COAT, FS William George (Can 10212) - Mention in Despatches - No.9408 Servicing Echelon - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 31 July 1944. Fitter IIA, enlisted 23 March 1939; served 33 months in Canada, 32 months overseas.

 

As Non-Commissioned Officer in charge of riggers at this Echelon, this airman has displayed outstanding ability in the organization of his section and the handling of the personnel under him. His untiring energy and devotion to duty, often under adverse conditions, has materially contributed to the maintenance of the high standard of serviceability attained at this station.

 

* * * * *

 

COATE, W/C James Fraser (C7103) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born 18 April 1901 in Kingsville, Ontario. Educated in Windsor, Woodstock, and University of Detroit. Life insurance underwriter. Enlisted in London, Ontario, 29 August 1941. Became Deputy Director of Special Services (and Director ?). Presented 13 February 1948.

 

This officer is head of the Special Service Branch of the Directorate of Personnel. He has been outstanding for the intelligence and efficiency with which he has handled the many involved personal [personnel ?] matters under his direction. During recent months, many new and difficult problems have arisen with respect to the welfare of Royal Canadian Air Force personnel and this officer has originated and put into effect new plans and organization for dealing with the same. The general welfare of Royal Canadian Air Force personnel has benefited to a large extent by the efforts of this officer and by his outstanding devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

COATES, FS David Mervin (R78013) - George Medal - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 27 July 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1949/43 dated 24 September 1943. Born in Walkerton, Ontario, 1921, home in Woodbridge, Ontario. Labourer; enlisted in RCAF in Toronto, 9 October 1940. Trained at No. 7 BGS (graduated 20 July 1941) and No.2 WS (23 June 1941). Award presented 8 December 1944. Applied for Operational Wings while at No.31 OTU, February 1944; decision at AMAS/Ops was the refused; applied again that summer but in October the answer was still "No" because he had insufficient flying time.

 


In November 1942, Flight Sergeant Coates was the wireless operator air gunner in an aircraft which crashed into a petrol dump and a lorry when landing after an arduous sortie over the Bay of Biscay. The entire scene became an inferno of blazing petrol and exploding ammunition and there was imminent danger of the detonation of a torpedo which was in the aircraft. The navigator was pinned by the legs and was unable to free himself. Displaying great persistence and complete disregard for personal safety, Flight Sergeant Coates succeeded in extricating the navigator. He then went to the aid of the pilot who was also pinned by the legs and unconscious and endeavoured to release him until his own face and wrists were too severely burned to permit him to continue. Throughout his heroic endeavour to release the pilot Flight Sergeant Coates faced the risk of sudden death. It was only when the intensity of the conflagration surpassed human endurance that he left the aircraft and even then he assisted the navigator whom he had rescued to move further away to safety.

 

* * * * *

 

COATSWORTH, F/O Emerson Steadman (J25354) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 22 May 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated20 November 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 16 April 1943) and No. 4 AOS (graduated(graduated 19 february 1943). No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 19 August 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (177 hours 40 minutes) from 21 January to 30 July 1944.

 

During a notable tour of thirty-four attacks on enemy territory this Bomb Aimer has shown keenness and enthusiasm for his work and a great desire to come to grips with the enemy. Both in the air and on the ground his conduct has been a source of inspiration to his crew members and to the Bomb Aimers on the squadron. He has proved himself to be an accurate bomb aimer who is undeterred by any opposition from the enemy.

 

* * * * *

 

COBB, P/O Nelson Alexander - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - Award effective 7 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 May 1943 and AFRO 1078/43 dated 11 June 1943. Home in Tillsonburg, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 17 December 1940. Trained at 1 ITS (graduated 11 June 1941), No.6 EFTS (graduated 25 July 1941), and No.4 SFTS (graduated 10 October 1941). Killed in action with No.35 Squadron, 28 June 1943 (Halifax HR850); buried in Germany. Award presented to next of kin by Governor General 12 December 1944.

 


Pilot Officer Cobb has participated in a large number of operational sorties, displaying exceptional keenness and skilful flying ability. On his first sortie, when coned by searchlights and with his aircraft riddled by anti-aircraft fir, this officer, showing grim determination, dived from 17,000 to 6,000 feet, bombed his target, and obtained some excellent photographs. On another occasion, when on an operation at Bremen, Pilot Officer Cobb's aircraft was fiercely attacked by a Junkers 88. A running encounter ensued, lasting ten minutes, before the enemy fighter was finally destroyed. This officer has acquired a reputation for a very high standard of photography, while his infectious enthusiasm, courage and energy have made him a most valuable member of his squadron.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8950 has the original recommendation dated 1 March 1943 when he had flown 28 sorties (178 hours 58 minutes); document includes sortie list:

 

25 June 42 Bremen (6.20) 6 Dec 42 Mannheim (7.05)

11 Aug 42 Le Havre (4.55) 9 Dec 42 Turin (9.00)

26 Aug 42 Saarbrucken (6.48) 9 Jan 43 GARDENING (6.56)

2 Sept 42 Karlsruhe (7.48) 15 Jan 43 Lorient (5.34)

4 Sept 42 Bremen (5.45; 23 Jan 43 Lorient (5.43)

Ju.88 shot down 14 Feb 43 Cologne (4.22)

8 Sept 42 Frankfurt (7.04) 18 Feb 43 Wilhelmshaven (4.13)

10 Sep 42 Dusseldorf (4.36) 25 Feb 43 Nuremburg (4.48;

13 Sep 42 Bremen (4.27) abandoned, engine u/s

15 Oct 42 Cologne (5.05) 26 Feb 43 Cologne (5.20)

15 Nov 42 Genoa (9.13) 28 Feb 43 St.Nazaire (6.01)

18 Nov 42 Turin (8.32) 1 Mar 43 Berlin (7.00)

20 Nov 42 Turin (9.03) 3 Mar 43 Hamburg (4.46)

28 Nov 42 Turin (8.31) 5 Mar 43 Essen (4.32)

2 Dec 42 Frankfurt (7.40) 8 Mar 43 Nuremburg (7.58)

 

Pilot Officer Cobb was posted to this squadron as a Sergeant in July 1942 and has to date carried out 28 successful sorties comprising 179 operational hours.

 

It is characteristic of this officer's flying ability that he never did a trip as a second pilot, and of his grim determination that on his very first sortie, when his aircraft was repeatedly coned by enemy searchlights and riddled by flak over Bremen, he dived from 17,000 feet to 6,000 feet to bomb his target and return with exceptional photographs. On his fourth operation, again to Bremen, his aircraft was fiercely attacked by a Junkers 88 and a running encounter lasting ten minutes ensued before the enemy fighter was finally mortally hit, caught fire and disintegrated.

 

This Dominion captain has deservedly acquired in this squadron a reputation for his extraordinary keenness to achieve nothing but the best photographic results, and on recent attacks against Turin, Lorient and St.Nazaire he descended to 10,000, 7,000 and 7,000 feet respectively in order to bring back exceptional photographs.

 

His Flight Commander recently said of this officer, "Nothing appears too arduous or too trivial", and I feel very strongly that Pilot Officer Cobb's outstanding qualities of leadership and unswerving resolution should now be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.


The Commanding Officer, RAF Station Pocklington, added on 9 March 1943:

 

Pilot Officer Cobb is the captain of a remarkable crew. His courage, enthusiasm and energy are infectious and these qualities have been the means of fusing together a collection of individuals into the best operational crew I have had the honour to meet. Aided and abetted by corresponding enthusiasm and disregard of danger on the part of the fellow crew members of his team, Pilot Officer Cobb has set a shining example of how to set about an operational tour. In recognition of his fine record, I have great pleasure in strongly recommending him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

The Air Officer Commanding, No.4 Group, added, on 30 March 1943:

 

A fine and courageous captain who has been posted at his own request to the Pathfinder Force. Very strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COBURN, P/O Graham Willoughby (J18560) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - Award effective 10 January 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944. Home in Beeton, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 20 February 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 14 July 1941), No.20 EFTS (ceased training 15 August 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 31 January 1942), No.9 AOS (graduated 19 December 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 8 June 1942). Applications for Operational Wings show he flew two tours; was at No.6 OTU late in 1945. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9153 has recommendation dated 20 November 1943 when he had flown 39 sorties (248 hours 25 minutes).

 

28 Feb 43 St.Nazaire 21 June 43 Krefeld

12 Mar 43 Essen 3 July 43 Cologne

22 Mar 43 Duisburg 8 July 43 Cologne

26 Mar 43 St.Nazaire 9 July 43 Gelsenkirchen

27 Mar 43 Berlin 12 July 43 Turin

29 Mar 43 Berlin 27 Aug 43 Nuremburg

3 Apr 43 Essen 31 Aug 43 Berlin

4 Apr 43 Kiel 3 Sept 43 Berlin

8 Apr 43 Duisburg 5 Sept 43 Mannheim

9 Apr 43 Duisburg 6 Sept 43 Munich

13 Apr 43 Spezia 21 Sep 43 Hanover

14 Apr 43 Stuttgart 29 Sep 43 Bochum

15 Apr 43 Pilsen 2 Oct 43 Munich

18 Apr 43 Spezia 3 Oct 43 Kassel

20 Apr 43 Stettin 7 Oct 43 Stuttgart


26 Apr 43 Duisburg 8 Oct 43 Hanover

12 May 43 Duisburg 18 Oct 43 Hanover

13 May 43 Pilsen 22 Oct 43 Kassel

23 May 43 Dortmund 10 Nov 43 Modane

27 May 43 Essen

 

Pilot Officer Coburn has completed 39 operational sorties against the enemy, and in addition seven anti-submarine patrols with Coastal Command. Fifteen of these have been with Pathfinder Force, and have included attacks on Berlin, Hanover, Duisburg, Stettin, Pilsen and other heavily defended targets in the Ruhr.

 

Throughout all these operations, Pilot Officer Coburn has displayed the utmost keenness and determination in pressing on to bomb accurately in the face of enemy opposition, and has obtained several excellent aiming point photographs.

 

His captain and crew have the fullest confidence in his ability, and his skill as bomb aimer has been particularly responsible for the success achieved in all the operations in which he has participated.

 

* * * * *

 

COBURN, P/O Lloyd Gerrard (J18127) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Home in Temiskaming, Ontario; enlisted at North Bay, 30 July 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 18 November 1941), No.15 EFTS (graduated 30 January 1942) and No.6 BGS (graduated 13 April 1942). Award presented 2 December 1946. No citation other than "...completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/8782 has recommendation dated 22 December 1943 when he had flown 45 sorties (349 hours 42 minutes). Although his total times differ by 13 hours 22 minutes from those of H.C. Banks, their list of sorties and times are virtually identical in targets, dates and flying times. Clearly the flying times should be added again.

 

An Air Gunner of exceptional ability, Pilot Officer Coburn has participated in numerous attacks against most of the enemy's heavily defended targets in Germany. He has consistently displayed coolness and courage of a high order in the face of enemy opposition. His determination and devotion to duty have proved an inspiration to the squadron. This officer is strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 


COCHAND, F/O (now F/L) Louis Emile (J13478) - Air Medal (United States) - 11th USAAF - effective 27 August 1943 as per Canada Gazette dated 4 May 1946 and AFRO 473/46 dated 10 May 1946. Home in St.Marguerite, Quebec. Enlisted in Montreal, 1 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 September 1940), No.7 EFTS (graduated 20 November 1940) and No.31 SFTS (graduated 27 January 1941). Biographical file has long letters describing his experiences. Details found in DHist file 181.009 D.4402 (RG.24 Vol.20648) where USAAF 11th Air Force General Order No.106 dated 27 August 1943, on behalf of Alaska Defence Command, lists officers receiving Air Medal "for meritorious achievement in aerial flight" with the following citation; Cochand's services are listed as from 1 April to 12 August 1943. NOTE: The same order awards posthumous Air Medals to J5216 F/L D.W.N. Wakeling (Vancouver, flights 1 January to 6 May 1943) and J27371 P/O R.M. Bell (Hot Springs, Arkansas, flights 19 April to 10 August 1943). Apparently not approved by RCAF authorities. The file contains much operational information on all those decorated on this occasion. All were in No.14 (F) Squadron.

 

These officers, as pilots of fighter planes, participated in numerous attacks on enemy installations in the Aleutians which were pressed home despite heavy anti-aircraft fire and often under adverse weather conditions. All flights were made from advanced bases and required skilful airmanship for a successful execution of the mission. The courage and devotion to duty of these officers reflect great credit upon themselves and the organization of which they are a part.

 

COCHAND, F/O Louis Emile (J13478) - Croix de Guerre (France) - No.442 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas" - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. No citation. DHist file 181.009 D.2833 (RG.24 Vol.20632) has recommendation for a Non-Immediate DFC dated 9 September 1944; no action was taken, and an identical recommendation was put forward on 9 January 1945, this time for the Croix de Guerre. He had flown 149 sorties (186 hours 45 minutes). Recommendation read:

 

This officer has completed 158 sorties over enemy territory, many of them against very heavily defended ground targets, and he has at all times proven himself exceptionally keen and aggressive. On August 18th and 19th, Flying Officer Cochand destroyed or damaged twenty-one enemy vehicles bringing his total to sixty-two enemy vehicles destroyed or damaged since the invasion of the Continent. This officer's courageous and determined low level attacks in the face of very intense flak have obtained many fine results and he has won the greatest admiration and respect of all.

 

Public Records Officer Air 2/9645 has a much shorter citation, presumably the final one.

 

This officer has completed 158 sorties over enemy territory, many against heavily defended targets. His courageous and determined low level attacks in the face of intense opposition have obtained very fine results.

 

* * * * *

 


COCHRAN, F/L Charles Kerr (J17296) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.170 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Home in Calgary; enlisted there 16 May 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 16 August 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942). Award presented 9 July 1949. No citation other than "completed... numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/8749 has recommendation dated 20 March 1945 when he had flown 37 sorties (244 hours), 14 October 1944 to 15 March 1945.

 

14 Oct 44 Duisburg 2 Jan 45 Nuremburg

14 Oct 44 Duisburg 7 Jan 45 Munich

19 Oct 44 Stuttgart 22 Jan 45 Duisburg

25 Oct 44 Essen 28 Jan 45 Stuttgart

28 Oct 44 Cologne 1 Feb 45 Mannheim

30 Oct 44 Cologne 3 Feb 45 Bottrop

2 Nov 44 Dusseldorf 7 Feb 45 Cleves

4 Nov 44 Bochum 8 Feb 45 Politz

6 Nov 44 Gelsenkirchen 14 Feb 45 Dresden

9 Nov 44 Wanne Eickel 15 Feb 45 Chemnitz

11 Nov 44 Dortmund 23 Feb 45 Pforzeim

18 Nov 44 Wanne Eickel 1 Mar 45 Mannheim

21 Nov 44 Aschaffenburg 2 Mar 45 Cologne

27 Nov 44 Freiburg 5 Mar 45 Chemnitz

15 Dec 44 Ludwigshaven 8 Mar 45 Kassel

17 Dec 44 Ulm 11 Mar 45 Essen

22 Dec 44 Koblenz 12 Mar 45 Dortmund

27 Dec 44 Rheydt 15 Mar 45 Misburg

29 Dec 44 Gelsenkirchen

 

Flight Lieutenant Cochran of the Royal Canadian Air Force has successfully completed his first tour of operations against the enemy with a total of 37 sorties to his credit. All his sorties were against Germany's most heavily defended cities including such places as Stuttgart twice, Duisburg three times, Nuremburg and Chemnitz twice.

 

That he has at all times pressed home his attacks in the face of heavy opposition has been proved by photographic evidence. His determination, courage and skill while in the squadron, combined with his superb captaincy and airmanship have set a magnificent example to the rest of the squadron. In his capacity as Assistant Flight Commander he has also given great assistance to other crews, and in particular to those about to embark upon their operational careers.

 

While on his tour of operations Flight Lieutenant Cochran has displayed great courage and initiative and has set a magnificent example to his crew. It is therefore recommended that his commendable courage and devotion to duty be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.


* * * * *

 

COCHRANE, P/O John Malcolm (J88460) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.433 Squadron - Award effective 15 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Home in Jackson, Michigan (but described as Canadian); enlisted Windsor, Ontario, 22 September 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 17 September 1943). Award presented.

 

One night in October 1944 this officer was the mid-upper gunner of an aircraft detailed for a mine-laying mission. When leaving the target area the aircraft was struck by a burst of machine gun fire from an enemy fighter. Much damage was sustained and the rear gunner was killed. All the aileron controls were severed and, as the fighter closed in for a second attack, evading action could not be taken. During this Pilot Officer Cochrane coolly withheld his fire until the attacker came to close range. Then, with a well placed burst of fire he shot the enemy aircraft down. His coolness, courage and good shooting set a very fine example. This officer has participated in many sorties.

 

* * * * *

 

COCHRANE, F/L Robert Hugh (J17277) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.218 Squadron - Award effective 25 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 12 October 1943 and AFRO 2386/43 dated 19 November 1943. Home in New Richmond Station, Quebec; enlisted North Bay, Ontario, 13 August 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 31 December 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 26 March 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 17 July 1942). Award presented by the King 29 June 1945. Died in Toronto, 28 March 1981.

 

Flight Lieutenant Cochrane is a most efficient captain who has completed many sorties. He has always endeavoured to press home his attacks and his example, determination and devotion to duty have been worthy of high praise. One night in September 1943, Flight Lieutenant Cochrane took part in an attack on Mannheim. When nearing the target his aircraft was hit and the port wing tip was extensively damaged but he completed his bombing run and afterwards flew the damaged bomber to base.

 

* * * * *

 

COCKADAY, Sergeant Arthur John (R90414) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 9 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. Home in Brantford, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 12 March 1941. Trained at No.3 WS (graduated 20 December 1941) and No.7 BGS (graduated 20 January 1942). POW 15 April 1943. Award sent by registered mail 13 June 1948.

 


One night in April 1943, this airman was rear gunner in an aircraft against Frankfurt-on-Main. The target was bombed successfully but, while on the homeward flight, his aircraft was attacked by an enemy night fighter. The aircraft was severely damaged and all members of the crew, except the captain, wounded. The fabric of the rear of the fuselage burst into flames. Sergeant Cockaday was severely wounded in the leg and he was also suffering from flesh wounds which were bleeding profusely. Despite these injuries and the intense heat engendered by the fire, he crawled out of his turret and, using his parachute, succeeded in smothering the flames completely. It was largely owing to this airman's gallant action that his captain was enabled to make a successful forced landing.

 

* * * * *

 

COCKRAM, A/C William Ewart (C1701) - Commander, Order of the British Empire - Air Force Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born at Gillingham, Dorset, 3 November 1898. Educated at Yeovil. Served in British Army (infantry), 1915 to 1917; Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force, 1917-1919. Accountant in British Civil Service, 1919-1923; went into theology and graduated from McGill University. Ordained in United Churech of Canada. Enlisted at Toronto, 12 February 1940 (chaplain). Served first with No.112 Squadron; then to RCAF Overseas Headquarters, May 1940 (first RCAF Protestant chaplain overseas). Promoted to Honourary Squadron Leader, 15 May 1941. Returned to Canada in December 1941 and appointed Deputy Director of Chaplain Services (Protestant); promoted to Honourary Wing Commander, 15 June 1942, Honouray Group Captain, 1 September 1942, and Honourary Air Commodore, 1 November 1943. Retired 8 January 1946; died 22 February 1946. Award presented 8 April 1948.

 

The outstanding ability and leadership of this officer has continued since his appointment as the first Royal Canadian Air Force Chaplain (P) Overseas. During the Battle of Britain he served all Canadian personnel in the British Isles with exceptional energy and devotion. His subsequent appointment as Director of Chaplain Services (P) increased his loyalty and devotion to the Service. He was chosen to represent Canada by the British Ministry of Information, and toured Great Britain as Canada's representative. In the past six months he has given capable supervision to all chaplaincy work, and brought a real uplift of morale to the many stations he has visited. He has maintained the closest relationships between civilian Protestant churches and the Royal Canadian Air Force, and has displayed great acumen in the fulfilling of his duties.

 

* * * * *

 


CODD, F/O Percy (J38184) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945. Home in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan; enlisted Montreal, 7 July 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 6 March 1943), No.10 AOS (graduated 12 November 1943) and No.6 BGS (graduated 25 June 1943). Award presented 11 August 1949. No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy". DHist file 181.009 D.2610 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 19 March 1945 when he had flown 32 sorties (182 hours), 17 September 1944 to 23 February 1945.

 

Flying Officer Codd, as a navigator of a heavy bomber aircraft, has participated in 32 attacks on enemy targets which included heavily defended industrial areas such as Hanover and Magdeburg. The outstanding success of this officer's crew was largely due to the tireless and painstaking efforts of this navigator. Throughout his tour of operations his keen offensive spirit and cheerful co-operation at all times have been of great assistance to the unit Navigation Section and has given inspiration, not only to the entire crew, but to his fellow navigators of this squadron. By his skilful navigation his pilot has always managed to keep on track, on time, and to reach his objective and return safely to base.

 

It is considered that the splendid operational record established by this navigator, his cheerfulness and devotion to duty throughout his operational tour fully merits the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

CODE, WO1 (now P/O) Arthur Warren (R128398/J87549) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.101 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Home in Phippen, Saskatchewan; enlisted Saskatoon. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 20 June 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 11 November 1942). No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/8827 has recommendation dated 18 July 1944 when he had flown 31 sorties (185 hours 50 minutes), 27 January to 5 June 1944.

 

27 Jan 44 Berlin Bombed Wangani; glow seen through cloud and for 200 miles on return.

28 Jan 44 Berlin Many big fires; heavy attack.

15 Feb 44 Berlin Glow of nine concentrated fires seen; thick cloud.

19 Feb 44 Leipzig Large concentration of fires seen.

20 Feb 44 Stuttgart Marking concentrated; many incendiary fires seen.

24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt Attack heavy and concentrated; widespread fires.

25 Feb 44 Augsburg High explosive bursts and fires in target; three explosions in marshalling yard.

1 Mar 44 Stuttgart Bombing rather scattered; fires in target area seen.

15 Mar 44 Stuttgart Fires seen through break in clouds; marking very scattered.

18 Mar 44 Frankfurt Concentration of fires.

22 Mar 44 Frankfurt Three large explosions; fires covering a large area.


24 Mar 44 Berlin Marking and attack scattered; large orange explosion; scattered fires.

26 Mar 44 Essen Glow of fires on cloud; nothing else visible.

30 Mar 44 Nuremburg Fairly good concentration of fire; numerous H.E. bursts seen in target area.

10 Apr 44 Aulnoye Three large explosions seen at time of bombing; large building to northeast well ablaze.

11 Apr 44 Aachen Good fire glow on cloud and many bomb bursts seen on target.

20 Apr 44 Cologne Orange glow on cloud visible 100 miles from target.

22 Apr 44 Dusseldorf Large explosion seen; many concentrated fires.

24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe Marking and bombing well concentrated; many fires and explosions in successful attack.

26 Apr 44 Schweinfurt Concentrated bombing; one large explosion and small concentrated fires.

30 Apr 44 Maintenon Very large red-orange explosion; attack well concentrated.

11 May 44 Hasselt Scattered attack due to bad weather; second target going well.

19 May 44 Orleans Very good trip; large fires and explosion in target.

21 May 44 Duisburg 10/10 cloud. Bad conditions. No markers visible; brought back bombs.

22 May 44 Dortmund Concentrated attack; bombed ground markers.

24 May 44 Aachen PPF accurate and well-timed; hazy; no results seen.

27 May 44 Aachen Quantity of black smoke after bombing; a good attack.

31 May 44 Trappes Visibility good; red, yellow, green and white markers seen; bombed railway visually.

2 June 44 Trappes Defences active; no cloud and bright moon.

4 June 44 Calais Bombed in 10/10 cloud; heavy attack on small target.

5 June 44 Special 10/10 cloud; 12/13,000 feet; very quiet trip.

duties patrol

 

Warrant Officer Code, a Canadian, has carried out 31 sorties on his first operational tour and has at all times displayed a high commendable keenness and determination to complete the task in hand.

 

Undeterred by the heaviest opposition, Warrant Officer Code's sorties, including four against Berlin, have been successful due in no small measure to his exceptional navigation.

 

Determined at all times to ensure that no efforts of his were spared to achieve the finest results, Warrant Officer Code has shown outstanding ability and produced splendid examples of navigational skill.

 


This Warrant Officer has set a fine example by his courage and tenacity of purpose, and it is considered that his devotion to duty is deserving of his recommendation for an award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

CODE, S/L William Henry (C11547) - Mention in Despatches - No.9 Construction and Maintenance Unit - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Sharbot Lake, Ontario. Enlisted in Toronto, 17 April 1942.

 

During the past three years this officer has shown initiative, skill and energy of such calibre that he has inspired the men under his command. Under his direction, urgently required work and services have been completed well and speedily under the most adverse conditions of climate, availability of skilled personnel and supply of equipment and material. He has cheerfully assumed responsibilities far in excess of the normal requirements of his rank, and he is an officer of exceptional resource and trustworthiness.

 

* * * * *

 

CODERRE, F/L Maurice A. (J21551) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.170 Squadron - Award effective 23 November 1945 as per London Gazette of 4 December 1945 and AFRO 212/46 dated 1 March 1946. Home in Peterborough, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 3 July 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 4 November 1940), No.3 EFTS (graduated 23 December 1940), and No.6 SFTS (graduated 9 March 1941). Award presented 29 June 1949.

 

Many of Flight Lieutenant Coderre's sorties have been against Germany's most heavily defended targets such as Hanover, Stuttgart, Dortmund and Kiel. In February 1945, he was detailed for an attack against Duisberg. Shortly after leaving the target he was engaged by very heavy anti-aircraft fire which set on fire the port wing of his aircraft and he was forced to abandon it. Flight Lieutenant Coderre's determination, courage and skill combined with his excellent captaincy and fine airmanship have set a magnificent example to all.

 

* * * * *

 

COFFEY, F/O Jesse Ray (J86050) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Provost, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 15 May 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 23 October 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 1 January 1943) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Award sent by registered mail. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 20 July 1944 when he had flown 34 sorties (172 hours 15 minutes), 10 November 1943 to 19 July 1944.


+ not counted as operational sortie

* counted as 1/3 an operation

# daylight operation

 

18 Nov 43 Nantes (Nickling, 4.05)+ 22 May 44 Dortmund (3.45)

31 Jan 44 Sea Search (6.45)+ 27 May 44 Rennes (3.55)

1 Feb 44 Sea Search (5.30)+ 25 May 44 Aachen (3.30)

15 Feb 44 Berlin (7.50) 28 May 44 Dunkirk (2.00)

7 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.20)* 11 June 44 Tours (5.05)

13 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.35)* 15 June 44 Lens (2.35)

15 Mar 44 Stuttgart (7.50) 23 June 44 NOBALL (1.50)

18 Mar 44 Frankfort (6.20) 24 June 44 St.Omer (1.50)

22 Mar 44 Frankfort (5.20) 28 June 44 Abbeville (2.25)

24 Mar 44 Berlin (8.20) 29 June 44 Metz (5.40)

26 Mar 44 Essen (5.05) 30 June 44 Villers Bocage (2.30)#

30 Mar 44 Nuremburg (8.10) 2 July 44 Oisemont-au-Bois (2.00)#

18 Apr 44 Paris (5.30)* 5 July 44 Watten (1.45)#

20 Apr 44 Lens (4.20)* 6 July 44 Abbeville (2.35)#

24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe (7.00) 7 July 44 Caen (2.25)#

26 Apr 44 Essen (5.00) 9 July 44 Dunkirk (1.40)#

27 Apr 44 Aulnoye (4.40)* 10 July 44 Paris (2.50)#

30 Apr 44 Somain (4.20)* 12 July 44 Paris (3.10)#

19 May 44 Calais (2.00) 15 July 44 Nucourt (3.30)#

21 May 44 Duisburg (3.40) 19 July 44 Rollez (2.55)#

 

This officer is a keen and capable Captain of a highly successful crew. Flying Officer Coffey has a fine record of achievement which can be attributed to his skilful airmanship, devotion to duty and dogged determination to successfully complete his missions. The fine personal example set by this officer, not only to his crew, but to the squadron generally, is most commendable. Strongly recommended for the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

COFFEY, F/L Jesse Ray, DFC (J86050) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Public Records Office Air 2/8830 has recommendation dated 20 November 1944 when he had flown 54 sorties (261 hours 45 minutes), 10 November 1943 to 9 November 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Coffey has proved himself an exceptionally keen and skilful pilot and captain of aircraft. He has now completed two tours of operations against such strongly defended targets as Berlin, Stuttgart and Essen. Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross he has continued to display outstanding airmanship, determination and exceptional devotion to duty which have won the confidence and admiration of all his crew.


* * * * *

 

COFFEY, G/C Patrick Joseph (C1132) - Mention in Despatches - EAC Headquarters - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Enlisted in Ottawa, 2 October 1939.

 

This officer has been employed for the past year as Staff Officer Personnel at Eastern Air Command Headquarters. Prior to this he was employed in the Personnel Branch at Air Force Headquarters. Throughout his period of service he has at all times devoted his entire energy to the benefit of the Royal Canadian Air Force. He has embraced his duties in a vigorous and determined manner to the advantage of all personnel and units in this command. The tireless application to duty of this officer to any job large or small is a consistent feature of his work.

 

* * * * *

 

COFFEY, F/L Robert Ellsworth (J10256) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.438 Squadron - Award effective 13 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 January 1945 and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1915 in Greenview, Illinois; home there; spent six years in U.S. Army, two years in USAF; civil engineer. Enlisted in RCAF at Windsor, Ontario, 26 June 1941. Commissioned in February 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 13 September 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1941), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 27 or 29 March 1942). Instructed at No.1 SFTS, Camp Borden and then further trained at No.1 OTU, Bagotville. Overseas in November 1943, flying with No.438 Squadron, 18 December 1943 to 15 March 1945 until given command of No.440 Squadron. Fatally injured in an automobile accident, 1 August 1945; buried in Graasthen, Denmark. Photos PL-40907 and PL-42809. DFC and Bar sent by registered mail to his father, 13 October 1947. Recommended when he had flown 101 sorties (105 operational hours).

 

Flight Lieutenant Coffey has a fine record of successful operations. He has displayed excellent qualities as a leader. Prior to the invasion of Normandy he participated in numerous attacks on enemy installations in France, encountering heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire. In July 1944, Flight Lieutenant Coffey pressed home a successful attack on a bridge at Thury Harcourt which was completely destroyed and during and after the battle in the Falaise Gap he destroyed many locomotives, barges and an ammunition ship. He has led many successful sorties against railway targets in the battle area and has done effective work disrupting enemy communications and supply lines.

 

COFFEY, S/L Robert Ellsworth, DFC (J10256) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.440 Squadron - Award effective 3 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1944 and AFRO 1672/45 dated 2 November 1945.

 


This officer is now on his second tour of operational duty. In March, 1945, he participated in an attack on the railway sidings at Winterswijk. Despite intense anti-aircraft fire his squadron destroyed twenty-five trucks and damaged ten. On another occasion this officer completely silenced heavy guns on a well defended enemy position. Squadron Leader Coffey has at all times shown a high standard of devotion to duty. He has led attacks against a wide variety of targets displaying exceptional qualities of leadership and courage.

 

* * * * *

 

COFFIN, FS Rolfe Meredith (R66916) - Mention in Despatches - No.4 Repair Depot - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Enlisted in Montreal, 21 August 1940.

 

This non-commissioned officer, when in charge of civilian pay, brought No.4 Repair Depot the honour of being the first unit in Eastern Air Command to achieve one hundred percent accuracy in paylists. Later as non-commissioned officer in charge of Non-Public Funds, he did his work so well that inspectors could raise no observations. Now in charge of service pay, he has done splendid work and has made sound recommendations for improvement of procedure. All this has been achieved by hard work and long hours and his record is worthy of the highest praise.

 

* * * * *

 

COGHLAN, FS Lloyd James (Can 7515) - British Empire Medal - No.2 Air Command Headquarters - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Enlisted in Ottawa, 7 February 1936. In postwar RCAF; awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 21 October 1943 when on strength of AFHQ as Flight Sergeant. Award presented 17 January 1948.

 

Flight Sergeant Coghlan has proven himself to be an exceptionally conscientious, enthusiastic and dependable non-commissioned officer. On many occasions he has willingly tackled work which necessitated extra hours of labour beyond the call of normal duties. His extreme dependability to organize, his praiseworthy devotion to duty and his outstanding perseverance have contributed immeasurably in maintaining high morale and a most efficient section.

 

* * * * *

 


COGHLAN, F/L Terence (J14087) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Home in Fort William; enlisted North Bay 30 July 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 17 January 1942), No.21 EFTS (graduated 11 April 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 10 October 1942). Award sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.9 Vol.20612) has recommendation dated 3 April 1945 when he had flown 30 sorties (203 hours 15 minutes), 2 November 1944 to 31 March 1945. Sortie list mentions heavy flak on first sortie (Dusseldorf), early returns on 2 December and 4 December (engine trouble). On 13 February 1945 (Dresden) it reads, "Predicted flak on the outward journey holed both No.3 tanks and port fin." Heavy flak on 20 February (Dortmund); for 7 March 1945 it reads, "Fighters and flak en route very active." 15 March 1945, "Fighters active."

 

Flight Lieutenant Coghlan has completed numerous sorties against the enemy, the majority of which were attacks against such heavily defended targets as Stuttgart, Munich, and Hamburg. He has at all times displayed the greatest determination and tenacity in pressing home his attacks. He is a highly skilled and courageous pilot whose coolness under fire, devotion to duty, and display of a fine offensive spirit have served as an example to the whole squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

COHEN, S/L Sydney Joshua Joseph (J7645) - Air Force Cross - Western Air Command Headquarters - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 132/45 dated 26 January 1945. Enlisted in Montreal, 8 October 1940; trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.4 AOS (graduated 7 July 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 18 August 1941) and No.2 ANS (graduated 15 September 1941). As of recommendation had flown 873 hours including 308 operational hours (66 sorties). Award presented 25 February 1949.

 

This navigator has at all times displayed exceptional keenness and efficiency in the air. Since being posted from an operational squadron to staff duties he has flown a comparatively large number of operational hours and has made remarkable progress in organizing the work of squadron navigators. He has been instrumental in raising the standard of navigation of coastal squadrons far beyond anything previously achieved. The skill, organizing ability and devotion to duty of this officer is outstanding.

 

* * * * *

 

COHN, Sgt Harry Joseph (R59387) - British Empire Medal - AFHQ, Directorate of Air Training - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and RCAF Routine Order 1380/44 dated 30 June 1944 - Born in Norwood, Manitoba; home there; enlisted in Winnipeg, 4 July 1940. Award presented 27 April 1945.

 

This NCO has served in the Directorate of Air Training during his more than three years of service. He has organized the work in his section in a most efficient manner, thereby enabling them to work at the highest pressure at all times. His initiative, energy and devotion to duty have been an example and inspiration to all members of his section.

 

* * * * *


COHOE, F/O George Elmer Kennedy (J12687) - Air Force Cross - No.3 OTU - Award effective 11 August 1945 as per London Gazette dated 14 August 1945 and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. Enlisted at Winnipeg, 4 May 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 21 June 1940), No.2 EFTS (graduated 20 October 1940) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 10 December 1940). Had flown 2,597 hours to date, 1,558 hours as instructor, 308 hours in previous six months. Award presented 9 April 1949. DHist file 181.009 D.2280 (RG.24 Vol.20623) has his application for Operational Wings dated 20 May 1945. It notes that he had been an instructor from March 1941 to January 1943 before going on operations. He flew with No.7 (BR) Squadron, commencing 28 May 1943 (Shark, anti-submarine patrol, four hours 20 minutes). He flew a total of eight sorties on Sharks (32 hours 20 minutes) before going on to Cansos with the occasional Stranraer (two sorties, nine hours 50 minutes) and Catalinas (five sorties, 58 hours 15 minutes). His total operational time was 463 hours 35 minutes (57 sorties). His longest patrol was 25 July 1943 (16 hours ten minutes). Last sortie was 26 June 1944 when he was re-assigned (under protest) to instructional duties. In the end he was not awarded Operational Wings (insufficient operational hours).

 

This officer is an exceptionally keen and conscientious type of instructor who has spent the majority of his service career on instructional duties. He has invariably shown an extremely high degree of flying and instructional ability which has set a splendid example among those with whom he has served. His keen devotion to duty as well as an all-absorbing interest in his work are well deserving of very high praise.

 

* * * * *

 

COLBOURNE, F/L Frederick Charles (J2937) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.5 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 13 August 1943 as per Canada Gazette dated 21 August 1943 and AFRO 2198/43 dated 29 October 1943. Home in West Calgary; enlisted Calgary 15 April 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 22 June 1940), Calgary Flying Club (graduated 22 July 1940) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 18 September 1940). Flew two tours. Photo PL-13655 shows him. Postwar minister in Alberta cabinet.

 

This officer has completed 1,900 hours of flying, 1,500 hours of which have been on anti-submarine operations in the North Atlantic from January 1941 to May 1943. He has participated in two attacks on enemy submarines and has proven himself to be a skilful pilot under any and all conditions. Recently, while six hundred miles at sea, he sighted and made an attack on a submarine which has been reported as being probably sunk. His enthusiastic persistence in all his undertakings has contributed greatly to the efficiency of his squadron. He has been an inspiration to all who work with him.

 

* * * * *

 


COLDRIDGE, F/O Alfred Stanley (J26625) - Mention in Despatches - No.138 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Home in Port Arthur, Ontario; enlisted Fort William, 4 June 1940. Trained at No.34 EFTS (graduated 29 January 1943) and No.38 SFTS (graduated 28 May 1943). Public Records Office Air 2/9230 has recommendation for a Military Cross (downgraded) and refers to Interrogation Reports Nos. M.I.9/S/PG - 2387 and 2388. Cited with F/O Harry D. Medland (also Mentioned in Despatches).

 

These officers were members of the crew of a Halifax aircraft engaged on operations over France on the night of 9th May 1944. Owing to serious engine trouble developing, the captain - Flying Officer Coldridge - ordered the crew to abandon the aircraft. He remained in the aircraft until all was clear and, after leaving it finally at a low altitude, sprained both ankles very badly when reaching the ground. Whilst endeavouring to reach cover he encountered Flying Officer Medland who helped his captain to a wood over a mile away, and then made his way alone to a village. having obtained help, Flying Officer Medland returned and, with a peasant's assistance, managed to bring Flying Officer Coldridge to a house where he was attended by a doctor of the Maquis. Both officers remained with the doctor until 3rd June 1944. During their stay they took part in some of the operations by the Maquis, blowing up trains, etc and they also instructed Maquis personnel in the laying out of reception areas in which to receive supplies from the air. Whilst so engaged the two officers made arrangements for returning to England. They were assisted to Spain by members of the Resistance movement. They were arrested by the Guardia Civile at Labuerda and subsequently imprisoned at Boltana. They were ultimately released and reported to the British Consulate in Madrid. Both officers returned to this country, via Gibraltar, early in September 1944.

 

* * * * *

 

COLE, WO Edward Frederick (R157880) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.409 Squadron - Award effective 30 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born in Vancouver, 13 March 1920. Enlisted there, 26 March 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 12 September 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1942) and No.3 SFTS (wings on 5 March 1943). Arrived in UK, 4 April 1943. To No.12 (P) AFU, 8 June 1943; to No.51 OTU, 31 August 1943. Served with No.409 Squadron, 4 January 1944 to 12 March 1945. Commissioned 22 December 1944. Repatriated to Canada, 13 August 1945; released 3 October 1945. Sergeant on 5 March 1943; Flight Sergeant, 3 September 1943; WO2 as of 5 Marach 1944; Pilot Officer, 22 December 1944; Flying Officer, 22 June 1945. Award sent by registered mail. Cited with F/O William S. Martin (RCAF observer). The incident described was on the night of 29/30 November 1944 when they shot down two Ju.88s. DHist file 181.009 D.3510 (RG.24 Vol.20640) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944. They had to fly 100 miles to reach airfield after damage; they had completed 53 sorties as of recommendation.

 


As observer and pilot respectively, Flying Officer Martin and Warrant Officer Cole have completed a large number of operational missions. They have displayed a high degree of skill and determination and throughout have set a fine example of devotion to duty. During a recent sortie they were responsible for the destruction of two enemy aircraft. In the second of the fights one wing of the hostile aircraft was shot away. It struck Warrant Officer Cole's aircraft which sustained severe damage. Height was gradually lost but Warrant Officer Cole flew a considerable distance to reach an airfield where a safe landing was effected. On the flight home he received the greatest assistance from Flying Officer Martin, whose navigation, although deprived of the use of many of his instruments, was faultless. These members of aircraft crew displayed courage and coolness in difficult circumstances.

 

* * * * *

 

COLE, WO Harry Clifford (J61668) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.582 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 19 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Home in Tompkins, Saskatchatchewan; enlisted Regina. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 14 September 1940), No.2 WS (graduated20 January 1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 17 February 1941. Award presented 9 July 1949. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/7276 has recommendation dated 17 June 1944 when he had flown 51 sorties (267 hours) over two tours

 

25 Jun 42 Bremen 9 Nov 42 Hamburg

28 Jun 42 GARDENING 8 Jan 43 Duisburg

(Courbe Point) 23 Jan 43 Dusseldorf

3 July 42 Bremen 27 Jan 43 Dusseldorf

6 July 42 GARDENING 30 Jan 43 Hamburg

(Coubre Point) 3 Feb 43 Hamburg

24 Jul 42 Duisburg 11 Feb 43 Wilhelmshaven

26 Jul 42 Duisburg 14 Feb 43 Milan

28 Jul 42 Hamburg 21 Feb 43 Bremen

29 Jul 42 Saarbrucken 26 Feb 43 Cologne

31 Jul 42 Dusseldorf 9 Mar 43 Munich

10 Aug 42 Osnabruck 5 Jan 44 Special target

12 Aug 42 Mainz 24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt

16 Aug 42 Dusseldorf 1 Mar 44 Stuttgart

17 Aug 42 Osnabruck 15 Mar 44 Stuttgart

20 Aug 42 Enemy tanker, Bay 18 Mar 44 Frankfurt

of Biscay 8 May 44 Nantes

27 Aug 42 Frankfurt 10 May 44 Cap Gris Nez

28 Aug 42 Nuremberg 19 May 44 Boulogne

4 Sept 42 Bremen 22 May 44 Dortmund

6 Sept 42 Duisburg 28 May 44 Mardyck

8 Sept 42 Frankfurt 31 May 44 Montcouple

10 Sep 42 Dusseldorf 6 June 44 Longues


13 Sep 42 Bremen 7 June 44 Foret de Cerisy

14 Sep 42 Wilhelmshaven 8 June 44 Fougeres

23 Sep 42 Wismar 10 Jun 44 Laval

6 Nov 42 Genoa 15 Jun 44 Lens

 

Warrant Officer Cole is the set operator of a very successful crew. He has taken part in a large number of attacks on heavily defended German targets as well as on French and Italian targets. His aircraft has frequently been the target for the enemy defences, often sustaining severe damage. He has complete disregard for enemy opposition.

 

This warrant officer is a most resourceful member of aircrew who is determined to meet the enemy wherever he can be found. He has made a valuable contribution to the squadron's operational effort, and is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

 

 

* * * * *

 

COLE, FS James Pettigrew (R71461) - Mention in Despatches - Station Patricia Bay - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 15 October 1940.

 

This non-commissioned officer has done splendid work on the Service Police (Investigation) which has resulted in recovery of Royal Canadian Air Force property amounting to several thousand dollars. He shows well above average ability in Police Investigation work, which sets a high standard for his associates to follow. Untiring in efforts to bring matters to a successful conclusion, he works long hours without thought of self.

 

* * * * *

 

COLE, P/O James Henry (J86733) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.50 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 19 September 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Sious Lookout, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 7 February 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 11 September 1942), No.1 BGS (graduated 7 December 1942) and No.10 AOS (graduated 5 April 1943). Commissioned 15 May 1943. Overseas May 1943. Flew two tours; repatriated August 1945; released 17 September 1945. Award sent by registered mail 30 September 1946.

 

This officer has completed many successful operations during which he has displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 


* * * * *

 

COLE, P/O Mervyn William (J88249) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.432 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Home in Parry Sound, Ontario; enlisted Hamilton, 6 April 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 11 September 1942), No.20 EFTS (ceased training) and No.1 CNS (graduated 14 May 1943). Award sent by registered mail 20 April 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.5557 (RG.24 Vol.20668) has recommendation dated 21 November when he had flown 32 sorties (147 hours 25 minutes), 27 April to 6 November 1944.

 

An above average and efficient navigator who has completed thirty-two successful sorties and has shown such exceptional navigation ability that he has won the confidence and respect of his crew and superior officers. His cheerful disposition, alertness and strong sense of duty in his work have made him stand out among his fellow navigators. For his fine record and intense loyalty, this officer is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

 

* * * * *

 

COLE, FS Sydney Reginald (R179577) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.162 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 28 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Home in Long Branch, Ontario; enlisted Toronto, 6 July 1942. Trained at No.3 WS (graduated 10 April 1943) and No.8 BGS (graduated 31 May 1943). Cited with F/O B.C. Denomy (DSO), F/Os Graham Campbell and Sidney E. Matheson (DFCs) and Flight Sergeants Israel J. Bodnoff (DFM). See Bodnoff, above, for citation. Award presented 18 October 1947. Applied for Operational Wings while at No.1 AOS, January 1945; application denied 31 January 1945 - "He has only 460 hours during seven months of flying, mostly with 160 Squadron".

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9158 has recommendation raised 1 July 1944 by the Officer Commanding, RAF Station Wick. It noted that Cole had flown approximately 30 sorties (350 operational hours):

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer was the 3rd Wireless Operator in Canso "P" of 162 Squadron on the 24th June 1944. and was manning the Wireless Telephone set During the run in to attack a U-Boat in the face of accurate and intense anti-aircraft fire, the aircraft was being repeatedly hit and the starboard engine out of action and on fire. He cooly and courageously continued sending a sighting report until he was wounded by shrapnel and stunned momentarily, when the Wireless Telephone set was manned by the 1st Wireless Operator.

 


After the U-Boat had been sunk the aircraft was forced to ditch due to fire and the starboard engine falling out. This Non-Commissioned Officer then searched the aircraft, which was full of fumes and smoke, for a dinghy which had without his knowledge been launched. He collected a tin of water and rations at a time when the petrol tanks were in danger of exploding, and even when in the dinghy leaving the aircraft, had to be restrained by the others from going back to get the dinghy radio which had been left behind.

 

During the 21 hours spent in the water he did all in his power to assist the others and as a result of his efforts the Navigator's life was saved, in spite of the fact that he was suffering from shrapnel wounds received during the attack.

 

It is considered that this Non-Commissioned Officer showed great devotion to duty and exceptional courage and is most strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

To this the Air Officer Commanding, No.18 Group, added (2 July 1944):

 

Throughout the gallant and successful attack by this aircraft on a U-Boat, Flight Sergeant Cole behaved in an exemplary manner, continuing to send out sighting reports until he was wounded and thrown from his position by the wireless set. Strongly recommended for immediate award.

 

* * * * *

 

COLEMAN, G/C Sheldon William (117) - United States Legion of Merit (Degree of Officer) - Award effective 8 August 1947 as per Canada Gazette dated 2 August 1947 and AFRO 431/47 dated 8 August 1947. Born in Hamilton; home in Montreal; enrolled as Provisional Pilot Officer, 15 July 1929; awarded wings, 21 February 1930. Much survey flying in the 1930s and was the object of an extensive aerial search in the Northwest Territories in 1936. Commanded No.5 (BR) Squadron, December 1938 to June 1939 and again June to September 1941. Senior Air Staff Officer at No.1 Group, St.John's, September 1941 to November 1942. Posted to Washington early in 1945 and was stationed that summer on Guam with the 16th Bombardment Group, 315 Bomb Wing, 20th Air Force, June to October 1945. He applied for a Pacific Star (unsuccessfully) for this service, claiming one "bomb raid" on Tokyo on 2 September 1945 (a demonstration, not a raid). Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 while an Air Commodore at Tactical Air Command Headquarters. Retired 13 June 1959. Captain (USN) John Raby, Naval Attache for Air, to Air Marshal Leckie, 19 June 1947, provides citation for American award:

 


For exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service as Chief Staff Officer to the Commander of the Royal Canadian Air Force units based in Newfoundland during the period 13 September 1941 to 30 September 1942. He worked in close harmony with CTF-24 and staff and thereby ensured employment of RCAF coordination with Naval air and surface forces under the command of Commander Task Force Twenty-Four. His intelligent and cooperative attitude were contributing factors in the successful escort of convoy operations and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Allied military performance.

 

NOTE: recommended for CBE or OBE by Air Vice Marshal Curtis, 5 March 1946 when on AMAS, AFHQ, confirmed as OBE but did not reach priority list for awards:

 

This officer has displayed a brilliant knowledge of the various phases of Air Force planning. He has remarkable ability in expressing himself on paper on [in ?] clear-cut concise language. His well written precis and submissions to the Government on matters of high policy level have been productive of amazingly gratifying results. He is unsparing of himself in preparing documents which only an officer with his sound Service knowledge could produce, often under pressure to meet a deadline. Many of his submissions have been prepared on post-hostilities plans where his foresight and reliable knowledge have been invaluable.

 

On his return from the Pacific Theatre of War, he prepared a combined report on the U.S. Army Air Force operations which will be of great benefit to the RCAF in its post-war tactical planning.

 

He has advanced many excellent constructive ideas for the training of the future Air Force.

 

His willing co-operation and untiring efforts have at all times assisted the smooth functioning of AMAS Division.

 

Coleman was living at 48-122 Lakeshore, St. Catharines, L2N 6N6 in 1994 when applied for Special Service Medal.

 

* * * * *

 

COLES, P/O Millard Wright (J16833) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.115 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Home in Milton, Prince Edward Island; enlisted Charlottetown, 13 March 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 25 August 1941), No.20 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 9 January 1942). Award sent by registered mail 1 August 1951.

 

Pilot Officer Coles has completed many sorties against targets in Germany, Italy and occupied Europe and recently has participated in attacks on the heavily defended area on the Ruhr Valley. His work as captain of aircraft has been consistently excellent and he has achieved some fine results.

 

* * * * *

 


COLES, F/O Nathaniel John (J17728) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Smith Falls, Ontario; enlisted London, Ontario, 20 July 1940. Trained at No.3 WS (graduated 24 October 1941) and No.8 BGS (graduated 24 November 1941). Award presented 24 May 1946. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 22 November 1944 when he had flown 18 sorties of a second tour (27 September to 6 December 1944). First tour had been 21 sorties in Bomber Command, 18 January to 29 May 1943.

 

Flying Officer Coles has now completed eighteen sorties on his second tour. All his sorties have been characterized by his exceptional devotion to duty and high "esprit de corps". While on the ground, Flying Officer Coles is untiring in his endeavours to assist his less experienced fellows and his precept and example have been of great value to the squadron.

 

I consider the courage and high sense of duty shown by this officer fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COLEY, F/O James Edmund (J26344) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Home in Kenora, Ontario; enlisted Winnipeg, 7 April 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 September 1942), No.3 AOS (graduated 6 December 1942), No.5 BGS (graduated 7 March 1943) and No.1 ANS (graduated 14 May 1943). Award sent by registered mail. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9051 has recommendation dated 20 December 1944 when he had flown 39 sorties (170 hours), 27 May to 17 September 1944. In crew of F/L Alexander Horne, DFC.

 

27 May 44 Bourg Leopold (4.04) 25 Jul 44 Ferfay (3.45)

1 June 44 Ferme d'Urville 28 Jul 44 Foret de Nieppe (3.00)

(2.43) 1 Aug 44 Prouville (3.45)

5 June 44 Mont Fleury (4.52) 3 Aug 44 Bois de Cassan (3.50)

6 June 44 St.Lo (5.22) 5 Aug 44 Foret de Nieppe (3.10)

7 June 44 Juvisy (4.36) 7 Aug 44 May-sur-Orne (4.20)

9 June 44 GARDENING (5.29) 9 Aug 44 Foret de Nieppe (3.30)

12 Jun 44 Amiens (4.18) 12 Aug 44 Brunswick (5.30)

14 Jun 44 Douai (4.02) 14 Aug 44 TRACTABLE (3.45)

15 Jun 44 Fouilliard (5.09) 15 Aug 44 Tirlemont (3.40)

22 Jun 44 Laon (4.11) 18 Aug 44 Sterkrade (4.05)

27 Jun 44 Mont Candon (3.19) 25 Aug 44 Brest (5.30)

28 Jun 44 Blainville (6.55) 26 Aug 44 GARDENING (6.00)

1 July 44 St.Martin l'Hortier 29 Aug 44 GARDENING (6.05)

(3.52) 1 Sept 44 Lumbres (3.10)


4 July 44 St.Martin l'Hortier 3 Sept 44 Soesterburg (2.56)

(3.45) 10 Sep 44 Le Havre (3.16)

5 July 44 St.Martin l'Hortier 11 Sep 44 GARDENING (5.30)

(3.45 12 Sep 44 Munster (4.15)

6 July 44 Croixdale (3.55) 13 Sep 44 Gelsenkirchen (4.14)

23 Jul 44 Kiel (4.56) 17 Sep 44 Boulogne (2.58)

24 Jul 44 Stuttgart (8.05)

 

Flying Officer Coley was posted to No.10 Squadron in May 1944, and after completing 39 sorties, comprising 170 operational hours, has been screened and posted. He has taken part in attacks on heavily defended German targets including Gelsenkirchen, Munster, Brunswick, Kiel and Sterkrade.

 

Throughout his operational tour, this Canadian officer has consistently proved himself to be an outstanding Air Bomber and a gallant and dependable member of aircraft crew. His cheerful confidence under adverse conditions has helped to maintain a high standard of morale in his crew and has played a good part in the successes achieved. He has brought back many fine photographs of the target area.

 

He was the Air Bomber of a Halifax aircraft detailed to attack Blainville on 28th June 1944. When the aircraft was fifty miles from the target area, the starboard outer engine failed, but the pilot decided to go on. On reaching the target, heavy and accurate flak was encountered but despite this Flying Officer Coley coolly and skilfully directed his aircraft and a successful attack was made from 10,000 feet instead of the ordered 11,000 feet. On this, as on many other occasions, he displayed courage of a high order. I strongly recommend that his fine record of achievement, skill, determination and strong sense of duty be recognised by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COLL, FS Henry Nelson (R104195) - Mention in Despatches - Leeming - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Home in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Halifax, 4 July 1941. DHist file 181.009 D.2619 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has recommendation forwarded 1 February 1945 to No.63 Base HQ when he had served 14 months in Canada, 20 months in UK. NCO in charge of Sick Quarters.

 

Flight Sergeant Coll has a long and useful record in the RCAF including six months' service in the Middle East. He has been employed in Station Sick Quarters at this unit since 29th September 1944 and has carried out his duties in an exemplary manner. His knowledge of service medical matters is of a very high standard. He possesses excellent NCO qualifications and has organized his Section into an efficient unit. He possesses good service spirit and it is considered his work fully merits the award of Mention in Despatches.


* * * * *

 

COLLARD, A/C Richard Reeve (C1253) - Commander, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ, Director of Works and Buildings - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born in Belmont, Ontario, 30 September 1886. Enlisted in 49th Battery, Canadian Field Artillery, February 1916, went overseas as a lieutenant, and transferred in France to 23rd Battery. Between wars was active in construction. Entered RCAF October 1939 or 13 March 1940; the latter date may be his appointment as Director of Works and Buildings. Supervised construction of BCATP stations; retired 1945 (at which time he was Air Member for Works and Buildings) and died 21 April 1963. Award presented 17 April 1943.

 

This officer as Director of Works and Buildings has been primarily responsible for the construction of the extraordinarily large number of Flying Training Schools, other formations of the Combined Training Establishment and Operational Stations of the RCAF. The excellence and rapidity with which these have been completed were in the main attributable to his leadership and forcefulness. In this particular field he has made a valuable contribution

 

* * * * *

 

COLLEDGE, F/O William Wilson (J8207) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 17 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 April 1943 and AFRO 985/43 dated 28 May 1943. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 25 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 16 June 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941), and No.7 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941). Killed in flying accident at No.3 Flying Instructor School, 1 July 1943 (Oxford X6858); buried in Britain.

 

Flying Officer Colledge was captain of an aircraft detailed recently to complete an anti-submarine patrol. While so engaged he was attacked by four Junkers 88 and a running fight ensued which lasted thirty-six minutes. During the encounter, one enemy aircraft was destroyed and two damaged. Much credit is due to this officer for his coolness and skill under fire, and for his continued devotion to duty which made this success possible.

 

* * * * *


COLLIER, F/L James Edwin (J8648) - Mention in Despatches - No.250 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Born 20 April 1919 at Vancouver. Enlisted in Toronto, 11 February 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 21 June 1941), No.14 EFTS (graduated 20 August 1941), and No.11 SFTS (wings 7 November 1941). Arrived in UK 13 December 1941. Posted to Middle East where he flew with No.250 Squadron (June 1942 to June 1943). Further work in Egypt before posting to UK (February 1944) and Canada (March 1944). Returned to Britain in May 1944, with posting to No.403 Squadron 4 July 1944 to 22 February 1945. In the course of his second tour he was credited with the destruction of a Bf.109 (16 July 1944 and a Me.262 (25 December 1944). To Canada in May 1945, released 25 June 1945. See "Desert Kittyhawks - Flying with 250 Squadron RAF", Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society, XXII No.4 (Winter 1984).

 

COLLIER, S/L James Edwin (J8648) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.403 Squadron - Award effective 27 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 8 May 1945 and AFRO 966/45 dated 8 June 1945. Award presented 30 November 1949.

Squadron Leader Collier has completed two tours of operational duty. He has served with distinction in the Tunisian campaign. Since July, 1944, he has operated from bases in France, Belgium and Holland. A keen and resolute pilot and a reliable leader, this officer has destroyed at least two enemy aircraft and damaged others. In addition he has inflicted considerable damage on the enemy's mechanical transport.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINGE, F/L George Bruce (J8813) - Commended for Valuable Services in the Air - No.1 CFS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 19 November 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 10 April 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 25 September 1941). No citation in AFRO or biographical file. DHist file 181.009 D.1721 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation for an AFC dated 21 December 1944 when he had flown 3,012 hours five minutes, 2,758 hours as instructor, 283 hours in previous six months. Certificate and emblems sent to No.1 Central Flying School, 5 July 1945.

 

This officer's keenness and genuine devotion to duty constitute an example beyond question to those with whom he works. He is an exceptional pilot and instructor. In addition, much of his spare time is devoted to work designed to elevate the prestige of the unit.

 

* * * * *

 

 

COLLINGS, WO1 Baisel Benjamin (R117346) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Home in Chapleau, Ontario; enlisted North Bay, 11 August 1941. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 29 August 1942). Award presented 20 August 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2610 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 15 April 1945 when he had flown 34 sorties (300 hours 30 minutes) in two tours - 21 June to 24 September 1943 (14 sorties) and 30 October 1944 to 12 March 1945 (20 sorties). From the sortie sheet, the first tour was very odd with six bombing raids on German targets (21 June to 9 July 1943) followed by eight attacks on targets in Greece (6), Albania and Yugoslavia.


This Warrant Officer has now completed a second tour of operations comprised of twenty operational sorties over enemy territory including many of the major and heavily defended targets in Germany. Warrant Officer Collings has at all times displayed outstanding ability and a strong sense of duty, and he holds a fine record of achievement on the squadron.

 

His untiring devotion to duty in moments of danger has been largely responsible for the successful completion of his crew's many sorties, and by his example of cheerful courage, has maintained a very high standard of morale among, not only his crew members, but the squadron in general.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, S/L Arthur Stewart (J7819) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.400 Squadron - Award effective 10 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 24 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Home in Peterborough; enlisted in Ottawa, 17 December 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 28 May 1941), No.7 EFTS (graduated 15 July 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 7 October 1941). Award sent by registered mail 26 September 1949 when he was living in Renfrew.

 

On photographic and tactical reconnaissances this pilot has shown exceptional skill and courage and has produced excellent results, frequently in the face of heavy opposition. On one occasion he led a section at low level to cover a heavily defended gun position and searchlight battery at St.Valeren-Caux. On approaching the target the anti-aircraft fire became intense but Squadron Leader Collins continued with his task, diving to an altitude of twenty-five feet. During the attack the aircraft was severely damaged. Despite this the pilot returned to base with excellent photographs. On another flight Squadron Leader Collins' aircraft was damaged by a cannon shell which burst directly behind his head, a piece of shrapnel piercing his helmet. He has at all times displayed outstanding courage, determination and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, F/L Clarence Charles (J5819) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.427 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Home in Calgary; enlisted there 16 October 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.12 EFTS (graduated 29 March 1941) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 22 June 1941). Award sent by registered mail 27 September 1955. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1720 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has recommendation dated 19 April 1945, when he had flown 24 sorties (158 hours 42 minutes).

 


Squadron Leader Collins is a flight commander and has completed twenty-four operational bombing attacks on some of the most heavily defended enemy targets. His work both in the air and on the ground has been outstanding and his courage, skill and determination in action have been an inspiration to the squadron.

 

In view of the fact that Squadron Leader Collins is so dependable he has been chosen to make some of the squadron's most hazardous mining attacks. On these Gardening attacks he has made as many as three runs over the area to ensure that all his mines will be planted in the desired location.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, Sergeant Donald Glynn (R111111) - Mention in Despatches - No.31 OTU - Award effective 11 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 December 1943 and AFRO 568/44 dated 17 March 1944. Home in Sydenham, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 20 June 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 5 March 1943) and No.6 BGS (graduated 5 April 1943). No citation. He was in the crew of a Hudson that attacked a U-boat on 4 July 1943; the RAF trainee pilot, Sergeant Ian D. Wallace, was awarded a DFM.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, FS Earl Donald (R81193) - Mention in Despatches - Western Air Command Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Port Coquitlam, British Columbia; enlisted in Vancouver, 27 November 1940.

 

This non-commissioned officer did excellent work in setting up a Unit Release office at Comox. This office has functioned very efficiently. Forms originated by him have aided in simplifying and standardizing release documentation in this Command. He has aided materially in issuing Western Air Command Release Bulletins. He originated a War Service Gratuity Computation chart put into use on Western Air Command stations which he later modified by one issued at No.8 Release Centre.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, F/L Frank Alistair (J12810) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.576 Squadron - Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Home in North Vancouver; enlisted Vancouver, 2 October 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 20 December 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 14 March 1942) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 14 August 1942). Award presented 29 January 1947. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9137 has recommendation dated 15 May 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (138 hours 35 minutes), 27 November 1944 to 10 April 1945.


27 Nov 44 Freiburg 21 Feb 45 Duisburg

12 Dec 44 Essen 23 Feb 45 Pforxheim

15 Dec 44 Ludwigshaven 1 Mar 45 Mannheim

17 Dec 44 Ulm 5 Mar 45 Chemnitz

28 Dec 44 Bonn 7 Mar 45 Dessau

29 Dec 44 Gelsenkirchen 15 Mar 45 Misburg

2 Jan 45 Nuremburg 16 Mar 45 Nuremburg

5 Jan 45 Royan 18 Mar 45 Hanau

14 Jan 45 Merseburg 22 Mar 45 Hildesheim

16 Jan 45 Zeitz 24 Mar 45 Dortmund-Harpenerweg

28 Jan 45 Stuttgart 27 Mar 45 Paderborn

1 Feb 45 Mannheim 31 Mar 45 Hamburg

2 Feb 45 Weisbaden 4 Apr 45 Lutzkendorf

7 Feb 45 Cleve 9 Apr 45 Kiel

13 Feb 45 Dresden 10 Apr 45 Plauen

14 Feb 45 Chemnitz

 

Flight Lieutenant Collins, a Canadian officer, has carried out 31 operational sorties as captain of a Lancaster heavy bomber operating in Bomber Command. He has attacked many heavily defended targets in Germany including Essen, Nuremburg, Dresden and Chemnitz. He has also made numerous deep penetrations into enemy territory when fighters have been active. His unconquerable spirit under these most trying conditions has inspired a very high standard of morale in his crew.

 

On several occasions Flight Lieutenant Collins' aircraft has been damaged by anti-aircraft fire, but this has not deterred him from pressing home his attacks with the utmost skill and determination.

 

Flight Lieutenant Collins has shown exceptional fighting qualities in the face of great danger; his cheerful confidence and complete disregard for personal safety has led to a fine record of achievement. I very strongly recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, S/L Leslie Alexander (C20769) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date, Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Home in Mont Royal, Quebec. Enlisted in Ottawa, 13 November 1942. Award presented 4 June 1945.

 


This officer, who served as Air Traffic Officer for the Quebec Conference, displayed great skill and energy in the performance of his duties. His position was one requiring exceptional knowledge, organizing ability, tact and efficiency. Despite the long hours of duty, his cheerful co-operative attitude was maintained throughout. The fact that Air Transport functioned so efficiently was in large part due to his untiring attention to the many details and to his high sense of duty and responsibility. His diplomatic handling of all United States aircraft arriving and departing at the airport was most commendable. In his capacity as Air Traffic Officer, Squadron Leader Collins rendered extraordinarily fine service and made an exceptionally fine contribution to the efficient organization at the conference. Throughout his service in the Royal Canadian Air Force this officer has displayed organizing ability, resourcefulness and efficiency of a high order. His devotion to duty has been exemplary.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLINS, Sergeant Lloyd George (R134085) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.432 Squadron - NOTE: The AFRO erroneously says No.423 - Award effective 22 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 6 July 1943 and AFRO 1582/43 dated 13 August 1943. Home in Marchweel, Saskatchewan; enlisted Winnipeg, 19 September 1941. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 30 January 1942), No.8 BGS (graduated 4 July 1942), No.2 AOS (graduated 22 May 1942), and No.1 ANS (graduated 21 August 1942). Invested with award by the King 30 November 1943.

 

This airman was the navigator of an aircraft which attacked Dortmund one night in May 1943. Whilst over the target area, Sergeant Collins was wounded in the head and sustained a fracture of the skull. Although weakened by the loss of blood, he refrained from informing his captain of his injury until the target had been bombed and the aircraft was well clear of the area. Displaying outstanding fortitude, Sergeant Collins calmly executed his duties and plotted courses for the homeward flight. He did not desist until a safe landing had been effected, when he collapsed and was removed to a hospital in a semi-comatose condition. This airman set a fine example of courage, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLISON, F/L Harvey John (J29582) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 18 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 20 August 1943). Award sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy". Public Records Office Air 2/9082 has recommendation dated 19 March 1945 when he had flown 49 sorties (253 hours), 27 June 1944 to 18 March 1945.

 

27 Jun 44 Vaires 23 Oct 44 Essen

29 Jun 44 Sevacourt 1 Nov 44 Oberhausen

30 Jun 44 Vierzon 4 Nov 44 Bochum

2 July 44 Oisemonde 6 Nov 44 Gelsenkirchen

5 July 44 Dijon 16 Nov 44 Duren


7 July 44 Caen 18 Nov 44 Munster

12 Jul 44 Tours 21 Nov 44 Sterkrade

18 Jul 44 Sannerville 3 Dec 44 Urft Dam

18 Jul 44 Gelsenkirchen 4 Dec 44 Karlsruhe

20 Jul 44 Wizernes 31 Dec 44 Osterfeld

11 Aug 44 Somain 4 Jan 45 Royan

12 Aug 44 Russelsheim 16 Jan 45 Zeitz

14 Aug 44 Battle area 7 Feb 45 Goch

15 Aug 44 Volkel 8 Feb 45 Politz

16 Aug 44 Stettin 13 Feb 45 Dresden

18 Aug 44 Bremen 14 Feb 45 Chemnitz

25 Aug 44 Russelsheim 24 Feb 45 Kamen

26 Aug 44 Kiel 1 Mar 45 Mannheim

29 Aug 44 Stettin 8 Mar 45 Hamburg

15 Sep 44 Kiel 11 Mar 45 Essen

16 Sep 44 Moerdijk 14 Mar 45 Hamburg

5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken 15 Mar 45 Hanover

14 Oct 44 Duisburg 16 Mar 45 Nuremburg

15 Oct 44 Wilhelmshaven 18 Mar 45 Hanau

19 Oct 44 Stuttgart

 

Flight Lieutenant Collison has completed 49 operational sorties, 39 of which have been with the Pathfinder Force.

 

This officer is an exceptionally keen and able navigator whose skill and accuracy has always been maintained at a consistently high standard. He has invariably shown courage and dogged determination under trying and difficult conditions, and has always produced good results in spite of the attending hazards of the flights.

 

His enthusiasm and devotion to duty have been of a high order, and I recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COLLVER, F/O Hugh Ray (J87759) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.427 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Home in Wellandsport, Ontario; enlisted Winipeg, 26 March 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942), No.15 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.12 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1943). Award presented 14 June 1949. No citation in AFRO other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1729 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20607) has recommendation forwarded from squadron, date uncertain but apparently early July 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (153 hours 40 minutes).

 


This captain has completed twenty-nine operational bombing attacks against the enemy. His coolness and devotion to duty contributed in a large measure to the success of these operational sorties. He has at all times displayed great presence of mind and gallantry.

 

* * * * *

 

COLMAN, Sergeant Albert (R51929) - British Empire Medal - No.10 Squadron (Canada) - Awarded 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born in Windsor, Ontario, 13 November 1920; home there; enlisted there 24 October 1939. Award presented 16 April 1943.

 

Sergeant Colman is a key man in his squadron and has been tireless in his efforts to keep the aircraft maintenance at a high standard. The maximum serviceability of aircraft maintained at this squadron is in no small measure due to this NCO's devotion to duty. By his reliability, conscientiousness and exemplary conduct, this NCO has set a splendid example to all.

 

* * * * *

COLMER, Sergeant Rex Wayne (R267443) - British Empire Medal - Station Fort Nelson - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Kimberley, B.C. Enlisted in Calgary, 27 September 1943. Award presented 21 February 1948.

 

This non-commissioned officer has shown unusual loyalty in his untiring efforts to carry out his duties diligently and efficiently, at times under the most trying circumstances and continuous long hours of duty. He has displayed an extraordinary initiative as a hospital assistant in his efforts to improve the lot of his fellow airmen and by his industry and resourcefulness has helped immeasurably in achieving a high standard of morale and efficiency amongst the men at a very isolated unit.

 

* * * * *

 

COLMER, FS (now F/O) Stephen (R54601/C52088) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Home in Montreal; enlisted there 18 October 1939.

 

* * * * *

 

COLOSIMONE, F/L Frank (J6647) - Mention in Despatches - No.116 Squadron - Award effective 11 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 December 1943 and AFRO 568/44 dated 17 March 1944. Home in Calgary, Alberta; enlisted there 12 September 1940. Trained at No.2 BGS (graduated 21 July 1941) and No.2 WS (graduated 23 June 1941). Remained in postwar RCAF, retiring in 1976 with the rank of Colonel. Died in Ottawa, 29 December 1999.


As a Gunnery Officer in an operational squadron, Flight Lieutenant Colosimone has shown excellent qualities of leadership and resourcefulness, particularly in his ability and keenness in training Wireless Air Gunners in the squadron. He has completed many operational missions and his cheerful devotion to duty and fine example have been a source of inspiration to the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

COLP, G/C Maynard Leonce (C960) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - No.4 Repair Depot - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/45 dated 25 January 1946. Joined RCAF 1 March 1939 at Dartmouth. Retired 5 February 1945. Aero engineer. Award presented 16 April 1948.

 

This officer has served almost continuously since 1917. His devotion to duty has been marked throughout his career. With energetic application he prepared himself for the invaluable work he has done so capably since hostilities commenced. He commanded a repair depot with outstanding ability.

 

* * * * *

 

COLPITTS, G/C Henry Gardner Moore (C192) - Mention in Despatches - Station Sydney - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Born in Sussex, New Brunswick, June 1911. Educated at University of New Brunswick (B.Sc., Electrical Engineering). P/P/O with RCAF, 30 August 1935; trained as pilot, 1937. Test and development flying before the war; astro navigation instructor at Trenton and Rivers early in war. Posted to Eastern Air Command, March 1941, to AFHQ in 1941 (operational requirements, with special concern for marine craft and aerodrome lighting). In 1944 he attended Staff College in Toronto, then went to Station Torbay. Commanded Station Sydney, March to August 1945. Afterwards commanded No.10 Repair Depot. Continued in postwar RCAF with service in England, Kingston, Rivers, and NATO. Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953.

 

This officer is a Regular Officer of considerable service. During this war he held several important staff and flying positions. As Command Navigation Officer at Eastern Air Command he was responsible for the excellent map and navigational arrangements that existed in Command. He also did outstanding work as Wing Commander flying at Torbay and as Commanding Officer of Royal Canadian Air Force Station Sydney.

 

* * * * *

 


COLQUHOUN, P/O Aldie Beaton (J93319) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Home in Parry Sound; enlisted North Bay, 3 January 1941. Trained at No.2 BGS (graduated 23 December 1941). Award sent by registered mail. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2610 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 18 April 1945 when he had flown two tours. The first was 20 sorties (126 hours 30 minutes), 31 July 1942 to 29 April 1943; the second was 13 sorties (90 hours 45 minutes), 28 January to 13 April 1945.

 

This officer, as rear air gunner, has completed thirteen trips on his second operational tour. His first tour, which included mining expeditions and low-level bombing attacks, was carried out in 1942-1943 against the most heavily defended targets in Germany and German-occupied countries against heavy odds; he is credited with one probable enemy fighter. Pilot Officer Colquhoun's second tour targets have been predominantly deep penetrations against such targets as Stuttgart, Mainz and Chemnitz. His aircraft has been attacked three times, twice on bombing runs and once on a sortie to Chemnitz, but every time prompt direction for evasive action and firing have resulted in the successful completion of bombing runs and the sortie.

 

His coolness under fire, skill, tenacity and determination to press home the attack deserve the highest commendation.

 

It is considered that this air gunner, by his efficiency, daring and devotion to duty, combined with his fine offensive spirit, fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COLQUHOUN, F/O Ian Lorne (J6032) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in Edmonton, Alberta; enlisted there 25 October 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS, No.14 EFTS and No.33 SFTS. Killed in action with No.434 Squadron (Halifax DK260), 17 August 1943; buried in Germany.

 

* * * * *

 

COLQUHOUN, W/C John David (C4023) - Mention in Despatches - Eastern Air Command Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Ethel, Ontario; enlisted in Regina, Saskatchewan, 16 November 1940.

 


As Principal Medical Officer of Eastern Air Command and former President of No.5 Regional Medical Board, Wing Commander Colquhoun has rendered distinguished service to the Royal Canadian Air Force. The manner in which he has supervised the health of the many thousands of Royal Canadian Air Force personnel at so many far flung bases is deserving of particular praise.

 

* * * * *

 

COLTON, Sergeant Gordon Edgar (R94880) - Mention in Despatches - Headquarters, Bomber Command - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945. Home in Balacarres, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Regina, 7 April 1941. No citation.

 

* * * * *

 

COMAR, S/L John, DFC (C89569) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.105 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Formerly CAN/RAF. Born in Winnipeg, 20 June 1915, educated there. In Canadian Army, 1934-1939. Enlisted in RAF, 17 September 1939. Flew with No.78 Squadron. Served in No.424 Squadron in 1943. Posted to No.105 Squadron 11 January 1944 and won DFC with that unit (London Gazette dated 15 September 1944, general citation only). Transferred to RCAF, 7 February 1945. Appointed Commanding Officer, No.429 Squadron, 26 September 1945. Presented with DFC and Bar, 26 February 1949.

 

Squadron Leader Comar, during the whole of his operational career, has displayed skill and tenacity of purpose in everything he has undertaken. Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has continued to operate with courage and determination, often in the face of fierce opposition, thus establishing one of the most outstanding operational records in the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

COMBE, F/O Charles Joseph (J14215) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 29 August 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942) and No.9 AOS (graduated 11 September 1942). Award sent by registered mail 7 June 1950. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9276 has recommendation dated 15 June 1944 when he had flown 27 sorties (167 hours), 16 August 1943 to 11 May 1944.

 

16 Aug 43 ferry to Port 24 Mar 44 Berlin (8.00)

Reath (8.20) 26 Mar 44 Essen (5.15)

18 Aug 43 to Kairouan (7.25) 30 Mar 44 Nuremburg (7.45)

29 Aug 43 Torre Annunziata 9 Apr 44 Paris (4.45)

(6.00) 11 Apr 44 GARDENING,

12 Sep 43 Caslenova (6.35) Kattegat (4.50)

13 Sep 43 Pompei (6.10) 18 Apr 44 Paris (5.20)


14 Sep 43 Battadaglia (6.50) 20 Apr 44 Lens (4.30)

15 Sep 43 Torre Annunziata 21 Apr 44 Brest (5.15)

(6.15) 24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe (6.35)

17 Sep 43 Cerveteri (6.00) 26 Apr 44 Essen (4.25)

22 Sep 43 Formia (6.00) 4 May 44 GARDENING,

24 Sep 43 Leghorn (7.00) Cherbourg (3.40)

15 Feb 44 Berlin (6.40) 8 May 44 GARDENING,

24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt (8.00) Lorient (5.25)

7 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.35) 11 May 44 Boulogne

13 Mar 44 Le Mans (5.20)

 

Flying Officer Combe has completed a tour of operations that included ten sorties from Tunisia on Italian targets, seven major German targets, six precision targets in France and four "gardening" trips. Throughout his tour Flying Officer Combe has shown himself to be a most capable navigator. He has been successfully employed as a wind finder on three occasions and has proved worthy of the responsibility.

 

Throughout his training, Flying Officer Combe has been an apt student and a precise and accurate navigator. His willingness at all times to assist his fellows has materially helped the navigational standards of the whole squadron.

 

For his high standard of navigational skill and his cheerful devotion to duty Flying Officer Combe is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

COMPTON, WO Harry Marcus (R54292) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943. Born 20 April 1948. Home in Woodroffe, Ontario; enlisted in Ottawa, 13 August 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 November 194), No.14 EFTS (graduated 20 January 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 1 April 1941). Posted overseas 18 April 1941; commissioned 15 January 1943; Flying Officer, 15 July 1943; Flight Lieutenant 15 January 1945. Released 8 August 1945. Rejoined postwar RCAF and retired again, 1 February 1957.

 

Shot down in Libya in November 1942, Compton spent five and one-half days in the desert walking 125 miles to regain contact with Allied forces; he thus became a member of the "Late Arrivals Club" (otherwise known as the "Order of the Boot"). On rejoining his unit he found his friends preparing to ship his effects back to his parents. News clipping dated 14 August 1944 says that he escaped unharmed when his Spitfire crashed and burned in Italy following engine failure on take-off.

 

* * * * *

 


COMRIE, WO1 William Glenn (Can 1249) - Member, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ, Directorate of Procurement/Equipment - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. First World War veteran. Enlisted in Camp Borden, 1 April 1924. Award presented 23 November 1943.

 

As senior Warrant Officer of the Equipment Division, this Warrant Officer has performed his duties in a most conscientious and energetic manner. Warrant Officer Comrie has greatly assisted his superior in the organization and special work involved in the administration of a large number of equipment depots scattered throughout Canada, which has had a direct bearing on the efficient operation of all units.

 

* * * * *

 

CONLEY, F/O William (J18328) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 13 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Home in Humboldt, Saskatchewan; enlisted Saskatoon, 14 May 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 August 1941), No.1 WS (graduated 8 December 1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 22 June 1942). Award presented 23 April 1949.

 

Flying Officer Conley as an air gunner has participated in many sorties. On 22 November 1943, during an attack on Berlin, it was by this officer's coolness under fire and great presence of mind in giving skilful directions to his pilot in the target area, that they were successful in evading persistent attacks of an enemy night fighter. As a result the crew were able to make a successful attack. Flying Officer Conley has consistently displayed courage and devotion to duty which merit high praise.

 

* * * * *

 

CONLIN, F/L John Baskerville (J21125) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.107 Squadron - Award effective 20 June 1945 as per London Gazette dated 29 June 1945 and AFRO 1453/45 dated 14 September 1945. Home in Kingston, Ontario; enlisted Ottawa, 9 October 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS 24 April 1942), No.13 EFTS (graduated 31 July 1942) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 20 November 1942). Award sent by registered mail 21 December 1950.

 

Flight Lieutenant Conlin is a skilful and courageous pilot who has achieved many successes against the enemy. On one occasion in December 1944, during an attack against an enemy target, his aircraft was hit by fire from the defences and one engine was rendered useless. With great skill this officer flew his damaged aircraft safely back a distance of 300 miles with only one engine functioning and made a successful landing despite the presence of enemy intruders. In moments of crisis Flight Lieutenant Conlin has always displayed exceptional coolness, initiative and devotion and at all times unswerving devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *


CONLIN, LAC Philip Cecil Charles Paul (R57739) - British Empire Medal - Station Patricia Bay (unit not identified in AFRO) - Award effective 6 October 1941 as per London Gazette dated 14 October 1941 and AFRO 1192/41 dated 17 October 1941. Born 3 April 1919. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 15 April 1940. Classified as General Duties on enlistment; Marine Section, 17 February 1943; Seaman, 1 June 1943; Wireless Mechanic, 25 November 1943. AC2 on enlistmeent; AC1 on 15 July 1940; LAC, 15 October 1940; Corporal, 1 September 1942; Sergeannt, 1 May 1943; Flight Sergeant, 1 July 1944. On strength of No.6 (BR) Squadron, 15 April 1940; No.13 (OT) Squadron, 23 January 1941; Western Air Command, 20 October 1942; No.31 Repair Depot, 31 August 1943; released 23 November 1945. Award presented 3 December 1942.

 

On March 18th [1941], without regard to his personal safety, Leading Aircraftman Conlin piloted an eighteen foot dinghy amidst the flames surrounding the wreckage of a crashed aircraft in order to rescue Lieutenant Bjornebye, R.N.N.A.F. who was floating unconscious in the water. This brave act undoubtedly saved the life of the officer.

 

* * * * *

 

CONLIN, F/O Wesley Gerald (J35805) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945. Home in Regina or Tisdale, saskatchewan; enlisted in Vancouver, 28 July 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 20 February 1943), No.2 BGS (graduated 17 September 1943) and No.7 AOS (graduated 7 September 1943). Award presented at Sea Island, 22 October 1949. No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy". Public Records Office Air 2/9083 has recommendation dated 19 March 1945 when he had flown 37 sorties (202 hours three minutes), 10 September 1944 to 20 February 1945.

 

10 Sep 44 Le Havre (3.35) 5 Dec 44 Soest (6.25)

12 Sep 44 Munster (4.25) 12 Dec 44 Essen (5.35)

15 Sep 44 Kiel (5.25) 14 Dec 44 GARDENING (5.40)

23 Sep 44 Neuss (4.45) 22 Dec 44 Bingen (6.00)

25 Sep 44 Calais (3.35) 1 Jan 45 Dortmund (5.05)

26 Sep 44 Calais (4.00) 2 Jan 45 Ludwigshaven (6.35)

6 Oct 44 Schloven (4.40) 6 Jan 45 Hanau (6.45)

7 Oct 44 Cleve (4.05) 14 Jan 45 GARDENING (6.05)

14 Oct 44 Duisburg (5.15) 16 Jan 45 Magdeburg (6.25)

15 Oct 44 Duisburg (5.05) 28 Jan 45 Stuttgart (6.55)

15 Oct 44 Wilhelmshaven (4.25) 1 Feb 45 Mainz (6.00)

25 Oct 44 Essen (4.55) 2 Feb 45 Wanne Eickel (5.20)

28 Oct 44 Cologne (5.40) 4 Feb 45 Bonn (5.55)

30 Oct 44 Cologne (1.55), DNCO 7 Feb 45 GARDENING (5.30)

31 Oct 44 Cologne (5.15), DNCO 9 Feb 45 Wanne Eickel (5.45)

18 Nov 44 Munster (5.35) 14 Feb 45 Chemnitz (8.08)

21 Nov 44 Sterkrade (6.20) 17 Feb 45 Wesel (6.10)


30 Nov 44 Duisburg (5.50) 20 Feb 45 Dusseldorf (6.20)

2 Dec 44 Hagen (6.40)

 

Flying Officer Conlin was posted to No.10 Squadron in August 1944 and has now completed his operational tour of 37 sorties comprising 202 operational hours. He has taken part in attacks on heavily defended targets in Germany including Cologne (three times), Duisburg (three times), Essen (twice), Magdeburg and Chemnitz.

 

This officer has proved himself to be a courageous and resolute member of an exceptionally good aircraft crew. His determination to press home his attacks and his fine offensive spirit have been outstanding and have maintained a high standard of morale in his crew. His ability as an Air Bomber has played a good part in the successes obtained.

 

He was the Air Bomber of a Halifax aircraft detailed to attack Munster on 12 September 1944 and Schloven on 6 October 1944. On both these occasions his aircraft was subjected to very heavy and accurate flak, causing the nose and the fuselage to be damaged on one occasion. Despite these reverses Flying Officer Conlin remained undeterred and coolly directed the aircraft to the target, thus enabling the mission to be successfully completed.

 

I strongly recommend that his skill, courage and strong devotion to duty be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

 

CONNELL, F/O Cameron Laird (J29976) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945 and AFRO 824/45 dated 18 May 1945. Home in Warren, Manitoba; enlisted Winnipeg, 28 August 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 17 April 1943) and No.7 AOS (graduated 3 September 1943). Large card says it was presented, 22 February 1947 but letter in biographicall file indicates he did not attend investiture and medal was sent by registered mail, 27 February 1947. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1750 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20608) has recommendation dated 21 December 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (147 hours 45 minutes):

 

Throughout his tour, this navigator has been consistently accurate in his work. He has navigated his aircraft to the targets and kept it out of trouble on every occasion. Highly skilled himself, Flying Officer Connell has given unsparingly of his time to assist in the training of other members of his section. Both in the air and on the ground his services have been most valuable.

 


* * * * *

 

CONNELL, FS Phillip Frederick (R126312) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.83 Squadron - Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 9 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Home in Saint John, New Brunswick; enlisted Moncton, 4 September 1941. Trained at No.7 BGS (graduated 16 February 1942). Award presented by King George VI 29 February 1944.

 

This airman has completed a large number of operational sorties. He has taken part in attacks on targets at Essen, Dusseldorf and Munich. In December 1942, while employed as mid-upper gunner, Flight Sergeant Connell greatly assisted his captain to evade an enemy night fighter which attacked their aircraft five times on the outward journey to Munich and later when the enemy fighter eventually gave up assisted in putting out the fire caused by the enemy. On all occasions this airman has displayed great courage and helped to maintain a very high standard of morale.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNELL, Corporal William (R193634) - British Empire Medal - No.4 Release Centre - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 18 September 1942. Award presented 18 October 1947.

 

This outstanding non-commissioned officer has served as a Service Policeman with great efficiency and effect. He has always discharged his duties in a manner indicating not only keen interest in his work but showing that he is ready and willing to do far more than is required of him. He was instrumental in disarming an airman who had in his possession a loaded revolver which he had smuggled into the Detection Barracks of No.4 Release Centre. The non-commissioned officer in charge of the Detention Barracks was set upon by a number of airmen, whereupon Corporal Connell immediately armed himself and entered the Detention Barrack. The airman pointed a cocked revolver at him, but he nevertheless approached and ultimately disarmed him. By displaying a most commendable degree of coolness and courage, Corporal Connell brought completely under control a situation that was fraught with ugly possibilities.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNER, F/L John Herbert (C7836) - Mention in Despatches - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944. Home in Dauphin, Manitoba; enlisted Winnipeg, 4 October 1941. Unit identified in AFRO only as "Overseas"; No.6 Group Monthly Summary of Operational and Training Activities (January 1944) gives unit. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 26 August 1943 (for an MBE).

 


This officer joined his unit shortly after its formation and it was mainly through his efforts that the squadron got off to such a fine start. Since that time he has not only performed his duties in an extraordinarily efficient manner, but he has also given unstintingly of his time and energy to maintain the excellent morale of the squadron. His personal loyalty and unfailing interest have been a great support to his commanding officers; he has dealt with the problems and needs of aircrew and groundcrew so as to make for their happiness and to maintain the standards of the Service, and in other ways he has contributed largely to the good spirit of the squadron.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNOR, F/O Donald Daubney (J86186) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 31 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 February 1946 and AFRO 322/46 dated 29 March 1946. Home in Ottawa, Ontario; enlisted there 1 May 1942. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 7 November 1942), No.20 EFTS (graduated 10 January 1943) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 14 May 1943). Killed in action 1 November 1944 (Lancaster KB817); buried in Holland. Award sent by registered mail from Government House to his father. Medals with Canadian War Museum (AN 19820166-001).

 

Flying Officer Connor as pilot has completed numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty.

 

NOTE: The Ottawa Citizen of 5 February 1998 carried a piece by Dave Brown, "War Hero Deserves Recognition at Home". Having stated that Connor was buried at Linne, Holland, that a street there was named for Connor, and that a cousin, David Daubney (lawyer and former Member of Parliament) had done much to keep his story aline, Brown wrote:

 

On the night of November 1, 1944, Flying Officer Connor, the only son of William Connor, of the Connor Washer Company of LeBreton Flats, was at the controls of a spanking new Lancaster bomber returning from a raid into Germany. The machine was fitted with the latest radar, and its operator, Gordon Leppington, thought there was something suspicious moving in astern, but was assured by gunners there was nothing.

 

Then came a yell, "That sonofabitch opened up on us !" It was a German night fighter. A storm of heavy bullets ripped the floor out of the aircraft and set two engines ablaze.

 

There were yells from mid-upper gunner Jim Campbell, but the rest of the crew were used to that. He was a nervous sort, made that way earlier in the war when the propeller of another bomber tore his perspex dome off in a collision.

 


The skipper over the intercom ordered everybody to be calm, they had ben through this before and made it home on two engines. He ordered engineer Ray Joiner to cut off the fuel supply to the burning engines. Then came the unexpected order from the skipper: "Emergency ! Jump ! Jump !"

 

The aircraft commander was a stickler for emergency training, making his crew work through the procedures over and over. For training in escape in water he yelled, "Dinghy ! Dinghy !" Hence his nickname.

 

Radio operator Leppington would later tell how, in an emergency training session while parked on an airfield, when the order "dinghy" was yelled, the whole crew jumped onto bicycles and repaired to a pub. But he admitted the training saved his life.

 

He had to fight an urge to jump through a gaping hole in the floor. Wind forced would have pushed him into the jagged edges. He had a drilled-in escape route and followed it. The skipper fought to keep the aircraft under control long enough for his crew to get out.

 

On the ground, residents of Linne saw the burning aircraft in a shallow dive heading for their village. At the last moment the plane pulled up and over the community, and crashed a few metres clear of buildings. Even then, residents realized the pilot had sacrificed his life for theirs, and asked their German occupiers for permission to bury him. This was granted, but with a provision: No flowers.

 

Retired economics teacher Frans Ververs was 14 when he watched the crash. In a story published in Holland, he clearly remembered the funeral. Mainly, he remembered the great quantity of flowers.

 

He also remembered people pick up the body of another member of the crew just outside the town. The man's parachute failed to open and he landed feet first. The impact left him much shortened. There is also a Joiner Street in Linne, and the grave is beside Mr. Connor's.

 

Another Connor cousin, Doug Williams of Mississauga, visited Linne a few years ago, and was introduced to Jan Putts, an aged market gardener who also witnessed the crash. Mr.Putts showed him how two brass oxygen cylinders were used in his garden to mark each end of a row of vegetables. They were the last remains of the Lancaster. His daughter, Tania Putts, still tends the graves of the two men killed in the crash.

 

The nervous upper gunner, Jim Campbell, was hidden by the Dutch underground for 15 days, and then turned over to the British as the town was liberated. The rest of the surviving crew members spent the rest of the war in prison camp.

 


There's something else carved into the Connor marker that's worth remembering. He was 21.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNOR, F/L Douglas William (J8157) - Distinguished Flying Cross - Overseas - Award effective 21 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 15 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 24 May 1941), No.8 EFTS (graduated 27 July 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 17 October 1941). With AFTU at time of award. Award presented 14 May 1951 in Berne, Switzerland.

 

This officer is an exceptional pilot who has consistently proved his determination by flying to his objective through appalling monsoon weather. He has often been intercepted by enemy night fighters and engaged by searchlights and anti-aircraft fire. At all times he has displayed skill, determination and devotion to duty of a high order.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNOR, S/L Maurice Francis (C4264) - Mention in Despatches - Station Patricia Bay - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Home in Saskatoon; enlisted there 15 March 1941.

 

Squadron Leader Connor has displayed outstanding ability as senior operations room controller at Royal Canadian Air Force Station, Patricia Bay. He has been untiring in his efforts to keep abreast of changing conditions and to introduce new ideas for improving efficiency of control. His devotion to duty at all times, and particularly in times of emergency, has been an inspiration to his colleagues.

 

* * * * *

 

CONNOR, WO Paul Morton (R124700) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.83 Squadron - Award effective 11 April 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 April 1944 and AFRO 1296/44 dated 16 June 1944. Home in Kingston, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 29 August 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 2 January 1942), No.10 EFTS (ceased training 14 February 1942) and No.7 BGS (graduated 27 April 1942). Award sent by registered mail.

 

Warrant Officer Connor has completed a tour of operational duty during which he has attacked some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany. An exceptional air gunner, his skill, cheerful confidence and unceasing vigilance have been largely responsible for the successful completion of many missions.

 

* * * * *

 


CONQUIST, S/L Carlyle William (J16812) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 14 February 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 7 June 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 26 July 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 8 October 1941). Award sent by registered mail 7 June 1950. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1741 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation by W/C W.F. McKinnon dated 23 April 1945 when he had flown 13 sorties (101 hours 31 minutes) of a second tour, 28 January to 13 April 1945. Flight Commander.

 

Squadron Leader Conquist (pilot, captain of aircraft) has carried out thirteen sorties on his second tour of operations. This officer previously completed a very long and arduous first tour of forty trips in the Middle East. With great experience, he has been an unfailing source of guidance and inspiration to the squadron. Squadron Leader Conquist in his position has displayed admirable qualities of leadership, and considerable skill in administration.

 

For his skill and daring courage, unbounded energy and initiative, and his enviable quality of leadership, I strongly recommend the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

CONRAD, F/O Reginald George Joseph (J25511) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.166 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1944 as per London Gazette dated 15 September 1944 and AFRO 2373/44 dated 3 November 1944. Home in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia; enlisted Halifax, 5 June 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 5 March 1943) and No.9 AOS (graduated 16 April 1943). Award sent by registered mail 13 November 1948. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations during which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Officer Air 2/7296 has recommendation dated 14 June 1944 when he had flown 26 2/3 sorties (164 hours):

 

15 Feb 44 Berlin 1 May 44 Lyon

19 Feb 44 Leipzig 9 May 44 Mardyck

15 Mar 44 Stuttgart 11 May 44 Hesselt

22 Mar 44 Frankfurt 15 May 44 GARDENING

24 Mar 44 Berlin 19 May 44 Orleans

26 Mar 44 Essen 21 May 44 Duisburg

11 Apr 44 Aachen 22 May 44 Dortmund

18 Apr 44 Rouen 24 May 44 Aachen

20 Apr 44 Cologne 3 June 44 Boulogne

22 Apr 44 Dusseldorf 5 June 44 Cherbourg

24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe 6 June 44 Acheres


26 Apr 44 Essen 10 Jun 44 Acheres

27 Apr 44 Friedrichshafen 12 Jun 44 Gelsenkirchen

30 Apr 44 Rouen 14 Jun 44 Le Havre

 

This Canadian officer has successfully completed 26 2/3 sorties including some of the most heavily defended targets in Germany and enemy occupied territory. His tour of operations has been characterized by a desire to hit the enemy hard and he has always guided his aircraft through any opposition offered to the target to deliver a successful attack.

 

Of quiet disposition, he is unremitting in his efforts to improve on his skill and is unflagging in his zeal. His confident bearing and coolness under fire have contributed largely to the excellent discipline and morale of the crew. For his calm courage and determined operational spirit, he is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

 

* * * * *

 

CONRAD, F/L Walter Allan Grenfell (J5023) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.274 Squadron - Award effective 12 January 1943 as per London Gazette dated 22 January 1943 and AFRO 272/43 dated 19 February 1943. Born at Melrose, Ontario, 3 April 1920. Enlisted 23 August 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (9 November to 9 December 1940), No.11 EFTS (10 December 1940 to 27 January 1941) and No.2 SFTS (28 January to 11 April 1941). Arrived in UK, 6 June 1941. Trained at No.59 OTU. Posted to No.274 Squadron, 19 September 1941; to No.145 Squadron, 16 July-11 September 1942. To UK, 15 February 1943. To No.403 Squadron, 6 May 1943. Decorated by King George VI 29 June 1943. Shot down over France, 17 August 1943 but evaded capture and was reported safe in UK, 10 October 1943. Returned to Canada immediately but was posted overseas again, 30 December 1943. With No.421 Squadron, 1 January to 28 July 1944. Returned to Canada, 6 August 1944; staff officer until released, 16 October 1945. See Chris Shores, Aces High.

 

The sound judgement and exceptional efficiency displayed by this officer has contributed greatly to the successes achieved by his squadron. On one occasion, while in co-operation with a South African squadron, fifteen Junkers, strongly escorted by Messerschmitts were intercepted and through the brilliant leadership displayed by Flight Lieutenant Conrad, his squadron was able to continue the escort, while fourteen of the enemy were destroyed. He has been personally responsible for the destruction of four enemy aircraft.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9612 has recommendation for non-immediate award sent by Group Captain W.J.M. Akerman, Headquarters, Royal Air Force, Middle East to Air Ministry on 11 December 1942:

 


This officer is an outstanding Flight Commander who has continuously been on operations since November 1941. His unfailing cheerfulness has been an inspiration to everybody in the squadron.

 

His sound judgement and good leadership have contributed greatly to the success achieved during [the] recent campaign, notably whilst in command of the top cover to No.1 Squadron, South African Air Force when they distinguished themselves on 3rd July 1942. In this encounter twelve Hurricanes of No.1 South African Air Force Squadron and twelve Hurricanes of No.274 Squadron intercepted 15 Junkers 87s escorted by about 20 Messerschmitt 109s. Through his leadership the Hurricanes of No.274 Squadron were able to contain the escorting '109s while No.1 Squadron went in to attack the Stukas. Through his brilliant leadership of this top cover, No.1 Squadron was able to destroy 13 Stukas and one Messerschmitt 109 without loss to themselves.

 

Flight Lieutenant Conrad has flown more than 158 operational hours covering 131 sorties before being posted to No.145 Squadron on the 15th July 1942.

 

He has also participated in five bombing trips, dropping ten 250-pound bombs. He also dropped parachute containers during the siege of Bir Hacheim. Finally, he has had four confirmed victories to his credit, a share in a fifth and numerous probables and damaged.

 

CONRAD, S/L Walter Allan Grenville, DFC (J5023) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.421 Squadron - Award effective 8 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 11 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944.

 

Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, Squadron Leader Conrad has made numerous sorties against the enemy. He has destroyed at least seven enemy aircraft and has set at all times proved himself to be highly determined and a keen fighter pilot.

 

NOTE: It is interesting to see how detailed submissions are edited down to bare-bones citations. Public Record Office Air 2/9633 has the original recommendation (undated but about 10 April 1944) drafted when he had flown 237 sorties (329 hours five minutes), including 85 sorties (141 hours 50 minutes) since previous award.

 


Since this officer was cited for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, he has participated in a further 85 sorties involving 142 hours of offensive operations against the enemy. All his sorties have been over enemy territory. In August of last year whilst diving to attack a FW.190 at approximately 500 m.p.h. and 1,000 feet he had his tail unit cut off by his No.2. Despite the circumstances he extricated himself and successfully evaded and escaped through Spain back to this country. After a month's leave in canada he returned to command No.421 Squadron. His total score is seven destroyed, three probables and 4 damaged of which two destroyed have been since his last award. He has at all ties been an inspiration in keenness and ability and energy to those serving under and with him.

 

His commanding Group Captain endorsed this on 12 April 1944 as follows:

 

A fine fighter pilot with an excellent record of devotion to duty, high ability and determination to engage the enemy. I strongly recommend him for the non-immediate award of a Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

This was further endorsed by an Air Vice Marshal (signature illegible) on 18 April 1944, by Air Marshal A. Coningham on 24 April 1944, and by Air Chief Marshal Trafford Leigh-Mallory on 2 May 1944. The text then went to Air Ministry Awards Committee and was edited to the following:

 

Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross, Squadron Leader Conrad has made numerous sorties against the enemy. During August 1943 he was diving at great speed to attack a Focke Wulf 190 when his aircraft sustained severe damaged and he was forced to leave it by parachute. He successfully evaded capture and arrived back in this country. He has destroyed at least seven enemy aircraft and has set at all times proved himself to be highly determined and a keen fighter pilot.

 

* * * * *

 

CONSTABLE, FS Cecil George (R76589) - British Empire Medal - No.13 SFTS - Awarded 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 6 Novvember 1940.

 

This non-commissioned officer has been employed as a fire fighter for the past four years in which trade he is most efficient as well as in administrative work. His devotion to duty and tenacity in face of adversity is such that he commands the supreme confidence and respect of all those with whom he comes in contact. He is an outstanding leader and has done excellent work in charge of the fire fighters at this unit.

 

* * * * *

 


CONTANT, WO Joseph Hector Euclide (R125297) - Mention in Despatches - No.86 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas" - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Born 1920 in Cornwall, Ontario; home there (hotel worker, paper worker); enlisted Ottawa 12 August 1941. Trained at No.5 BGS (graduated 3 August 1942). Posted overseas in January 1944. No citation found, but the following is garnered from Coastal Command Operational Record Book and newsclippings in his biographical file. On 18 July 1944 Liberator F/86 parolling west of Lofoten at 2200 hours sighted and attacked a fully surfaced U-Boat. The crew was international in character which included a Spaniard, an Irishman, a New Zealander and an Australian. The submarine opened fire from 3,000 yards. Six depth charges failed to damage the target and two more dropped on a second run were also unsuccessful. The aircraft was badly hit and caught fire. The pilot ditched, but two men died in the ditching and one subsequently died of flak injuries in the dinghy. Six survivirs spent 60 hours in three dinghies before rescue by a Catalina. Coastal Command Operations Book states that Contant was one of the casualties, but this is not accurate. He survived but with three broken vertabrae, a broken pelvis and partial paralysis. He had used his parachute to cushion the shock of ditching, but even so his head was bloddied and he had to swim up through the aircraft using only his hands. The men experienced icy cold water and an aircraft flew over an hour after ditching; it failed to see them. They were cheered by having sails and emergency supplies. After two and a half days another Liberator flew over and they fired a signal pistol which was seen; the aircraft dropped a rations box which, however, broke up in the sea. However, a Catalina arrived soon after.

* * * * *

 

CONTENT, FS (now P/O) Joseph Benjamin Louis Maurice (R195050/J88880) - Mention in Despatches - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 625/45 dated 12 April 1945. Home in Montreal; enlisted there 7 October 1942. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 23 July 1943). DHist file 181.009 D.5526 (RG.24 Vol.20667) has recommendation for a BEM dated 17 July 1944; incident occurred on 5 July 1944 and won a George Medal for WO1 R.J. Hooker.

 

This NCO served as a Mid-Upper Gunner in an aircraft which crashed immediately after taking off on a operational mission. He left the aircraft, directly it crashed, and although in a very dazed condition, he recovered sufficiently to return to the burning aircraft in an effort to locate the other members of his crew. On reaching the aircraft, he found the captain lying, wounded and unconscious, on the wing. He managed to drag the wounded man from the wing and carry him a safe distance from the aircraft. Once again he returned to the burning wreck, to locate further members of the crew, but finding no one, he was himself helped to safety by the crash party. By his coolness and presence of mind, as well as a complete disregard for his personal safety, this Air Gunner helped save the life of his captain. This NCO is highly recommended for the award of the British Empire Medal.

 

* * * * *

 

CONWAY, F/O Joseph William Henry (J20157) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.268 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 3 July 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 September 1945 and AFRO 1672/45 dated 2 November 1945. Home in East Angus, Quebec; enlisted Montreal, 6 October 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated10 April 1942), No.22 EFTS (graduated 3 July 1942) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 23 October 1942). Killed in action on Mustang FS602, 4 July 1944; buried in France. Award presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947.

 


This officer has completed numerous photographic reconnaissance sorties, all at levels below 4,000 feet and some almost ground level. Nearly all have involved deep penetrations within the main enemy fighter areas and all have been within the best range of medium or light anti-aircraft fire. In no case has he had fighter cover or escort. Before the invasion of Normandy, Flying Officer Conway photographed a heavily defended military installation at Le Treport from ground level. Though his aircraft was damaged by the defences he obtained fine photographs. He also secured outstanding pictures of bridges on the Somme. Since the invasion he has completed many more missions, on three of which he has been intercepted by enemy fighters. This did not deter him from completing his tasks successfully. Flying Officer Conway's courage and determination have been highly commendable at all times.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9033 has original recommendation; the date is entered in a bad scrawl; it might be 9 July 1944 although it looks more to be dated 9 October 1944. In either case, it is obviously drafted after he went missing and the date of the award had to be made effective before his death. The documents states he had flown 44 sorties (80 hours 40 minutes) and goes into much more detail than the final citation.

 

The 44 sorties this officer has carried out have all been done below 4,000 feet, often at ground level, and have nearly all involved deep penetrations of France within the main enemy fighter areas. All his operations have been done within the best range of light and medium flak and in no case has he had fighter cover or escort.

 

Before D Day, Flying Officer Conway photographed a heavily defended radar installation at Le Treport from ground level. Though hit by flak he completed his task and brought back first class photographs. His pre-D Day photographs of bridges on the Somme were exceptionally successful and were taken in clear weather at 500 feet in the face of intense light flak. He also carried out many low photographic sorties over beach defences and NOBALL targets, all of which he completed regardless of flak, which was in many cases severe.

 

Since D Day and during the assault, Flying Officer Conway completed 18 sorties and 43 hours operational flying in 29 days. He was on three occasions intercepted by enemy fighters in great force while engaged on these operations, but returned and finished his task.

 

This officer's courage is well out of the ordinary. He has never failed to do what he set out to do no matter what the risk to himself. He seemed to me to invite disaster through his dogged determination and as a reconnaissance pilot he has always made use of the enemy's opposition as a means of obtaining extra information.

 

* * * * *