LICQUORISH, F/O Stanley John (J22941) - Croix de Guerre (France) - No.101 Squadron - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Enlisted in Vancouver, 21 April 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 26 September 1942) and No.2 AOS (graduated 5 February 1942). Public Records Office Air 2/9645 has citation.

 

Flying Officer Licquorish completed a very successful tour, comprising 31 sorties, a number of which have been against some of the most heavily defended targets in France. He has, at all times, displayed a fine offensive spirit, by his superb skill, cheerfulness and outstanding determination in the face of the enemy, and has been a splendid example to the crew. He has always navigated his aircraft to the most difficult of targets with unerring skill and complete disregard of all danger.

 

* * * * *

 

LIDKEA, F/L William Rupert (C7357) - Mention in Despatches - RCAF Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 418/46 dated 18 April 1946. Home in North Bay, Ontario (bank clerk). Enlisted in Toronto, 12 September 1941. Certificate sent 16 August 1948.

 

* * * * *

 

LIGGINS, Corporal Ernest Frank (R71101) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 388/46 dated 12 April 1946. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 12 September 1940.

 

* * * * *

 

LIGHTBOURN, G/C Gilbert Ord (C1871) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - RCAF Overseas Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/45 dated 25 January 1946. Enlisted in Toronto, 13 April 1940. Insignia sent by registered mail.

 

This officer has been Senior Protestant Chaplain of Royal Canadian Air Force Overseas for the past three and one half years. He started off with a small nucleus of chaplains and has built up his branch until it now consists of over seventy chaplains. He has them placed at strategic positions where they can best look after the welfare of the Protestant personnel overseas. Group Captain Lightbourn has not spared himself and has travelled many thousands of miles in the interest of the service and the work which has to be done. He has set an example of a very high standard and due to the policy of two-year repatriation has lost many excellent key men who have been hard to replace. His work has been endless in the training of new personnel to fulfil their difficult task. He has contributed greatly to the goodwill and high morale of the personnel with whom he came in contact wherever he served.


 

* * * * *

LIGHTBOWN, F/O James Ray (J86649) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 27 March 1945 and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born 1922 in Stanley, Alberta; home in Vancouver; enlisted there 15 October 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 1 January 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 19 March 1943) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 23 July 1943). Commissioned May 1944. No citation other than "completed ...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 15 December 1944 when he had flown 28 sorties (138 hours 30 minutes), 14 August to 6 December 1944.

 

Pilot Officer Lightbown is a fearless and reliable pilot, who has successfully captained his aircraft on twenty-eight sorties against the enemy. His determination and fine offensive spirit has served his crew well in attacks on such heavily defended areas as the Ruhr, Bremen and Kiel. This officer's courage, enthusiasm and devotion to duty has tempered his crew into an efficient fighting unit.

 

I strongly recommend that Pilot Officer Lightbown's gallantry and skill be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

LIGHTFOOT, FS Douglas George (R155760) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.57 Squadron - Award effective 21 March 1944 as per London Gazette dated 28 March 1944 and AFRO 921/44 dated 28 April 1944. Born in Burnham, Saskatchewan, 1918; home there (farmer). Enlisted in Regina, 17 March 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 September 1942) and No.3 BGS (graduated 4 December 1942).

 

As rear gunner this airman has participated in a large number of sorties and has displayed great keenness and devotion to duty throughout. His constant vigilance has enabled his pilot to avoid combat on many occasions. On two occasions whilst over Berlin his aircraft was attacked by fighters but his good shooting and sound knowledge of tactics were mainly responsible for frustrating the attackers. His coolness and confidence in the face of the enemy have set a fine example.

 

* * * * *

 

LINCOLN, P/O George Edward (J89171) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.76 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1921 in Teulon, Manitoba; home there (piano teacher). Enlisted in Winnipeg, 8 July 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 2 January 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 14 May 1943). Commissioned September 1944. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty". Public Records Office Air 2/9060 has recommendation dated 13 January 1945 when he had flown 35 sorties (158 hours ten minutes), 25 March to 18 December 1944.

25 Mar 44 Diversion (5.15) 18 Aug 44 Sterkrade (4.35)

4 July 44 St.Martin (4.05) 1 Sept 44 La Pourchinte (3.10)

6 July 44 St.Martin (3.15) 12 Sep 44 Gelsenkirchen (4.05)

7 July 44 Croixdale (4.20) 15 Sep 44 Kiel (5.25)

9 July 44 Chateau Bernapre (4.10) 20 Sep 44 Calais (3.35)

12 Jul 44 Thiverny (4.25) 23 Sep 44 Neuss (4.50)

15 Jul 44 Nucourt (4.35) 6 Oct 44 Scholven (4.30)

18 Jul 44 Manneville (4.00) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (4.55)

18 Jul 44 Acquet (4.05) 14 Oct 44 Duisburg (5.20)

20 Jul 44 Bottrop (4.20) 25 Oct 44 Essen (5.05)

30 Jul 44 Villers Bocage (3.55), 29 Oct 44 Walcheren (2.55)

returned as ordered 31 Oct 44 Cologne (5.20)

3 Aug 44 Bois de Casson (3.55) 4 Nov 44 Bochum (5.00)

5 Aug 44 Foret de Nieppe (3.15) 29 Nov 44 Essen (5.30)

9 Aug 44 Foret de Mormal (3.35) 2 Dec 44 Hagen (4.50)

12 Aug 44 Russelsheim (5.40) 6 Dec 44 Osnabruk (5.30)

14 Aug 44 TRACTABLE (3.55) 12 Dec 44 Essen (5.45)

17 Aug 44 Brest (4.55) 18 Dec 44 Duisburg (6.10)

 

 

This officer has participated in a large number of varied sorties. He is an extremely capable navigator and has shown great determination to guide his pilot to the target. he has at all times displayed great coolness and good judgement and his efforts have contributed materially to the success achieved. It is felt that his excellent record merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDO, F/L Harold Lester (J4762) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.103 Squadron - Award effective 16 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Born in Kingston, Jamaica, 6 July 1917; home in Northwood, Middlesex. Enlisted in Ottawa, 20 June 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 15 August 1940), No.3 AOS (graduated 4 January 1941, No.2 BGS (graduated 15 February 1941), and No.1 ANS (graduated about 16 March 1941 and commissioned). Proceeded overseas 26 March 1941. Forced down and missing in 1941 but returned to Britain. Invested at Buckingham Palace, 4 December 1942. Killed in action, 15 February 1944, while serving with No.103 Squadron and holding Squadron Leader rank.

 

Flight Lieutenant Lindo is a most experienced and dependable navigator. His efficiency and coolness in action have a fine influence on his comrades. During the many operational sorties on which he has been engaged he has faced bad weather and enemy opposition with an unconquerable spirit of determination to complete his allotted task.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9598 has recommendation dated 24 July 1942. He had flown 21 sorties (120 hours 54 minutes) and the text gave a remarkable account of his tour that the published citation only hints at:

 

10 July 41 Boulogne (4.20) 28 Dec 41 Wilhelmshaven (5.55)

20 July 41 Cologne (6.10) 6 Jan 42 Brest (6.29)

2 Aug 41 Hamburg (8.36) 21 Jan 42 Bremen (7.26)

8 Aug 41 Duisburg (3.45) 3 Mar 42 Paris (6.00)

18 Aug 41 Duisburg (4.37) 10 Apr 42 Essen (5.00)

22 Aug 41 Mannheim (6.55) 25 Apr 42 Rostock (7.33)

27 Aug 41 Mannheim (7.30) 30 May 42 Cologne (6.00)

29 Aug 41 Mannheim (5.00) 1 June 42 Essen (5.00)

13 Oct 41 Dusseldorf (4.16) 6 June 42 Emden (5.36)

22 Oct 41 Mannheim (4.03) 25 Jun 42 Bremen (5.36)

16 Dec 41 Wilhelmshaven (5.43)

 

This officer joined the squadron a year ago. Throughout that time he has proved himself to be an observer of outstanding merit. His consistent, exemplary navigation and accurate bombing have set a high example which the other observers have been inspired to reach for.

 

Being recognised as unquestionably the best observer in the squadron, he was appointed Squadron Bombing Leader, which post he has filled with enthusiasm and increasing efficiency for five months.

 

Although this has given him little opportunity to go on raids he has continually asked to take part and has flown as observer with various pilots, producing extremely good results and being involved in many dangerous situations. His cheerfulness and efficiency in the face of danger and while under heavy fire from flak have been largely responsible for bringing these sorties to a successful conclusion. All his captains have spoken most highly of him and every captain is keen to have him as observer.

 

Early on in his operational tour, Flight Lieutenant Lindo, with his crew, landed in the sea. His dinghy was depth-charged by an enemy aircraft before they were rescued. His coolness and cheerfulness under most trying conditions set a fine example to the rest of his crew.

 

On another occasion his aircraft collided with high tension cables and caught fire. Flight Lieutenant Lindo acted with great coolness, helping the rest of the crew. Despite these two unnerving incidents, occurring at the start of his tour, he has remained most enthusiastic and keen to take part in as many raids as possible.

 

More recently, when bombing Essen, the port engine of his aircraft failed over the target and the pilot was forced down to extremely low altitude by flak and searchlights. In spite of intense flak and great difficulties, Flight Lieutenant Lindo skilfully navigated his aircraft safely back to the nearest aerodrome in England, greatly assisting his captain to steer clear of defended areas by his skilful map reading on a very dark night. His skill, confidence and high example did much to encourage his crew and bring them and their aircraft safely out of an extremely dangerous situation.

 

This officer's fine operational record, magnificent example and unshakable enthusiasm and spirit fully merit the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross for which I strongly recommend him.

 

This was refined to the following text for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee (shorter than the original submission but much longer than the published citation).

 

Flight Lieutenant Lindo is an experienced and dependable navigator. His efficiency and coolness in action have had a fine influence on his comrades. During the many operational sorties on which he has been engaged he has faced bad weather and enemy opposition with an unconquerable spirit of determination to complete his allotted task. He has acted as Squadron Bombing Leader for five months. Although this has diminished his opportunity to go on sorties, he has continually asked to take part and has flown as observer with various pilots, producing extremely good results and being involved in many dangerous situations. Early during his operational tour, Flight Lieutenant Lindo was compelled to alight [with] his aircraft on the sea. Whilst afloat in the dinghy with his crew it was depth-charged by enemy aircraft before they were eventually rescued. On this occasion his conduct under most trying conditions was of great benefit to his comrades. On another occasion his aircraft collided with high tension cables and caught fire. Flight Lieutenant Lindo acted with great coolness helping the rest of the crew. Despite these two unnerving incidents, occurring at the beginning of his tour, his enthusiasm for operations remained undiminished.

 

LINDO, S/L Harold Lester, DFC (J4762) - Mention in Despatches - No.103 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.2 BGS and No.3 AOS. NOTE: training units should be resolved.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDO, WO Wilfred Alexander (R182122) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.76 Squadron - Award effective 19 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 27 June 1944 and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born 1914 in Toronto; home there (milk salesman). Enlisted in Toronto, 23 July 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 18 December 1942). No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Presented with award 27 January 1946. Public Records Office Air 2/8780 has recommendation for a DFM (he was still a Flight Sergeant) dated 18 March 1944 when he had flown 28 sorties (181 hours 35 minutes). Promoted to Warrant Officer by Overseas Order dated 3 March 1944 (with effect from 18 December 1943) he thus became eligible for the DFC. Mid-upper gunner.

 

29 May 43 Wuppertal (5.15) 23 Aug 43 Berlin (8.10)

11 June 43 Dusseldorf (6.15) 30 Aug 43 Munchen (6.10)

12 June 43 Bochum (5.50) 5 Sept 43 Mannheim (7.25)

26 June 43 Gelsenkirchen (3.40) 22 Sept 43 Hanover (7.00)

28 June 43 Cologne (4.40) 23 Sept 43 Mannheim (7.15)

3 July 43 Cologne (6.30) 27 Sept 43 Hanover (7.20)

15 July 43 Montbeliard (7.30) 8 Oct 43 Hanover (7.10)

24 July 43 Hamburg (5.15) 11 Nov 43 Cannes (8.00)

27 July 43 Hamburg (5.30) 22 Nov 43 Berlin (6.55)

29 July 43 Hamburg (5.25) 26 Nov 43 Stuttgart (8.00)

30 July 43 Remscheid (5.45) 29 Dec 43 Berlin (7.50)

2 Aug 43 Hamburg (5.10) 28 Jan 44 Berlin (7.45)

17 Aug 43 Peenemunde (7.10) 24 Feb 44 Cobourg (7.40)

22 Aug 43 L'Edsen (5.40) 13 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.20)

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer has completed 28 sorties as Air Gunner and flown a total of 182 operational hours. He has carried out attacks against many of the heaviest defended of targets, including four to Berlin, three to Hanover and four to Hamburg.

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer has always handled his guns with cool determination and marked ability, and under a calm and quiet manner has shown a fine offensive sprit in action which has inspired complete confidence in his crew.

 

He possesses a complete disregard of personal safety, commendable courage and an exceptional tenacity of purpose. It is considered that his fine record of achievement merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, Nursing Sister Davina Clark (C6352) - Associate, Royal Red Cross - RCAF Overseas Headquarters - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born in Dundee, Scotland, 13 November 1911. Educated in Ottawa schools (Glashan Public School, Glebe Collegiate) and Ottawa Civic Hospital. Supervisor at Alexandria Hospital, Montreal before enlisting in that city, 24 May 1941. Married to S/L J.E. Lindsay.

 

This Nursing Sister has been overseas since August 1942, serving with distinction on various stations, including No.6 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Group. She was one of the two Nursing Sisters attached to No.52 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Mobile Field Hospital arriving in Normandy on D plus 12 and has served with that unit until recently. A most capable and conscientious officer she has, by her constant efficiency and devotion to duty, contributed a great deal to maintain the high standards of the Royal Canadian Air Force Nursing Service overseas.

 

* * * * *

LINDSAY, F/L Ewart John Adyn (C8721) - George Medal - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 12 November 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2558/43 dated 10 December 1943. Born in North Bay, Ontario; home in Drayton, Ontario. A Lieutenant in Royal Canadian Engineers before being commissioned in RCAF Medical Branch, 1941. Joined RCAF in North Bay, 10 January 1941. Cited with F/O R.J.O. Doehler (MBE), F/L R.J. McCombe (GM), Sergeant J.A. Campbell (BEM), LAC C.A.G. Snelling (BEM) and LAC P.P. Wilkinson (BEM). Presented with George Medal at Buckingham Palace, 1 May 1945.

 

One night in July 1943, the bomb load of an aircraft, which was standing in the dispersal area, detonated and the wreckage caught fire. Soon a second aircraft caught fire and its bomb load also exploded.

 

Flying Officer Doehler was proceeding to the scene immediately after the first aircraft had exploded, when the second aircraft blew up and he was thrown to the ground. He immediately got up and went towards an aircraft which had not caught fire and taxied it to safety.

 

Assistance to injured personnel was rendered by Flight Lieutenant McCombe, an armament officer who had, on a previous occasion, displayed great calmness in directing fire fighting operations on an aircraft which was blazing near to a 4,000-pound bomb and by Flight Lieutenant Lindsay, a medical officer, who had previously displayed great courage in dragging the body of an air gunner from a blazing turret. Flight Lieutenants McCombe and Lindsay proceeded to the first aircraft after it had exploded and found that several airmen, who had been standing under the wing, had been seriously injured and burned. During their successful efforts in rescuing two airmen, both officers were thrown to the ground by an explosion in the second aircraft. Flight Lieutenant Lindsay then took the rescued airmen to hospital, while his companion remained and took the remaining injured personnel into his own car. While the car was being drawn away, a bomb exploded and two large fragments were hurled through the doors of the car. Flight Lieutenant McCombe remained unperturbed, only thinking of the safety of those he had rescued.

 

Sergeant Campbell was proceeding to the scene of the first explosion when the second aircraft blew up and he was thrown to the ground. Undaunted, he went on and helped to start the engines of a nearby bomber which had not been caught by the flames and while this aircraft was being taxied away he went to a second aircraft and after its engines had been started assisted the pilot in negotiating obstructions while the aircraft was being taxied to safety. During this time an explosion occurred and Sergeant Campbell was knocked down again. Still undeterred, he helped to put out fires on the runway.

 

Leading Aircraftman Snelling was thrown to the ground by the explosion in the second aircraft while he was proceeding to render assistance at the first aircraft when it had blown up. Regaining his feet, he ran to an aircraft which was untouched by fire and taxied it away after having started its engines himself.

Leading Aircraftman Wilkinson proceeded to the scene when he heard the first explosion and helped a wounded man to safety. The fire had spread to the second aircraft and, disdaining the risk of explosion of its bombs, this airmen led three other men to rescue another injured man lying near the first aircraft. As the party were leading the rescued man away from the conflagration the second aircraft exploded and all were thrown to the ground but they were able to save their comrade and reached safety as a third explosion occurred.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, WO George Alexander (R79065) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - Award effective 28 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 12 November 1943 and AFRO 166/43 dated 28 January 1944. Born in New Brunswick, 1918; home in Quebec (craftsman). Enlisted in Montreal, 22 January 1941. Trained at No.2 BGS (graduated 28 September 1941) and No.3 WS (graduated 31 August 1941). Award sent by registered mail, 12 July 1946.

 

This Warrant Officer was a mid-upper gunner of an aircraft detailed to attack Oldenburg one night in September 1943. Shortly after the take-off, Warrant Officer Lindsay discovered that his electrically heated clothing was unserviceable and that his oxygen supply was not functioning properly. Displaying exceptional devotion to duty, Warrant Officer Lindsay refrained from disclosing these mishaps to his captain. At great personal discomfort he remained at his post, alert to any threat to his aircraft, until the operation was almost completed. Not until the English coast was crossed on the homeward flight did he disclose his plight. His conduct was typical of the determination he has shown throughout many sorties in which he has taken part.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, F/L James Douglas (J9081) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.403 Squadron - Award effective 8 August 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944. Home in Arnprior, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 11 February 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 3 July 1941), No.21 EFTS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 21 November 1941). Commissioned November 1941. Remained in Canada as an instructor for some time. Overseas with No.403 Squadron (8 October 1943 to 3 August 1944 and again from 2 April 1945 to 20 April 1945; with No.416 Squadron, 20 April 1945 to 15 March 1946. Aerial victories as follows: 7 May 1944 - one Bf.109 destroyed, one FW.190 damaged; 19 May 1944 - one FW.190 destroyed (shared with F/O R.H. Smith); 26 June 1944 - one Bf.109 destroyed; 29 June 1944 - one FW.190 destroyed west of Lisieux; 2 July 1945 - the Bf.109s destroyed; 5 July 1944 - one FW.190 damaged; 3 August 1944 - one Bf.109 destroyed, one Bf.109 damaged; 17 April 1945 - one FW.190 damaged. Served in postwar RCAF and was awarded US DFC for services in Korea. Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 while with No.1 (F) Wing. Photos PL-26564 (standing in door); PL-26643 (in Spitfire); PL-5400 (in flying gear, No.413 Squadron, postwar); PL-104986 (studio portrait, 1958).

 

In July 1944, this officer took in an engagement against a large formation of enemy fighters, three of which he shot down. Flight Lieutenant Lindsay has invariably displayed praiseworthy courage and skill and his keenness to engage the enemy has always been apparent. He has destroyed six enemy aircraft.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, F/O Jeffrey Burland (J28735) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1924 in Montreal; home there. Enlisted in Montreal, 26 June 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 30 December 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 26 March 1943) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 23 July 1943). Commissioned 1943. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". Public Records Office Air 2/9083 has recommendation dated 23 March 1945 when he had flown 33 sorties (205 hours 15 minutes), 6 October 1944 to 20 March 1945.

 

6 Oct 44 Dortmund (7.00) 14 Jan 45 Saarbrucken (4.45)

28 Oct 44 Cologne (6.45) 22 Jan 45 Sterkrade (4.05)

30 Oct 44 Cologne (6.20) 28 Jan 45 Stuttgart (6.10)

1 Nov 44 Aberhausen (6.55) 8 Feb 45 Cleve (4.15)

2 Nov 44 Dusseldorf (6.05) 8 Feb 45 Politz (8.15)

4 Nov 44 Bochum (6.10) 13 Feb 45 Dresden (8.05)

6 Nov 44 Gelsenkirchen (5.15) 14 Feb 45 Chemnitz (7.10)

18 Nov 44 Munster (6.15) 23 Feb 45 Essen (4.10)

21 Nov 44 Castrop Rauxel (7.05) 7 Mar 45 Dessau (8.05)

27 Nov 44 Neuss (6.00) 8 Mar 45 Hamburg (5.50)

30 Nov 44 Duisburg (6.10) 11 Mar 45 Essen (4.35)

4 Dec 44 Karlsruhe (7.25) 12 Mar 45 Dortmund (7.00)

5 Dec 44 Soest (7.10) 15 Mar 45 Misburg (6.30)

6 Dec 44 Osnabruck (6.25) 16 Mar 45 Nuremburg (7.15)

22 Dec 44 Hagen (6.30) 18 Mar 45 Witten (5.25)

5 Jan 45 Hanover (3.40) 20 Mar 45 Heide (5.20)

7 Jan 45 Munich (7.10)

 

Flying Officer Lindsay is an extremely capable and efficient captain who has almost completed one tour of operations. He is an excellent leader and organizer, with a high sense of responsibility and devotion to duty. The skill, courage and determination invariably displayed by him has been an inspiration to his crew. He has shown a very high standard of efficiency which it will be difficult to surpass.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, LAC Robert Caldwell (R134937) - Mention in Despatches - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 5 November 1941. Enlisted 4 November 1941. DHist file 181.009 D.1762 (RG.24 Vol.20609) has recommendation for a later MiD dated 17 July 1944 at which time he had been 16 months in Canada, six months in UK and 10 months overseas; had joined No.424 in March 1943. Armourer/Bombs.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, F/O Samuel Blair (J38181) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 16 February 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Born 1923 in Rossburn, Manitoba; home there. Former Bank of Montreal employee; enlisted in Winnipeg, 19 August 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 2 April 1943), No.6 BGS (graduated 25 June 1943) and No.10 AOS (graduated 26 November 1943). Commissioned 1943. Posted to UK, February 1944. Award presented 13 September 1947.

 

This officer was the navigator in an aircraft which attacked Oberhausen. Shortly after leaving the target the aircraft was attacked by a fighter. Extensive damage was sustained. Three of the crew were wounded including Flying Officer Lindsay who was hit in the back; his face was also badly lacerated by fragments of shrapnel. A fire had started in the compartment but he was able to quell it by means of an extinguisher. He afterwards put out another fire which had started in the root of the starboard wing. In so doing his hands were badly burned. Soon afterwards Flying Officer Lindsay fainted through shock. He soon revived when his injuries had been attended to and resumed his duties. Much of his equipment had been destroyed in the fight. Nevertheless, he navigated the aircraft to base. In the face of most harassing circumstances this officer displayed great courage, fortitude and resource.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, WO2 Thomas (R76262) - Air Force Cross - No.8 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born in England, 9 March 1918. Home in Sydney Forks, Nova Scotia. Enlisted in Halifax. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 March 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941). Later commissioned (J47544) and flew a tour overseas. Award presented 16 April 1943.

 

In a short period this Warrant Officer has flown 300 hours in 60 operational sorties on off-shore reconnaissance patrols from a far northern base, most of which have been carried out under adverse weather conditions. The unceasing efforts and devotion to duty whilst flying, displayed by this Warrant Officer, have been, in no small part, responsible for the excellent showing made by his squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSAY, Corporal Willa Zitella (W304333) - Mention in Despatches - award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette dated 1 February 1949 and AFRO 80/49 dated 25 February 1949. Teletype operator.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSELL, S/L Richard Campbell (J4816) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.60 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina; home in Worthing, Sussex. Enlisted in Ottawa, 17 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 9 December 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 28 January 1941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 10 April 1941). Commissioned 1941. Decoration presented 20 December 1946.

 

Squadron Leader Lindsell has led his squadron on many hazardous and successful sorties. He has also been responsible for the training and efficiency of his squadron on operations after conversion from Blenheim aircraft to Hurricane bombers. In one month in 1944 his squadron completed 728 sorties and as the result of the accuracy of their bombing received many congratulatory signals from the forward Army units. Throughout this officer has displayed outstanding leadership and devotion to duty.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9276 has detailed recommendation dated 5 June 1944. He was reported as having flown the following operations:

 

No.2 Group, United Kingdom, September 1941 to February 1942

 

Circus operations (France, occupied territory) 3 hours

Shipping sweeps (Dutch coast, etc.) 12 hours 25 minutes

Night intruder sorties to Holland 2 hours 50 minutes

Scharnhorst and Gneisenau ops, 12 Feb 42 3 hours 15 minutes

 

Mediterranean Area, November 1941 and March 1942

 

Detachment, special long range operations with Naval

"H" Force from Gibraltar and Malta, escorting

Hurricane and Spitfires to Malta from Ark Royal,

Eagle, etc. 38 hours 50 minutes

 

Middle East and India, March and April 1942

 

Escort duties to Hurricane air convoy 20 hours 10 minutes

 

Vultee Vengeance, India, No.110 Squadron, on

anti-submarine patrols 2 hours 30 minutes

 

India, No.60 Squadron, Arakan Front (Blenheim IVs), March to May 1943

 

Close support bombing operations 16 hours 40 minutes

Long-range strategic bombing (airfields, etc.) 9 hours 35 minutes

Offensive bomber and road reconnaissance ops. 3 hours 35 minutes

 

India, No.60 Squadron (Hurricane IIc aircraft), November 1943 to May 1944

 

Scrambles and searches 7 hours 15 minutes

Bomber and transport escorts 40 hours 15 minutes

Day long-range rhubarbs 6 hours 55 minutes

Night long-range rhubarbs 3 hours 35 minutes

A.S.C. Strafing (Arakan) 3 hours 5 minutes

A.S.C. Hurri-bombing and strafing,

Imphal and Chindwin 69 hours 40 minutes

243 hours 35 minutes

 

The Commanding Officer of No.189 Wing (W/C P.K. Devitt) wrote on 5 June 1944:

 

Squadron Leader Lindsell has been responsible for the training and extreme efficiency of his squadron on operations after re-equipping from Blenheim aircraft to Hurricane bombers. Through his energy and leadership his squadron carried out 728 sorties from the 1st April to 2nd May 1944, during which time many congratulatory signals were received from the forward army units, on the accuracy of their bombing, who were on occasions only 100 feet away from the target. This officer has shown exceptional keenness for operations and his powers of command, leadership and devotion to duty are outstanding.

 

The Air Commodore commanding No.221 Group added (21 June 1944):

 

The manner in which Squadron Leader Lindsell converted his squadron to a remarkably reliable and accurate Hurri-bomber squadron in a very short space of time on joining this Group was worthy of the highest recognition. His personal keenness and powers of leadership have made the squadron into a really good one, both from the point of view of operational results and aircraft serviceability. He has personally led the squadron on many extremely dangerous and successful sorties. Strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

LINDSEY, WO2 (now F/O) Harry Craig (R102173/J41889) - Mention in Despatches - No.10 Squadron (Canada) - now No.45 Group - Award effective 14 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944. Enlisted in Regina, 9 May 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 11 October 1941), No.7 AOS (graduated 2 March 1943), No.3 BGS (graduated 11 April 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 11 May 1942).

 

This warrant officer was navigator of a VLR Liberator aircraft which carried out two attacks against an enemy U-boat. He successfully navigated his aircraft over 700 miles in poor weather conditions to a convoy. During the run-in on the first attack he kept up a sustained and accurate fire against the conning tower, which consequently largely contributed to the successful execution of the attack. In the two running battles which followed against this and another submarine, he operated his gun in the face of heavy enemy fire and then navigated the aircraft over the distance back to base in almost zero conditions.

 

* * * * *

 

LINEHAM, F/O Glen William (J37333) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.435 Squadron - Award effective 15 January 1946 as per London Gazette dated 29 January 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946. Born in Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 1916. Home in Okatoks, Alberta; enlisted in Calgary 11 August 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 6 December 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 14 March 1942), No.7 BGS (graduated 9 May 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 9 June 1942). Commissioned September 1943.

 

This officer has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. He has completed two tours of operational duty, one with coastal command and more recently in the Far Eastern theatre of war where he has been engaged in flying supplies to the Army in Burma. These latter missions have been flown over difficult mountainous terrain, often in the face of enemy opposition and during monsoon weather. At all times, Flying Officer Lineham has displayed courage, skill and devotion to duty worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

LINEKER, F/O George Walker (J18839) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 3 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Born in Edmonton, 1922; home there. Enlisted in Edmonton, 10 September 1940. Trained at No.1 WS (graduated 9 February 1941) and No.6 BGS (graduated 20 July 1941). Commissioned 1943. Remained in postwar RCAF (27168). Killed on flying operations, 21 August 1949 with six others including Flight Lieutenants F.J. Rush, DFC and W.W. Robson, DFC.

 

As wireless operator (air), this officer has displayed the highest standard of efficiency. He has participated in a large number of sorties and on numerous occasions his vigilance and timely warning have enabled his pilot to evade enemy fighters. His record is worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

LINK, W/C Charles Henry (C3055) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Enlisted in Montreal, 9 November 1940. Remained in postwar air force (Queen's Coronation Medal, October 1953).

 

Throughout the four and a half years he spent in the Royal Canadian Air Force this officer rendered most distinguished and unselfish service. As Assistant Air Historian he was responsible for the maintenance and improvement of unit records. Their present general excellence is due in no small part to the extremely capable way in which these duties were carried out and to the initiative displayed in assisting unit officers in preparing these documents which will form the basis for the official history of the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was responsible for the compilation under great stress of involved and most difficult reports on a great variety of subjects which were prepared in every instance with great clarity and precision in an incredibly short time and not infrequently involved working a full 24 hours without sleep. As a result of the immense amount of research involved and the attention to detail displayed by Wing Commander Link, these documents were of such importance that in many instances they formed the basis upon which Government policy was later based. Wing Commander Link made a notable contribution to the success of the first volume of the official history of the Royal Canadian Air Force by his editing of the sections dealing with Coastal Command in "The Royal Canadian Air Force Overseas: The First Four Years."

 

* * * * *

 

LINK, F/O Henry David (J11848) - George Medal - No.14 OTU - Award effective 29 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 April 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born in Saskatchewan, 1918; home there. Home in Bercky or Swift Current, Saskatchewan. Enlisted in Regina, 19 June 1941. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 26 May 1942) and No.3 WS (graduated 26 March 1942). Commissioned 1942. Arrived in UK, 19 July 1942. At No.7 AGS, 1 September to 6 October 1942; then to No.14 OTU. Incident was 9 January 1943 at Ashwell. To No.16 OTU, 4 April 1944; to No.85 OTU, 6 July 1944.

 

In January 1943, Flying Officer Link was the rear gunner of an aircraft which crashed a few miles away from an airfield and caught fire. Although thrown clear of the wreckage, this officer sustained injuries to his back and was badly cut about the head and face. Disregarding his injuries and danger from exploding ammunition, petrol tanks and oxygen bottles, Flying Officer Link immediately proceeded to assist other members of the crew who were trapped in the blazing wreckage. By his heroic efforts he succeeded in releasing two of his companions and it was not until the flames became too fierce that he abandoned his rescue efforts. Flying Officer Link's outstanding courage and fortitude were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Royal Air Force.

 

LINK, F/L Henry David, GM (J11848) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945.

 

* * * * *

 

LINKERT, F/O Murray Edward (J25132) - Air Force Cross - No.14 SFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946 - Enlisted at Hamilton, 11 March 1942 - Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 14 August 1942), No.12 EFTS (graduated 23 October 1942), and No.1 SFTS (graduated 2 April 1943). As of award had flown 2,031 hours (1,733 hours as instructor, 225 hours in previous six months).

 

As a Flight Commander this officer has shown immeasurable ability in organizing and is outstanding among his fellows as a pilot and flying instructor. His skill and devotion to duty have been exceptional in all respects. His excellent contribution to specialist training is an inspiration to all.

 

* * * * *

 

LINKLATER, F/O James Donald (J22978) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.433 Squadron (incorrectly printed as No.133 Squadron in AFRO) - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1921 in Lampman, Saskatchewan; home in Dawson Creek, British Columbia (wood worker and truck driver). Enlisted in Edmonton, 27 May 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 10 September 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 13 March 1942). Commissioned 1942. No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy." DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation by W/C A.J. Lewington dated 19 September 1944 when he had flown 37 sorties (188 hours 20 minutes), 11 April to 26 August 1944.

 

This officer has now completed his first tour of operations comprised of thirty-seven trips over enemy territory, including such targets as Stuttgart, Hamburg, Dusseldorf, Karlsruhe and Essen.

 

The successful completion of these operational sorties was due largely to the initiative, resourcefulness and skilful airmanship of this officer. His tenacity, endurance and fine offensive spirit have undoubtedly inspired a high standard of morale in his crew and the squadron in general.

 

I consider that his exceptional qualities of leadership and his fine record of achievement fully merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

 

* * * * *

 

LINKLETTER, W/C Harold Clarence (C6579) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 9 August 1941.

 

This officer is head of the Inquiry Section of the Legal Branch of the Directorate of Personnel. The volume of work handled by his section has consistently increased and become of a more involved nature and has required imagination, wide knowledge and efficiency, which this officer has supplied. Despite the fact that during recent months this officer has had to carry on with an inadequate staff and has had to assume, in addition to his regular duties, that of acting head of the Legal Branch, he has carried on with unfailing good humour and ready co-operation and has kept on top of his work by a large amount of overtime work and intelligent organization. This officer is outstanding in his devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

LINN, Sergeant John Walter (R188108) - British Empire Medal - No.4 Release Centre - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Home in Fergus, Ontario; enlisted on Toronto, 19 August 1942.

 

Corporal Linn, a unique airman, though mustered as a clerk, he has given of his outstanding abilities in many different ways. He is an organist of distinction, and as such he has consistently rendered to the functions of this station his amazing talents in this regard. For two years he gave up his Sundays to play the organ for all church services. He was present at all entertainments, and recently has been on hand to meet all incoming overseas drafts and entertain the vast crowds in the coliseum. The hours he has worked may be regarded as uncounted. He is anxious and untiring in his efforts to carry out all duties assigned to him and always goes the second mile. On the release of bandsmen and thus the loss of the band at this unit, he has played the organ at every mustering out parade as well as for incoming drafts, etc. His hours are long and varied, but his ever present cheerfulness and complete disregard of personal convenience or effort mark him as outstanding in his duties and as a person.

 

* * * * *

 

LINTON, F/L Karl Raymond (J17417) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.421 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 April 1944 and AFRO 1020/44 dated 12 May 1944. Born 18 February 1923 in Plaster Rock, New Brunswick; home there. Enlisted in Moncton, 14 May 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 1 September 1941), No.21 EFTS (graduated 25 October 1941) and No.9 SFTS. (graduated 27 February 1942. Flight Sergeant on 27 August 1942, WO2 on 27 February 1943. Commissioned 5 April 1943; F/O 5 October 1943; F/L 20 December 1943. Arrived in UK, 29 March 1942. At No.17 (P) AFU, 26 May to 23 June 1942; No.52 OTU, 23 June 1942 to 14 September 1942; No.416 Squadron, 14 September 1942 to 21 May 1943; No.421 Squadron, 21 May 1943 to 8 April 1944. No.83 Group Support Unit, 8 April to 27 October 1944. Went on leave to Canada, returning to UK 18 January 1945. With No.417 Squadron, 12 February to 5 July 1945. Arrived back in UK, 14 July 1945; repatriated to Canada 7 August 1945; released 26 October 1945. Victories as follows: 29 July 1943, one FW.190 destroyed southwest of Amsterdam; 31 July 1943, one Bf.109 probably destroyed north of St.Omer; 3 October 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (shared with another pilot), Roy/Amy; 18 October 1943 - one FW.190 destroyed, Lille; 22 October 1943, one FW.190 destroyed, Beauvais; 20 December 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed and two Bf.109s damaged, Merville/Douai. Photo PL-23360 shows him, head and shoulders. Public Record Office Air 2/9633 indicates the award was recommended when he had flown 148 sorties (203 operational hours).

 

This officer has been constantly on operations for a year and five months. He has taken part in numerous operations of various kinds and on many occasions has engaged the enemy. Flight Lieutenant Linton has destroyed at least four enemy aircraft and damaged others. He has displayed excellent leadership as a flight commander and on occasions he has led the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

LINTON, F/L Oscar Mahaffy (J15205) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.401 Squadron - Award effective 8 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944. Born 21 December 1920 in Eden, Manitoba; home in Toronto. Enlisted in Regina, 12 September 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 21 December 1940), No.14 EFTS (graduated 9 February 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 23 May 1941). To RAF overseas, 18 June 1941; commissioned 9 February 1942. Repatriated, date uncertain; to Great Brotain again, May 1944; repatriated 28 October 1944; to No.13 SFTS, 4 December 1944; released 23 March 1945. Photo negative PMR 78-307.

 

Flight Lieutenant Linton has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. He has destroyed at least one aircraft and damaged others. Throughout a period of intensive operations he showed outstanding ability as a leader which, coupled with his fine fighting spirit, has made him a valuable member of his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9633 has recommendation drafted about 26 January 1944 when he had flown 148 sorties (203 hours 45 minutes). This provides much more detail.

 

Flight Lieutenant Linton was on his second tour of operations when he broke his back in a forced landing while at the Fighter Leaders Course. During his first tour in Malta, he completed 108 sorties during which he destroyed 1 1/3 enemy aircraft and damaged four others. Beginning his second tour with No.401 (RCAF) Squadron, he was given a flight. This he led with great skill for some 40 sweeps. During this time his squadron was continuously employed on the tedious and exacting work of close escort to USAAF medium bombers.

 

Flight Lieutenant Linton was an outstanding fighter pilot who concentrated his entire energy and interest on his duty.

 

On 28 January 1944, W/C K.L.B. Hodson wrote, "F/L Linton is an outstanding fighter pilot and merits an award."

 

On 3 February 1944, G/C W.R. MacBrien added his remarks:

 

Flight Lieutenant Linton's sorties were all, to the best of our knowledge, offensive. He fought through a very difficult period in Malta and showed outstanding ability as a leader while operating in this country previous to his accident. Lack of opportunity, due to the type of work being performed by Spitfire Vs during the period, is probably the only reason his present score is not higher. Owing to his return to Canada, I cannot give any more detailed information than above, but I most strongly recommend the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross to this officer.

 

On 19 February 1944 an Air Vice Marshal (signature illegible) wrote:

 

The recommendation for this award is partly based on this officer's record of service outside this Group, as known to his immediate superiors. I have no means of checking his record and therefore forward the recommendation for consideration. The sound leadership and determination to engage the enemy which he has shown while under my command, combined with his log operational record convince me that the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross is well merited.

 

The Air Officer Commanding, 2nd Tactical Air Force, approved this on 27 February 1944, but it was not until 31 May 1944 that Air Chief Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory, Air Commander-in-Chief, Allied Expeditionary Air Forces, also forwarded the document with his notation, "Approved".

 

* * * * *

 

LINTON, F/O Wayne Bryce (J86937) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.194 Squadron - Award effective 15 January 1946 as per London Gazette dated 29 January 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946. Born 1922 in Humboldt, Saskatchewan; home in Islay, Alberta. Enlisted in Edmonton, 3 June 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 21 November 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 6 February 1943), and No.15 SFTS (graduated 4 June 1943). Commissioned May 1944. With No.437 Squadron as of date of award.

 

This officer has completed a tour of operational duty. He has throughout displayed outstanding ability and skill as a pilot and captain of aircraft. Many of his missions have been flown in adverse monsoon weather and over difficult mountainous terrain.

 

* * * * *

 

LIPPA, P/O Arthur (J15247) - Commended for Valuable Services - Attached to RAF - Award effective 2 September 1942 as per London Gazette of 5 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942. Home in Houston, Texas; enlisted in Toronto. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 17 May 1941), No.9 EFTS (graduated 2 July 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 13 September 1941). Transferred to American forces, 23 November 1942. Commended for Brave Conduct, but no citation.

 

* * * * *

 

LIPPINCOTT, WO2 (now F/O) Robert Taylor (R96419/J88679) - Croix de Guerre (France) - Overseas - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania; enlisted in Ottawa, 11 June 1941. Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 6 July 1942) and No.1 BGS (graduated 12 October 1942). Public Records Office Air 2/8769 has recommended citation but does not identify unit.

 

Warrant Officer Lippincott has taken part in many operations. He has always displayed outstanding determination to complete his allotted tasks successfully. His efficiency has been exceptional at all times and has done much to secure the success achieved by his crew.

 

* * * * *

 

LIPSIT, F/L Richard Rosswell (J10601) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.114 Squadron - Award effective 27 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 7 July 1944 and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born 1921 at Grimsby, Ontario; home there. Enlisted in Vancouver, 30 May 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 August 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 13 March 1942). Commissioned 1942.

 

For some months Flight Lieutenant Lipsit has been engaged on operational sorties over North Africa, Sicily and Southern Italy. The majority of these sorties have been flown at night and he has never let adverse weather or enemy opposition deter him from completing his mission. In May 1944 this officer was detailed for a reconnaissance of the coast roads in the area of Rome. Only a few scattered transports were seen so he penetrated inland making low level attacks over mountainous terrain in the face of anti-aircraft fire and inflicting much damage on enemy supplies. Throughout a long tour of operations Flight Lieutenant Lipsit has displayed praiseworthy courage and skill.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9016 has detailed recommendation dated 28 May 1944 when he had flown 67 sorties (195 operational hours); form gives his Christian names as "Ross Richard".

 

Flying Officer Lipsit is now nearing the end of his tour having flown on operations with the utmost success for well over a year on light bombers on sorties covering North Africa, Sicily and southern Italy. Nearly all his sorties have been on armed reconnaissance at night in all kinds of weather. At all times he has shown the greatest courage and determination and has been an inspiration to the other crews of the squadron. He has never lost an opportunity to inflict the utmost damage on the enemy which can be well illustrated by one of many similar trips, when on the night of 6/7 May 1944, Flying Officer Lipsit was briefed to take on operations for the first time an A-20G; this aircraft is used for strafing purposes only and carries no navigator, the pilot having to rely solely on his ability to get himself to the target, to carry out an armed reconnaissance of the coast roads in the area Rome-Civitavecchia-Orbetello. On reaching the area only a few scattered transport were seen and these he quickly machine-gunned from a height of 500 feet; he decided to go inland in the more mountainous area; on the Viterbo-Montefiascone road he encountered further motor transport and in spite of the surrounding high ground again went low to strafe the transports; light flak was fired at him from Viterbo but in spite of this he continued his attack, scoring hits on the enemy trucks. Only when his ammunition was exhausted did he return to base, having inflicted losses and caused much delay to the enemy supplies.

 

* * * * *

 

LIPTON, S/L Moses (C868) - Mention in Despatches - No.410 Squadron - Award effective 9 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942.

 

LIPTON, W/C Maurice (C868) - Air Force Cross - AFHQ - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born 21 June 1916 in Sydney, Nova Scotia. Graduated from Station Trenton, 17 June 1939. Instructor in surveying at Dalhousie before enlisting. Chief Flying Instructor, No.3 SFTS, October to December 1940. Deputy CFI, Central Flying School, May 1941. Had completed 2,339 flying hours to date, 1,525 flying hours as instructor, 42 hours in previous six months. NOTE: He uses "Maurice" and "Moses" but the latter appears to be his final (postwar) choice.

 

This officer was first employed in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a flying instructor. He proved highly efficient in this capacity and amassed over a thousand instructional hours. He was then posted overseas and upon his return he organized No.129 Fighter Squadron and subsequently commanded No.1 Flying Instructor School, Trenton, Ontario. At the Empire Central Flying School he obtained the highest all-round assessment ever granted for air and ground work. His knowledge and attitude to flying have been and are exceptional. In the various positions he has held in the Air Force he has always carried out his duties in an exemplary manner and the contribution he has made to service flying is very great.

 

* * * * *

 

LISSON, S/L Harold Stanley (J4330) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.418 Squadron - Award effective 28 April 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1186/44 dated 2 June 1944. Born 1 February 1916 at Jarrow, Alberta; farmed there; graduted from Canrose Luthren College and attended University of Alberta. Taught school for five years. Enlisted in Edmonton, 29 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 September 1940), No.9 EFTS (graduated 11 December 1940) and No.5 SFTS (graduated and commissioned, 11 March 1941). To No.7 SFTS, 31 May 1941; to "Y" Depot, Halifax, 15 November 1942; repatriated 11 May 1944; to No.36 OTU, 28 June 1944; to No.8 OTU, 30 June 1944; to Western Air Command, 1 February 1945. Last wartime posting was to Patricia Bay. Remained in postwar RCAF (service number 1955*), attaining rank of Squadron Leader (1 June 1948) and Wing Commander (1 January 1953); retired from RCAF in 1966. He then attended Queen's University and moved to Victoria to teach science. Died in Victoria, 5 February 1997.

 

This officer has completed very many sorties during which he has attacked airfields and installations with success. In air fighting, Squadron Leader Lisson has shot down two enemy aircraft at night. His fine fighting qualities have always been evident and he has set an outstanding example of keenness and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

LISTER, F/O John Ernest (J4706) - Mention in Despatches - No.407 Squadron - Award effective 9 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942. Home in St.Catharines, Ontario; enlisted in Hamilton. Graduated from No.1 BGS, Jarvis, Ont., 18 January 1941 and No.1 ANS, Rivers, 15 February 1941. NOTE: card in DHist biographical file says he trained at No.1 ITS, No.1 AOS and No.1 BGS). DHist file 181.009 D.2620 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has recommendation dated 4 March 1942 for him, F/O L. Cowperthwaite (which see for text) and FS Norman John Jones (RAF). Killed in action, 12 February 1942 (Hudson AM598); name on Runnymede Memorial (Observer).

 

* * * * *

 

LISTER, G/C Murray Duncan (C168) - Mention in Despatches - Station Tofino - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Born in Edmonton, 17 January 1912; educated there; joined RCAF at Camp Borden, 13 June 1935. Attended Royal Military College. Trained as pilot, 1936. Overseas in July 1943; served with No.84 Air Disarmament Group. Remained in postwar RCAF, rising to Air Vice Marshal; awarded Queens Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953, while a Group Captain in Training Command.

 

This officer, during the period he has been in command of this station, has discharged his duties in an exemplary manner. By his ability and outstanding devotion to duty he has raised the standard of this unit to a high pitch of operational efficiency. Group Captain Lister, by his own excellent example, is an inspiration to those serving under him.

 

* * * * *

 

LISTER, LAC William Norman (R151546) - Mention in Despatches - No.434 Squadron (No.64 Base in AFRO) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Enlisted in Vancouver, 14 January 1942. DHist file 181.009 D.4364 (RG.24 Vol.20648) has recommendation dated 26 July 1944.

 

This airman enlisted on 14th January 1942, and has served in the United Kingdom since 24th May 1943, and is employed as an electrician. He has at all times displayed a high degree of zeal and devotion to duty during long hours at work during the organizational stage of this squadron. His efforts have contributed greatly to the efficient operation of the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

LITTLE, F/O Meldrum Wells (J43798) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.117 Squadron - Award effective 27 March 1946 as per London Gazette dated 5 April 1946 and AFRO 497/46 dated 17 May 1946. Born 1923 in Viking, Alberta; home in Edmonton. Enlisted in Edmonton, 19 October 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 18 September 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 13 November 1943) and No.19 SFTS (graduated 7 April 1944. Commissioned April 1944.

 

Flying Officer Little has completed a large number of operational sorties. He has developed great skill in supply dropping missions in the Arakan area, often in the face of enemy fire. Throughout his operational career this officer has set a high standard of courage and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

LITTLE, F/L Stuart Walker (J21422) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.582 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 24 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1913 in Scarborough, Ontario; Home in Agincourt, Ontario. Enlisted in Toronto, 28 June 1937. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 6 June 1942), No.16 EFTS (graduated 20 June 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 27 December 1942). Commissioned December 1942. Killed in action 25 May 1944 (Lancaster ND816); buried in Germany.

 

This officer has completed as pilot and captain of aircraft many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9652 has recommendation drafted 18 May 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (195 hours); text slightly more detailed than that published.

 

4 Oct 43 Ludwigshaven 28 Jan 44 Berlin

8 Oct 43 Hanover 15 Feb 44 Frankfurt-on-Oder

18 Oct 43 Hanover 19 Feb 44 Leipzig

19 Oct 43 Leipzig 20 Feb 44 Stuttgart

22 Oct 43 Kassel 24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt

18 Nov 43 Berlin 25 Feb 44 Augsburg

22 Nov 43 Berlin 1 Mar 44 Stuttgart

16 Dec 43 Berlin 15 Mar 44 Stuttgart

29 Dec 43 Berlin 18 Mar 44 Frankfurt

1 Jan 44 Berlin 18 Apr 44 Noisy-le-Sec

5 Jan 44 Stettin 20 Apr 44 Cologne

14 Jan 44 Brunswick 22 Apr 44 Laon

20 Jan 44 Berlin 3 May 44 Montdidier

21 Jan 44 Magdeburg 7 May 44 Nantes

27 Jan 44 Berlin 9 May 44 Cap Gris Nez

 

This officer has carried out 30 attacks on enemy targets, 25 of which have been against heavily defended targets. He is a captain of a vert reliable marking crew, who is keen to operate on every possible occasion.

 

His ability to make instant decisions in emergency, skilful handling of his aircraft, and cool judgement have been an inspiration to his crew, and an example to the squadron. By his fine offensive spirit he has earned the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, and is accordingly recommended.

 

The Officer Commanding, RAF Station Little Staughton, added his remarks on 20 May 1944:

 

This officer has proved himself to be a very capable operational captain, and his courage and endurance have set a most worthy example to his crew. I can recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This was duly marked "Strongly recommended" by the Air Officer Commanding, No.8 Group, on 30 May 1944.

 

* * * * *

 

LIVINGSTON, P/O Robert Andrew (J17110) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.425 Squadron - Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Home in Rosebank, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 29 May 1941. Trained at No.5 BGS (graduated 2 March 1942) and No.2 WS (graduated 1 February 1942). Commissioned 1943. Presented 12 December 1944.

 

This officer has taken part in a large number of operational missions as wireless operator air gunner. He has always shown the greatest determination to achieve his objective. On one occasion, during a daylight attack on Oldenburg, the aircraft in which he was flying was hit by cannon shells from two enemy fighters and fire broke out behind the navigator's seat. Pilot Officer Livingston promptly put the fire out, thus enabling the aircraft to return safely. At all times his devotion to duty and coolness under fire have set a fine example to his crew.

 

* * * * *

 

LIVINGSTONE, G/C Amos Thomas (C4612) - Mention in Despatches - No.1664 Conversion Unit - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Enlisted in Winnipeg, 1 April 1924. DHist file 181.009 D.2993 (National Archives RG.24 Volume 20634) has recommendation forwarded to No.6 Group Headquarters, 25 July 1944. Described as having served 1914 to 1919 with RFC and RAF, and with the RCAF from September 1920 onwards. Had been nine months overseas. Aeronautical Engineer and Chief Technical Officer at his unit.

 

This officer has built up and at all times maintained a high standard of efficiency and work in the Servicing Wing of his unit. His marked degree of keenness and interest in his men has proven a worthy example to his juniors which is evident in the improved aircraft serviceability since the re-establishment of the unit on the station. Wing Commander Livingstone's loyalty and untiring efforts have contributed considerably towards a high standard of training and production of aircrew.

 

* * * * *

 

LIWISKI, P/O Peter Edward (J85597) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1919 at Gilbert Plains, Manitoba; home there (teacher). Enlisted in Winnipeg, 19 May 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 5 March 1943). Commissioned March 1944. Repatriated 19 September 1944). No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1633 (RG.24 Vol.20603) has recommendation dated 16 August 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (149 hours 12 minutes), 30 January to 20 July 1944. Medal sent by registered mail, 20 March 1951. NOTE: Name later changed to "Lewis".

 

Pilot Officer Liwiski has completed an operational tour on four-engined bombers. He has successfully navigated his aircraft to many targets deep into Germany, including three to Berlin and others to Stuttgart, Frankfurt and Essen. On all occasions he navigated with great skill and the excellence of his work was a very large contributing factor to the outstanding success achieved by his crew. The very fact that the aircraft in which he flew was so seldom hit by flak or attacked by fighters indicated the very high standard of track-keeping and navigation he attained.

 

Pilot Officer Liwiski, by his cheerful tenacity and operational keenness, greatly inspired and set a splendid example to all navigators in the squadron.

 

* * * * *