WANLESS, Sergeant (now F/O) Wilkie William Alexander (R130515/J17336) - Mention in Despatches - No.20 Operational Training Unit (now POW) - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 30 January 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 10 April 1942) and No.4 BGS (graduated 8 June 1942).

 

* * * * *

 

WANLIN, F/L Alexander Camille (C46535) - Air Force Cross - No.435 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted Hamilton 26 June 1944. No citation in AFRO. DHist file 181.009 D.1768 (RG.24 Vol.20610) has recommendation dated 27 October 1945 when he had flown 2,514 hours, 510 on transport duties, 350 in previous six months. Deputy Flight Commander. Presented 11 June 1949.

 

This officer is an exceptional transport captain of considerable flying experience. Since the beginning of this year he has been flying long range transport as captain flying freight and passengers from bases in the United Kingdom to Europe and South East Asia. With his vast experience he has been of invaluable help since joining this unit by instructing new crews with the polish expected of a transport captain. His cheerful disposition, personal conduct, and conscientious efforts are an example to all.

 

* * * * *

 

WARBERG, LAC Bernard Joseph (R114957) - Mention in Despatches - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1647/45 dated 26 October 1945. AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; DHist file 181.009 D.1746 (PAC RG.24 Vol. 20608) has list of MiDs that places him at Tholthorpe. DHist file 181.009 D.1746 has recommendation dated 27 January 1945, originating from No.420 Squadron, which defines his trade as Clerk/GD. Home in Robsart, Saskatchewan; enlisted Regina, 1 August 1941.

 

LAC Warberg has during a period of three years with 420 (RCAF) Squadron proven his high sense of duty, responsibility and initiative.

 

This airman, when he originally came to this unit, was mustered in the trade of ACH/GD. He was not, however, content to do just general duties and took a keen interest in orderly room procedure.

 

When this unit proceeded to North West Africa, it involved an enormous amount of document work and in this instance LAC Warberg's knowledge which he had accumulated over a period of time was put to use, and his assistance eased greatly the strain on the remaining Orderly Room personnel.

 


Not only was LAC Warberg present in the move of the squadron to Africa, but he [has] participated in every move of the unit since its formation and at all times was highly spoken of.

 

On the return to the United Kingdom from North-West Africa and the depletion of clerks due to postings, LAC Warberg's ability to handle more than one man's job was greatly responsible for the carrying out of immediate work.

 

This airman was later remustered to Clerk/GD and placed in charge of the Squadron documents section which at that time was in a very bad state. A great amount of work was involved and his efforts gave excellent results.

 

At all times LAC Warberg has proved a conscientious and most willing worker. His conduct and character are outstanding...

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, S/L Arthur Martin (C3246) - Member, Order of the British Empire - No.23 EFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Enlisted in Quebec, 1 November 1940. Presented 21 February 1948.

 

This officer as Chief Engineering Officer has proven himself to be a man of exceptional ability and courage. By his initiative, forethought, leadership and all-out hard work he has been responsible for the organization of a Maintenance Wing far above average calibre. This Wing in turn has been responsible to a marked degree for the success of the training programme. This officer has proved himself to be outstanding in all respects.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, S/L Bruce Clifford (J3718) - Air Force Cross - No.3 SFTS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Edmonton, 12 October 1919; educated there. Worked in Edmonton for Hudson's Bay Company before the war; enlisted in Edmonton, 21 June 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 July 1940), No.5 EFTS (graduated 6 October 1941) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 28 January 1941). Award sent by registered mail 22 November 1945. Governor General's Records (RG.7 Group 26 Volume 59, file 190-I, dossier 7) has citation; when recommended he had flown 1,492 hours, 926 as instructor, 71 in past six months.

 

This officer has been engaged in flying instructional training since April 1941 and has done excellent work throughout. He has taken a keen interest in all phases of flying training and has been particularly active in organization and administration, showing an unusual willingness to accept and discharge responsibilities. At no time during this period has he allowed his interest in training to subside. He is an exceptionally keen, conscientious and progressive officer who has at all times carried out his duties in a highly meritorious manner.

 

* * * * *

WARD, F/L Donald Byrne (J9402) - Mention in Despatches - No.10 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette and Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. Born 13 May 1913 at Regina, Saskatchewan. Home in Toronto; enlisted in Edmonton, 27 January 1941. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 22 November 1941) and No.1 BGS (graduated 22 December 1941).

 

This officer as a Wireless Leader has performed his duties in an exceptional manner. He is very capable and has shown great initiative and forethought which has contributed largely to the high degree of efficiency maintained by the Wireless Operators of his unit. His ability to organize and persistence and devotion to duty have gained a place of high respect and admiration among all his comrades.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, F/O Douglas Merrill (J88115) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.100 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Born 8 September 1922 in Regina; home in Edmonton; enlisted there 10 September 1941. Initially assessed as Air Gunner trainee; he was so upset with this that he went absent without leave for several days and was subsequently reduced in rank and graded for General Duties. Once it was deemed that he had learned his lesson, he was permitted to apply again for aircrew, and this time he was assessed as pilot material. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 January 1943), No.15 EFTS (graduated 29 May 1943) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 1 October 1943). Arrived in Britain in late 1943; posted to No.18 (Pilot) Advanced Flying unit, 1 February 1944; to No.18 Operational Training Unit, 25 April 1944; to No.100 Squadron, 14 October 1944; to No.582 Squadron, 19 November 1944; to No.100 Squadron again, 1 February 1945. Last sortie flown on 18 April 1945. Repatriated to Canada, 8 July 1945. Released on 12 August 1946. Award sent by registered mail 11 March 1949. Rejoined RCAF, 15 June 1951, serving at Trenton, Calgary and Macdonald. Transferred to RCAF Auxiliary, 15 June 1954. Killed in the crash of Mitchell FW259 (No.418 Squadron), 22 January 1955 (low flying, hit a ferry cable across North Saskatchewan River).

 

Flying Officer Ward has completed a large number of operational sorties. On many occasions he has skilfully handled his aircraft and saved his crew in perilous situations. While returning from an attack against Kassel in March 1945, an enemy fighter was observed moving into position to attack his aircraft. He manoeuvred his aircraft so successfully that the rear gunner was able to drive the enemy fighter off. This officer has at all times shown courage and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, P/O Frederick James (J88866) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 12 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Home in North Portal, Saskatchewan; enlisted Toronto, 2 April 1940. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 7 December 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 11 June 1943). Presented 18 October 1947.

Pilot Officer Ward has consistently displayed high qualities of courage and ability. As air gunner he has taken part in numerous sorties, including attacks on such heavily defended targets as Berlin, Stuttgart and Kiel. On one occasion, whilst over Acheres, his aircraft was attacked by several enemy aircraft. Coolly and skilfully, Pilot Officer Ward directed the necessary combat manoeuvres and, in the ensuing fights, shot down one of the attackers. His excellent work contributed materially to the safe return of his aircraft to this country. Pilot Officer Ward is a most vigilant and resolute gunner.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, FS (now P/O) George Latimer (Can 2590/C48203) - Mention in Despatches - No.160 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 14 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944. Home in Kingston, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 16 May 1939.

 

This NCO is an outstanding flight engineer who has displayed great enthusiasm and untiring efforts at all times in the execution of his duties.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, F/L George Oliver (J26105) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.192 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Home in Cranbrook, British Columbia; enlisted Edmonton, 27 February 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 3 October 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Presented 27 May 1950. No citation other than "completed... numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9038 has recommendation dated 18 October 1944 when he had flown 27 sorties (139 hours 50 minutes), 1 July to 14 October 1944. All operations are described as "Special Duty" (the unit, as part of No.100 Group, would have been involved in radar jamming and other countermeasures:

 

* counted as sortie

 

7 June 44 Paris (3.40) 26 Aug 44 Dutch, German and

10 June 44 Dreux (4.20) Danish coasts (3.55)

12 June 44 Gelsenkirchen (3.05) 29 Aug 44 Stettin (8.30)

27 June 44 Paris (3.45) 2 Sept 44 Lofoten Islands (9.05)

15 July 44 Nevers (7.25) 9 Sept 44 Gladbach (3.00)

17 July 44 Dutch coast (1.50)* 11 Sep 44 Darmstadt (4.40)

18 July 44 Scholven (3.00) 13 Sep 44 Dutch coast (7.10)

20 July 44 Le Havre (2.45) 15 Sep 44 East of Saarbrucken

24 July 44 Stuttgart (7.15) (4.25)

28 July 44 Dutch coast (3.25) 17 Sep 44 Dutch coast (7.10)

8 Aug 44 North Sea patrol 27 Sep 44 Kaiserlauten (6.00)

(daylight, 3.40) 28 Sep 44 North of Zwolle (2.35)

10 Aug 44 Dijon (6.10) 5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken (5.30)

12 Aug 44 Brunswick (5.00) 6 Oct 44 Bremen (4.10)

16 Aug 44 Kiel (4.10) 9 Oct 44 Bochum (4.35)

18 Aug 44 Sterkrade (3.00) 14 Oct 44 Brunswick (6.35)

 

This officer has nearly completed a tour of operations on heavy bombers. He has attacked heavily defended targets in Germany and the occupied territories. His keenness for operations has been exceptional and he has at all times carried out whatever task has been allotted to him with cheerful courage and in a highly efficient manner.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, LAC Herbert George (R123387) - Mention in Despatches - No.420 Squadron (No.62 Base) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Home in Carey's Hill, Bonaventure County, Quebec; enlisted Toronto, 8 August 1941. No citation in AFRO. DHist file 181.009 D.1745 (RG.24 Vol.20608) states that he was an Armourer (Bombs) who enlisted 8 August 1941 and remained in Canada until 3 February 1943. Arrived overseas 13 February 1943. Recommended for MiD by Commanding Officer, No.420 Squadron, 22 July 1944. Recommendation read:

 

LAC Ward has contributed to the service through his loyalty to duty and his untiring efforts in the face of very tiring difficulties. His enthusiasm and cheerfulness when called upon to do arduous tasks has been an outstanding example to others. The service has gained much from his unhesitating devotion to duty, and it is strongly recommended that Leading Aircraftman Ward be awarded a Mention in Despatches.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, P/O John Gordon (J86721) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted Regina 5 December 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 18 July 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 5 February 1943). Presented 17 May 1948. See Martin Middlebrook, The Nuremburg Raid, page 243.

 

This officer's determination and skilful ability in handling his aircraft have largely contributed to the successful completion of many operational sorties. On two occasions it was due to Pilot Officer Ward's excellent airmanship and imperturbable courage that his crew and aircraft were extricated from perilous situations. His fine fighting spirit in the face of the fiercest enemy opposition and his unfailing devotion to duty merit high commendations.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, F/O John Shrapnel (J27414) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.77 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Home in Westmount; enlisted Montreal 6 June 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 25 June 1943). Presented in Montreal 25 November 1949.

 

Throughout his operational tour this officer has maintained a very high standard of navigation which has played a large part in the successes achieved by his crew. Twice during the course of his tour his aircraft has been severely damaged by anti-aircraft fire. On one occasion during a mission against Homburg in August 1944, heavy anti-aircraft fire was encountered and the flight engineer was seriously wounded. Despite these hazards Flying Officer Ward continued with his allotted duties with the greatest skill and courage. His devotion to duty at all times has been most noteworthy.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, Sergeant Ronald James (R61019) - Mention in Despatches - No.21 Staging Unit - Award effective 14 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944. Enlisted in Edmonton, 12 August 1940 (home in Edmonton). Cited with Sergeant Edward Howard Baker (which see), Sergeant Felix Londeau, Sergeant Henry Arnold Joseph Rosko, Sergeant Larus Scheving, Sergeant Michael George Svos, and Sergeant Frederick John Wells for a rescue of occupants of a crashed aircraft.

 

* * * * *

 

WARD, Sergeant Russell James (R7706) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 January 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 142/42 dated 30 January 1942. Home in Lachine; enlisted in Montreal, 2 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.2 EFTS and No.2 BGS.

 

* * * * *

 

WARDELL, P/O William Harold (J87565) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 3 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Calgary. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 6 July 1942). Presented 5 March 1949. Cited with P/O William R. Stewart (RCAF, pilot, awarded DFC, which see for citation).

 

* * * * *

 

WARFIELD, F/O William (J19095) - Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm (deceased) - Awarded 17 July 1948 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 455/48 dated 23 July 1948. Home in New York; trained at No.6 ITS, 20 EFTS and No.13 SFTS. Commissioned 4 September 1942 although not graded as pilot until 25 September 1942. Killed in action with No.421 Squadron, 3 December 1944. Spitfire MK232. Buried in Belgium. Long diary in DHist files.

* * * * *

 

WARING, FS Edgar Morris (Can 4003) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Home in Victoria; enlisted Vancouver 12 January 1939.

 

* * * * *

 

WARK, F/O George Arthur (J88101) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.514 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 27 March 1945 and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Home in Calgary; enlisted Galt, Ontario, 14 February 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 19 February 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 16 April 1943) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 6 August 1943). Presented 1 February 1946. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9051 has recommendation dated 17 December 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (122 hours 15 minutes), 9 August to 3 December 1944.

 

9 Aug 44 Lille (2.30) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (4.25)

12 Aug 44 Russelheim (4.45) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (5.10)

14 Aug 44 Falaise (3.30) 19 Oct 44 Stuttgart (6.20)

25 Aug 44 Russelheim (8.00) 21 Oct 44 Flushing (2.50)

31 Aug 44 Pont Remy (3.30) 23 Oct 44 Essen (5.35)

3 Sept 44 Eindhoven (3.40) 25 Oct 44 Essen (4.00)

6 Sept 44 Le Havre (3.10) 28 Oct 44 Flushing (2.30)

8 Sept 44 Le Havre (3.35) 30 Oct 44 Wesseling (4.15)

11 Sep 44 Kamen (4.15) 31 Oct 44 Bottrop (4.40)

14 Sep 44 Wessenaar (2.50) 6 Nov 44 Coblenz (5.00)

20 Sep 44 Pas de Calais (2.50) 15 Nov 44 Dortmund (4.45)

25 Sep 44 Pas de Calais (2.45) 16 Nov 44 Heinsberg (4.35)

27 Sep 44 Pas de Calais (2.45) 20 Nov 44 Homburg (4.30)

3 Oct 44 Walcheren (2.30) 21 Nov 44 Homburg (4.05)

5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken (5.05) 3 Dec 44 Oberhausen (4.20)

 

Flying Officer Wark has completed thirty operational sorties as pilot and captain of four-engined bomber aircraft. These include attacks by day and by night against some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany.

 

This officer has at all times displayed outstanding courage and devotion to duty and throughout his tour of operations has set a fine example to his many comrades in the squadron.

 

Flying Officer Wark is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross in recognition of his constant devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

WARMAN, Gerald Burton (J18540) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas -Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Home in Marysville, New Brunswick; enlisted in Chatham, 17 September 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 9 June 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941). Certificate sent to Toronto, 27 April 1951.

 

* * * * *

 

WARNE, WO David Earl (R109093) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.227 Squadron - Award effective 7 December 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Born 17 January 1919. Home in Kennedy, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Regina, 3 May 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 16 August 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942). To "Y" Depote, 3 January 1942; to RAF overseas, 23 January 1942; commissioned 12 August 1943 (J19294); repatriated 28 April 1945; released 25 September 1945. Award sent by registered mail 11 March 1949.

 

Warrant Officer Warne has completed a very large number of sorties, including several successful attacks on shipping. He has invariably pressed home his attacks with great determination, often in the face of heavy opposition, and his achievements have been worthy of high praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WARNER, Sergeant Charles William (R96284) - Mention in Despatches - No.62 Base - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1647/45 dated 26 October 1945. AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has list of MiDs this date with unit. No citation in AFRO. DHist file 181.009 D.1722 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 3 February 1945. Electrician in No.62 Base Daily Servicing Section. Home in Pembroke, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 26 May 1941. Served eight months in Canada, overseas 37 months.

 

This NCO has been outstanding in his devotion to duty, leadership, co-operation and loyalty. Due to his superior knowledge which he has gained by diligent study and application of his abilities he is frequently called out on his off-duty hours by his superiors and men. He responds cheerfully to such calls and has been responsible in many cases for getting aircraft serviceable for operations. His men are inspired by his uncomplaining willingness to work long hours under trying and difficult conditions and by his ability and knowledge. He always gives full co-operation and displays outstanding loyalty to his superiors.

 

WARNER, Sergeant Charles William (R96284) - Mention in Despatches - Tholthorpe - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; unit found in McEwen Papers list of recommendations for MiD. DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has recommendation forwarded to No.6 Group Headquarters, 5 May 1945. Electrician who had been overseas about three years.

He has shown at all times outstanding qualities of leadership and devotion to duty. At all hours of the day or night he shows the utmost keenness in the performance of his duties, maintaining a cheerful and optimistic outlook under the most adverse conditions. His unswerving loyalty, his eagerness to improve his trade knowledge, and his whole-hearted co-operation with all those whom he comes in contact with, is an inspiration to his men.

 

* * * * *

 

WARNER, F/O Earl Eugene (J96344) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 10 January 1947 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 70/47 dated 7 February 1947. American in the RCAF; born 1 November 1920; home in Payson, Utah; enlisted Vancouver 22 September 1941. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 11 May 1942). Posted overseas May 1942. Reported missing, 14 May 1943 while in a Stirling of No.15 Squadron; reported safe, 5 May 1945; repatriated July 1945; released 10 October 1945. Air Gunner. Certificate sent 20 January 1949.

 

* * * * *

 

WARNER, F/O Kenneth William (J27369) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.231 Squadron (AFRO says No.232 Squadron, but recommendation is from No.231 Squadron) - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1219/45 dated 28 July 1945. Born in Regina, Saskatchewan, 12 February 1923. Truck and motorcycle driver for two years. Enlisted in Regina, 8 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 7 November 1941), No.12 EFTS (graduated 31 January 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 5 June 1942). Overseas in March 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/8771 has citation drafted when he had flown 1,600 hours, 534 in previous six months).

 

Flying Officer Warner was co-pilot of the Liberator aircraft which took Lord Reith's mission on Imperial Telecommunications on its Empire flight, covering a distance of approximately 44,500 miles in 234 flying hours. The diligent and co-operative manner in which this officer carried out his duties played an important part in the successful completion of this outstanding flight.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, F/L Bruce (J9286) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.66 Squadron - Award effective 18 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944 and AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945. Born 28 May 1922 in Nanton, Alberta. Home in Ponoka, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 14 March 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 9 July 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.34 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941). Posted to UK, January 1942. To No.165 Squadron, June 1942 (appointed Deputy Flight Commander, November 1942). To No.2 Tactical Exercise Unit, January 1944 as instructor; to No.1687 Bomber Defence Training Flight, Ingkham, Lincolnshire, March 1944; to No.66 Squadron soon after. Operated on Continent to March 1945; repatriated May 1945. Remained in postwar RCAF including service at Winter Experimental Establishment, Empire Test Pilot School at Farnborough, and test pilot assigned to CF-100 development. As of 1950 described as having flown 28 types of aircraft and logged over 2,200 hours. Presented by King George 20 March 1945. Credited with the following victories with No.165 Squadron: 19 August 1942, one Do.217 destroyed (shared with three others including his twin brother); 26 January 1943, one FW. destroyed; 10 February 1943, one FW.190 damaged; 30 July 1943, one FW.190 destroyed. Killed in the crash of CF-100 18102 on 5 April 1951.

 

This officer has led his flight with much skill and determination in attacks on ground targets. More than twenty vehicles have been damaged and many probably destroyed. During his numerous sorties he has destroyed two enemy fighters and participated in the destruction of a hostile bomber. His fine fighting spirit and zeal have set an excellent example to all.

 

WARREN, F/L Bruce, DFC (J9286) - Air Medal (United States) - No.66 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as 2nd Tactical Air Force) - Effective 24 July 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 602/46 dated 14 June 1946. DHist file 181.009 D.1630 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has letter from AFHQ to No.2 Air Command Headquarters, 27 November 1945, forwarding his and his brother's award. It says, in part, "There is no citation available for these awards but it is known they were granted in recognition of valuable services rendered whilst serving with the 2nd Tactical Air Force." Public Records Office Air 2/9090 has recommended citation drafted when he had flown 189 sorties (357 operational hours).

 

Flight Lieutenant Warren has participated in a large number of sorties and has displayed great determination in pressing home his attacks in the face of heavy anti-aircraft fire. During the Ardennes battle, this officer completed a number of missions in direct support of the United States forces, and his cool courage as flight commander has been an inspiration to the rest of his flight. During the course of his tour he has destroyed two enemy fighters and inflicted damage on others.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, F/L Douglas (J9735) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.66 Squadron - Award effective 18 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 29 December 1944 and AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945. Identical twin brother of Bruce Warren; born in Nanton, Alberta, 28 May 1922; home in Ponoka; enlisted Edmonton 14 March 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 9 July 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.34 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941). Presented by King George 20 March 1945. See his articles, "Christmas in Buzzbomb Alley", Airforce, January-March 1986, "Falaise" in Airforce, July-September 1987, and "Dieppe" in Airforce, August-September 1992. Credited with the following victories with No.165 Squadron: 19 August 1942, one Do.217 destroyed (shared with three other pilots including his twin brother); 31 December 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed; 18 December 1944, one Bf.109 damaged.

 

Flight Lieutenant Warren during two tours of operational duties has shown outstanding skill and courage. His determination to engage and destroy the enemy in the air and on the ground is worthy of high praise. He has completed numerous varied missions on heavily defended ground targets and enemy shipping. He has participated in the destruction by cannon fire of twenty enemy vehicles and the explosion of the magazine of a large enemy strong point. By accurate bombing he has destroyed one enemy aircraft and shared in the destruction of another. On another occasion his accurate bombing severed an important rail link in Germany.

 

WARREN, F/L Douglas, DFC (J9735) - Air Medal (United States) - No.66 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as 2nd Tactical Air Force) - Award effective 3 July 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 602/46 dated 14 June 1946. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.5 EFTS, and No.34 SFTS. DHist file 181.009 D.1630 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has letter from AFHQ to No.2 Air Command Headquarters, 27 November 1945, forwarding his and his brother's award. It says, in part, "There is no citation available for these awards but it is known they were granted in recognition of valuable services rendered whilst serving with the 2nd Tactical Air Force." Public Records Office Air 2/9090 has citation as published in USAAF Orders; described as having flown 198 sorties (366 operational hours).

 

Flight Lieutenant Warren has completed numerous sorties and has displayed outstanding skill and initiative. He has at all times displayed great courage and determination in pressing home his attacks and on numerous missions has operated in immediate support of the United States Forces. His personal example has been an inspiration to the members of his flight.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, FS Earl Freeman (R114511) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.15 Squadron - Award effective 29 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 1 January 1943 and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in Regina; enlisted there 8 July 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 26 October 1941), No.5 EFTS (ceased training 27 December 1941) and No.6 BGS (graduated 11 May 1942). Arrived in No.15 Squadron, 10 October 1942. Cited with FS William D. MacMonagle (which see for citation).

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, Sergeant (now P/O) Jean Louis Nazaire (R136975/J96294) - British Empire Medal - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 2 July 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 781/46 dated 9 August 1946. Home in Pointe-au-Pic and Murray Bay, Quebec (colonization inspector); enlisted in Quebec City, 25 June 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 14 May 1943. Shot down, POW, 19 November 1943. Released October 1945. Presented 24 April 1948.

 

Sergeant Warren was a member of the crew of a Halifax bomber which was shot down over Cologne in November 1943. He got clear of the burning wreckage and hid in a haystack for the night. In the morning he left his hiding place and walked across fields most of the day, sleeping in the woods at night. He was so weak as a result of wounds and bruises sustained when the aircraft crashed that he eventually went to a farm and gave himself up. He was imprisoned in Dulag Luft at Wetzlar and sent to Stalag Luft IVB at Nuhlberg. On 17th March 1944, Sergeant Warren made his first attempt to escape by joining a party of French prisoners going out for supplies. When the party reached the stores he broke away and went to a cemetery where, by pre-arrangement, he was to have met a Canadian airman who had previously escaped. On arrival, Sergeant Warren learned that the other airman had been recaptured and the guards had been reinforced. As he had neither food nor maps, Sergeant Warren decided to return to the camp and await a more favourable opportunity. He regained the camp undetected. On 1st May 1944, Sergeant Warren made a further attempt, using the same method as before. He met an RAF officer and both successfully evaded the search parties and guards for five days. Four other escapers soon joined them and all managed to get on a train carrying rolls of paper to Holland. On arrival in Holland the party split up, and Sergeant Warren and one companion travelled north until they made contact with the Dutch underground movement in Borne. They stayed for five weeks and then moved on to Nijverdal, owing to the activities of the Germans. Early in August 1944, Sergeant Warren moved to Zwolle and hit in a boat until the end of the month when he was given shelter in a castle near Hattem. The German search parties were very active, but he successfully evaded them and eventually reached Gossel, where he remained for eight weeks. Of the period, six weeks were spent hiding in a cave under a pigsty, in company with two Poles and a Dutchman. The Germans made a surprise search and the members of the party were ultimately arrested. After brutal treatment, they were taken to the Landwach prison. Although Sergeant Warren produced his RAF identity discs, he was treated as a "terrorist" and badly manhandled during interrogation, after which he was put in a cell measuring 12 feet by 6 feet with thirteen others. For three weeks they remained in the cell, no one being allowed out for any purpose. Later he was taken to an empty house for interrogation and further brutal treatment was carried out. Eventually Sergeant Warren was moved to Oxelhoft, where conditions were even worse. On 1st February 1945, he and ninety-three others were put into two box cars and sent to Germany. During the journey some of the party pried open a window of the truck and made an attempt to escape, but the guards saw them and opened fire. Sergeant Warren succeeded in getting away and evading capture by walking all night through water waist-high. The next evening he made contact with an underground organization and was taken to Lobith. The next night an attempt to cross the Rhine was made, but those who tried had to return to the starting point owing to strong enemy opposition. The party was then taken to a farm by a Dutch nurse and given shelter. On the 22nd February 1945, the Germans ordered all farms to be evacuated, so Sergeant Warren and some others posed as members of the farmer's family and moved with them. Later he posed as a Dutch policeman in order to prevent being taken again. he continued to evade capture until liberated by British forces in April 1945.

 

* * * * *

WARREN, Sergeant Margaret Elizabeth (W309252) - British Empire Medal - No.4 RC - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 3 December 1942. Presented 14 February 1948.

 

This non-commissioned officer has been at this unit for approximately eighteen months and has been a tower of strength to her superiors and an outstanding example to those working with her. She has unusual organizing ability, has co-ordinated the activities of the Women's Division staff, and has been outstanding in her assistance in maintaining proper discipline and service spirit.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, P/O Milton Wilfred (J18398) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 10 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Home in Geraldton, Ontario; enlisted in Winnipeg, 6 June 1941. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 30 March 1942) and No.2 WS (graduated 2 March 1942). Presented by King George 11 August 1944. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2624 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has recommendation dated 18 November 1943 when he had flown 24 sorties (149 hours six minutes) between 10 September 1942 and 18 October 1943 (the half-sortie was an ASR search).

 

This officer has participated in 24 operational sorties including attacks against some of the most heavily defended areas in Germany and several mine laying operations. Recent targets included raids on Peenemunde, Berlin and Hanover, where intense fighter opposition was encountered. He has at all times displayed a coolness and courage under fire which is worthy of the highest praise. The fine record of achievement held by this officer has in no small measure contributed to the operational efficiency of his crew, and I recommend that the keenness with which he has undertaken any type of operation be recognized with the award of the DFC.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, Sergeant Robert Charles (R63774) - Mention in Despatches - Linton-on-Ouse - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Identified in AFRO as "Overseas". McEwen papers (CWM) with list of recommendations with MiD recommendations for 1 February to 31 July 1945 identifies unit. Home in Chatham, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 10 June 1940. Certificate sent 28 September 1948.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, LAC Robert Ellis (R145450) - Mention in Despatches - Skipton-on-Swale - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1647/45 dated 26 October 1945. Home in Sandwich East, Ontario; enlisted in Winnipeg, 18 March 1942. DHist file 181.009 D.2619 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has recommendation forwarded 1 February 1945 to No.63 Base HQ when he had served 34 months in Canada, nine months overseas.

 

This airman has been employed in the Repair and Inspection Squadron as an Instrument Mechanic. He has proved to be hard and efficient worker. Since his arrival overseas he has quickly improved his wide knowledge and become familiar with the additional specialist instruments peculiar to Bomber Command. While in charge of a party of airmen rendering the nitrogen system in Halifax aircraft serviceable, he has done particularly good work. By its nature, this was an arduous and discouraging task. Despite this, by persistent hard work and good organization, the job was completed in a comparatively short time.

 

* * * * *

 

WARREN, F/L William Arnold (C12589) - Air Force Cross - No.1 CFS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Woodstock, Ontario, 9 October 1908. Attended Colbourne Public School, Colbourne High School and Shaw's Business College. Owner and manager of Warren Business College. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 5 June 1940. Graduated from No.6 SFTS, 19 June 1942. Award sent by registered mail 11 January 1946. No citation in AFRO or biographical file. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 23 December 1944 when he was Examining Officer, Central Examining Flight; he had flown 2,360 hours 55 minutes, 2,096 hours 55 minutes instructional, 101 hours in past six months:

 

Flight Lieutenant Warren has been an instructor since July 1940 when he helped start the BCATP by instructing at an Elementary Flying Training School as a civilian instructor. Since then he has held a variety of jobs, all of which have called for a man of outstanding ability. Since coming to Central Flying School in June 1944 he has proven himself an exceptional officer in all respects. He has assisted in two vital training experiments and the wealth of knowledge gained from them have been directly attributable to this officer's ability and resourcefulness.

 

* * * * *

 

WARRINER, F/L Lloyd Hubert (J5337) - Air Force Cross - No.112 Wing - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 16 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 23 December 1940), No.12 EFTS (graduated 21 February 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 16 May 1941). Award sent by registered mail 1 September 1944. No citation in Canadian sources. Public Records Office Air 2/9019 has recommendation drafted when he had flown 1,932 hours of which 295 were in previous six months.

 

This officer is an excellent instructor on the various types of aircraft used for training. His work has always been of a high order.

 

* * * * *

 

WARRINGTON, FS Edward George (R80373) - Mention in Despatches - Croft (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas" - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Home in Vancouver. DHist file 181.009 D.4364 (RG.24 Vol.20648) has recommendation submitted 2 February 1945. Had enlisted in Winnipeg, 27 November 1940, spending 18 months in Canada, 31 months overseas. Cook.

 

This NCO's devotion to duty and untiring co-operation has contributed in a large measure to the efficient operation of his section. His outstanding ability and strong sense of duty under long hours of work are highly commendable. He has been in charge of all messes on this station for the past 18 months. It has been necessary for him to be on duty day and night in many cases, supervising operational meals to ensure that air crews are properly fed, also keeping constant watch of the Other Ranks' mess hall to make sure that they also get well cooked, hot food.

 

* * * * *

 

WARRINGTON, F/L Gilbert Rex (J20446) - Air Medal (United States) - No.437 Squadron - Award effective 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1100/46 dated 29 November 1946. Born in Plato, Saskatchewan, 17 April 1918. Home in Mervin, Saskatchewan (farmer); enlisted Saskatoon, 26 August 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS, Edmonton (graduated 27 February 1942), No.5 EFTS, High River (graduated 24 April 1942) and No.7 SFTS, McLeod, Alberta (graduated and commissioned, 28 August 1942). Further trained at No.1 General Reconnaissance School, Summerside (19 September to 20 November 1942) and No.31 Operational Training Unit, Debert (21 November 1942 to 3 March 1943. To "Y" Depot, Halifax, 4 March 1943; to RAF Overseas, 8 March 1943; to No.1 (Coastal) Operational Training Unit, 15 June 1943; with that unit until 4 September 1943; to No.48 Squadron, 22 September 1943; while with that unit he appears to have delivered aircraft to Gibraltar; to No.437 Squadron, 14 September 1944; taken on strength of No.45 Group Headquarters, Dorval, 14 January 1945; with that formation until 17 July 1945 (although with No.313 Flying Training Unit, North Bay, 18 February to 8 April 1945) when sent to No.1 Repatriation Depot; to No.2 Air Command Headquarters, Winnipeg, 20 July 1945; released 15 September 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/9644 has recommendation.

 

As captain of aircraft Flight Lieutenant Warrington towed a glider aircraft into the Arnhem area on the 17th and 18th September 1944. Despite concentrated and accurate anti-aircraft fire he participated in another sortie on the 21st September and successfully dropped supplies to our beleaguered troops. Flight Lieutenant Warrington's skill, determination and devotion to duty have set an inspiring example.

 

NOTE: On applying for RAF Operational Wings, 24 December 1944, he stated that he had flown 29 sorties on Coastal Command duties with No.48 Squadron, 4 September 1943 to 28 February 1944 (183 hours 45 minutes). The squadron then converted to transport duties. In that role he flew 45 sorties with Nos.48 and 437 Squadrons (198 hours 25 minutes), commencing 28 February 1944 and concluding 24 December 1944. However, another form, dated 17 July 1945, states his last sortie was 20 December 1944. It estimates his flying time at 700 hours overseas plus 350 non-operational hours.

 

* * * * *

 

WARWICK, F/L William Albert (C16470) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 20 November 1937.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERBURY, P/O David John Cunningham (J29457) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.162 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron - Award effective 11 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 22 August 1944 and AFRO 2231/44 dated 13 October 1944. Home in Wolfeville, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax 15 July 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 19 December 1941), No.7 EFTS (ceased training 2 February 1942), No.4 AOS (graduated 20 June 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 31 Jul 1942), and No.1 ANS (graduated 21 September 1942). Presented 16 October 1946.

 

This officer has invariably performed his duties as navigator in a most skilful and efficient manner. While on an anti-U-boat patrol his aircraft attacked an enemy submarine. During this encounter the aircraft was seriously damaged by anti-aircraft fire and later was forced to alight in the sea. As eight crew members occupied one dinghy the situation was difficult. After three hours an air/sea rescue aircraft dropped a lifeboat which unfortunately drifted away from the survivors. Stripping off all his clothing, Pilot Officer Waterbury swam after it and secured it and with considerable difficulty paddled it back to the remainder of the crew who were eventually rescued. But for this officer's determination and courage all would undoubtedly have been lost.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERBURY, P/O Orville Ray (J7520) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - Award effective 29 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 16 October 1942 and AFRO 1731/42 dated 30 October 1942. Home in Birtle, Manitoba; enlisted Saskatoon, 10 September 1940. Trained at No.3 AOS (graduated 23 June 1941), No.2 BGS (graduated 4 August 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 15 September 1941). Presented by King George 9 February 1943. Killed in action, 13 March 1943 (Lancaster W4928); buried in Germany.

 

On two occasions, despite the most adverse weather conditions, in daylight attacks on Germany, Pilot Officer Waterbury has displayed skilful navigation and as a result has successfully carried out his mission and brought his aircraft safely back to base. One night in September, when returning from an operational sortie on Wilhelmshaven, his aircraft was fired on by hostile aeroplanes and the wireless operator was severely wounded. Pilot Officer Waterbury successfully administered first aid, thereby saving the life of his colleague. He has completed numerous operational sorties, including attacks on the enemy's most heavily defended targets, and by his exceptional keenness and efficiency has set a fine example.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERFIELD, F/L Leslie (J23061) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.160 Squadron - Award effective 22 May 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 9 December 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 4 May 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 21 June 1941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 1 September 1941). Presented 19 December 1952. Cited with F/O James D.A. Robertson (see above for citation). Served in postwar RCAF Auxiliary (No.2400 Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron).

 

* * * * *

 

WATERMAN, F/O Frederick Charles Ernest (J6362) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.40 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 December 1942 and AFRO 2069/42 dated 18 December 1942. Born at Princetown, British Columbia, 8 October 1914. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 15 November 1940), No.10 EFTS (ceased training), No.5 AOS (graduated 26 April 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 9 June 1941), and No.1 CNS (graduated 22 July 1941). Presented by King George 29 June 1943.

 

In August 1942, when engaged in an attack on shipping at Tobruk, this pilot had serious trouble with his engines. Evasive action was almost impossible but with great determination he proceeded to the target. Despite these difficulties, heavy gun fire and concentrations of searchlights, Flying Officer Waterman, with perfect calmness, released his bombs along the jetties at Tobruk. Flying Officer Waterman has at all times shown a sense of duty which has been an inspiration to his colleagues.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9606 has recommendation as transmitted from Middle East to Air Ministry, 4 November 1942.

 

This Canadian officer observer joined No.40 Squadron on the 12th of May 1942 having been posted from No.2 Middle East Training School and was the first commissioned officer to report for duty with the recent;y reformed No.40 Squadron.

 

The work of this navigator has been of a very high order, and he has on several occasions displayed much courage in carrying out his navigational duties during operations. For example, on the 9th of August 1942, when flying in an attack on shipping at Tobruk, his pilot had serious trouble with his engines which in many cases would have caused the abandonment of the task. Instead of returning to base, however, the aircraft proceeded to the target where because of the manner in which the pilot had to go in, evasive action was almost impossible. Despite this and despite heavy flak and concentrations of searchlights, three runs were made over the target and the bombs were dropped along the jetties at Tobruk, where a large explosion was observed. Throughout this operation, Pilot Officer Waterman with perfect calmness, carried on with his task and aimed his bombs in spite of the dangers to which the aircraft was subject. On the return journey from the target, Pilot Officer Waterman continues his duties until ordered by the captain to bale out which he did with the rest of the crew, landing behind enemy lines. Although some members of the crew were shaken by this experience, Pilot Officer Waterman expressed a desire to fly operationally on the first possible occasion and the whole crew is now continuing to operate in a normal manner.

 

It is considered that this officer's example and high courage were the means of saving a crew which otherwise would probably have lost confidence from an operational point of view. This officer has at all times shown a sense of duty and he has set an example of the highest order to the rest of the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERMAN, F/O Thomas John Davies (J5689) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.207 Squadron - Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1659/42 dated 16 October 1942. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 13 August 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.3 AOS, No.2 BGS, and No.1 ANS. Killed in action 3 September 1943 (Lancaster ED832); name on Runnymede Memorial.

 

This officer is employed as air observer and navigator. He has completed numerous sorties, a large proportion of which have been against heavily defended targets such as Cologne, Essen, Wilhelmshaven, Brest, Bremen, and Hamburg. On one occasion whilst over Bremen his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and Flying Officer Waterman was struck by fragments of shrapnel just above both eyes. Despite this he continued his work and navigated the aircraft safely back to base without even mentioning that he had been slightly wounded. In July 1942 he took part in a daylight raid on Danzig. This officer has always displayed great keenness, determination and courage and his work has contributed materially to the successes achieved.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9598 has recommendation dated 26 July 1942 when he had flown 31 sorties (172 hours 25 minutes) which gives much more detail:

 

10 Oct 41 Essen (5.00) 16 Feb 42 GARDENING, 10/10 cloud

12 Oct 41 Huls (5.10, unsuccessful, at sea level, unsuccessful

bombed Nijmegen aerodrome 23 Feb 42 Kiel (6.45)

21 Oct 41 Bremen (6.25) 3 Mar 42 Paris (5.40)

7 Nov 41 Cologne (5.05) 9 Mar 42 Essen (4.35)

27 Nov 41 Dusseldorf (6.00) 26 May 42 GARDENING, Pumpkins (6.00,

7 Dec 41 Aachen (5.15,target not unsuccessful, bad

located; Dunkirk bombed visibility)

as alternative) 30 May 42 Cologne (5.10)

2 Jan 42 St.Nazaire (6.15, bad 1 June 42 Essen (4.00)

visibility, unsuccessful) 5 June 42 Essen (5.40)

5 Jan 42 Brest (5.45, visibility 9 June 42 GARDENING (7.20, Nasturtiums)

bad, bombs brought back) 20 Jun 42 Emden (4.10)

8 Jan 42 Brest (5.25, Scharnhorst 25 Jun 42 Bremen (4.20)

and Gneisenau, not 29 Jun 42 Bremen (5.50)

successful, docks 2 July 42 Bremen (4.35)

bombed). 8 July 42 Wilhelmshaven (4.45)

10 Jan 42 Wilhelmshaven (6.35) 11 Jul 42 Danzig (10.40, day raid)

14 Jan 42 Hamburg (7.05) 19 Jul 42 Vegasack (4.50, 10/10 cloud,

25 Jan 42 Brest (5.00, Scharnhorst TR u/s; unsuccessful)

and Gneisenau, not 21 Jul 42 Duisburg (4.30)

successful, docks 23 Jul 42 Duisburg (4.30)

attacked) 26 Jul 42 Hamburg (5.00)

 

Since this officer joined No.207 Squadron in September 1941, he has completed 31 operational sorties, a large proportion of which have been against heavily defended targets such as Cologne, Essen, Wilhelmshaven, Brest, Bremen and Hamburg.

 

On one occasion his aircraft was hit by ack-ack fire when over Bremen. Flying Officer Waterman was himself struck by fragments of shrapnel just above both his eyes; notwithstanding, he continued his work and navigated the aircraft safely back to base without even mentioning that he had been slightly wounded. It was not until he arrived in the Operations Room with his face covered in blood that the fact was known.

 

During a daylight raid on the submarine yards at Danzig on the 11th July 1942, Flying Officer Waterman, despite the very difficult adverse weather conditions, navigated his aircraft successfully to the target, which was bombed from a height of 2,500 feet, direct hits being scored. This officer has always displayed outstanding keenness, determination and courage on operations, and his work has contributed considerably to the success of the operational sorties in which he has taken part.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERS, F/L Alfred Henry Hillman (J10628) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.435 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 418/46 dated 18 April 1946. Home in Calgary; enrolled there 23 May 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 8 September 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 21 November 1941), and No.12 SFTS (graduated 13 March 1942). Certificate sent 30 December 1948. No citation in AFRO or biographical file. DHist file 181.009 D.1768 (RG.24 Vol.20610) has recommendation for an AFC dated 27 October 1945 when he had flown 1,744 hours, 1,100 on transport duties, 350 in previous six months.

 

Flight Lieutenant Waters has been continuously on long range transport as Captain of aircraft, operating from the United Kingdom to destinations as far as India, Russia and Canada, for the past two years. Due to his overwhelming keenness to fly irrespective of weather, he has been an inspiration to all who have served with him and has won him the distinction of being an exceptional transport captain.

 

Since joining this unit he has been instructing new crews and by his devotion to his work he has produced results that would be hard to surpass. He is strongly recommended for the Air Force Cross.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9144 has the recommendation as it went to the Air Ministry Awards Committee; it has a slightly different text from the above:

 

Flight Lieutenant Waters is a deputy flight commander in his squadron. He has been continuously employed on long range transport as Captain of aircraft for the past two years. He has operated on the routes from the United Kingdom to India, Russia and Canada during this time. His keenness to fly in all weathers has been an inspiration to all who have served with him and he has won the distinction of being an exceptional transport captain. During his present tour of duty he has been instructing new recruits; his devotion to this work has produced results that would be hard to surpass.

 

* * * * *

 

WATERS, F/O Samuel John (J25267) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.7 SFTS - Award effective 2 September 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Home in Morrin, Alberta; enlisted in Calgary, 9 April 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 25 September 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1943). Incident described took place at 1400 hours, three miles east of secondary field R2 near Standoff, Alberta. Anson 11528 with F/O G.W. Brereton (RCAF instructor) and LAC M. Zuback (RCAF pupil) hit Anson 11456 flown by Waters, whose pupil was Corporal T.M. Hunt (RAF) with passenger AW1 B. Pool (RCAF WD). Anson 11528 went out of control, hit ground, exploded and burned out. Waters (who had 970 solo hours and 172 dual hours, including 785 and 31 respectively on type) was able to make wheels up landing after loss and regaining of control.

 

This officer was captain of an Anson aircraft recently and was giving instruction on beam approach flying when his aircraft collided with another at an altitude of approximately 1,000 feet. This officer had practically no opportunity to see the aircraft he struck as it came down through the overcast immediately in front of his aircraft. The complete tail unit and about fifteen feet of fuselage from the other aircraft were lodged on his right wing, held there by the controls of the other aircraft, which completely disabled his right engine and caused his aircraft to be almost unmanageable. Despite this, Flying Officer Waters righted his aircraft after the collision and made a successful crash landing without injury to any of the occupants. The clear thinking and skilful handling of the aircraft by this officer is most praiseworthy.

 

* * * * *

 

WATKINS, F/O Albert Allen (J26919) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.440 Squadron - Award effective 20 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1920 in Regina; home in Aylesbury, Saskatchewan. Apprentice engineer. Enlisted in Regina, 7 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 13 October 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 19 December 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1942). Commissioned 1942. Presented 19 July 1945.

 

This officer has displayed courage, endurance and devotion to duty of the highest order.

 

* * * * *

 

WATKINS, W/C Francis Hubert (J7690) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born in Winnipeg; enlisted 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.16 EFTS and No.4 SFTS. In postwar RCAF, attaining rank of Group Captain. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/7276 has recommendation dared 20 June 1944 when he ha flown 22 sorties (134 hours five minutes), 22 October 1943 to 15 June 1944. Squadron Leader when recommended.

 

No.428 Squadron No.434 Squadron

 

22 Oct 43 Kassel (7.40) 9 Apr 44 Lille (5.25)

3 Nov 43 Dusseldorf (7.05) 26 Apr 44 Villeneuve St.George (6.00)

18 Nov 43 Mannheim (7.00) 29 Apr 44 Terschelling (3.25)

26 Nov 43 Stuttgart (7.35) 1 May 44 Ghislain (5.00)

20 Jan 44 Berlin (8.05) 7 May 44 East Frisians (3.15)

2 Feb 44 Kiel (6.25) 27 May 44 Le Clipon (4.25)

3 Feb 44 La Rochelle (8.05) 16 Jun 44 Boulogne (4.30)

11 Mar 44 Brest (5.55)

15 Feb 44 Berlin (6.50)

21 Feb 44 La Rochelle (7.00)

25 Feb 44 Fakre Bay (7.30)

3 Mar 44 Bordeaux (7.50)

6 Mar 44 Trappes (5.45)

22 Mar 44 Femern Belt (7.40)

25 Mar 44 Aulnoye (6.10)

 

This officer is an extremely efficient captain and leader whose example of courage, skill and resolution has been an inspiration to the members of his squadron. He has completed sorties against such well defended targets as Kassel, Dusseldorf, Mannheim, Stuttgart, and Berlin on which he pressed home his attack with great determination.

 

Squadron Leader Watkins' untiring efforts and high standard of efficiency has been reflected in the success of the squadron he now commands. He is a skilled leader and his achievements have won him admiration and praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WATKINS, S/O Joan (V30337) - Mention in Despatches - No.62 Base - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Home in Victoria; enlisted in Vancouver 22 July 1942.

 

* * * * *

 

WATKINS, Corporal John Percival (R151632) - Mention in Despatches -No.6 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born 12 May 1912. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 26 January 1942. Initially a Clerk (Steno); reclassified Clerk (Admin), 24 October 1944.

 

This non-commissioned officer has given diligent and conscientious service during two years on isolated stations. When confronted with a great increase of work and a staff that was below establishment he worked untiringly for long hours overtime to keep the orderly room routine up to date and in doing so he was able to maintain an exceptionally high degree of efficiency. He works with a speed and ingenuity that show he has an excellent knowledge of his trade, which has led to a high state of efficiency in his section.

 

* * * * *

 

WATLINGTON, FS Hubert Fortescue (R66150) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.39 Squadron - Award effective 17 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 2 October 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Home in Hamilton, Bermuda. Enlisted in Niagara Falls, 16 August 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.10 EFTS, and No.5 SFTS. Presented by King George, 13 March 1945.

 

This airman has displayed exceptional ability and his courage has been an example to his fellow pilots. In September 1942, he was the pilot of an aircraft in the leading flight of a force detailed to attack an enemy convoy with a formidable escort of destroyers and fighter aircraft. Despite this opposition, Flight Sergeant Watlington pressed home his attack from short range and although both of his air gunners were wounded during attacks by fighters, this airman succeeded in evading the attackers and flew his aircraft back to base safely.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, FS Alan Douglas (R94261) - British Empire Medal - Radar and Communications School - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Enlisted in Montreal, 15 April 1941. Presented in Montreal, 21 March 1947.

 

This non-commissioned officer has been employed as an instructor in Radar micro-wave theory. He has been at thus unit since its opening and during that time has been directly charged with the preparation of many of the precis, assignments and manuals required for instruction on this particular subject. This required considerable research both in reading and practical work. His efforts have at all times been an example and inspiration to those working with him.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O Albert Vernon (J26311) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.138 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Plumas, Manitoba. Enlisted in Winnipeg, 6 November 1941. Trained at No.7 ITS, No.7 BGS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.7 AOS (graduated 5 February 1943). Medal sent by registered mail, 3 July 1951. No citation other than "completed ...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 16 July 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (173 hours 45 minutes on operations). Sortie list gives no objectives; times only as the mission is described only as ""Operations as ordered", and names only 29 operational flights.

 

31 Mar 44 (5.20) 2 June 44 (6.20)

9 Apr 44 (5.25) 4 June 44 (6.15)

12 Apr 44 (5.45) 5 June 44 (2.55)

26 Apr 44 (7.15) 7 June 44 (4.20)

27 Apr 44 (6.35) 21 June 44 (4.45)

29 Apr 44 (7.35) 22 June 44 (5.50)

30 Apr 44 (8.00) 24 June 44 (5.10)

3 May 44 (4.50) 27 June 44 (6.25)

6 May 44 (6.35) 29 June 44 (4.45)

8 May 44 (6.55) 3 July 44 (5.20)

9 May 44 (6.45) 5 July 44 (4.50)

15 May 44 (6.20) 7 July 44 (5.30)

23 May 44 (6.50) 9 July 44 (7.50)

28 May 44 (6.40) 11 July 44 (8.15)

1 June 44 (4.25)

 

This officer has now completed 30 operations with the squadron and has proved to be a very reliable and efficient Bomb Aimer. A number of these sorties have been over heavily defended areas where a slight variation from the planned track would have probably been disastrous. Flying Officer Watson has, however, conscientiously improved his navigation to a high standard thereby making possible the many successes achieved by his crew. Flying Officer Watson's determination and devotion to duty have been a source of inspiration to all Bomb Aimers in the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, FS David Wilson (R143005) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 14 November 1941. Certificate sent 22 September 1948.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/L Frederick Fowler (J12627) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.194 Squadron - Award effective 9 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. Home in Peterborough, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 15 July 1941. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 8 June 1942) and No.7 BGS (graduated 6 July 1942). Presented 26 August 1949.

 

This officer has completed a successful operational tour as wireless operator (air). He has operated with his present squadron for a period of seven months, during which he has completed numerous sorties dropping supplies to forward elements of the Army. He has frequently flown through monsoon weather when it was essential to maintain supplies to the Army under trying circumstances. Flight Lieutenant Watson's skill and devotion to duty have set an inspiring example to other wireless operators.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, Sergeant George Bonner (R77579) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Home in Calgary; enlisted there 18 November 1940.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, W/C Howard Lee (C7722) - Member, Order of the British Empire - NWAC Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 4 October 1941. Presented 29 November 1947.

 

The high standard of efficiency to which Flying Control in this Command has been developed is due to the ability and efforts of this officer. He has shown a great devotion to duty and a keen interest in the welfare of all ranks. His willingness to accept any work and carry it through to a successful conclusion has been most praiseworthy.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/L James Andrew (J20076) - Mention in Despatches - No.622 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 21 February 1947 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 120/44 dated 7 March 1947. Home in Hamilton; enlisted there 22 September 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 31 January 1942), No.22 EFTS (graduated 19 June 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 23 October 1942). Killed in action 27 April 1944 (Lancaster ND781); buried in France. Certificate sent to his mother, 10 January 1949.

 

Public Record Office Air 14/4115 has extensive correspondence and affidavits relating to a possible Victoria Cross to this officer. Although no formal citation was drafted, the documents record the story as follows. The aircraft (code letter "R") took off from Mildenhall, the crew briefed to attack Friedrichshaven. At about 0130 hours, while en route to the target, and flying at 17,000 fet a little south of Strasbourg, they were attacked by a night fighter. This was driven off, but further attacks continued and the aircraft sustained increasing damage. The rear gunner, Flight Sergeant M.D. MacKinnon (RCAF), later reported that his turret was knocked out; 30 seconds later (evidently a second fighter was involved) the starboard wing and starboard inner engine were set on fire. Watson maintained control but efforts to fight the fire were unsuccessful and he ordered the crew to abandon the aircraft. MacKinnon, in s deposition sworn in Toronto on 30 March 1946, went on to say:

 

The aircraft lost altitude rapidly. Nevertheless, Flight Lieutenant Watson remained at the controls and kept the aircraft under sufficient control to enable the other members of the crew and myself to parachute to safety.

 

It is beyond doubt that the unselfish conduct of Flight Lieutenant Watson and his devotion to duty and complete disregard for his own safety resulted in the lives of the crew and myself being saved. I sincerely trust that such heroic action be duly acknowledged and strongly urge that Flight Lieutenant Watson be suitably awarded posthumously so commensurate with the highest possible gallantry.

 

The flight engineer, Sergeant Roy Clive Eames (RAF) swore a more detailed deposition on 25 July 1946, saying in part:

 

On the night of April 27th, 1944, I flew with Flight Lieutenant Watson on an operation and our mission was to bomb Friedrichshaven. At approximately 0115 B.S.T. on the 28th April, we were at 17-18,000 feet approximately; I was in the nose of the aircraft carrying out window (radar defence) procedure when some shells came through the nose of the aircraft and realising we were being attacked, I immediately left the nose to take up my standing position beside the captain, Flight Lieutenant Watson. In this position, I saw the call light flickering. This call light is used in emergency when the intercommunication by telephone is unserviceable. I realized that although the rear gunner's intercom has been all right a few minutes before that it must be out of order, since we heard no report from [about] the attackers.

 

I subsequently learned that the first burst which I had encountered in the nose had also damaged the port tail plane, port aileron and rear controls. The Mid-Upper gunner then gave orders to corkscrew starboard and an enemy aircraft opened fire which set out starboard inner petrol tank on fire and also starboard inner engine. Flight Lieutenant Watson gave the order immediately to prepare to abandon aircraft. I feathered the starboard inner engine and also pressed its fire extinguisher to try to put the flames out. Flight Lieutenant Watson put the nose down to keep the flames away from the aircraft and to possibly quench the flames.

 

Realizing this was impossible, Flight Lieutenant Watson then endeavoured to keep the aircraft straight and level. This was only achieved by keeping control column pressed tightly on his chest and I realized that our flying controls were seriously damaged.

 

As part of the drill, the bomb aimer endeavoured to attach to Captain's harness his parachute and succeeded after considerable difficulty.

 

During this time the Captain asked the navigator to inform the crew of our position fr the purpose of escape. The navigator told us we were approximately on the French border, 30 minutes flying time from the turning point into our target. This point was a little south of Strasbourg.

 

There was at no time any suggestion of panic and this was largely due to the coolness and perfect calm of out Captain.

 

I must point out that all the action of combat actually occurred in the space of a few minutes.

 

At this time, the rear gunner was out of communication with the rest of the crew, but I heard bursts of machine gun fire from his turret. I saw that the rear of the aircraft was badly damaged and I thought that the rear gunner must have been injured

 

Throughout the combat, Flight Lieutenant Watson repeatedly asked for news of the rear gunner and assured us that he would look after him; I think his exact words were, "Whatever happens, he'll be O.K."

 

I told the skipper that his turret was still moving, but that was the only indication we had that he was alive. The damage caused by the second attack had damaged the cal light communication.

 

The Mid-Upper gunner was giving a commentary on the fires of the starboard wing.

 

The captain gave us orders to bale out. I remember his words, "I'm sorry lads, but you'll have to hit the silk" and in accordance with our drill, I was the first one to leave the aircraft at approximately 12,000 feet. I acknowledged the captain's order as I left, and that was the last time I saw him.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/L James Russell (J7744) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.164 (Transport) Squadron -Award effective 11 August 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14th September 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 13 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 16 May 1941), No.19 EFTS (graduated 15 July 1941) and No.12 SFTS (graduated 25 September 1941).

 

Due to exceptional ability, skill and resourcefulness, this officer is one of the most trusted and highly respected Senior Captains in the squadron. He has logged 600 hours in the past eight months on Trans-Atlantic and other long over-water flights in land planes, completing some of these in the face of great odds. Flight Lieutenant Watson has brought all these flights through to a successful conclusion in spite of some of the worst weather imaginable. His day by day punctuality and devotion to duty sets an excellent example to other members of the squadron,

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O John Albert (J23057) - Air Force Cross - No.3 Operational Training Unit - Award effective 21 April 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945. Enlisted in Toronto, 26 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941), No.6 EFTS (graduated 22 April 1941) and No.10 SFTS (graduated 15 July 1941). Presented 5 March 1949. No citation in AFRO. Governor General's Records (RG.7 Group 26, Vol.58, file 190-I, dossier 6) has citation. When recommended he had flown 2,030 hours, 150 as instructor (and 150 in past six months). DHist file 181.009 D.2280 (RG.24 Vol.20623) has recommendation (for Commendation) dated 22 September 1944; it also notes he had flown 142 operational sorties (1,280 operational hours). Incident of 23 August involved P/O R.C. Hughes, No.133 Squadron.

 

On two occasions in August 1944, Flying Officer Watson rescued pilots of fighter aircraft who had come down in the sea by parachute. On 15th August, Flying Officer Watson was flying as instructor in a Canso aircraft when he saw a parachute come down in the water. The pilot, whose leg had been cut off in leaving the aircraft, was picked up by a fishing boat. Flying Officer Watson landed his aircraft and took the injured pilot aboard, returning at once to base. This prompt and skilful action undoubtedly saved the pilot's life. On 23rd August Flying Officer Watson again landed and took aboard a pilot who had parachuted and was in his dinghy. This officer, on these occasions, displayed courage and devotion to duty of a very high order.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O John Henry (J7802) - Mention in Despatches - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Home in Woodstock, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 13 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 29 March 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 1 September 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 20 July 1941), and No.2 ANS (graduated 29 September 1941). See G.A. Brown, Those Who Dared. Forced to bale out over Belgium, 16 June 1942, he did not leave the aircraft until he had destroyed secret equipment. Linked up with Belgian Underground and made it back to UK.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O John Victor (J17301) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Born 27 June 1922 in Lonsing, Ontario; home there; enlisted in Toronto, 24 September 1940. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 14 September 1941) and No.7 BGS (graduated 13 October 1941). Flew two overseas tours with Nos.57 and 635 Squadrons. Repatriated in March 1945, released August 1945, rejoined April 1946. Instructed at School of Flying Control, Trenton and then flying instructor at Camp Borden and Centralia (October 1947 to 1949); instructed at Radio and Communications School, Clinton. Flew a year with No.435 Squadron (1951-52) and then became a staff officer. As of August 1967 he had attained the rank of Wing Commander. No citation in AFRO.

WATSON, F/O John Victor (J17301) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.635 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 May 1945 and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9070 has recommendation dated 20 February 1945 when he had flown 46 sorties (279 hours 15 minutes), 13 September 1942 to 8 July 1943 and 25 August 1944 to 8 February 1945.

 

First Tour Second Tour

 

13 Sep 42 Bremen (5.25) 25 Aug 44 Russelheim (7.00)

12 Oct 42 Wismer (6.20) 29 Aug 44 Stettin (8.15)

19 Oct 42 Le Creusot (9.30) 31 Aug 44 Lumbres (2.30)

22 Oct 42 Genoa (9.05) 3 Sept 44 Soesterburg (2.45)

7 Nov 42 Genoa (8.35) 8 Sept 44 Le Havre (3.10)

9 Nov 42 Hamburg (6.00) 10 Sep 44 Le Havre (3.05)

20 Nov 42 Turin (10.00) 12 Sep 44 Frankfurt (6.00)

21 Dec 42 Munich (8.45) 15 Sep 44 Kiel (4.45)

16 Feb 43 Lorient (5.45) 5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken (5.00)

18 Feb 43 Wilhelmshaven (4.30) 14 Oct 44 Duisberg (3.15)

25 Feb 43 Nuremberg (7.45) 15 Oct 44 Wilhelmshaven

11 Mar 43 Stuttgart (7.40) 19 Oct 44 Stuttgart (5.40)

12 Mar 43 Essen (4.50) 23 Oct 44 Essen (4.10)

3 Apr 43 Essen (5.00) 2 Nov 44 Dusseldorf (4.40)

13 Apr 43 Spezia (10.00) 18 Nov 44 Munster (3.25)

30 Apr 43 Essen (5.05) 6 Dec 44 Ludwigshaven (5.00)

12 May 43 Duisberg (4.30) 17 Dec 44 Ulm (6.30)

23 May 43 Dortmund (5.25) 28 Dec 44 Munchen-Gladbach (5.00)

25 May 43 Wuppertal (5.45) 29 Dec 44 Troisdorf (5.00)

11 Jun 43 Dusseldorf (5.30) 13 Jan 45 Saarbrucken (5.05)

8 July 43 Cologne (6.05) 14 Jan 45 Merseburg (7.45)

16 Jan 45 Magdeburg (5.25)

22 Jan 45 Gelsenkirchen (4.15)

7 Feb 45 Cleve (4.20)

8 Feb 45 Politz (7.45)

 

This officer has completed 46 operations against the enemy and has attacked many heavily defended German targets including Munich, Stuttgart, Essen and Stettin.

 

Throughout he has showed exceptional keenness to operate and his ability and devotion to duty are worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O Richard Arthur (J88228) - Croix de Guerre (France) - No.440 Squadron - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Oba, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 29 October 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 8 May 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 28 August 1942) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 18 December 1942). Photo UK-12708 shows him with torn parachute following his baleout from a Typhoon. Public Records Office Air 2/9645 has citation.

 

This officer has completed a tour of operational duty during which he has taken part in many sorties against heavily defended ground targets. At Caen, on 18th July, 1944, his aircraft received a direct hit by anti-aircraft fire and exploded in mid-air. He was able to parachute safely to earth and found himself in the midst of a furious tank battle but he returned to our lines bringing back 139 prisoners with him. He has displayed great presence of mind and gallantry and has been an outstanding example to all those with whom he flies.

 

 

WATSON, F/O Richard Arthur - (J88228) - Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm (Belgium) - No.440 Squadron - Award effective 27 June 1947 as per London Gazette dated of that date and AFRO 403/47 of dated 25 July 1947. Public Records Office Air 2/9110 has recommended citation with statement he had flown 90 sorties, 94 operational hours. Drafted when he was Warrant Officer.

 

During the period from D Day until the completion of his tour Warrant Officer Watson participated in many sorties during the liberation of France and Belgium. In july this officer was one of a flight which successfully attacked the heavily defended mortar positions near Lemesni Fremental, east of Caen. His aircraft was hit and blew up but he made a successful landing by parachute although machine-gunned by the enemy. He evaded capture and rejoined his unit within 48 hours. In August, when the German army was retreating across the Seine, Warrant Officer Watson made many attacks against barges and motor transport which were highly successful. Throughout the battle for the Ardennes he displayed unusual steadfastness and courage worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, S/L Thomas William (J6206) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.159 Squadron - Award effective 11 December 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 212/46 dated 1 March 1946. Born 13 September 1913, Whitehorse, Yukon. Educated there. Home in Montreal; enlisted Vancouver 24 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 20 February 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 24 April 1941) and No.32 SFTS (graduated 16 Jul 1941). Overseas, August 1941, and flew Hurricanes in the Far East, early 1942; clipping from Whitehorse Star dated 10 November 1977 says he escaped Singapore in a Brewster Buffalo (which he never piloted before) when the Japanese were almost on the aerodrome. At Palembang, Sumatra he flew Hurricanes before leaving for Java. Star article says he was shot down 3 March 1942, spending three days evading. Flown, slight wounded, on 7 March 1942 to Australia; flew Kittyhawks in Australia and New Guinea, 1942-43. Returned to Canada, May 1944, and converted to Liberators. Proceeded with a Liberator to India, November 1944. Released 19 January 1946. Award sent by registered mail 13 March 1950. See War Service Records, 1939-1945 (Canadian Bank of Commerce, 1947). Long personal account of his operations in DHIst biographical file.

 

Squadron Leader Watson has a fine operational record. In the early stages of the fighting in the Far Eastern theatre, he completed very many sorties, flying in fighter aircraft, and was responsible for the destruction of at least two enemy aircraft. Three times this officer was himself shot down. On the last of these occasions he succeeded in escaping from Java just a few hours before the arrival of the enemy troops in the area. Some two years later, Squadron Leader Watson converted to heavy bomber aircraft in which type he has completed many attacks at various targets. On three separate occasions, vital bridges on the Bangkok-Singapore line were destroyed largely by the accurate bombing and repeatedly determined attacks of Squadron Leader Watson. This officer has set an outstanding example of courage and tenacity.

 

* * * * *

 

WATSON, F/O William Thomas Glenn (J19884) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.433 Squadron - Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 16 March 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 25 September 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 8 January 1943) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 14 May 1943). Award sent by registered mail 30 March 1949. In June 1998 Gateway Coin and Militaria (Winnipeg) were selling his medals fors $ 1,350.

 

This officer has completed very many sorties. He has proved himself to be a cool and skilful pilot and a very fine captain. On one occasion early in September 1944, he piloted an aircraft detailed to attack Emden in daylight. When crossing the English coast on the outward flight, Flying Officer Watson was compelled to feather the propeller of the port inner engine when the oil cooler became defective. Despite the loss of engine power Flying Officer Watson continued to the target and executed his attack. His determination was characteristic of that which he has invariably displayed.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, F/L Alexander William (C7479) - Mention in Despatches - No.8 Squadron - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Enlisted in Vancouver, 17 April 1941.

 

This officer has served as a radar officer since September 1941 and did excellent work with No.502 Squadron in England and No.31 Operational Training Unit at Debert. Now at No.8 (BR) Squadron, his efforts to raise the radar standard at that unit have resulted in great success. His loyalty and devotion to duty have always been above the ordinary call of duty and his skill and efforts are worthy of high praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, WO1 Charles Anderson (R119127) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.28 Squadron - Award effective 2 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1444/44 dated 7 July 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 25 July 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 October 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 6 December 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 27 March 1942. Award sent by registered mail.

 

Warrant Officer Watt has participated in very many sorties and has achieved much success. He has displayed high qualities of skill and courage and throughout has set an example of devotion to duty beyond praise.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, F/L Leonard Nelson (J6381) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.14 SFTS - award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born at Point Pelee, Ontario, 6 May 1919. Farmer. Enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 25 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 21 February 1941), No.10 EFTS (graduated second in his class, 22 April 1941), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 28 July 1941). Instructed at No.6 SFTS (22 October 1941 to 24 April 1942) and No.14 SFTS (25 April 1942 to 31 January 1944). On 2 April 1942, pulling out of a dive in a Harvard, he met another aircraft and sliced off wingtip; no injury. Posted overseas, reaching UK 24 February 1944. Further trained at No.5 (P) AFU and No.57 OTU. Served with No.401 Squadron (5 October 1944 to 27 June 1945 - 184 sorties) and briefly with No.411 Squadron. Returned to Canada, 7 August 1945; demobilized 27 September 1945. Overseas he was credited with four enemy aircraft destroyed and one damaged (one Me.262 shot down, 12 March 1945; one FW.190 shot down and one damaged, 20 April 1945; one Ju.52 and one Ju.87 destroyed on ground, 3 May 1945). Also claimed 80 locomotives and MET destroyed or damaged. No citation to Commendation.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, F/O Reginald Seward (J22143) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.76 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Home in Raymore, Saskatchewan; enlisted Toronto 24 October 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 6 June 1942), No.4 EFTS (graduated 11 September 1942) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 29 December 1942). Presented by King George 13 July 1945. No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy." Public Records Office Air 2/8881 has recommendation dated 15 September 1944 when he had flown 36 sorties (173 hours one minute), 22 September 1943 to 30 July 1944.

 

22 Sep 43 Paris (5.30) 12 May 44 Hasselt (4.15)

11 Nov 43 Cannes (9.40) 19 May 44 Boulogne (3.25)

20 Jan 44 Berlin (8.00) 5 June 44 Mont Fleury (4.50)

6 Mar 44 Trappes (4.20) 14 Jun 44 Douai (4.05)

7 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.00) 15 Jun 44 Fouillard (5.20)

13 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.00) 16 Jun 44 Domleger (3.35)

18 Mar 44 Frankfurt (5.55) 22 Jun 44 Laon (4.10)

22 Mar 44 Frankfurt (6.15) 24 Jun 44 Noyelle-en-Chaussee (3.46)

9 Apr 44 Lille (4.25) 25 Jun 44 Montorguiel (3.40)

10 Apr 44 Tergnier (4.55) 28 Jun 44 Blainville (5.55)

18 Apr 44 Tergnier (4.40) 1 July 44 St.Martin (3.25)

20 Apr 44 Ottignies (3.55) 4 July 44 St.Martin (3.55)

22 Apr 44 Dusseldorf (5.00) 6 July 44 St.Martin l'Hey (3.40)

24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe (7.00) 9 July 44 Chateau Bernapre (4.05)

26 Apr 44 Villeneuve (5.45) 12 Jul 44 Thiverny (4.15)

27 Apr 44 Montzen (4.35) 23 Jul 44 Kiel (5.25)

1 May 44 Malines (3.00) 28 Jul 44 Foret de Nieppe (3.40)

11 May 44 Trouville (4.30) 30 Jul 44 Villers Bocage (4.10)

 

This officer has completed 36 sorties and flown a total of 173 operational hours. He has carried out attacks against many of the heaviest defended of targets including two to Frankfurt and others to Dusseldorf, Berlin and Karlsruhe.

 

This officer possesses a history of courage, skill and determination in action. He shows exceptional tenacity of purpose and great devotion to duty which have been an inspiration to his crew. His discipline, ability as pilot and his cheerful confidence, at times under difficult circumstances, has inspired a high standard of morale in his crew. His ability to make instant decisions in emergency and his complete disregard for personal safety, together with coolness under fire are worthy of the highest praise.

 

It is considered that his fine record of achievement merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, F/O Robert Huycke (J18309) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1944 and AFRO 1020/44 dated 12 May 1944. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 16 April 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 3 August 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 30 December 1941). Presented 8 January 1946.

 

Since January 1943, this officer has flown on most of the major operations undertaken by his squadron. He has often encountered very severe weather over the Dutch coast and has many times pressed home his mission in the face of heavy and light concentrated fire from enemy ships and in the presence of enemy night fighters. A skilful leader, he has been largely responsible for the fine efficiency and unerring operational ability of his detachment.

 

* * * * *

 

WATT, FS Temple Arvin Norman (R78335) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in Churchill, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 21 October 1940. Later commissioned (J16810).

 

* * * * *

 

WATTERSON, P/O Thomas Albert Kidd (J21312) - Mention in Despatches - No.145 Squadron (Canada) - deceased - Award effective 11 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 December 1943 and AFRO 568/44 dated 17 March 1944. Home in Manotick, Ontario. Educated at Lisgar Collegiate, Ottawa; served in RCMP Marine Branch before war; enlisted in Ottawa, 19 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 30 September 1940), No.13 EFTS (graduated 23 December 1940), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 3 April 1941). Killed 14 February 1943 in the crash of Hudson 771 of No.145 Squadron.

 

This officer as captain and pilot has carried out numerous operational sorties over the North Atlantic. He was an exceptionally steady and reliable pilot and exhibited commendable qualities in successfully completed tasks. He has set a fine example and won the admiration and respect of all with whom he worked.

 

* * * * *

 

WATTIE, F/O Charles Forbes (J16410) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 3 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Home in Barrie, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 17 April 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 27 September 1941), No.9 AOS (graduated 5 January 1942) and No.9 BGS (graduated 28 February 1942). Presented. Cited with F/L R.E. Curtis (RCAF, awarded DSO), F/O Dougal A. McGillivray (RCAF, awarded DSO) F/L Hugh F. Smith (RCAF, awarded DFC), F/O Robert G. Marshall (RCAF, awarded DFC) and Sergeant J.D. Rose (RAF, awarded DFM). See Marshal, above, for citation.

 

* * * * *

 

WATTS, G/C Alfred (C723) - Air Force Cross - No.3 Training Command Headquarters - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944. Born in Vernon, British Columbia. Educated there and University of British Columbia. Lawyer. Enlisted in Vancouver as a P/P/O, 1 August 1934; resigned 8 October 11936. Re-appointed Provisional Pilot Officer, 16 September 1937; received pilot's wings 4 May 1938 and confirmed as Pilot Officer that same day. Had completed 1,310:05 flying hours to date, 903:45 hours as instructor, 23 hours in previous six months.

 

This officer has made an outstanding contribution to the Air Training Plan in a wide range of flying instructional work, throughout which he has displayed outstanding ability, energy and devotion to duty. His wealth of knowledge and friendly co-operative spirit have been an inspiration to all personnel under his supervision.

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WATTS, F/O Allan Ivan (J5300) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.37 Squadron - Award effective 1 October 1942 as per London Gazette dated 6 October 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Home in Brentwood (Vancouver Island), British Columbia; enlisted Calgary 15 August 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.4 EFTS, and No.8 SFTS. Presented 13 April 1944. DHist file 181.009 D.1636 (RG.24 Vol.20604) has application for Operational Wings submitted about February 1944. Began operations with No.149 Squadron in England, 20 September 1941 (eight sorties, 41 hours 45 minutes). First sortie with No.37 Squadron was 19 February 1942 (33 sorties, 285 hours including 13 trips to Benghazi). Tour ended 20 July 1942 when he was posted to Canada; later to No.149 Squadron (Venturas) on west coast.

 

This officer has participated in attacks on objectives in France, Germany, Cyrenacia, Greece, Crete and the Dodecanese. After completing a normal tour he volunteered to remain on operational flying and has proved a mainstay of his unit during a difficult period. His exceptional dash and determination were well illustrated on one occasion when he machine-gunned an enemy motor transport from a height of only fifty feet. Through this officer has set a praiseworthy example.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9265 has recommendation transmitted 26 August 1942 from Headquarters, RAF Middle East to Air Ministry which adds a few details:

 

This officer has completed 41 long distance operational flights totalling 327 operational flying hours. These operations include raids on objectives in occupied France, Germany, Cyrenacia, Greece, Crete, the Dodecanese, and enemy occupied territory in Egypt.

 

Flying Officer Watts has been a fine example in his flight and the squadron generally. After completing a normal tour, he volunteered to stay on for further operational duties in the squadron, and has been one of the mainstays during the somewhat difficult and intensive operations carried out recently.

 

He has always shown exceptional dash and initiative, and went down to as low as 50 feet machine gunning enemy motor transport with excellent results on all the recent short trips.

 

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WATTS, F/O Charles Reginald (J23393) - Mention in Despatches - 524 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan; enlisted Edmonton 17 November 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 22 May 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 25 September 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 5 February 1943). Killed in action 30 August 1944 (Wellington MF175).

 

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WATTS, WO2 George Barrie (R165311) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.9 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 5 May 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 9 October 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 8 December 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 5 February 1943). Award sent by registered mail 30 March 1949.

 

Warrant Officer Watts has completed a successful tour of operations as air bomber. His skill and accuracy have materially contributed to the successes achieved by his crew. His aircraft was been in combat on three occasions. During one of them three Junkers 88 attacked simultaneously. Another time when on a mission against Stuttgart Warrant Officer Watts was engaged by an enemy fighter, which after encountering this Warrant Officer's accurate fire, broke off the combat. Warrant Officer Watts has consistently shown courage and determination of a high order.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9039 has recommendation dated 12 October 1944 when he had flown 35 sorties (plus one incomplete) totalling 190 hours 35 minutes. Sortie sheet indicates he was in same crew as P/O John A. Peterson and Warrant Officer George B. Watts.

 

28 Apr 44 Bordeaux (7.45) 21 June 44 Gelsenkirchen (4.20)

1 May 44 Toulouse (8.25) 24 June 44 Prouville (3.35)

5 May 44 Mailly le Camp (5.35) 29 June 44 Beauvoir (3.20)

6 May 44 Sable-sur-Sarthe (4.50) 12 July 44 Culmont Chalndrey (3.00)

8 May 44 Brest (4.55) 15 July 44 Nevers (7.20)

10 May 44 Lille (3.25) 19 July 44 Thiverny (3.55)

11 May 44 Bourg Leopold (3.55) 20 July 44 Courtrai (3.20)

21 May 44 Duisburg (4.40) 24 July 44 Stuttgart (8.00)

22 May 44 Brunswick (6.25) 26 July 44 Givors (2.25, DNCO)

27 May 44 Nantes (5.45) 28 July 44 Stuttgart (7.50)

28 May 44 Cherbourg (3.15) 1 Aug 44 Mont Condon (4.45)

31 May 44 Saumur (5.40) 2 Aug 44 Bois de Casson (4.40)

3 June 44 Cherbourg (3.35) 5 Aug 44 Etaples (4.25)

6 June 44 Argentan (3.55) 7 Aug 44 Lorient (4.35)

8 June 44 Rennes (7.00) 9 Aug 44 La Pallice (6.10)

12 June 44 Poitiers (6.15) 11 Aug 44 Givors (7.50)

14 June 44 Auray-sur-Odon (4.45) 13 Aug 44 Brest (4.30)

15 June 44 Chatellerault (6.50) 14 Aug 44 Brest (4.40)

 

Warrant Officer Watts has just completed a tour of operations as Air Bomber in a highly successful crew, whose results have been outstanding. As Air Bomber, he has played a very large part in these successes and has maintained a consistently high standard of bombing. He has also, in cooperation with his Navigator, been most successful in wind finding for the squadron on special daylight operations.

 

Warrant Officer Watts has always shown the greatest coolness in all circumstances. The crew of which he was a member were engaged in combats on three separate occasions, once being attacked by three Ju.88s simultaneously. On another occasion, while attacking Stuttgart, Warrant Officer Watts, in the front turret, was engaged with a single-engine fighter which, after Warrant Officer Watts had opened fire, broke off the combat.

 

He has shown courage and determination of a high order and has been at great pains to locate and accurately bomb his target under all conditions.

 

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WATTS, F/L Jack Vincent (J4688) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron (RAF) - Award effective 29 July 1942 as per London Gazette dated 4 August 1942 and AFRO 1413/42 dated 4 September 1942. Born in Hamilton, 1920; enlisted July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, No.1 AOS, No.1 BGS and No.1 ANS. Flew 26 trips with No.10 Squadron; posted to No.462 Squadron (Middle East); then to No.109 Squadron (second tour) and No.105 Squadron (third tour). In the Middle East, 11 November 1942, he was shot down five miles offshore from Tobruk; swam ashore and spent three days watching Germans. On fourth day, hungry and thirsty, he broke into a stores hut and barely escaped being captured. DHist file 181.009 D.1505 (RG.24 Vol.20599) has recommendation dated 17 May 1942 when he had flown 17 sorties (134 hours). Had joined unit on 31 August 1941. Incident described was on night of 27 April 1942 - going after Tirpitz at 150 feet.

 

Flight Lieutenant Watts is a courageous and highly skilled navigator who has done much to ensure the success of many of the sorties in which he has participated. One night in April 1942 he was the navigator of an aircraft detailed to attack the naval base at Trondheim. On arrival at the target area the aircraft was intercepted by an enemy fighter but Flight Lieutenant Watts coolly and skilfully guided his captain down through an intense barrage and the fighter was unable to follow. The objective was then attacked from an extremely low level. The following night when attacking the same objective, Flight Lieutenant Watts distinguished himself by his brilliant navigation.

 

WATTS, S/L Jack Vincent, DFC (J4688) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.109 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944.

 

This officer is a very capable and conscientious officer. He has completed a large number of sorties on Mosquito aircraft since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross which have necessitated a high degree of navigational skill, and excellent results have frequently been achieved. His skill and determination have always been of a very high order.

 

WATTS, S/L Jack Vincent, DFC (J4688) - Distinguished Service Order - No.105 Squadron - Award effective 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 27 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945.

This officer has completed more than 100 sorties. He has at all times displayed the greatest keenness and devotion to duty and his example has impressed all. Squadron Leader Watts is a navigator of high merit and the successes obtained on the many sorties in which he has taken part are a fine tribute to his outstanding skill. This officer has proved of the greatest value to the squadron.

 

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WATTS, Sergeant James Dowdney (R117523) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 6 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 17 August 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 6 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 November 1941), No.10 EFTS (ceased training 25 November 1941), No.7 BGS (graduated 25 May 1942) and No.7 AOS (graduated 6 February 1942). Invested with award by King George VI, 2 May 1944.

 

In the capacity of rear gunner this airman has completed numerous sorties against many of the most heavily defended areas in Germany and enemy occupied territory. One night in April while mine laying his aircraft was heavily attacked by an anti-aircraft ship. Sergeant Watts returned the fire causing the ship to break off its attacks. Both in the air and on the ground this airman has displayed outstanding keenness and efficiency and has rendered valuable assistance to the gunnery leader in the training of new crew.

 

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WATTS, S/L John William (J7007) - Air Force Cross - No.4 SFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Regina; enlisted there 17 December 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 9 April 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 8 June 1941), and No.11 SFTS (graduated 12 September 1941). As of December 1943 he had flown 1,280 hours, 988 as instructor, 224 in previous six months. Award presented 18 June 1949.

 

This officer served at this unit for two years [and] through perseverance and demonstration of leadership and organizing ability, became the Officer Commanding of Navigation Flight. His good work continued in spite of his eager desire for overseas duties. His devotion to duty has been an inspiration to the instructional staff, and through his own initiative and unflagging interest in his work has organized and is operating a most successful Navigation Flight.

 

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WAUGH, FS James Harry (R201625) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 9 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1 June 1924 at Summerside, Prince Edward Island. Home in Wilmot Valley, Prince Edward Island; enlisted in Montreal, 23 November 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 14 January 1944). Invested with award by the King, 13 July 1945. Postwar contractor and trucker. Rejoined postwar RCAF, 28 December 1951 (Ground Observer Corps).

 

This airman has taken part in a number of sorties and has proved himself to be a cool and confident crew member. One night in November 1944 he was the rear gunner in an aircraft detailed to attack Oberhausen. After leaving the target area the bomber was intercepted by a fighter. The enemy aircraft came in with guns blazing. Flight Sergeant Waugh coolly withheld his fire and gave the necessary evading directions to his pilot. When the attacker was within close range, Flight Sergeant Waugh opened fire. His bullets struck the enemy aircraft which burst into flames, fell away and afterwards crashed on the ground. This airman displayed skill and coolness worthy of much praise.

 

WAUGH, P/O James Harry, DFM (J93891) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 18 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 26 October 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Award sent by registered mail, 10 August 1948.

 

Pilot Officer Waugh has successfully completed numerous sorties since the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal. During his tour he shot down one enemy aircraft and was involved in two aircraft crashes. Despite these trying experiences this officer resumed operational flying with undiminished enthusiasm. While flying on an operation in March 1945, Pilot Officer Waugh had to leave the aircraft by parachute on instructions from the pilot at approximately 3,000 feet. The aircraft crashed directly beneath him and the explosion caused him to shoot up again and his parachute partially folded up. After a drop of 400 feet he was able to get his parachute open again and alight safely. Throughout his operational career Pilot Officer Waugh has shown courage, tenacity and devotion to duty worthy of the highest praise.

 

NOTE: In a postwar questionnaire he wrote in detail about his worst wartime experiences which bear quotation:

 

On November 11, 1944, upon returning from my 15th bombing mission while serving with No.420 Squadron I experienced my first aircraft crash; one member of the crew was killed, my pilot was seriously injured, also other members of my crew. I sustained several cuts and bruises and injury to my back, which I believe was caused by crashing through my rear turret doors and being thrown against the rear bulkhead. Our aircraft was completely demolished. In January of the same year [1944 or 1945 ?] I experienced a rather shaky attempt of taking a fully loaded Halifax bomber off of a snow lined runway in England, almost ground-looped at approximately 95 m.p.h.; needless to say we did not attempt to take off that night.

 

But the worst was yet to come, for on the 5th of March 1945 I was involved in what I believe to be one of the worst aircraft accidents that had ever happened in England to that date. While flying as a spare mid-upper gunner, with our aircraft loaded with petrol and high explosives, we climbed to 10,000 feet where we encountered severe icing and pilot was unable to control aircraft; at 7,000 feet we were ordered by our pilot to "JUMP, JUMP" but due to difficulties with the Engineer, I did not get out until base of cloud which was approximately 1,200 feet; at approximately 800 feet the explosion of aircraft upon impact caused me to become severely tangled with my parachute; finally at about 300 feet I managed to untangle shroud lines, etc from my parachute harness and alight with slightly more than normal impact.

 

The remaining six members of crew did not jump and were all killed in the explosion; no trace of the bodies could be found. The largest piece of aircraft that could be found was no larger than a normal sized wash basin.

 

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WAYAVE, F/O (now F/L) Theodore Marshall (C7044) - Air Force Cross - No.120 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per Canada Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. American from Brooklyn, New York, enlisted in Ottawa, 14 August 1941. Incident described seems to have been about 23-24 August 1942. Award presented (date uncertain).

 

Stranraer 951 was forced down at sea about 100 miles from the coast. This officer engaged in the preliminary search during which the aircraft was located. Unfortunately contact was lost with Stranraer 951 and the searching aircraft were forced to return to base due to adverse weather conditions. Flying Officer Wavave volunteered to continue the search that night and as Captain of Stranraer 909 proceeded to the last reported position of 951. He displayed great ability and determination in that, in spite of a very severe storm and engine trouble, he completed a square search of the area, which unfortunately proved fruitless.

 

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