blenheims; with No.30 Squadron, Greece, 2 November 1940 to 4 April 1941 (Blenheims); with No.30 Squadron, Crete, 5 April to 19 May 1941 (Blenheims and Hurricanes, covering evacuation); with No.30 Squadron, Egypt, 20 May to 23 October 1941 (Hurricanes, engaged in "visual night fighting"); with No.2 Photo Reconnaissance Unit, Egypt, 24 October to 23 November 1941 (photographing Tobruk; aircraft type not clear); with No.30 Squadron, Egypt, 24 November 1941 to 25 February 1942 (Hurricanes); with No.30 Squadron, Ceylon, 26 February to 23 May 1942 (Hurricanes); with No.261 Squadron, Ceylon, 24 May to 22 August 1942; with Ferry Command, Dorval, 26 December 1942 to 24 March 1943 (delivering Bostons overseas; confirmed that he ferried Boston BZ256 to United Kingdom, February/March 1943 as per RAF Ferry Command crew cards, Directorate of History and Heritage, Document 84/44-3); with No.59 OTU, Milfield, 4 April to 15 May 1943 (training on Typhoons); with No.182 Squadron, 16 May to 11 July 1943 (Typhoons, Commanding Officer); with No.175 Squadron, 11 July to 11 September 1943 (Typhoons, Commanding Officer); with No.16 Wing, 11 September 1943 to 19 January 1944 (Wing Commander, leading Nos.175, 245 and 247 Squadrons); with No.143 Wing, 20 January to 8 May 1944 (leading Nos.438, 429 and 440 Squadrons).  Forced landed after engine failure on 8 May 1944 and joined French Underground as a Private, serving until 5 September 1944 (Group "Voix du Nord", sabotage and disorganization of Germans in Pas de Calais area).  With No.83 GSU, 6 September to 12 December 1944.  Transferred to RCAF, 12 December 1944, reverting to Squadron Leader.  Promoted Wing Commander, 1 September 1951; promoted Acting Group Captain, 1 August 1961; confirmed in that rank, 5 March 1964. With Air Force Headquarters, Ottawa, 24 May to 16 September 1945 (on Planning Staff for "Tiger Force"); with Instrument Flying School, Trenton, 19 September to 30 November 1945; with AFHQ, Ottawa, 1 December 1945 to 20 May 1946 (Directorate of Intelligence); with Western Air Command, Vancouver, 21 May 1946 to 20 March 1947; with RCAF Staff College, 26 March to 20 September 1947 (student); with Central Air Command, Trenton, 21 September to 22 December 1947; with No.12 Group Headquarters, Vancouver, 23 December 1947 to 24 March 1949; with No.410 Squadron, St.Hubert, 26 March to 14 September 1949; with No.421 Squadron, 15 September 1949 to 25 November 1951; with No.1 Wing, 26 November 1951 to 9 September 1952; on strength of Canadian Joint Staff, Washington, 10 September to 16 December 1952 (service in Korea with 335th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, USAF, 15 September to 7 December 1952, flying 51 Sabre sorties - 65 hours 40 hours operational, one hour 15 minutes non-operational plus one non-operational T-33 sortie of one hour 40 minutes, for which he was awarded the Air Medal; ten engagements with MIGs but no claims by him); with No.1 Wing, 17 December 1952 to 31 January 1953; with No.3 Wing, 1 February to 15 September 1953; with No.1 Air Division Headquarters, 16 September 1953 to 6 November 1956; with Station Trenton, 7 November 1956 to 18 March 1957; with Station Portage la Prairie, 19 March 1957 to 15 July 1960; with Air Defence Command (26 NORAD Sector), 16 July 1960 to 12 July 1964; with Canadian Joint Air Training Centre, Rivers, Manitoba, 13 July 1964 to retirement.  Released from RCAF, 1 April 1968.  Died in Kempville, Ontario, 13 December 1976.  No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  AFRO 1338/44 dated 23 Jun 1944 (reporting him missing on operations) described him as a Canadian in the RAF. Air Ministry Bulletin 11585 refers:

 


This officer has completed large number of operational sosrties in Far East, Middle East and European theatres. Much of his flying experience gained in the Greek and Cretan campaigns. He has destroyed five enemy aircraft. Squadron Leader Davidson has displayed extreme keenness for operations.

 

NOTE: In a letter dated 30 January 1945, Air Commodore E.E. Middleton summarized Davidson's career, concluding as follows:

 

During S/L Davidson's career in the RAF he has flown 55 different types of aircraft for a total of over 1,800 flying hours, 600 hours of which are operational flying time. During this officer's 287 operational sorties he has been officially credited with having shot down six enemy aircraft comprising two German, two Italian and two Japanese. He also has a total of three probables and ten enemy aircraft damaged.

 

On a form dated 7 February 1945 he claimed to have flown four tours with 280 sorties (800 operatuonal hours plus 700 non-operational hours). A form dated 1 December 1950 credited him with 2,019 hours 20 minutes flying time and listed his types as follows: Hart (76 hours 15 minutes), Blackburn B2 (63 hours 40 minutes), Audax (14 hours 20 minutes), Tutor (14 hours 20 minutes), Gypsy Moth (22 hours 50 minutes), Queen Bee (33 hours ), Prefect (8 hours 55 minutes), Swordfish (42 hours 5 minutes), Avro 504N (4 hours 15 minutes), Fury (20 minutes), London II (5 hours ), Anson (493 hours 35 minutes), Magister (40 hours 30 minutes), Vincent z(14 hours 10 minutes), Hind (18 hours 15 minutes), Bombay (1 hours 25 minutes), Percival Q6 (8 hours 50 minutes), Gauntlet (4 hours 10 minutes), Blenheim (151 hours 50 minutes), Gladiator (30 minutes), Fulmar (15 minutes), Hurricane (292 hours 25 minutes), Proctor (1 hours 35 minutes), Maryland (30 minutes), Martlett (15 minutes), Dominie (3 hours 20 minutes), Oxford (6 hours 20 minutes), Mitchell (3 hours 15 minutes), Menasco Moth (11 hours ), Boston (38 hours ), Walrus (45 minutes), Lysander (30 minutes), Electra (4 hours 45 minutes), Beaufighter (1 hours 30 minutes), Kittyhawk (30 minutes), Seal (40 minutes), Swallow (45 minutes), Vildebeest (one hour minutes), Typhoon (172 hours 30 minutes), Master (10 hours 10 minutes), Tiger Moth (12 hours 25 minutes), Tempest (5 hours 15 minutes), Mustang (1 hours 20 minutes), Spitfire (33 hours 25 minutes), Auster (25 minutes), Harvard (122 hours minutes), Beechcraft (36 hours 35 minutes), Dakota (10 hours 25 minutes), Vampire (192 hours 20 minutes) and Meteor (37 hours 35 minutes).  Another form, with flying times to 20 July 1955, credited him with 2,532 hours 25 minutes.  Most of the above types (and flying times) were unchanged, but the following additions or amendments applied: Vampire (368 hours 45 minutes), T-33 (two hours 55 minutes), North Star (19 hours five minutes), Sabre (281 hours 55 minutes).

 

This officer had one of the most remarkable and distinguished careers on all CAN/RAF personnel. During the postwar years he was often assessed as "average" in staff work, but he was sometimes graded above average on that score, and he was invariably praised for his outstanding leadership, discipline and flying skills. On 29 August 1951, for example, G/C H.J. Maguire (RAF Station Odiham) wrote:

 


My report on this officer must be considered in the light of the circumstances of his service with me. He has had to integrate his squadron in an RAF Wing, and at the same time satisfy RCAF training requirements. With certain qualification I think he has succeeded admirably. He is shrewd, forceful and at times dogmatic. Like John Wesley, he would rather rule in hell than serve in heaven - and a very good leader he makes. His own force of will and determination does at times lead him to doubt the wisdom of other peoples' orders or procedures, but his own frankness saves him from disloyalty.  He commands rather than evokes respect and admiration from his men, but a strong sense of humour enable their mutual relations to be cordial. He has acted in an unofficial capacity as a local ambassador socially, with happy results, at some financial loss. With his temperament and experience he will make an ideal Wing Commander Flying or Wing Leader.

 

Another assessment, dated 14 November 1956 (completed by A/V/M H.B. Godwin), was revealing of other traits:

 

Wing Commander Davidson, up until recently, was Commanding Officer of our Detachment at Rabat, Morocco. This task involved working diplomatically with the French, with the United States Air Force and, at first, only to a minor extent with the Moroccans. However, as time went on, the Moroccan liberation movement became more pronounced. His task became extremely difficult and indeed touchy since there were changes of Sultans and considerable antagonism towards the French. Additionally, antagonism was felt by the Moroccans when Canada sold aircraft to the Israelis. Throughout all these difficulties he capably set up and operated air firing at Rabat, and when the time came to terminate the agreement with the French, he was able to leave a very fine feeling for the Canadians in the minds of all three nations involved. We owe a great deal of our success at Rabat to Wing Commander Davidson.

 

I consider him to be a good organizer, a strong supporter of the RCAF and an officer on whom we can rely in difficult circumstances.

 

On 15 August 1963, G/C C.R. Knowles of 26th NORAD Sector wrote:

 

Group Captain Davidson has been my Deputy Commander for two years, during which time he has several times assumed command in my absence, the last time being for three months. During these two years I have grown to know the Group Captain as an extremely able officer with traits of character and judgement that are rare even in a select officer corps. There is no question that this officer can assume all the responsibilities of increased rank, and is deserving of such rank.  In addition, Mrs. Davidson and their two sons have exemplified the best, in every way, in the RCAF tradition of "ambassadorship". The Davidson family, in toto, is loved and respected by all the many friends and associates they have collectively and individually made during this tour of duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


DAVIS, F/O Carl Raymond (90131) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.601 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 August 1940. Killed in action 6 September 1940 at the age of 29, at which time he was a Flight Lieutenant.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission states that he was the son of Carl Raymond and Clara May Davis (homes not indicated) and the husband of Katherine Anne Davis of Chelsea, London.  He had attended Cantabary College (BA) and McGill University (BA), and was a mining engineer by profession.  Chris Shores (Aces High, second edition) states that he is often listed as a South African but was actually of American parentage and educated in Britain from the age of 13 (Sherborne School and Trinity College, Cambridge), although he returned to North America to qualify as a mining engineer at McGill.  By 1936 he was back in Britain where he joined the RAFVR.  Shores further states that Davis particpated in an attack on Borkum seaplane base, 27 November 1939, when No.601 Squadron was still flying Blenheim Is.

 

Flying Officer Davis has been engaged on operational flying since 3rd September 1939.  He has taken part in nearly all patrols and interceptions carried out by his squadron.  He has been a section leader for the last two months and on several occasions has led his flight.  Flying Officer Davis has personaly destroyed six enemy aircraft and severely damaged several others.  He has shown great keenness and courage.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9456 has the original recommendation for this award, dated 14 August 1940 which adds some details; Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding approved the recommendation on 21 August 1940.

 

Flying Officer Davis has been engaged on operational flying since 3rd September 1939, and with the exception of a short spell when he was ill he has been on all patrols and interceptions carried out by this squadron.  He has been a section leader during the last two months, and on several occasions has led a flight. he has destroyed six enemy aircraft confirmed and unconfirmed, he has probably destroyed another two, and he has damaged three and a half.  He has shown great keenness and courage, which has inspired his section.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

DENISON, W/C Richard Warren (37596) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1944.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Knightsbridge, London in 1916 but that he had lived in Canada.  Granted Short Service Commission as Pilot Officer on Probation, 2 March 1936; to RAF Depot, Uxbridge, 2 March 1936; to No.3 FTS, Grantham, 14 March 1936; confirmed Pilot Officer, 11 March 1937.

 

DENISON, W/C Richard William (37596) - Air Force Cross - No.236 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945.

 

                                                                        * * * * *


DE SIEYES, F/L Fred Galt (42813 or 42819) - Air Force Cross - No.173 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 June 1944.  Born in Winnipeg, 20 May 1919; home there (confirmed by Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stating that he was born in Winnipeg in 1919). Educated at R.H. Smith School (1926-1933), Ravenscourt School (1933-34), Kelvin High School (1935-37) and St.Paul's College (1938-39).  Applied to join RAF, 5 October 1938; interviewed in Winnipeg, 7 October 1938 by Flight Lieutenant D. Edwards when described as "An excellent type of candidate. Should do well in the service" and "Considered suitable for appointment to a Short Service Commission in the Royal Air Force." Report forwarded from Miliary District No.10 to Department of National Defence, Ottawa, 19 October 1938; on hearing nothing he wrote Ottawa to inquire on 22 March 1939; on 31 March 1939 Squadron Leader A.D. Ross wrote him, "Owing to the large number of applications on file at this Headquarters from fully qualified candidates, your application for appointment to a Short Service Commission in the Royal Air Fore cannot be considered prior to July 1939."  Reported accepted on 8 July 1939.  Further correspondence to clarify his medal state. On 18 July 1939 he signs confirmation that he seeks a commission; sails for Liverpool on SS Letitia on 4 August 1939.  Graded as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 23 October 1939; Pilot Officer on Probation, 25 May 1940; confirmed as Pilot Officer, 14 August 1940; promoted Flying Officer, 25 May 1941; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 25 May 1942.  At Hatfield EFTS, 15 August to 15 November 1939; Hullvington Flying Training School, 16 November 1939 to 10 May 1940; Abbotsinch Torpedo Training Unit, 11 May to 16 Jun 1940; No.220 Squadron (operations), 17 June 1940 to 10 February 1941; Port Albert General Reconnaissance School, 20 February to 23 April 1941 (astro navigation course); No.220 Squadron, 6 May 1941 to 25 December 1941 (operations); Heliopolis, Egypt for service with No.267 Squadron (communication), 1 January 1942 to 4 February 1943; with No.173 Squadron, 5 February 1943 to 18 April 1945 (personal pilot to the Air Officer Commanding in Chief and general transport work; it would seem this unit was called the Middle East Communication Squadron from 1 March 1944 onwards).  AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944 (announcing award) identified him as a Canadian in the RAF.    Transferred to RCAF (C89592) on 1 March 1945 while in Middle East; repatriated to Canada, 5 August 1945; retired 12 September 1945.  The following citation was drafted when he had flown 1,543 hours including 337 hours in the previous six months.

 

Flight Lieutenant de Sieyes is an outstanding pilot who always displays a high degree of initiative, determination, skill and courage.  During the critical period at El Alamein he served as personal pilot to Air Chief Marshal Tedder.  He has also been responsible for the safe conveyance of many other important persons.  Throughout, this officer has set a splendid example by his enthusiasm and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: In a form dated 22 January 1946 he have his flying times as follows: Lodestar, 600 hours; Hudsons, 1,000 hours; Bostons, 200 hours; Wellington, 100 hours; other types, 300 hours.

 

His first tour consisted of 60 sorties (288 hours 50 minutes), 15 October 1940 to 30 September 1941 as follows:

 


15.10.40         Convoy escort, minelayers (3.30)

23.10.40         SA.2 patrol, North Sea (4.50)

25.10.40         SA.2 patrol (3.10)

28.10.40         Battle Flight sub search (6.10)

29.10.40         SA.3 patrol, "not a sausage" (2.50)

31.10.40         SA.3 patrol (3.25)

1.11.40           SA.3 patrol, strong wind (5.10)

10.11.40         SA.1 patrol, north (5.50)

12.11.40         SA.2 patrol, nothing (3.40)

24.11.40         Night bombing to 8 degree 5 minutes East (6.35)

28.11.40         SA.2 patrol, poor landfall (3.40)

24.12.40         Moon 3 Patrol (2.55)

26.12.40         Atlantic patrol, saw He.115 (4.35)

28.12.40         Search for dinghy (4.10)

12.4.41           HX convoy of 49 ships (5.00)

21.4.41           Escort, recalled (2.35)

23.4.41           Escort, "Polarsol" (5.15)

24.4.41           Escort, minelayers (5.50)

26.4.41           Escort "Tiashan", attack by Condor (7.00)

28.4.41           Escort "Jamaica Producer" (7.10)

4.5.41             U-boat hunt off Norway (4.40)

5.5.41             Escort 3 minelayers, 1 cruiser, 4 DVs (6.30)

7.5.41             Escort Port Jackson (6.10)

10.5.41           Escort St.Rongrald (4.30)

6.6.41             Escort "Laristan" (6.20)

7.6.41             Strike at Bergen (4.30)

10.6.41           Escort "Blythe" (5.00)

11.6.41           Escort "OB" 42 MVs, 2 DRs (5.55)

12.6.41           Escort "EC", 24 MVs, 6 EVs (6.10)

13.6.41           BERT - no cloud cover - went in (5.00)

14.6.41           Escort. Returned, bad weather (2.35)

18.6.41           Escort "HX", 55 MVs, 1 DR, 12 EVs (5.40)

19.6.41           Escort "WN", 23 MVs, 6 EVs (5.00)

24.6.41           Escort "EC", 32 MVs, 3 EVs (4.25)

4.7.41             Escort "Keeper", 7 MVs (5.00)

5.7.41             Escort "Keeper", 7 MVs (7.05)

8.7.41             Escort SC.35, 35 MVs (7.10)

9.7.41             Escort WN and 1 Cr Curacoa (4.30)

10.7.41           Escort SN (not met) (3.55)

14.7.41           A/S Sweep west of O, recalled (1.45)

16.7.41           BERT - duff weather, fired on (4.55)

20.7.41           BERT - saw boat, dropped rations (5.10)

22.7.41           Escort SN, 1 minelayer, 1 EV (5.10)

29.7.41           Escort ON, 1, 45 MVs (3.40)

23.8.41           Escort "Achates", photos (7.05)


24.8.41           Escort EC Norse "Sleipner" (5.00)

28.8.41           A/S sweep west of Hebrides (6.40)

29.8.41           ditto (6.30)

5.9.41             Escort WN.76, 14 MVs, 3 EVs (2.35)

7.9.41             Escort Agammenan and 1 DR (4.20)

9.9.41             Escort EC.70, 12 MVs 3 EVs (5.10)

10.9.41           Escort damaged Nigeria (4.10)

11.9.41           Recce St.Stab, fighter fun (4.45)

14.9.41           Escort EC, 35 MVs, 5 EVs (4.10)

15.9.41           Escort St.Magnus (3.05)

19.9.41           Escort EC.74, 17 MVs, 4 EVs (5.00)

20.9.41           Escort WN. 82, 60 MVs, 4 EVs (3.50)

22.9.41           Escort HMS London. Photos taken (4.05)

29.9.41           WN Escort, returned, weather (2.50)

30.9.41           Sub search by Rona, nothing seen (5.30)

 

Assessments are interesting: 16.9.40 (220 Squadron), total flying 180, 90 in last six months; "A very good type of Canadian entry; just arrived but has made a very good impression" - 20 Feb 41, 229 hors, 49 in last six months, "An excellent type of Canadian officer. This officer has done well since he came to the squadron. He is very keen to do the duty and should become efficient with experience".  7.11.41 (220 Sqn still), 569.30, 236.15 in last six months, "A reliable and conscientious officer, very keen and hard working" (also remarks about sense of humour); 14.8.43 (173 Squadron), 1,206 hours 15 minutes to date (164 hours ten minutes in last six months) "A dependable and conscientious officer"  To which A/C Whitney Straight adds, "Agreed. A most pleasant personality and a very sound pilot".  9 June 1944, Middle East Communication Squadron, 1703 hours, 276 in past six months, "He has outstanding technical knowledge of aircraft" (W/C P.Ruston); "A very good sound pilot with a definite mechanical outlook.  No liking or time for administration. He will possibly develop into an experimental technical expert".

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


DEVERS, F/L Robert Leslie (126466) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.462 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette 18 January 1944.  Born 3 June 1917 at Richmond, Surrey, England (his father was in the CEF at the time); educated at Bowmore Road Public School (Toronto), 1922-29 and Malvern Collegiate (Toronto), 1929-32.  Attended Torquay Technical College (England), 1934-36 (business course). Insurance salesman in Canada as of 1938.  Enlisted in RAF as 638093 Aircraftman 2 Clerk, General Duties, 21 March 1939; reclassified Aircraftman 1st Class, 1 November 1939; promoted Leading Aircraftman, 1 June 1940; promoted Corporal, 1 September 1940; remustered as Clerk/General Duties Under Training (Pilot), 7 July 1941; remustered as Observer Under Training, 20 January 1942; commissioned as Pilot Officer on Probation (General Duties Branch), 3 July 1942; promoted Flying Officer on Probation, 6 April 1943; later confirmed in appointment; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 6 October 1944; transferred to RCAF, 1 April 1945.  RAF postings shown as follows: prior to remuster to aircrew he was a clerk at Station Mont Batten, October 1939 to May 1941; at No.1 Training Wing, Torquay, May to December 1941.  No.31 Air Navigation School (on commissioning), 3 July 1942; departed Canada on 4 September 1942. No.3 Personnel Reception Centre, 21 September 1942 (date of disembarkation in England); No.22 OTU, 13 October 1942; No.1659 Heavy Conversion Unit, 25 March 1943; No.408 Squadron, 22 April 1943; Station Leeming, 11 May 1943; RAF Station Lynham, 12 May 1943 (ferry training pending posting overseas); Middle East Pool, 30 May 1943; No.462 Squadron, 9 June 1943; to No.47 Air School, Queenstown, South Africa, 29 March to 1 June 1944 (navigation instructor); to No.203 Group, pending posting, 31 July 1944; instructing at No.76 OTU, Palestine, until 22 April 1945. A form dated 22 March 1945 he claimed to have flown 230 operational hours and 380 non-operational hours on Ansons (50 hours), Wellingtons (80 hours) and Halifaxes (480 hours).  However, in a form dated 1 July 1953 he produced more exact figures, including 78 hours 20 minutes by day on Wellingtons, 39 hours 20 minutes by night on Wellingtons, 151 hours 15 minutes by day on Halifaxes and 213 hours 45 minutes by night on Halifaxes. Listed in DHist file 181.005 D.270 as a Canadian in the RAF in early 1940 (638093, Aircraftman First Class), although his next-of-kin (mother) was living in England.  He does not appear on CAN/RAF list in file 181.005 D.271.  Microfilm of RCAF personnel lists Robert Leslie Devers as coming to Canada, 25 October 1941 for training as a navigator; commissioned 3 July 1942 (service number 126466); AFRO 462/44 dated 3 March 1944 reports award of DFC to F/O R.L. Devers (incorrectly giving service number as 53254) but does not identify him as a "Canadian in the RAF" but as "RAF Trained in Canada".  Microfilm shows him as transferred to RCAF (C94016) on 1 April 1945 and repatriated to Canada, 7 June 1945; released 10 October 1945.  Postwar bible college, clergyman and real estate saesman. Rejoined RCAF as an Air Observer (Navigator), 3 July 1951 (service number 45247); at No.1 Air Navigation School, Summerside, 5 August to 1 October 1951; with No.1 Central Navigation School, Summerside, 2 October 1951 to 4 April 1952; with Communications and Rescue Flight, Trenton, 5 April 1952 to 3 September 1956 (unit redesignated No.102 Communications and Rescue Flight while he as there); with No.436 Squadron, 4 September 1956 to release; retired 1 August 1962.  Public Records Office Air 2/9153 had recommendation dated 22 December 1943 with sortie list.

 

28 Apr 43       GARDENING, Skaw (6.35)           10 Sept 43   Potenza (8.15)

28 June 43     Reggio Calabria (7.00)                  13 Sept 43   Potenza (8.25)

11 July 43       Reggio Calabria (6.50)                  26 Sept 43   Hassani (1.00, DNCO,

12 July 43       Reggio Calabria (6.25)                                       burst oil tank)

14 July 43       Messina Railway Central (7.20)    27 Sep 43    Barisso (7.55)

17 July 43       Reggio Calabria (6.40)                  28 Sep 43    Argos (6.15)

23 Jul 43        Reggio Calabria aerodrome         2 Oct 43       Calato a/d (7.40)

(7.15)                                               3 Oct 43       Heraklion a/d (5.30)

30 July 43       Reggio Calabria Ferry                   5 Oct 43       Marizta (3.15)

Terminal (7.15)                               7 Oct 43       Heraklion a/d (6.05)

5 Aug 43        San Giavani (6.50)                         9 Oct 43       Maritza a/d (7.15)

22 Aug 43      Crotone (6.50)                                11 Oct 43     Maritza a/d (8.45)

27 Aug 43      Crotone (7.15)                                16 Oct 43     Maritza a/d (5.20, DNCO,

3 Sept 43       Crotaglie a/d (8.10)                                              all guns unserviceable)

7 Sept 43       San Pancrazzio a/d (7.30)             18 Oct 43     Antimachia (8.20)                     

20 Oct 43     Maritza aerodrome (8.05)


This officer has completed 27 night sorties as navigator, totalling 189 hours operational flying.  He has on every occasion shown a very high standard of navigational skill and has never yet failed to navigate his aircraft to the target.

 

When employed on flare dropping, it has been due to Flying Officer Devers' faultless navigation and accurate timing that on ten separate occasions the target was successfully illuminated for the bombing force even in conditions of no moon, cloud en route, and poor visibility over the actual targets.

 

Flying Officer Devers is recommended to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for outstanding skill and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                         * * * * *

 

DEYELL, Sergeant Douglas Keith (580647) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.38 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 24 December 1940.  Born Alameda, Saskatchewan, 13 December 1917.  Later in No.7 Squadron. Commissioned (service number 45119).  AFRO 185/43 dated 5 February 1943 reported him as being attached to the RCAF at that time and promoted to Flight Lieutenant, effective 25 December 1942 but with seniority from 11 December 1942. Apparently with No.1 General Reconnaissance School in Canada; to No.31 Personnel Depot, Moncton, on 4 February 1944; returned to UK 5 March 1944. Transferred to RCAF (C89587), 1 March 1945; repatriated to Canada on 8 May 1946.  Remained in postwar RCAF as a Navigation Officer (service number 20475); promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 June 1949 and to Wing Commander, 1 January 1956.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date. Air Ministry Bulletin 2548 refers.  No citation published.  Public Records Office Air 2/9327 has recommendation dated 17 October 1940.

 

Sergeant Deyell has been a member of a war crew in No.38 Squadron since 8th February 1940 and has completed 35 operational flights as a navigator.  His navigational ability has been on a high order throughout, and by his consistent cheerfulness, fortitude and indifference to danger, he has been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.  His keenness to fill vacancies when his crew was not operating has been most noticeable, and on more than one occasion when told he was to be sent away for a rest, he begged to be allowed to continue operating with the squadron.

 

This was refined as follows for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee, although still not published:

 

This airman has completed 35 operational flights as navigator since 8th February 1940.  His navigational ability has been of the highest order throughout, and by his consistent cheerfulness, fortitude and indifference to danger, he has been an inspiration to the other members of his crew.  His keenness to fill vacancies when his crew have not been operating has been most noticeable.


                                                                        * * * * *

 

DOBSON, F/O William (127858) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.158 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 15 October 1943.  Born in Duncan, British Columbia, 8 October 1914. Gunner in 62nd Field Battery, Royal Canadian Artillery, 1935-1936; attended University of Edinburgh, 1936-1939.  Enlisted as 1055273 Aircraftman 2nd Class (aircrew), 21 June 1940; reclassified as Leading Aircraftman and pilot trainee, 2 January 1941; remusted as Aircraft Hand under Training (Wireless Observer), 4 February 1941; remustered as Wireless Operator under Training (Air Gunner), 15 October 1941; promoted Aircraftman 1st Class, 5 March 1942. Commissioned 15 August 1942; promoted to Flying Officer, 15 February 1943; promoted to Flight Lieutenant, 11 April 1944.  First tour was 4 January to 15 July 1943 with No.158 Squadron. Wireless Instructor from 9 August 1943 to 29 March 1944; Topcliffe Base Signals Leader from 29 March to 19 August 1945. Transferred to RCAF, 31 January 1945 (C89557). Repatriated to Canada 4 September 1945; released 18 October 1945.  On Repatriation Depot form dated 21 August 1945 he claimed to have flown 258 operational hours and 363 hours 20 minutes non-operational; flew 47 sorties (the last on 14 January 1945).  He also gave his flying times as follows: Botha (123 hours 30 minutes), Dominie and Proctor (11 hours 40 minutes); Blenheim (eight hours 45 minutes); Anson (21 hours 25 minutes); Whitley (61 hours 35 minutes); Halifax (393 hours 25 minutes). No citation other than "for gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations."  Air Ministry Bulletin 11720 refers and is probable source of following summary:

 

...has always taken full share in work of crew. In pursuit of operational tasks has displayed utmost disregard for danger and his calm efficiency when his aircraft has encountered intense opposition has contributed materially to crew's safe return from such difficult objectives as Berlin and targets in the Ruhr.  His enthusiasm and keenness have been equally valuable on the ground in the training of others.

 

DOBSON, F/L William (127858) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944.

 

Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, this officer has completed many sorties on his second tour of operational duty.  As a wireless operator and signals leader he has continued to display keenness, efficiency and devotion to duty.  On several occasions by his coolness under fire he has been of great assistance in ensuring the safe return of his aircraft.  At all times this officer has proved a valuable asset to his crew.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


DOMVILLE, S/L Henry de Gaspe (75034) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1945 - Died as a prisoner of war, 30 July 1943, aged 40; buried in Ambon War Cemetery, Indonesia.  Commonwealth War Graves Commission states that he was the son of James William and Adele de Beaujeu Domville of Montreal and lists his MiD as an award.  Royal Air Force Personnel Management Agency, in a letter to H.A. Halliday dated 21 September 1999, stated that he was born in Montreal in 1903.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

DONALDSON, S/L Edward Mortlock (32043) - Distinguished Service Order - No.151 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 31 May 1940. Born in Malay States, educated at McGill University; appointed Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, Royal Air Force, 29 June 1931; granted permanent commission in the RAF with rank of Flight Lieutenant, 29 March 1938; promoted to Squadron Leader, 1 December 1938.  RCAF lists of Canadians enrolled in the RAF omitted him as his Canadian connections were brief and tenuous.  Commanded No.151 Squadron from outbreak of war to 5 August 1940. Recommended for DSO, 19 May 1940.  Public Records Office Air 2/4095 has both original recommendation text going to Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee; the two texts differ marginally in expresion.

 

This officer has inspired such a fine fighting spirit in his squadron that, on their first encounter with enemy forces, nine aircraft of his squadron destroyed six enemy aircraft, and a further five were beleived to have been destroyed.  Four or five enemy aircraft were accounted for on the following day. His high courage and his inspiring qualities of leadership have made his squadron a formidible fighting unit.  He has, himself, shot down four enemy aircraft.

 

DONALDSON, S/L Edward Mortlock (32043) - Mention in Despatches - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1941.

 

DONALDSON, W/C Edward Mortlock (32043) - Air Force Cross - No.5 SFTS (although some records say No.151 Squadron).  Awarded as per London Gazette dated 30 September 1941 -  Public Records Office Air 2/9544 has recommendation dated 2 June 1941 when he was Chief Flying Instructor.  The signature of the Group Captain making the recommendation is eligible.

 

An outstanding officer, possessing tremendous energy and drive. Very quick brained and intelligent and an exceptionally fine pilot and leader of men.

 

He transferred from operational duties to Flying Training nearly a year ago and immediately tackled with enthusiastic zeal the innumerable difficulties and complications of Flying Training under war conditions.

 

During this period he has never spared himself and has devoted much time and thought to improvements in the method and organization of training, and to the infusing of a fighting spirit into the many hundreds of pilots who have passed through his hands. His gay and gallant personality has been an inspiration to all who have come in contact with him.

 


He is now leaving my command to take up a highly selective posting abroad, in which his work should be invaluable.  I have the highest opinion of this officer's qualities generally and have found his judgement sound and reliable.  I most strongly recommend him for the award of the Air Force Cross.

 

This was refined to the following for the Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer has shown conspicuous devotion to duty. On taking up flying training duties as Chief Flying Instructor nearly a year ago, he immediately undertook the innumerable difficulties and complications with enthusiastic zeal. He has devoted much time and thought to the method and organization of training and has infused a fighting spirit into the many pupils passed through his hands.

 

DONALDSON, S/L Edward Mortlock (32043) - Bar to Air Force Cross - awarded as per London Gazette dated 12 June 1947.

 

NOTE: It is interesting to note that this officer was unsuccessfully recommended for an AFC in October 1937 while a Flight Lieutenant with No.1 (F) Squadron in which he was a Flight Commander.  The recommendation (Public Record Office Air 2/2489) read:

 

He trained and led the No.1 (F) Squadron Aerobatic Flight which gave numerous demonstrations of flight aerobatics in diamond formation, including demonstrations for the RAF Display, the visit of the Overseas Representatives for the Coronation, and the International Air Meeting at Zurich.

 

In addition to the above, he has done exceptionally well in Air Firing, and through his keenness, energy and exceptional flying ability had helped considerably towards raising the general standard of flying in the squadron.

 

This was endorsed on 27 October 1927 by Air Vice-Marshal Gossage (Air Officer Commanding, No.11 Fighter Group) who wrote:

 

This officer has displayed exceptional zeal and the highest qualities of leadership.  These have been reflected by the success which has attended the flight which he has trained and led both in England and in the presence of the representatives of foreign air forces abroad.  Strongly recommended for the Air Force Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


DONALDSON, F/O Oliver Russell (37414) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.115 Squadron - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1940.  Born in Revelstoke, British Columbia, 22 January 1912; DHist file 181.005 D.270 listed him as Canadian in the RAF (next-of-kin in Revelstoke). Granted Short Service Commission as Acting Pilot Officer on Probation, 28 January 1937; promoted to Flying Officer in 1939 and posted to No.115 Squadron, Marham (Wellingtons); between September 1939 and August 1940 he completed at least 34 operations over Germany, Norway, France, Denmark, Holland and Belgium. Logbook lost due to enemy action at sea, January 1942.  Commanded No.7 Squadron (Pathfinders), 2 October 1942 to 3 May 1943.  Commanded Station Wyton, 27 July 1944 to 25 February 1945.  Postwar he served in Palestine.  F/L 3 September 1940; S/L 1 December 1941; W/C 28 August 1943 (but acting rank much earlier and made Acting Group Captain in June 1943).  Rank of Group Captain granted again in 1953/  Retired late in 1957.  Specifically listed in AFRO 1292/41 dated 7 November 1941 as a Canadian in the RAF who had been decorated as of that date.  Air Ministry Bulletin 858 refers to his DFC action.

 

One night in May 1940 this officer was captain of an aircraft detailed to attack focal points behind the enemy's positions.  In the neighbourhood of Hirson he came under heavy anti-aircraft fire which he regarded as indicating that he was near a profitable objective.  In spite of the enemy fire Flying Officer Donaldson made five attacks on a road through a nearby wood.  As a result a large fire and thirteen violent explosions occurred in what must have been an important enemy dump.  He has consistently shown the highest degree of courage and determination.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/4094 has recommendation dated 29 May 1940:

 

On the night of 20/21st May, Flying Officer Donaldson was captain of anb aircraft detailed to attack focal points behind the enemy's positions. In the neighbourhood of Hirson he came under heavy anti-aircraft fire which he regarded as an indication that there was a profitable objective in the neighbourhood. He remained uder intense fire while making five seperate attacks on a road running through a wood close by, and these resulted in a large fire and thrteen violent explosions in what must have been an important enemy dump.

 

Since the beginning of the year Flying Officer Donakdson has consistently shown the highest degree of courae and determination in the execution of all operations entrusted to him.

 

The final text (differeing in no significant way from that published) was despatched to the King on 5 June 1940.

 

DONALDSON, W/C Oliver Russell, DFC (37414) - Mention in Despatches - Bombing Development Unit - awarded as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943. Public Record Office Air 2/8871 has recommendation, drafted when he was a Squadron Leader. // This officer has been in charge of No.1418 Flight from its formation in January 1942 until its absorbtion in July 1942 by the Bombing Development Unit.  During that period he has been engaged on highly important work of a technical nature in connection with airborne Radio Direction Finding and navigation equipment, the success of which has helped considerably in striking more effectively at the enemy.  In order that certain essential tests should be performed, Squadron Leader Donaldson has flown, under all weather conditions, over Germany and the North Sea.  The untiring energy, initiative and leadership displayed by this officer have set a magnificent example to his flight.