CEMBROWSKI, F/O Johan (J85843) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945.  Born 1923 in Marquette, Manitoba; home in Selkirk, Manitoba (flour worker); enlisted in Winnipeg, 6 March 1942.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 24 October 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 30 December 1942) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned April 1944. Award presented 11 June 1949.

 

Flying Officer Cembrowski has participated in numerous sorties against many of the enemy's most heavily defended targets.  He has at all times displayed outstanding ability and courage and pressed home his attacks with determination.  On two occasions in June 1944, whilst attacking targets in enemy occupied territory, his aircraft has been attacked by hostile fighters but his fine airmanship on both occasions frustrated the attackers and resulted in the destruction of one Focke Wulf 190.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CERAT, P/O Joseph Andre Yvon Wilfred (J85404) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944.  Born 1923 in Montreal; home there; enlisted Montreal 26 August 1941.  Trained at No.1 WS (graduated 27 April 1942) and No.9 BGS (graduated 22 January 1943).  Commissioned 1944.  In F/L Keane's crew.  Award presented 27 February 1947.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty".  DHist file 181.009 D.3080 (RG.24 Vol.20636) has recommendation dated 24 July 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (185 hours five minutes), 2 September 1943 to 18 July 1944 (described as 117 "points").  Notable sorties were 2 October 1943 (Baltic minelaying, seven hours 40 minutes, severe icing and electrical storms) and 9 June 1944 (Le Mans, six hours 15 minutes, moderate flak, attacked by Bf.110).

 

This officer has completed a tour consisting of thirty-three operations of which over one-third have been to heavily defended German targets.  On numerous occasions this officer has flown as a spare gunner with new crews.  He has always displayed the highest degree of courage and his dogged determination and outstanding devotion to duty are an example and inspiration to all crews on the squadron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHABOT, F/L Stanislas Georges Emile (C88573) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.425 Squadron - Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born 1915 in Montreal; home in St.Lambert, Quebec (clerk); enlisted Montreal, 7 July 1942.  Commissioned August 1944.  Award presented in Montreal, 25 November 1949.

 


This officer has been engaged on operational flying since October 1944.  On one occasion he was detailed for an attack against Oberhausen.  While flying over the North Sea trouble developed in the port and starboard inner engines of his aircraft.  Undaunted he flew on and pressed home a determined attack.  While over the target a heavy barrage was encountered and his aircraft was severely damaged.  The main oxygen line was ripped, most of the navigational equipment was rendered useless and the bomb doors so damaged that they could not be closed for the return journey.  Despite these difficulties, Flight Lieutenant Chabot flew the crippled bomber safely back and accomplished a masterly landing.  Flight Lieutenant Chabot has always displayed fortitude, efficiency and dogged determination in completing his missions, frequently in extreme navigational difficulties.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHADBURN, S/L Lloyd Vernon (J2976) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.416 Squadron - Award effective 2 September 1942 as per London Gazette dated 22 September 1942 and AFRO 1653/42 dated 16 October 1942.  Born 21 August 1919 in Montreal; home in Aurora, Ontario. Enlisted in Toronto, 16 April 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS, Border Cities Aero Club (Windsor), and No.2 SFTS.  Wings and commissioned, 18 November 1940.  Killed in action (collided with another Spitfire), 13 June 1944.  Credited with the following victories: 20 November 1941, one E-Boat destroyed off Dutch coast (No.19 Squadron); 19 August 1942, one Ju.88 probably detroyed and one Ju.88 damaged (No.416 Squadron); 31 May May 1943, one FW.190 damaged; 13 June 1943, one FW.190 damaged (No.402 Squadron) plus one FW.190 probably destroyed (credited to squadron as a whole); 27 June 1943, one FW.190 probably destroyed (No.416 Squadron); 14 July 1943, one Bf.109 probably destroyed; 18 July 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with F/L J.A. Rae); 27 July 1943, one Bf.109 probably destroyed (Digby Wing); 2 August 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed (shared with two others, No.416 Squadron); 4 September 1943, one FW.190 destroyed alone plus one Bf.109 destroyed in company with three others and one Bf.109 damaged (shared with one other); 22 September 1943; two FW.190s damaged; 24 September 1943, one FW.190 destroyed (shared with one other) plus one FW.190 probably destroyed (shared with two others, No.402 Squadron); 27 September 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed plus one FW.190 probably destroyed plus one Bf.109 damaged (this last shared with another pilot); 3 October 1943, one Bf.109 destroyed (Digby Wing); 3 November 1943, two Bf.109s destroyed (Digby Wing). See H.A. Halliday, The Tumbling Sky, for a chapter on him.

 

This officer has led his squadron with great skill. During combined operations at Dieppe on 19th August the squadron destroyed three enemy aircraft, probably destroyed one, and damaged seven others without loss to themselves.  This achievement reflects greatest credit on this officer's excellent leadership and he has inspired confidence in those under his command.  He has personally destroyed one enemy E-Boat, probably destroyed a Junkers 88 and damaged other enemy ships and aircraft.

 


CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon (J2976) - Distinguished Service Order - Station Digby - Award effective 21 August 1943 as per London Gazette dated 7 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated12 November 1943.

 

Wing Commander Chadburn has led formations on very many sorties during which sixteen enemy aircraft have been destroyed, six of them by this officer.  In addition three E-Boats have been successfully attacked.  Wing Commander Chadburn has displayed exceptional leadership and great skill, while his fine fighting spirit have set a most inspiring example.

 

CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon, DSO, DFC (J2976) - Bar to Distinguished Service Order - "Attached RAF" (Digby Wing) - Award effective 30 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 January 1944 and AFRO 410/44 dated 25 February 1944.

 

This officer has displayed outstanding leadership, great tactical skill and courage.  Since being awarded the Distinguished Service Order he has led his formation in a large number of sorties during which twenty-three enemy aircraft have been destroyed and many others damaged.  Wing Commander Chadburn shot down six of this total himself.  Much of the great success achieved during the period can be attributed to this officer's sterling qualities.

 

CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon, DSO, DFC (J2976) - Chevalier of the Legion of Honour (France) - AFRO 485/47 dated 12 September 1947 and Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947

 

CHADBURN, W/C Lloyd Vernon, DSO, DFC (J2976) - Croix de Guerre avec Palm (France) - AFRO 485/47 dated 12 September 1947 and Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHADWICK, F/L Ronald Wilfred (J9665) - Medal for Bravery (Czechoslovakia) -  Canada Gazette dated 24 January 1948, AFRO 81/48 dated 6 February 1948.  Born 22 February 1923 in Winnipeg; enlisted there 15 March 1941; trained at No.4 ITS, Edmonton (graduated 19 August 1941), No.8 EFTS, Vancouver (graduated 8 October 1941) and No.3 SFTS, Calgary (3 January 1942; commissioned); to "Y" Depot, Halifax, 4 January 1942; to RAF Trainees Pool, 24 January 1942; posted to No.14 (Pilot) Advanced Flying Unit, 27 April 1942: to No.7 PRC, 22 June 1942; to No.1 (Coastal) Operational Training Unit, 18 August 1942; promoted Flying Officer, 1 October 1942; to No.86 Squadron, 15 October 1942; promoted Flight Lieutenant, 2 January 1944; to No.111 Operational Training Unit, Nassau, 5 August 1944; to Canada, 7 June 1945; released 26 July 1945.  Joined Trans-Canada Airlines.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHAGNON, Corporal Joseph Marcel Leopold (R81947) - Mention in Despatches - No.62 Base - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945.  Home in Montreal; enlisted there 9 February 1941.  Left Canada 18 September 1941, arriving in UK 28 September 1941. Served in North Africa, 3 June to 26 October 1943.  Recommended for MiD, 22 July 1944, when he was a Fitter IIE with No.9425 Servicing Echelon.  Recommendation noted his

 

...devotion to duty, dependability, leadership and the high calibre of his work.  He consistently and willingly undertakes extra duties which carry far beyond normal working hours.  Even under strain of long hours, this NCO remains efficient, cheerful and competent.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHALCRAFT, F/L William Robertson (J16556) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945.  Born 1919 in Calgary; home there (clerk, ex-Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted there 15 May 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 August 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 25 September 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941).   Commissioned 1943.  Award presented by King George VI 29 June 1945.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty".  DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation by W/C D.C. Hagerman dated 17 January 1945 when he had flown 35 sorties (166 hours 10 minutes), 9 May to 25 September 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Chalcraft has taken part in 35 day and night attacks on the enemy.  Many of these were in direct and indirect support of the Allied Ground Forces.  He has invariably set an extremely high standard of crew captaincy and has shown great determination to attack the enemy despite the stiffest opposition they could muster.

 

I consider the wholehearted devotion to duty and resolution shown by this officer fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHALMERS, S/L Alexander George (C3560) - Mention in Despatches - Station Patricia Bay - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 11 December 1940.  Certificate and emblem sent to Station Patricia Bay, 29 June 1945.

 

Squadron Leader Chalmers has shown outstanding ability as senior accountant officer, Royal Canadian Air Force Station, Patricia Bay.  In the face of acute shortage in staff he has cheerfully accepted new commitments, re-organizing his section in such a manner as to produce the utmost efficiency from an already overworked staff and at the same time maintained their confidence and co-operation.  His own keenness and ability have set a high standard which his staff have followed willingly.


                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHALMERS, WO2 (now P/O) Roy Leon (Can 4191/C23676) - Member, Order of the British Empire - No.7 BGS - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943.  Educated at Indian Head and Yorkton, Saskatchewan.  Enlisted in Regina, 22 July 1939.  Award presented 24 November 1946.  In postwar RCAF; survived crash of Expeditor HB118 which killed four others at St.Bruno, Quebec, 23 November 1951.

 

This Warrant Officer, employed in the Ground Instruction School of this unit, has, in the execution of his duties, displayed skill and determination which are highly commendable.  His keenness and diligence have been an inspiration to all and it is largely through his leadership and capabilities as an organizer that the training procedure has been raised to its present high state of efficiency.  Through his abilities as Instructor, Warrant Officer Chalmers has been invaluable to this unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAMBERS, F/O Edward Sanford (J37817) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.166 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945.  Born 1923 in Edmonton; home in Vancouver (stock clerk); enlisted Vancouver 16 September 1942.  Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 16 April 1943) and No.7 AOS (graduated 29 October 1943).  Commissioned 1943.  Award sent by registered mail 24 February 1950.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty".  Public Records Office Air 2/9070 has recommendation dated 8 February 1945 when he had flown 30 sorties (176 hours), 25 September 1944 to 28 January 1945.

 

25 Sep 44      Neuss                                16 Nov 44      Duren

26 Sep 44      Calais                                18 Nov 44      Wanne Eickel

5 Oct 44         Saarbrucken                     29 Nov 44      Dortmund

7 Oct 44         Emmerich                          3 Dec 44        Urft Dam

15 Oct 44       Duisburg                            6 Dec 44        Merseburg

15 Oct 44       Wilhelmshaven                 12 Dec 44      Essen

19 Oct 44       Fort Frederick                   15 Dec 44      Ludwigshaven

Hendrik                              21 Dec 44      GARDENING

19 Oct 44       Stuttgart                             24 Dec 44      Cologne

25 Oct 44       Essen                                25 Dec 44      Scholven Buer

28 Oct 44       Cologne                             26 Dec 44      Munchen Gladbach

30 Oct 44       Cologne                             2 Jan 45         Nuremburg

31 Oct 44       Cologne                             5 Jan 45         Hanover

4 Nov 44         Bochum                             6 Jan 45         GARDENING

6 Nov 44         Gelsenkirchen                   28 Jan 45       Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen

11 Nov 44      Dortmund


This Canadian air bomber has now completed a tour of 30 sorties since joining the squadron.  He has taken part in attacks on a wide variety of targets both in Germany and in enemy occupied territory.

 

Throughout these sorties he has displayed a magnificent offensive spirit and has proved himself in every way a worthy member of a gallant crew.  He has allowed nothing to deter him from his purpose and no matter whether subjected to heavy anti-aircraft gun fire or harassed by enemy fighters, he has never failed to bomb his target with consistent accuracy.

 

For his courage under fire, resolute determination and fine record of achievement he is recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAMNEY, P/O (now F/O) Donald Harold (J37332) - Mention in Despatches - No.113 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 14 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2684/44 dated 15 December 1944.  Enlisted in Saskatoon, 23 April 1941.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 8 September 1941), No.7 AOS (graduated 29 March 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 3 July 1942).

 

This navigator, throughout his operational duties in the North Atlantic, has at all times set an example of efficiency and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAMNEY, Sergeant Gordon Eifert (R105785) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943.  Home in Provost, Alberta; enlisted in Edmonton, 3 June 1941.  Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 2 March 1942) and No.8 BGS (graduated 30 March 1942). No.422 Squadron Progress Reports (cited on DHist award card) states this was for a gallant effort to rescue from drowning the fellow member of the Sunderland crew following a crash on 19 December 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAMPION, LAC Cecil Frederick (R94955) - Mention in Despatches - No.404 Squadron - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944.  Home in Perdue, Saskatchewan; enlisted Regina 16 April 1941.  No citation in AFRO.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHAMPION, Sergeant Lionel James (R197676) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.57 Squadron - Award effective 20 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1924 in Vancouver; home there; enlisted there 26 October 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 23 July 1943.  Award sent by registered mail 24 February 1950.

 

Sergeant Champion was rear gunner in an aircraft taking part in an attack on a target near Paris in daylight in August 1944.  After the bombing run the aircraft was attacked by an enemy aircraft.  In the fight the bomber sustained extensive damage.  Although his turret was put out of action and he was unable to use his guns, Sergeant Champion displayed great coolness and resolution.  In the face of repeated attacks he skilfully directed his pilot's combat manoeuvres until the attacker broke off the engagement.  This airman displayed outstanding devotion to duty and his sterling work played a good part in the safe return of the aircraft.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAMPION, FS William Harold Russel (R193070) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.44 Squadron - Award effective 5 August 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 August 1944 and AFRO 2101/44 dated 29 September 1944.  Born 1924; home in London, Ontario; enlisted there.  Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 11 June 1943.  Award presented 15 April 1948.  No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/9632 has recommendation dated 15 May 1944 when he had flown 27 sorties (181 hours five minutes); not all successful.  No sortie sheet at hand (either not in file or not sent from PRO).

 

Sergeant Champion has now completed an operational tour of 26 successful sorties, most of which were against heavily defended German targets.  He has in fact been to Berlin no less than seven times and Frankfurt three times.

 

A most efficient gunner, his confidence, enthusiasm and energy sustained throughout a trying tour have been an inspiration and example to crew comrades and also to his fellow gunners.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHANCE, F/O David Godwin (J86499) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1923 in Ottawa; home there (farmer); enlisted there 24 April 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 6 November 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 19 February 1943) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 25 June 1943).  Commissioned May 1944.  Award presented 9 December 1947.  No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty."  DHist file 181.009 D.2610 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 19 December 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (158 hours 15 minutes), 4 July to 5 December 1944.

 


This officer has successfully completed nearly thirty sorties, many of which have been against the most heavily defended German targets including Dortmund, Duisburg, Essen, Dusseldorf and Bochum. In addition he has carried out a number of mine laying missions which demanded the highest skill and concentration.  At all times Flying Officer Chance by his fine qualities of leadership, courage and devotion to duty has shown that he is capable of dealing successfully with any combination of circumstances.  He is a gallant captain of a very capable crew and his leadership has demonstrated time and again that this rare quality has been in no small degree responsible for the success of the sorties.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHANDLER, Sergeant Alfred James (R60718) - Air Force Medal - No.5 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 11 June 1942 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1942 and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942. Home in Ribstone, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 3 June 1940.  Graduated from Station Rockcliffe, 3 August 1940.  Award presented 3 December 1942.

 

The outstanding air gunner of No.5 (BR) Squadron, Sergeant Chandler has completed 446 hours of flying, 363 of which were during 104 actual war flights.  For the manner in which he has displayed never-failing courage and devotion, he is strongly recommended for the award of the Air Force Medal.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHANT, G/C Sperrin Noah Fulton (C8668) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Born 31 October 1896 at St.Thomas, Ontario. Educated there, University of Toronto (BA, MA), University of London and University of Chicago. From 1923 to enlistment he was professor in psychology, University of Toronto. Enlisted in Toronto, 10 November 1941.  Transferred to Reserve early in 1945 "to take up important duties in the Department of Veterans Affairs".  Award presented 29 June 1947.

 


Prior to being commissioned in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Group Captain Chant was active in an advisory capacity and greatly assisted the service in developing methods of aircrew selection.  During his service he has been responsible for developing psychological, aptitude and related technical tests to govern the selection and re-selection of aircrew and groundcrew personnel.  His contribution to the war effort has been of the utmost value by increasing efficiency, in effecting large economies of time and money and in salvaging potential wastage of aircrew.  Both the United States Army and the Royal Air Force have adopted many of these tests and practices.  He has also developed the recent method of personnel assessment, upon the results of which the merit promotion system is based.  In addition, he has developed the procedure for personnel counselling which will be used as a basis for assisting personnel to select the civilian occupation for which they are best suited upon demobilization.  Throughout his career Group Captain Chant has displayed a particularly high degree of initiative and outstanding knowledge and interest in his work and has unstintingly assisted other staff officers with the benefit of his wide experience and knowledge.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHANT, F/L William Starr Kenneth (C7145) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Home in Toronto; enlisted there 29 August 1941.  Certificate sent 20 August 1948.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, W/C Cecil George William (C1009) - Distinguished Service Order - No.162 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 11 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2052/44 dated 22 September 1944.  Home in Fredericton, New Brunswick.   Educated at University of New Brunswick. Enlisted in Fredericton, 5 June 1939. Trained at Calgary Flying Club; awarded wings 30 October 1939.  Award presented 25 February 1949.  In postwar RCAF he was Air Attache to Stockholm and as a Group Captain commanded United Nations air units in the Congo, 1960-1961.

 

This officer has completed a large number of sorties and has displayed a high degree of skill, courage and devotion to duty, qualities which were well in evidence on a recent occasion when he successfully attacked a U-Boat.  In the fight his aircraft was struck by anti-aircraft fire and extensively damaged.  Height was rapidly lost but Wing Commander Chapman skilfully brought the aircraft down on the sea.  The crew got safely aboard the dinghy and, some four hours later, were rescued.  During the time spent in the dinghy, Wing Commander Chapman set a fine example which greatly inspired his comrades in a trying period.  He has invariably displayed high qualities of leadership and tenacity.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, FS Frederic Roy (R58570) - British Empire Medal - No.5 Radio School - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Home in Kamloops, British Columbia.  Enlisted in Vancouver, 28 August 1940.  Award presented 21 February 1948.

 

This non-commissioned officer has achieved an extremely high level of instruction on new and advanced types of Radio Communication Equipment.  On his own initiative and largely in his own time, he acquired the necessary knowledge, and formulated an excellent instructional program.  His staff, inspired by his outstanding example and trained in his techniques and methods, has proved exceptionally capable.  Flight Sergeant Chapman's precis, well written and informative, is an authoritative work in this field.

 


                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, Corporal Gilbert Warren (R50060) - Mention in Despatches - No.432 Squadron (No.62 Base) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 425/45 dated 9 March 1945.  Home in Hilden, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Halifax, 20 October 1939.  DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 15 October 1944 when he had served 27 months in Canada, 32 months overseas.  Fitter IIE.

 

As a supervisor of Fitters in a Flight this airman has set an excellent example to all in contact with him.  He never hesitates to carry out and complete a job under the most trying circumstances.  He willingly co-operates with the other tradesmen working with him on the aircraft to keep them flying.  Duty he places before any other consideration.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, LAC Harry Horace Herbert (RR176968) - British Empire Medal - Station Prince Rupert - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Home in Truro, Nova Scotia; enlisted in Pembroke, Ontario, 24 January 1940.  Award sent by registered mail.  The DHist file gives two slightly varying citations, both given below:

 

Leading Aircraftman Chapman was one of the crewmen of a rowboat which capsized in a rough sea off Langara Island.  After reaching the comparative safety of the upturned boat and straddling it, this airman saw an officer struggling in the water some distance away.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he immediately dove into the water and succeeded in pulling the officer to shore.  Although the officer was drowned in this accident, the courage and resolution shown by Leading Aircraftman Chapman earned the highest praise from those present.  He displayed devotion to duty of a high order.

 

                                                                  (other version)

 

On 23rd March 1943, LAC Chapman was one of the crewmen of a rowboat which capsized in a rough sea off Langara Island.  After reaching the comparative safety of the upturned boat and straddling it, this airman saw F/L A. Newman struggling in the water some distance away.  With complete disregard for his own safety, he immediately dove into the water and succeeded in pulling F/L Newman to shore.  F/L Newman was drowned in this accident, but the courage and resolution shown by LAC Chapman earned the highest praise from those present, and the fact of this heroism was included in the findings of the Court of Inquiry.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHAPMAN, F/L Jack (C18980) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Home in Toronto; enlisted there 10 October 1940.  Certificate sent to Vancouver, 20 August 1948.

 

                                                                          * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, WO2 John Randall (R85522) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.97 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 9 May 1944 as per London Gazette dated 21 December 1945 and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Born 1922 in Toronto; home in St.Thomas, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 11 December 1940.  Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 5 February 1943).  Killed in action 10/11 May 1944 (Lancaster JB708); wife in St.Thomas, Ontario.  Award presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947.

 

This Warrant Officer has completed as air gunner many successful operations against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, S/L Tom Herbert (J11763) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.425 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945 and AFRO 824/45 dated 18 May 1945.  Born 1917 in Toronto; home there; enlisted there 20 July 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 30 September 1940), No.6 EFTS (graduated 20 November 1940) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 11 February 1941).  Commissioned May 1942.  Award presented by King George VI 29 June 1945.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty."  DHist file 181.009 D.1731 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20608) had recommendation dated 15 December 1944 when he had completed 28 sorties (140 hours 40 minutes):

 

On August 5th, 1944, Squadron Leader Chapman was detailed to bomb St.Leu d'Eseran in daylight.  When approximately five minutes from the target, a persistent stream of predicted flak bursts exploded all around his aircraft, severely damaging it to the extent that on return, if was classified as Category AC.  The main spars were severed, the tail assembly shot up, No.5 Petrol Tank holed and the aircraft as a whole completely riddled.

 

In spite of such trying circumstances, this officer with cool determination and superb airmanship pressed home a most successful attack and returned safely to base without any injury to his crew.

 

Squadron Leader Chapman has participated on raids over highly defended targets such as Essen, Kiel, Cologne and Dusseldorf.  This officer's remarkable efficiency as a pilot, his undaunted courage and exceptional leadership is worthy of high praise.  He has shown outstanding devotion to duty at all times...


                                                                          * * * *

 

CHAPMAN, W/C William Georges, DCM, DFM (C1332) - Mention in Despatches - No.3 Repair Depot - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette of that date, Canada Gazette dated 2 June 1943, and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943.  Born in Bournemouth, England, 1895.  Much decorated in First World War, he served with Ontario Provincial Air Service between the wars; enlisted at Regina, 13 June 1941.

 

Wing Commander Chapman, DCM, DFM, commands an Aircraft Repair Depot and a Reception and Disposal Centre for Australian and New Zealand Air Force personnel.  His technical knowledge and outstanding ability to organize have been reflected in the quality and volume of the work produced by his Depot.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPPELL, F/O Clifford Daniel Robert (J4693) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1247/43 dated 2 July 1943.  Home in Windsor, Ontario; enlisted there, 1 July 1940.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 13 September 1940), No.3 AOS (graduated 8 December 1940), 2 BGS (graduated 19 January 1941), and No.1 CNS (graduated 15 February 1941).

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAPPELL, Sergeant Edward William (R58024) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.405 Squadron - Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944.  Born 1921 in Vancouver; home there; enlisted there 12 June 1940.  Originally an Airframe Mechanic; remustered to Flight Engineer, 14 August 1943.  Award presented 1 July 1947.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which they have invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Officer Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 23 July 1944 when he had flown 48 sorties (236 hours 55 minutes), 23 September 1943 to 29 June 1944.

 

23 Sep 44      Darmstadt (5.30)                  19 Feb 44     Leipzig (6.25)

1 Oct 43         Hagen (4.55)                         20 Feb 44     Stuttgart (5.50)

2 Oct 43         Munich (7.25)                        24 Feb 44     Schweinfurt (6.40)

18 Oct 43       Hanover (5.10)                      14 Mar 44     Stuttgart (6.20)

20 Oct 43       Leipzig (6.30)                       18 Mar 44     Frankfort (4.35)

22 Oct 43       Frankfurt (5.45)                     24 Mar 44     Berlin (6.25)

3 Nov 43         Cologne (4.05)                     30 Mar 44     Nuremburg (6.10)

11 Nov 43      Mannheim (5.10)                  3 May 44       Montdidier (2.55)

12 Nov 43      Ludwigshaven (5.45)           6 May 44       Nantes Gassicourt (2.45)

2 Dec 43        Berlin (5.50)                          10 May 44     Ghent (2.20)

4 Dec 43        Leipzig (6.30)                       11 May 44     Boulogne (2.20)


16 Dec 43      Berlin (6.50)                          19 May 44     Mont Couple (1.45)

20 Dec 43      Frankfort (4.45)                     22 May 44     Le Mans (3.40)

24 Dec 43      Berlin (7.05)                          27 May 44     Rennes (3.40)

29 Dec 43      Berlin (6.15)                          10 June 44    Versailles (3.50)

2 Jan 44         Berlin (6.40)                          12 June 44    Amiens (2.35)

3 Jan 44         Berlin (6.10)                          14 June 44    Cambrai (2.50)

6 Jan 44         Stettin (8.30)                         15 June 44    Lens (2.15)

20 Jan 44       Berlin (7.00)                          16 June 44    Sterkrade (3.40)

21 Jan 44       Magdeburg (6.30)                17 June 44    Oisemont-au-Bois (2.35)

27 Jan 44       Berlin (6.55)                          21 June 44    Oisemont-au-Bois (2.15, day)

28 Jan 44       Berlin (7.40)                          24 June 44    Bonnetot (2.10, day)

30 Jan 44       Berlin (6.05)                          28 June 44    Wizerne (1.35)

15 Feb 44      Frankfort (7.05)                     29 June 44    Metz (5.15)

 

This Non-Commissioned Officer is a keen and efficient Flight Engineer who has now completed two tours of operations.  The fine fighting spirit displayed by Sergeant Chappell, together with his unselfish devotion to duty and dogged determination to complete the most difficult tasks has been an inspiration to all members of the squadron.  Strongly recommended for the mon-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

CHAPUT, F/O Joseph George Aime (J85376) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945.  Born 1923 in Letellier, Manitoba; home in St.Adolphe, Manitoba (labourer); enlisted in Winnipeg, 11 September 1941.  Trained at No.2 BGS (graduated 21 February 1942).  Commissioned 1943.  Award presented 11 June 1949.  No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy".  DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation dated 21 March 1945 when he had flown 19 sorties (119 hours 15 minutes) on a second tour, 4 October 1944 to 2 February 1945 - although 17 sorties were in No.419 Squadron (4 October 1944 to 2 January 1945) and only two were with No.428 (7 January and 2 February 1945),

 

Throughout his two tours of operations this officer has shown a high degree of courage and determination with a fine disregard of personal safety.  His obvious ability and coolness under all circumstances have proved an inspiration to his crew and rendered him of invaluable help to his pilot.  By his great loyalty and devotion to duty he has contributed to a major degree to the operational efficiency of the unit.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 


CHARBONNEAU, F/O Joseph Delphis Maurice Rene (J97585) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 23 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 7 December 1945 and AFRO 244/46 dated 8 March 1946.  Born 1922 in Montreal; home there (contractor); enlisted Montreal, 14 January 1941.  Trained at No.6 BGS (graduated 16 January 1942).  Entitled to Africa Star.  Presented with DFC, 25 November 1949.

 

This officer has participated in operations in the Middle East and over Germany.  In March 1945, during an attack against Pforsheim, his aircraft was engaged by an enemy fighter.  Flying Officer Charbonneau skilfully manipulated his guns and destroyed the enemy.  On another occasion in March 1945, when returning from an attack on Hagen, his aircraft was shot down.  This officer received injuries to his head and legs due to the aircraft catching fire and exploding before he was able to make his exit.  Undeterred by this trying experience, Flying Officer Charbonneau resumed operational flying on recovery with undiminished enthusiasm.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARDE, F/O William Crawford (J11328) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.13 SFTS - Award effective 26 October 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2386/43 dated 19 November 1943.  Enlisted in Toronto, 6 August 1941.  Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 October 1941), No.22 EFTS (graduated 22 December 1941) and No.9 SFTS (graduated 24 April 1942).  Killed in action, 9 February 1948 with No.418 Squadron (Mosquito HR151); buried in Germany.

 

Flying Officer Charde as a flying instructor and Flight Commander during the past year has shown exceptional flying and organizing ability.  His untiring efforts, outstanding work and unfailing devotion to duty have served as an inspiration to all with whom he comes in contact.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHAREST, A/C Joseph Edouard Allye (C1825) - Commander, Order of the British Empire - AFHQ - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Born in Hull, Quebec, 6 October 1891.  Educated at Classical College, L'Assumption, 1905-1913, then to Laval University to study Theology and Canon Law. Ordained about 1922.  Entered RCAF in Toronto, 23 March 1940, and rose to Director of Chaplain Services (RC).  Award presented 8 April 1948.  Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 26 October 1953 for services with the RCAF Association.

 


This officer was appointed to the Chaplain Services early in the war and rendered excellent service as Command Chaplain (RC), No.1 Training Command till early in 1940 [?], at which time he became Deputy Director of Chaplain Services (RC).  Early in 1944 he was given the heavy responsibility of becoming Director of Chaplain Services (RC).  Throughout his career he has given ample evidence of exceptional administrative ability in the performance of his duties and in meeting many difficult situations he has displayed tact, industry and good judgement.  With his spirit of tolerance and broadness of vision he has been particularly successful in promoting a better understanding and deeper feeling of fellowship between English and French speaking officers and men.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLEBOIS, WO2 Albert Joseph Phillipe (Can 2481) - Member, Order of the British Empire - Station Rockcliffe - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Home in Ottawa; enlisted there 27 June 1938. Award presented 9 December 1947.

 

This Warrant Officer has conscientiously applied himself to his duties as Master Mechanic.  He has never hesitated to render any service, no matter how trying the circumstances, which would advance the work of his unit or benefit the service generally.  His work and leadership have always been of a high order, and under all circumstances his conduct and attitude to his duties have been an outstanding example to all.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLEBOIS, F/O Joseph Bernard Remi (J43194) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.1 OTU - award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Home in Montreal;; enlisted there 22 July 1941.  Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 25 October 1941), No.22 EFTS (graduated 19 December 1941), and No.9 SFTS.

 

Since coming to this unit, over twenty-two months ago, this officer has displayed considerable zeal and has carried out his duties most efficiently.  Through his efforts he has to a great extent raised the standard of air firing at this unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLEBOIS, F/O Joseph Henri Hercule (J29782) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.433 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945.  Born 1911; home in Cornwall, Ontario (truck driver); enlisted in Montreal, 15 October 1940.  Trained at No.4 WS (graduated 27 October 1941) and No.9 BGS (graduated 25 May 1942).  Commissioned 1943.  Award presented 7 August 1946.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 20 October 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (161 hours 55 minutes), 16 June to 14 October 1944.

 


This officer, the Wireless Operator of the crew captained by Flying Officer J.D.R. Nixon, has now completed his first tour of operations comprised of thirty-three trips over enemy territory.  Throughout his tour he has consistently displayed a high degree of courage, skill and initiative and has proven himself to be an outstanding member of a gallant crew.  Flying Officer Charlebois has also greatly strengthened the hand of the Signals Leader of this squadron when on the ground, his keenness, energy and reliability being a constant source of inspiration to his fellow Wireless Operators.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLEY, F/O Walter Alan (J24697) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945.  Born 1917 in Melbourne, Australia; home in Le Crescent, Minnisota (but described as British subject); served with a light horse unit two years; enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 25 May 1942.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 6 November 1942) and No.2 AOS (graduated 19 March 1943).  Commissioned March 1943.  Presented with both DFC and Bar, 31 October 1947.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Officer Air 2/8831 has recommendation dated 20 November 1944 when he had flown 38 sorties (180 hours 22 minutes), 26 April to 11 November 1944.

 

26 Apr 44       Essen (5.45)                               24 Jul 44        Stuttgart (7.04)

6 May 44        Brest (4.55)                                27 Jul 44        Boissons (3.30)

8 May 44        Moralix (4.25)                             28 Jul 44        Hamburg (4.53)

9 May 44        St.Valerie (4.30)                        30 Jul 44        Battle area (3.33)

15 May 44      Kattegatt (5.55)                          3 Aug 44        L'ile Adam (2.56)

19 May 44      Le Clippon (3.00)                       4 Aug 44        St.Maximim (2.56)

21 May 44      Heligoland (4.35)                       5 Aug 44        Bordeaux (7.37)

22 May 44      Le Mans (5.05)                           7 Aug 44        TOTALIZE (2.32)

27 May 44      Le Havre (3.55)                          8 Aug 44        Lucheux (2.48)

28 May 44      Le Havre (3.55)                          25 Aug 44      Russelsheim (6.59)

2 June 44       Dunkirk (3.25)                            26 Aug 44      Kiel (5.30)

5 June 44       Houlgate (4.50)                          29 Aug 44      Stettin (5.23), DNCO

6 June 44       Conole sur Neirpau                   12 Sep 44      Frankfurt (5.59)

(5.35)                                           14 Oct 44       Duisburg (4.05)

10 Jun 44       Versailles (5.30)                        15 Oct 44       Wilhelmshaven (4.08)

13 Jun 44       Cambrai (4.30)                          19 Oct 44       Stuttgart (5.13)

15 Jul 44        Nucourt (3.44)                            23 Oct 44       Essen (4.39)

19 Jul 44        Rollez (3.00)                               25 Oct 44       Homburg (3.19)

22 Jul 44        Acquet (2.38), DNCO                30 Oct 44       Cologne (4.18)

(no sortie)                                   2 Nov 44         Dusseldorf (4.08)

23 Jul 44        Kiel (5.13)                                   11 Nov 44      Dortmund (4.27)

 


Flying Officer Charley is an outstanding navigator who is now on his second tour of operations.  He has participated in many raids against such heavily defended enemy areas as Stuttgart, Essen and Kiel.  Throughout his long and varied operational career, he has displayed a keenness for operational duty and a high sense of responsibility which has been a decided factor in influencing not only the successes attained by his own crew, but in inspiring confidence in his other fellow comrades.

 

CHARLEY, F/L Walter Alan, DFC (J24697) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945.

 

Throughout two tours of operational duty this officer has shown himself to be an outstanding navigator by his cheerful courage and determination even in the most adverse circumstances.  He has won the confidence and admiration of all members of his crew.  Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross Flight Lieutenant Charley has continued to operate with undiminished zeal and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLTON, P/O Arthur William (J51817) - Mention in Despatches - No.160 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1945 as per Canada Gazette dated 22 February 1946 and AFRO 183/46 dated 22 February 1946.  Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 11 October 1938.

 

This officer is a most efficient and co-operative Flight Engineer who has completed a large number of hazardous operational sorties over the North Atlantic. He has at all times shown great enthusiasm and devotion to duty which have contributed greatly to the high standard of morale at this unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLTON, F/L Richard Jeffrey (J9931) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.13 SFTS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Enlisted in Ottawa, 19 May 1941.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 20 August 1941), No.10 EFTS (graduated 7 October 1941) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 23 January 1942).  Certificate and emblems sent to No.1 CFS, 5 July 1945.  No citation.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARLWOOD, Sergeant Dennis William (R89818) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945.  Enlisted in Hamilton, 10 April 1941.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARRON, FS Gerald Raoul (Can 2403) - British Empire Medal - No.12 (Communications) Squadron - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944.  Born 1 July 1917 at Ottawa; enlisted there 6 June 1938.  Award presented 22 April 1944.


This non-commissioned officer has been employed as an Aero Engine Mechanic for a number of years and is now in charge of the Maintenance Section.  Throughout his service career his sincere devotion to duty, untiring efforts and skill have set an excellent example to those working with him.  His ability to direct and supervise has been largely responsible for the high standard of reliability of the equipment of his squadron which has been transporting important persons on minor and major continental trips for a considerable period without an accident.  This record, to a great extent, is due to the thorough work of Flight Sergeant Charron.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARTERS, FS Edward (Can 4111) - British Empire Medal - No.8 SFTS - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943.  Born in Medicine Hat, Alberta.  Enlisted in Calgary, 4 May 1939.  Commissioned in postwar RCAF (Flight Lieutenant, 4111); died 31 May 1958.  Award presented 31 May 1944.

 

This NCO, previously employed as aircrew, has to his credit 261 flying hours as navigator and approximately 100 hours as crewman.  Flight Sergeant Charters is now the Senior Aeronautical Mechanic of the Repair Squadron at this unit and has displayed an excellent knowledge of his trade.  By his driving force, untiring efforts and cheerful manner he has been a splendid example and inspiration to those working with him, thereby being largely responsible for the record obtained by this unit in aircraft serviceability.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARTERS, Flight Sergeant Robert Burns (R115419) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.199 Squadron - Award effective 3 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 16 April 1943 and AFRO 809/43 dated 7 May 1943.  Born 1918; home in Richmond, Virginia or in Brampton, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 22 July 1941.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 8 October 1941), No.4 BGS (graduated 14 March 1942), No.4 AOS (graduated 2 February 1942), and No.2 ANS (graduated 13 April 1942).  Award presented by King George VI 12 October 1943.  Cited with Sergeant A.J.W.R. Coupar (RAF, also awarded DFM).

 


One night in March 1943, Sergeant Coupar (RAF) and Flight Sergeant Charters were captain and navigator, respectively, of an aircraft detailed to attack Essen.  On the outward flight one engine of the bomber became overheated but Sergeant Coupar flew on to the target and bombed it.  Shortly after crossing the Dutch coast on the return journey the aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter, sustaining much damage.  The wireless apparatus was rendered unserviceable and the inter-communication and hydraulic systems were put out of action causing the bomb doors to open and the undercarriage to hang in a downward position.  In spite of this, Sergeant Coupar coolly and skilfully evaded the attacker and set course for base.  During the remainder of the homeward flight, Flight Sergeant Charters, who had been wounded in the chest, displayed great fortitude, remaining at his post to continue his navigational duties.  Sergeant Coupar eventually flew the damaged bomber to an airfield where he effected a successful crash landing.  Both these airmen displayed great courage and skill in harassing circumstances.

 

CHARTERS, F/L Robert Burns, DFM (J18469) - Croix de Guerre (France) - No.171 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Later attained rank of Squadron Leader.  Public Records Office document Air 2/9645 has citation.

 

This officer has taken a very active part as navigator in operations over France, both before and after D Day.  On the 3rd March, 1944, after being shot down over France, he eluded the Germans, with the ready assistance of the French people, walked back to his own lines and finally reached England.  After a very short rest he returned to his unit.  Flight Lieutenant Charters' work, both in the air and on the ground, have been of the highest order and his courage and tenacity of purpose have been an inspiration to his captain and crew.

 

NOTE: In January 1997 the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch) presented to the National Aviation Museum a "dossier" (actually more like an album) with extended autobiographical notes on members (catalogued in the museum as D.805 C3 L96 1995 NMM).  This included much information on Charters' evasion. W.R. Chorley, Royal Air Force Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War (1944 volume) states that the aircraft on which he was shot down was Stirling EE957, EX-Q, of No.199 Squadron, which raises the question of why No.171 Squadron is associated with this award.  Typographical error ?

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARTIER, F/L Clarence Amos (J87460) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 July 1945 and AFRO 1558/45 dated 5 October 1945.  Born 1919 in Toronto; home in Granby, Quebec (student, ex-Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted in Montreal, 24 April 1941.  Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 20 August 1941), No.11 EFTS (graduated 13 October 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942).  Commissioned 1944.  Award presented in Montreal, 25 November 1949.  No citation other than "in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy".  DHist file 181.009 D.1750 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20608) has recommendation dated 22 November 1944 when he had flown 18 trips (91 hours 55 minutes):

 

This officer has completed very many sorties involving attacks on a wide range of targets in Germany and Northern France.  He has also completed numerous minelaying operations.  He is an outstanding captain whose skill, determination and devotion to duty have a fine example...

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHARTIER, FS Floreat Guy (Can 6512) - Mention in Despatches - No.9425 Servicing Echelon (No.62 Base in AFRO) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945. Home in Ottawa; enlisted in Montreal, 10 August 1939.  DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation submitted 15 August 1944.  Had served 37 months in Canada, five months in North Africa, 19 months in UK.  Electrician.  Died in Ottawa, 17 October 1993, age 73; described as a WO1 (retired).

 

Flight Sergeant Chartier is non-commissioned officer in charge of the Daily Servicing Squadron Electrical Section, 9425 Servicing Echelon.  The high standard of leadership and proficiency possessed by this non-commissioned officer distinguished him unmistakedly among his fellow workers.  His outstanding ability remains undaunted during conditions of extremely trying character.  Flight Sergeant Chartier's unwavering devotion to duty during his five months in Africa and since returning to this country is well worthy of high praise.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHARTRAND, Corporal Joseph Raoul Adrien (R135612) - British Empire Medal - No.8 Bombing and Gunnery School - Awarded 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943.  Born in Navan, Ontario, 1 January 1918; home there.  Enlisted in Ottawa 7 October 1941.  Served at No.8 BGS, 24 October 1941 to 16 December 1944; discharged 9 January 1946.  Originally a General Duties airman; reclassified as Telephone Technician, 22 May 1944.  Award presented 16 April 1943.

 

This NCO is employed on the range crew.  He has always taken the initiative on any work required and has assumed duties over and above that required by his actual position.  Calling on past experience he has spent hours in all kinds of weather repairing telephone lines when electricians were not at the time available.  He has made an outstanding contribution to the training programme at his unit and has set a very fine example to all.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHASANOFF, F/L Joseph (C8455) - Mention in Despatches - No.427 Squadron - Award effective 14 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  Home in Selkirk, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 13 September 1940.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHASE, P/O Gerald Wilson (J85402) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.103 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944.  Born 1920 in Saint John, New Brunswick; home in Toronto (ex Army); enlisted in Montreal, 11 August 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 June 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 11 September 1942) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 30 December 1942).  At OTU he had an engine fire in a Wellington and had to bale out.  Commissioned 1944.  Left RCAF in 1946; re-engaged 1952 as Air Controller.  Award presented 20 April 1948.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty".  Public Records Office Air 2/9026 has recommendation dated 13 July 1944 when he had flown 29 1/3 sorties (160 hours 15 minutes), 8 September 1943 to 4 July 1944.

 

8 Sept 43          Boulogne                               21 May 44     Duisburg

24 Feb 44         Schweinfurt                            22 May 44     Dortmund

15 Mar 44         Stuttgart                                 24 May 44     Aachen

18 Mar 44         Frankfurt                                27 May 44     Aachen

22 Mar 44         Frankfurt                                2 June 44       Calais

24 Mar 44         Berlin                                      3 June 44       Wimereaux

26 Mar 44         Essen                                     6 June 44       Vire

11 Apr 44         Aachen                                  9 June 44       Flers

20 Apr 44         Cologne                                 16 June 44    Sterkrade

22 Apr 44         Dusseldorf                             17 June 44    Aulnoye

24 Apr 44         Karlsruhe                               28 June 44    Chateau Pernapre

26 Apr 44         Essen                                     29 June 44    Domleger

27 Apr 44         Friedrichshaven                    30 June 44    Oisemont

30 Apr 44         Maintenon                              2 July 44        Domleger

19 May 44        Orleans                                  4 July 44        Orleans

 

Pilot Officer Chase, a Canadian, has completed 29 1/3 sorties on heavy bomber aircraft, with a total of 160.15 hours operational flying, since being posted to No.13 Squadron on 7th February 1944, having carried out one operation before coming to the squadron.

 

These sorties have included many difficult attacks against the most heavily defended industrial targets in Germany, in addition to marshalling yards, oil targets and enemy military installations in occupied territory.  Throughout these attacks, which have entailed both high and low altitude bombing, by day and by night, this officer has shown zeal and efficiency of the highest order.

 

Quite undeterred by the strongest opposition from flak and fighters, he has consistently pressed home his attack with most commendable skill, courage and devotion to duty.  I strong;y recommend that his excellent record be recognized by the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHAUSSE, FS Louis Joseph Rosaire (R77357) - Air Force Medal - No.10 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943.  Born in Berthier, Quebec, 7 October 1915.  Home in Montreal; enlisted there 8 November 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 7 July 1941), No.9 AOS (graduated 26 September 1941), No.6 BGS (graduated 7 November 1941) and No.2 ANS.  Award presented 16 April 1943.

 

Flight Sergeant Chausse has proven to be a thoroughly reliable navigator. He has completed 55 operational sorties for a total of 467 hours.  He has demonstrated a high devotion to duty at all times and a thorough and dependable manner in the performance of his duties.  By his unfailing energy and exceptional ability he has been an inspiration to others.  His conduct has at all times been exemplary.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEATER, F/O Allan Percy Vivian (J9135) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 24 March 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 874/44 dated 21 April 1944.  Home in regina; enlisted there 6 April 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 26 July 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 31 September 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 5 December 1941).  Award presented 26 February 1945. Photo PL-24228 shows the whole crew after their attack on a U-Boat: Back Row - WO2 F.J. Patterson; F.O A.P.V. Cheater, F/O P.C.E. Lafond, F/O M.S. Wallace, P/O J.A. Banks.  Front Row - Sergent S.S. Archer, WO2 C.S. Carter.

 

This officer was captain of a VLR Liberator which sighted and attacked an enemy submarine at dusk one evening in February 1944.  Despite very difficult visibility, he promptly engaged the U-Boat, carried out three well executed attacks in the face of intense flak and succeeded in dropping his last depth charge right beside the conning tower, with probable considerable damage.  The courage and tactics displayed by Flying Officer Cheater were of the highest calibre and the all round efficiency of his crew on this occasion was a tribute to his training ability and inspiration.  In over 1,070 hours of operational flying in the North Atlantic area, he has at all times set a splendid example as a pilot and captain.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEEK, WO1 Lester Arras (Can 1027) - Mention in Despatches - No.161 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Born in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 1917; enlisted there 4 August 1936; trained as airframe mechanic.  Also served in No.162 Squadron.  In postwar RCAF as instructor of airframe mechanics (Camp Borden, 1946-1950) and later on Sabre field technical training (St.Hubert).  Took officer training in 1952, then to No.1 (F) OTU at Chatham as officer in charge of servicing aircraft.  With No.4 (F) Wing, 1954-57.  Next to AFHQ in Directorate of Maintenance Engineering.  As of August 1961 he was a Squadron Leader.  Certificate sent to Torbay, 4 July 1945.

 


This Warrant Officer has shown outstanding ability and has applied himself untiringly to his duties as master mechanic on his squadron.  He has provided leadership and has demonstrated superior administrative ability.  He possesses the power of getting the most out of each individual and his attitude and personality are reflected throughout all airmen on the squadron.  As a Warrant Officer he is far above the average and his devotion to duty is worthy of high praise.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEESMAN, F/L Silas Alward (C2001) - Mention in Despatches - Station Goose Bay - Award effective 3 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 2479/44 dated 17 November 1944.  Home in Fort William; enlisted there 22 February 1940.  DHist file 181.009 D3060, RG.24 Vol.20635 has letter dated 18 July 1944 from G/C A.J. Hanchet-Taylor recommending him and noting that Cheeseman was 44 years old and "an inspiration to all younger aircrews".  Noted that much of the flying had involved "long distances over very badly mapped and hazardous country in single engined aircraft."

 

This officer, as officer in charge of rescue and salvage, has made many mercy trips and taken part in a considerable number of searches for missing aircraft, for some of which he has been responsible for finding and aiding in rescue and salvage.  His cheerfulness, disregard of danger and willingness to go out under all conditions have been praiseworthy. He has proven himself to be a most skilful pilot.  His courage and devotion to duty are outstanding and an inspiration to younger aircrew.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEKALUK, F/L Harry Richard (J24172) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 3 November 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945. Born 1922 at Delacour, Alberta; home in Shepard, Alberta; enlisted Calgary, 9 January 1942.  Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 17 July 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 7 November 1942) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1943).  Commissioned 1943.  Award presented 9 July 1949.  Served in postwar RCAF (13323) in Edmonton.

 

Flight Lieutenant Chekaluk has completed a very large number of sorties, many of them involving flights far into enemy territory.  On all occasions he has displayed a fine fighting spirit and has always pressed home his attacks with great determination.  He is a fine leader and his example of courage and devotion to duty has won much praise.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHENEY, F/O Donald Harry (J18295) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.617 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 1920 in Ottawa; home there (ex-Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted 28 July 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 13 February 1942), No.4 EFTS (graduated 22 May 1942) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 11 September 1942). Commissioned 1943.  Award presented 1 April 1949.  The raid on Watten mentioned was 25 July 1944; shot down during raid on Brest, 5 August 1944; returned to England 1 September 1944.  In January 1997 the Royal Air Forces Escaping Society (Canadian Branch) presented to the National Aviation Museum a "dossier" (actually more like an album) with extended autobiographical notes on members (catalogued in the museum as D.805 C3 L96 1995 NMM).  This included much information on Cheney's evasion.

 

Flying Officer Cheney has completed a large number of operational sorties as captain of aircraft including ten attacks against Berlin.  He has also participated in further missions against submarine pens in enemy occupied territory.  The success of these operations has required a very high standard of accuracy, often in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire.  On one occasion in July 1944, during a daylight mission to Watten, one engine of his aircraft was damaged by heavy anti-aircraft fire and it caught fire.  Undeterred, Flying Officer Cheney dealt with the fire and with great determination completed his bombing run.  On return to base it was found that his aircraft had sustained very extensive damage.  A few days later his aircraft was again damaged during an attack against the submarine pens at Brest.  The starboard wing caught fire and it was necessary to abandon the aircraft by parachute.  The escape exit was partially blocked and the wireless operator was so seriously wounded that he could not leave without aid.  Flying Officer Cheney remained in the aircraft and assisted the wireless operator before finally abandoning it himself.  The fine leadership, gallantry and high courage displayed by this officer have won the admiration of all.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/9038 has original recommendation dated 12 October 1944 when he had flown 38 sorties (203 hours 10 minutes), as listed below; holes punched in sortie sheet make it impossible to verify the first two dates:

 

July 43            Paris (4.20)                                       

Aug 43            Leverkusen (5.10)                             2 Jan 44         Berlin (7.25)

27 Aug 43      Nuremberg (7.55)                             20 Jan 44       Berlin (6.35)

30 Aug 43      Munchen-Gladbach (8.20)               28 Jan 44       Berlin (6.20)

3 Sept 43       Berlin (8.05)                                       5 Apr 44         Special (6.50)

6 Sept 43       Munich (8.20)                         10 Apr 44       Special (4.35)

3 Oct 43         Kassel (6.20)                                     5 June 44       Special (4.00)

4 Oct 44         Frankfurt (6.35)                                  8 June 44       illegible (8.00)

7 Oct 43         Stuttgart (6.50)                                  14 June 44     Le Havre (3.55)

18 Oct 43       Hanover (5.45)                                  15 June 44     Boulogne (2.35)

22 Oct 44       Kassel (6.15)                                     19 June 44     Watten (2.45)

4 Nov 43         Dusseldorf (4.10)                              22 June 44     Wizernes (2.15)

23 Nov 43      Berlin (1.35, DNCO)             24 June 44     Wizernes (2.35)

26 Nov 43      Berlin (7.40)                                       16 July 44       Wizernes (3.00)

2 Dec 43        Berlin (7.00)                                       20 July 44       Wizernes (3.05)

16 Dec 43      Berlin (7.30)                                       25 July 44       Watten (2.50)

20 Dec 43      Frankfurt (6.25)                                  31 July 44       Rilly (4.20)

23 Dec 43      Berlin (7.40)                                       1 Aug 44        Siracourt (3.15)

29 Dec 43      Berlin (7.00)                                       4 Aug 44        Etaples (3.30)


1 Jan 44         Berlin (8.00)                                       5 Aug 44        Brest (missing

 

Flying Officer Cheney has completed 38 operational sorties as captain of aircraft. He has taken part in attacks against many of the most heavily defended targets in enemy territory and has operated against Berlin on ten occasions.  He joined Special Duties Squadron in April 1944, and since that date he has completed a further 16 sorties against special installations and submarine pens in occupied Europe.  The success of these attacks has depended upon a very high standard of precision bombing, often in the face of intense and accurate flak, and this officer has operated by day against such heavily defended areas as Boulogne, Le Havre and Brest.

 

On 25th July 1944, during the daylight attack against Watten, his starboard outer engine was hit by heavy flak. The engine caught fire but it was successfully feathered and Flying Officer Cheney with great determination continued to complete his bombing run. On return to base his aircraft was found to have sustained very extensive damage.

 

A few days later, on 5th August, 1944, his aircraft was hit during an attack on the submarine pens at Brest.  The starboard wing immediately caught fire and he was forced to order his crew to abandon the aircraft. The front escape hatch had unfortunately become twisted sideways, partially blocking the exit, and as a result, those members of the crew escaping from that hatch had to assist each other.  Flying Officer Cheney gave orders for the Bomb Aimer, Navigator and Flight Engineer to leave the aircraft and he himself left the controls to assist the Flight Engineer.  He then found the Wireless Operator still at his post and so seriously wounded that he could not leave without aid.  He re-trimmed the aircraft and then assisted the Wireless Operator to escape before finally abandoning the aircraft himself through the top hatch.

 

The two incidents described above are examples of the determination, calmness and devotion to duty which Flying Officer Cheney has invariably displayed during his long and successful tour of operations and I recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

Ottawa Journal of 26 February 1945 carried the following story under the heading DON CHENEY TELLS OF ADVENTURES IN FRANCE (reprinted from a magazine, France-Canada).

 

On his 18th birthday, June 30, 1941, Donald H. Cheney of Ottawa joined the Royal Canadian Air Force.  Three years later, on the morning of October 9, 1944, he returned to Ottawa wearing the blue uniform of the service, a Flying Officer's stripe on his sleeve.  It was Thanksgiving Day.

 


In the interval he had flown 39 sorties over enemy territory - ten of them to Berlin; he had won the Distinguished Flying Cross for "fine leadership, gallant and high courage"; he had been shot down into the sea off the French coast; he had lived for three and a half weeks in a tiny French fishing village occupied by the Germans, and had seen his best friend buried in the town church yard by the sympathetic inhabitants; he had learned to speak French in native idiom and he had escaped back to England.

 

It was a very special Thanksgiving day for Don; for his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. H.W. Cheney, who were advised on August 5 that their only son was missing, and suffered all the agony of uncertainty until the news of his return to England on September 1; for his fiancee, Miss Gladys Gardiner.

 

Don's adventures leave him with only one regret; he never spent a day in Paris.  "Oh, I've been there plenty of times, as far as that goes - I've bombed St.Cyr.  But I'd sure like to see some of those places from the ground."  France, Germany, Holland - he knows them all from the air - "but we didn't stick around any one place too much - it was not so good for our health.  And some day I'm going back and have a real look myself - from the level of the street !"

 

There will always be a welcome for him in the little French village, where for three and a half weeks he lived with M. and Mme X and their young daughter, Paulette.  He will never forget them and their kindness - "Gosh, they risked their lives for me - every day for three weeks", he says reverently.

 

I happened about noon in early August, a beautiful summer day.  Don, who was attached to the RAF Bombing Command, had gone over to France with a small force to bomb submarine pens.  They had discharged their bombs when the 'plane was hit by heavy flak and the starboard gasoline tank caught fire.  Don, as captain, gave the order to "Abandon aircraft" and according to tradition, watched the six other members of the crew slip over the side before jumping himself.  It was his very first jump - but his only sensation was one of intense relief.  "It was really very pleasant - no feeling of falling at all".

 

Uninjured, except for a few shrapnel splinters in his face and knees, he fell into the sea about two miles from shore.  Kicking off his parachute harness, he swam towards a sandy beach.  Coming closer, however, he discovered that the Germans had placed anti-landing devices - great crossed bars of steel - along the shore, and he could hear shooting in the town.  He turned back into the sea.  By then he had been in the water for more than an hour and was beginning to get cold.

 


Suddenly he saw two fishing boats leaving the harbour and about 20 minutes later an aged Frenchman and six young boys of about 17 years of age had pulled him into the boat and were all talking to him at once - in French.  They had brought dry clothes - a pair of blue overalls, and he changed into them while they put his boots out to dry.  They had seen the plane crash, but had had to wait to come to his rescue until they could escape the watchful eye of the Germans.  In answer to his queries as to the whereabouts of the Germans, they replied simply, "Les Boches ? - caput !"  "Caput" wasn't in Don's high school vocabulary, but the throat-slitting gesture which accompanied the words were indicative enough, and gradually he pieced together the information that the F.F.I. had just that afternoon taken possession of the village, and that fighting was still going on in the streets.

 

There was a large crowd on the pier - young lads of the F.F.I. hugging to them captured German machine guns and grenades, women, children and old men.  His rescuers pointed at him delightedly,  explaining to their friends on shore, "Canadien ! Canadien !"  They greeted him joyfully, and he shook hands with them all.  A Frenchman of 25 or so, who spoke English perfectly, took charge of the visitor, pushing a way for him through the crowd which gathered in streets littered with sandbags and burning vehicles.  There was quite a lot of shooting, but this did not seem to impress the townspeople, who ran along beside Don and his guard of honour, cheering, laughing, crying, embracing him and thrusting fruit and wine into his arms.  "I wasn't feeling much like drinking anything, after so much sea water", he laughed, "but by then I was shaking like a leaf and some of that cognac certainly helped to warm me up".

 

At the German headquarters which the F.F.I. had just wrested from the enemy, Don was given a meal.  He remembers the menu vividly - pickled mackerel, rye bread, even some butter - and two peaches which someone had given him at the wharf.

 

The place bustled with activity.  Captured ammunition, rifles and machine guns were being pile up, orders shouted and the women of the village were busy improvising bandages for the wounded.  In the courtyard, operations were being directed by a tiny man in uniform who, Don learned later, occupied an important position in the resistance movement of the region.  Don was introduced to him, and told that he would be sheltered at his house where he was duly conducted in a captured German truck, two members of the F.F.I. hanging on to the sides of the vehicle with sub-machine guns as a guard of honour.

 

There, his host's wife, a tiny, dark, brown-eyed woman, and her 15-year old daughter Paulette, showed him to a room on the top floor and he sank into an exhausted sleep.  Two hours later he was awakened with the news that the Germans had brought up strong reinforcements and had threatened to burn down the town and shoot all the male inhabitants if the insurgents did not surrender all their arms immediately.  There was no alternative.  An hour later the town was again occupied by the Boches.  Don had planned his arrival in the nick of time.

 


He became known as Henri Chenier, labourer, and, taking M. and Mme X's advice about keeping out of sight, stayed indoors, except for one occasion when he went to the morgue to identify the body of his wireless operator and great friend - Flight Sergeant Reg Pool, of London, England.  Officially, he was a relative seeking to identify a French lad killed in the street fighting.  The people of the village gave the Allied airman a splendid funeral.  "I saw the procession go past my window", Don said. "Everybody was there".  They also buried his navigator, who had landed in the sea, close to shore, and, according to the Frenchmen who found him 18 days later, had been shot by the Germans, with a bullet through his head.  It was after the Germans had left, and Don attended the ceremony in the village church yard.  "It was one of the most moving things I have ever seen.  Some of the people spoke to me, expressing gratitude for what the Allies had done; some just shook my hand, wordlessly; many were in tears."

 

Don spent his days talking with the Monsieur and Madame and their friends, who were all delighted to discover that he knew a little French, and amused over his efforts to express himself.  Talking about a fellow airman one day, he realized he didn't know the French word for "flyer".  He did remember, however, that "vol" was flight, and hastily improvised: "Il etait voleur - comme moi".  "Voleur", of course, is the French word for thief, and they never stopped teasing him about it.

 

There were some English books in the house - and they were rapidly supplemented by offerings from all over the town.  Everything English was taken to "le jeune Canadien".  Someone brought him pictures of the English countryside so that he wouldn't be homesick, and one woman gave him some snapshots of Broadway.  She had been to America, she told him proudly, in 1933.  "They were very interested in Canada - and never stopped asking questions", Don said, "particularly about the snow - and the Indians".

 

Don was amazed at the lack of fear among his French friends, and at their infrequent references to the hardships they had suffered under the Nazis. "All their talk was of liberation - and victory", he said.  "Monsieur heard the news of the liberation of Paris on the radio and came running to tell us about it.  It was wonderful.  We all shook hands, and jumped about - and opened a bottle of champagne which someone had brought me for a present.

 

With the advance of the Allies the Germans withdrew to a position a few miles out of the town.  Two days later, Monsieur and Madame, Paulette, Don and am American lad who had also been in hiding, set off by car for a town 20 miles away.  There he took regretful leave of his hosts.  "They were wonderful people from a wonderful little town", and he and the American and seven Frenchmen went on.  Later he got in touch with the Royal Air Force and was driven to Bayeux. On the way they picked up refugees returning to the ruins of Caen.  "Goodness knows where they were going to live; it was just rubble", Don said.  One old Frenchman tried to explain it to me: "It's home for us, you see".  Don could well understand what he meant.  Ottawa is home for him. "And it's certainly good to be here".

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHENIER, Sergeant Joseph Isidore Aurel (R135553) - Mention in Despatches - No.425 Squadron - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945.  Home in Ottawa; enlisted there 30 September 1941.  AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Vol 20607) has list of MiDs this date with unit given as "Tholthorpe".  DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded to No.6 Group Headquarters, 3 February 1945 and identifies his post as NCO in charge of No.425 Squadron Orderly Room.  Had served seven months in Canada, 32 months overseas.

 

As NCO in charge No.425 (RCAF) Squadron Orderly Room, both during the African campaign and now in England, Sergeant Chenier has been responsible for the compilation and submission of all returns on time, irrespective of long extra night hours and the lack of sufficient staff.  He is well versed in all phases of administration and he has helped the aircrew immensely to thrash out many of their different problems.  His outstanding leadership coupled with his exceptional devotion to duty and strong desire to serve have inspired all those working under him.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEPIL, Sergeant Mack (R117497) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 19 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943.  Born in Manitoba, 1915; home in Edwin, Manitoba; enlisted in North Bay, 28 August 1941.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 30 January 1942), No.3 EFTS (graduated 27 March 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 31 July 1942).  Killed in action, 2 August 1943 with No.428 Squadron (Halifax EB274); name on Runnymede Memorial.  Presented to next-of-kin.

 

This airman captained an aircraft detailed to attack a target at Le Creusot one night in June 1943.  Soon after crossing the enemy coast the hydraulic system in the bomber became unserviceable but Sergeant Chepil continued his flight.  Later, one engine caught fire and became unserviceable.  In spite of this the target was bombed after the bomb doors had been opened by an emergency method.  Sergeant Cherpil afterwards flew the damaged aircraft to base.  This airman displayed outstanding determination and devotion to duty, setting an inspiring example.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHEREMKORA, FS John (R124136) - Mention in Despatches - No.54 Base - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945.  Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 26 August 1941.  Radar technician.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHERRINGTON, S/L George Edward (C2891) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.7 Photo Wing - Award effective 23 February 1946 as per London Gazette dated 26 February 1946 and AFRO 280/46 dated 15 March 1946.  Enlisted at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, 15 October 1940.  Ottawa Citizen of 15 February 1946 has photo of him with crew that conducted a mercy flight in Arctic, 5 February 1946, covering 3,000 miles to Baffin Island and back in a Norseman; also involved were F/L Joe Higgs (Toronto, navigator) and Sergeant C.C. Biggars (mechanic).

 

This officer has at all times carried through his responsibilities as Officer Commanding a Photographic Squadron in a praiseworthy manner.  He has displayed ability and devotion to duty as a pilot and squadron commander.  The energy and enthusiasm with which he instilled all detachments did much in the accomplishment of 200,000 square miles of vertical air photography during the past season.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHERRY, F/O Douglas Raymond (C27592) - Mention in Despatches - No.53 Base - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 379/45 dated 2 March 1945.   Home in Saskatoon; enlisted there, 22 May 1942.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHESSON, S/L Arthur Thomas (C877) - Air Force Cross - No.6 EFTS - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1943 and AFRO 1459 dated 31 July 1943 - Enlisted in Calgary, 20 June 1938; trained at Camp Borden.  Awarded wings, 10 October 1939.  Award presented 26 September 1944.

 

Squadron Leader Chesson has displayed extreme devotion to duty and has been largely instrumental in the successful organization, operation and expansion of this school while Chief Supervisory Officer and later as Chief Flying Instructor.  He has flown a total of 1,319 [1,819 ?] hours, a goodly portion of which has been instructional.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHILDS, F/L Arthur Frederick (J9356) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945.  Born 1914 in Regina; home there or in Malton; enlisted in Regina, 15 May 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 5 August 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 25 September 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 19 December 1941).  Commissioned 1941.  Award presented by King George VI 29 June 1945.  DHist file 181.009 D.5524 (RG.24 Vol.20667) has recommendation dated 16 October 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (147 hours 45 minutes) on second tour.  First tour was with No.115 Squadron (159 hours five minutes), 16 September 1942 to 27 May 1943 including 12 holes in aircraft while minelaying at LaRochelle, 3 November 1942 and being coned over LaRochelle (minelaying again), 6 November 1943.  Last trip on Wellingtons was 28 November 1942 (Turin), resuming on Lancasters, 22 March 1943.  Over Berlin, 29 March 1943, coned 18 minutes, starboard outer unserviceable by flak.  Came home on three engines, landed with two as port outer also gave up.  Holes in perspex, turrets, mainplanes (immediate DFC).  Perspex hit again 16 April 1943 (Pilsen) and hit by flak again on 13 May 1943 (Bochum).  Second tour began 21 January 1944 with No.426 Squadron; had 15 combats on 15 March 1944 (Stuttgart) and engaged by Ju.88 on 18 March 1944 (Frankfurt).  Attacked by fighter 10 June 1944 (Versailles); made three runs over target on day raid, 15 June 1944 (Boulogne).  Last sortie with No.426 Squadron was 26 April 1944; first with No.429 Squadron was 19 May 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Childs has completed numerous sorties against such heavily defended targets as Stuttgart, Hamburg, Kiel and centres in the Ruhr.  On one occasion, on the outward flight to Duisburg in daylight, one engine failed.  Despite this, Flight Lieutenant Childs continued to the target and executed a successful attack.  This officer has invariably displayed a high degree of skill and determination.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHIPPERFIELD, FS Harry Ray (R63510) - British Empire Medal - No.6 SFTS (now No.1 FIS) - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944.  Born 29 July 1907 at Woodstock, Ontario.  Enlisted in London, Ontario, 1 April 1940.  Award presented 27 April 1944.

 

Flight Sergeant Chippenfield, employed as an Armament Instructor, has been responsible for the designing and construction of armament synthetic devices that have materially improved Armament Training.  His tremendous interest, patience and exceptional ingenuity were contributing factors in the successful completion of this work and his splendid example has proved an incentive to all with whom he works.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHIPPETT, FS Wallace (Can 2697) - British Empire Medal - No.8 Construction and Maintenance Unit. - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Born in Reading, England, 28 January 1904. Educated at Shaw's Business College.   Enlisted in Camp Borden, 23 July 1939.  Award presented 27 December 1945.

 

In the absence of a messing officer on his unit, this non-commissioned officer has been in charge of all messes and has been entrusted with full responsibility.  Despite the fact that two hundred to eight hundred airmen require feeding at unusual hours and at very short notice, this non-commissioned officer has carried out his duties in a commendable and exemplary manner.  By consistent devotion to duty and high qualities of leadership, he has been a tower of strength in maintaining the morale of the airmen and the efficiency of his unit.

 

                                                                        * * * * *


CHISHOLM, FS Duncan Archibald (R69511) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.10 Squadron - Award effective 21 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 9 November 1943 and AFRO 358/44 dated 18 February 1944.  Born 1921 in Mayhew, England; home in Toronto; enlisted there 19 June 1940.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 26 September 1942) and No.9 BGS (graduated 1 January 1943).  Award presented 15 April 1948.

 

Flight Sergeant Chisholm is a skilful, cool and determined air gunner.  He has undertaken very many sorties and, on more than one occasion in encounters with enemy fighters, he has fought with great zest.  Flight Sergeant Chisholm has set a very fine example by his keenness and confidence.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHISHOLM, F/L Melvin Douglas (J27672) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.431 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945.  Born 1921; home La Fleche, Saskatchewan; enlisted 11 June 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942), No.6 EFTS (graduated 5 March 1943) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 25 June 1943).  Commissioned 1943.  Award presented 6 November 1948.  No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy."  DHist file 181.009 D.5526 (RG.24 Vol.20667) has recommendation dated 15 September 1944 when he had flown 24 sorties (111 hours 45 minutes), 4 June to 31 August 1944.

 

This officer, a captain of an aircraft, has completed twenty-four trips against the enemy.  At all times, due to his sterling qualities as a leader, he has inculcated such fine esprit de corps within his crew that they have always pressed home the attack to the utmost.  A steady, resolute pilot, who seems most at home when the going is toughest, he and his crew have inflicted telling blows against the enemy.  In recognition of this officer's fearless courage and tenacity of purpose, I strongly recommend that he be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHISHOLM, Corporal Reginald James (R153977) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944.  Home in Toronto; enlisted there ?  No citation in AFRO.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHISHOLM, F/L William Lawrence (J15044) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.92 Squadron - Award effective 1 February 1943 as per London Gazette dated 5 February 1943 and AFRO 373/43 dated 5 March 1943.  Born 29 August 1916 at Berwick, Nova Scotia.  CPR brakeman before the war.  Home in Kentville.  Enlisted in Halifax, 18 June 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (30 June-29 August 1940), No.3 EFTS (30 August-3 November 1940, and No.1 SFTS (4 November 1940-28 January 1941).  Commissioned 13 November 1941 (Flying Officer, 1 October 1942; Flight Lieutenant, 2 December 1942; Squadron Leader, 1 May 1945).  Embarked for UK, 20 February 1941. Posted to No.7 Bombing and Gunnery School, Wales, 5 March 1941; posted to No.56 OTU, Sutton Bridge, 20 September 1941; posted to No.92 Squadron, with which he served from 5 November 1941 to 16 April 1943 (to Middle East, 13 February to 13 March 1942).  Returned to Canada, June 1943; recruiting in Winnipeg and Haliufax from 13 August 1943 to 27 February 1944; employed thereafter as staff officer.  Released 30 October 1945.  During his career he suffered slight concussion (2 December 1942) when landing Spitfire VC BR476 at Magrun; blew a tire and aircraft went over on its back.  Claimed to have flown 172 operational hours with No.92 Squadron.  Victories as follows: 4 July 1942, one Ju.87 probably destroyed; 24 July 1942, one Bf.109 damaged; 1 August 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed; 19 August 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed and one Bf.109 probably destroyed; 30 August 1942, two Bf.109s destroyed; 1 September 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed, one Bf.109 damaged;  7 October 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed; 9 October 1942, one Bf.109 damaged; 27 October 1942, one Bf.109 destroyed; 8 January 1943, one MC.202 probably destroyed; 7 March 1943, one MC.202 destroyed, one Bf.109 probably destroyed and one MC.202 damaged.  For added details of score, see Chris Shores, Aces High plus Fighters Over the Desert plus Fighters Over Tunisia.  Photo PL-10249 shows him beside Spitfire; PL-17294 is studio portrait photo.  DFC and Bar presented 24 April 1944.

 

Since July 1942, Flight Lieutenant Chisholm has flown on numerous operational sorties.  He has always displayed skill and courage and great determination to engage the enemy.  He has destroyed at least five enemy aircraft.  This officer's invigorating influence and personal example have greatly contributed towards making his flight a formidable fighting unit.

 

NOTE: Public Record Office Air 2/8933 has text from an earlier draft recommendation for a non-immediate award as sent on 21 December 1942 from Headquarters, Royal Air Force, Middle East to Air Ministry:

 

Pilot Officer Chisholm arrived in the Western Desert with No.92 Squadron at the beginning of July when the squadron was flying Hurricane aircraft of No.80 Squadron. On his first patrol one wheel refused to retract; letting his enthusiasm override his good sense he carried on and when the squadron engaged escorted Stukas he succeeded in badly damaging a Stuka. Since that day, both on Hurricane and later on Spitfires, Pilot Officer Chisholm has flown and fought with great courage and shown great determination to get to grips with the enemy; moreover he has displayed considerable skill as a leader of a flight. He has destroyed five enemy aircraft, shared a further two destroyed, has probably destroyed two more and damaged three others.

 

He has proved himself a cool and capable leader; his invigorating influence and personal example have gone a long way to make "B" Flight a formidable fighting unit.

 


CHISHOLM, F/L William Lawrence (J15044) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.92 Squadron - Award effective 23 February 1943 as per London Gazette dated 23 February 1943 and AFRO 513/43 dated 26 March 1943.

 

This officer has taken part in the squadron's activities since its arrival in the Western Desert.  Throughout he has displayed gallant leadership and outstanding keenness.  On one occasion he led the squadron in an attack on a force of enemy fighters and in the ensuing engagement two of them were destroyed without loss.  Flight Lieutenant Chisholm, who has destroyed six enemy aircraft, has invariably displayed great courage and devotion to duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHISLETT, S/L John Robert (C2234) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945.  Born 29 January 1915 in Port Hope, Ontario; home there; enlisted Toronto, 12 June 1940.   Following a postwar stint as a navigator with Trans-Canada Airlines, he returned to London to help form the Pathfinders Club and recruit British personnel for American airlift work to Korea.  This led to a 35-year career as a navigator with American charter companies out of San Francisco and Los Angeles.  Retired 1980 and came back to Canada.  Medal sent to External Affairs, 17 June 1955 and forwarded to him; finally presented in San Francisco, 21 July 1955.  Died in Bowmanville, Ontario, 24 December 2000; obituary stated he had flown two tours (66 missions). No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/8831 has recommendation dated 17 November 1944 when he had flown 35 sorties (138 hours 30 minutes)

 

14 Jun 44       St.Pol                                      5 Aug 44        Coulombieres

15 Jun 44       Lens                                        7 Aug 44        Battle area

16 Jun 44       Renescure                             29 Aug 44      Stettin

23 Jun 44       Coubronnes                           12 Sep 44      Frankfurt

24 Jun 44       Middel Straete                       15 Sep 44      Kiel

9 July 44         L'Hey                                      16 Sep 44      Moerdyjk Bridge

10 Jul 44        Nucourt                                   20 Sep 44      Calais

11 Jul 44        Gapennes                              26 Sep 44      Cap Gris Nez

14 Jul 44        Revigny                                  14 Oct 44       Duisburg

19 Jul 44        Rollez                                      15 Oct 44       Wilhelmshaven

20 Jul 44        Foret de Croc                        19 Oct 44       Stuttgart

23 Jul 44        St.Nazaire                              23 Oct 44       Essen

24 Jul 44        Stuttgart                                  25 Oct 44       Essen

29 Jul 44        Hamburg                                28 Oct 44       Cologne

30 Jul 44        Battle area                             31 Oct 44       Cologne

3 Aug 44        Bois de Cassan                    2 Nov 44         Dusseldorf

 


Squadron Leader Chislett has completed 35 operational sorties with the Pathfinder Force, all of which have been Marker sorties.

 

This officer is an outstanding Set Operator of special equipment.  The proof of his skill and efficiency is reflected in numerous aiming point photographs.  He is determined and earnestly keen on his operational work,, and always endeavours to produce the best possible results.

 

His enthusiasm, loyalty and devotion to duty have been of a consistently high order, and I recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHITTENDEN, F/O Frederick Jackson (J15369) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 15 June 1943 and AFRO 1338/43 dated 16 July 1943 - Born 1920 in Tara, Ontario; home in Cainsville, Ontario; enlisted in Hamilton, 24 June 1941.  Trained at No.1 BGS (graduated 18 January 1941) and No.1 WS (graduated 22 December 1940).  Commissioned 1940. Award presented by King George VI 7 December 1943.

 

As wireless operator this officer has successfully completed a very large number of operational sorties, the majority of which have been against strongly defended targets including Berlin, Hamburg, Rostock, Cologne, Kiel, Wilhelmshaven, Bremen and the Ruhr.  He has always performed his duties in a highly satisfactory manner holding the confidence of his squadron and flight commanders.  Flying Officer Chittenden has set an outstanding example to all by his cheerfulness, skill and high sense of duty.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHMILAR, F/O William Alexander (J29855) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.156 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 13 April 1945 and AFRO 824/45 dated 18 May 1945.  Born 1922 in Vermilion, Alberta; home St.Paul, Alberta (student); enlisted in Edmonton, 25 July 1942.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 19 March 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 20 August 1943).  Commissioned August 1943.  Award presented in Esquimalt, 21 July 1956.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/9060 has recommendation dated 12 January 1945 when he had flown 40 sorties(204 hours 15 minutes), 10 April 1944 to 7 January 1945.

 

10 Apr 44       Aulnoye                                  6 Sept 44       Emden

18 Apr 44       Rouen                                     12 Sep 44      Gelsenkirchen

20 Apr 44       Cologne                                 13 Sep 44      Nordstern

24 Apr 44       Karlsruhe                                30 Sep 44      Bottrop

26 Apr 44       Essen                                     5 Oct 44         Saarbrucken

27 Apr 44       Friedrichshaven                    12 Oct 44       Wanne Eickel


1 May 44        Lyons                                      14 Oct 44       Duisberg

3 May  44       Mailly                                      15 Oct 44       Wilhelmshaven

6 May 44        Aubigne                                  19 Oct 44       Stuttgart

9 May 44        Merville                                   25 Oct 44       Essen

22 May 44      Dortmund                               28 Oct 44       Cologne

5 Jun 44         Crisbecq                                21 Nov 44      Koblenz

6 Jun 44         Vire                                         27 Nov 44      Freiburg

17 Jun 44       Domleger                               5 Dec 44        Soest

4 July 44         Orleans                                   6 Dec 44        Osnabruck

5 July 44         Dijon                                       30 Dec 44      Cologne

12 Jul 44        Revigny                                  2 Jan 45         Nuremburg

11 Aug 44      Douai                                      5 Jan 45         Royan

29 Aug 44      Stettin                                     5 Jan 45         Hannover

3 Sept 44       Eindhoven                              7 Jan 45         Munich

 

Flying Officer Chmilar has completed 40 operational sorties, 22 of which have been carried out in the Pathfinder Force.  The majority of the targets attacked have been heavily defended German areas,

 

This officer is a keen and reliable navigator who is continuing for his second tour, after most of his crew had decided to finish on the first tour.  He has plenty of courage and determination, and a commendable zest for operational work.

 

He has shown keenness, loyalty and devotion to duty of a high order, and I recommend him for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

CHORNY, P/O Walter (J92831) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.9 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945.  Born 1915 in Edmonton; educated at University of Ottawa; teacher. Home in Ranfurly, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 27 July 1942.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 6 March 1943) and No.7 AOS (graduated 20 August 1943).  Commissioned November 1944.  Award presented 9 July 1949.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/8750 has recommendation dated 14 April 1945 when he had flown 29 sorties (187 hours 21 minutes), 7 August 1944 to 27 March 1945.

 

7 Aug 44           Lorient (4.50)                         28 Dec 44      Oslo (7.05)

9 Aug 44           La Pallice (6.10)                    12 Jan 45       Bergen (7.10)

10 Aug 44        Bordeaux (7.11)                    3 Feb 45        Ijmuiden (2.35)

11 Aug 44        Givors (8.18)                          6 Feb 45        Altenbeken (6.45)

14 Aug 44        Brest (4.21)                            14 Feb 45      Altenbeken (6.10)

15 Aug 44        Gilste (3.30)                           3 Mar 45         Dortmund (5.30)


27 Sep 44        Brest (4.36)                            6 Mar 45         Sassnitz (9.15)

7 Oct 44            Flushing (3.05)                      7 Mar 45         Hamburg (6.40)

15 Oct 44         Sorpe Dam (5.10)                 13 Mar 45      Arnsburg (6.30)

19 Oct 44         Nuremburg (7.40)                  14 Mar 45      Arnsburg (6.05)

29 Oct 44         Tirpitz (13.10)                        15 Mar 45      Arnsburg (6.45)

26 Nov 44         Munich (8.55)                         19 Mar 45      Voltho (6.20)

11 Dec 44        Urft Dam (5.05)                     22 Mar 45      Bremen (4.40)

17 Dec 44        Munich (9.00)                         27 Mar 45      Farge (4.15)

18 Dec 44        Gyndia (10.35)                                             

 

This officer has now completed 29 sorties against the enemy.  His attacks have included many against the most heavily defended targets such as Brest (twice), Nuremburg, Munich (twice), Dortmund, Hamburg and Bremen. Many of his attacks have required accurate navigation over long distances, in some cases far beyond the range of normal navigational aids.  An example of this latter type of operation was the attack on the battleship Tirpitz when a successful attack was made possible by his very high standard of navigation.

 

Apart from his normal duties as navigator, Pilot Officer Chorny has frequently been called upon to find a bombing wind in the vicinity of the target, a task only given to a small, specially picked force and upon which the whole success of the attack depends.  The outstanding successes of his squadron can be attributed in a large manner to the skill with which this duty has been performed.

 

At all times Pilot Officer Chorny has shown the greatest keenness to operate and has proved himself by his skill, courage and determination to be a valuable member of a sound operational crew.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

CHOTE, S/L Arthur Abel Aisne Robs (J14063) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.1 Air Command Headquarters - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945.  Home in Toronto; enlisted there 18 December 1940.  Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 22 April 1941), No.1 EFTS (graduated 28 May 1941) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 8 August 1941).  Certificate and emblems sent to No.1 Air Command, 5 July 1945.  No citation.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 

CHOUINARD, AC1 Jean Charles (R111863) - Mention in Despatches - Station Eastmoor (No.62 Base in AFRO) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945.  DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation forwarded 15 August 1944.  Home in St.Epiphane, Quebec.  Enlisted in Ottawa, 28 July 1941; served 21 months in Canada, 16 months overseas.  Armourer (Bombs).


AC1 Chouinard is employed in the bomb dump at RCAF Station Eastmoor, where he has rendered outstanding service for an airman of his rank.  He is thoroughly reliable and capable of carrying out his duties with a minimum of supervision and can be entrusted to supervise other airmen in their work.  His devotion to duty and ability are an example to other airmen in his section.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHOWN, F/O Clinton Warren (J19991) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.515 Squadron - Award effective 31 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1/45 dated 5 January 1945.  Born 4 November 1920 at Dubuc, Saskatchewan; home in Mirror, Alberta.  Enlisted in Calgary, 14 February 1941.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 16 June 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 8 August 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 24 October 1941).  Promoted to Flight Sergeant, 24 April 1942; to WO2, 24 October 1942; to WO1, 24 April 1943; commissioned 15 September 1943; Flying Officer, 15 March 1944.  Arrived in UK, 23 November 1941.  To No.1455 Flight, 14 March 1942 (Tangmere, flying Turbanlight Bostons); to No.51 OTU, 14 April 1942 (Blenheims and Bostons); to No.287 Squadron, 9 July 1942 ("beating up gun positions, flying courses for searchlights").  Served with No.515 Squadron, 19 July 1943 to 23 September 1944 (150 operational hours; last sortie on 23 September 1944; intruding and jamming radar; flew eight day fighter patrols, four ASR sorties, and 31 or 32 night fighter patrols; 160 operational hours and 715 hours 35 minutes non-operational).  Returned to Canada, November 1944, released 13 September 1945. Served in postwar RCAF, February 1952 to February 1959, mainly with No.407 Squadron.  Award presented 26 February 1949.  Photo PL-34347 shows Flying Officers E.M. Aldred and G.W. Chown.

 

Flying Officer Chown has successfully completed numerous sorties over Germany and German occupied territory.  He has destroyed four hostile aircraft, one of which he shot down during a daylight mission far into Reich territory despite the accurate anti-aircraft fire that was directed at his aircraft from the ground. He has consistently displayed the greatest skill, resource and tenacity.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRETIEN, Sergeant George Theodore (R83457) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 29 October 1942 as per London Gazette dated 10 November 1942 and AFRO 1870/42 dated 20 November 1942. Born 1916 in Penetanguishene; home there (horseman); enlisted Windsor, 4 March 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 1 July 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 19 August 1941), and No.8 SFTS (graduated 7 November 1941).  Award presented 15 April 1948.  Cited with Sergeant Thomas Edward Carlon (which see for citation). NOTE: DHist file 181.009 D.2902 (RG.24 Volume 20633) has recommendations for both men, dated 15 October 1942, which are far more detailed and dramatic. Chretien had completed seven sorties (48 hours seven minutes) and the text read:

 


This pilot has now completed seven operational sorties.  The first three were carried out as second pilot to Flight Lieutenant Shockley (2) and Pilot Officer Palmer, from whom he absorbed the lesson of cool-headed, sensible and determined attack.  In his subsequent four operations he has displayed outstanding determination, initiative and courage, and as a result welded his crew into an efficient machine with unbounded confidence in him as captain.  On 13th October 1942, during the attack on Kiel, at the moment preparations were being made to drop bombs, the aircraft was surrounded by heavy flak, and Sergeant Chretien was wounded in the neck by shrapnel, from which he bled very extensively.  Although in a serious condition, he carried out evasive action and gave orders to jettison the bombs, which he arranged when they were heading directly towards the target.  Subsequently the aircraft was caught and held for several minutes by two searchlight cones, and from these, by violent evasive action, he succeeded in escaping.  He then made directly for the coast.  When over the sea the navigator induced Sergeant Chretien to sit back and take things easily whilst the aircraft was flown by the automatic pilot.  The navigator maintained this situation until five miles away from base, when Sergeant Chretien again took over, and with remarkable determination circled the aerodrome and carried out an excellent landing with the assistance of the Flight Engineer, who helped him to pull back the stick, and the navigator, who operated the throttle.  It was subsequently discovered that flak had damaged the trimming controls so that the aircraft had to be landed in a nose-heavy condition as for a full bomb load.  As an example of courage, devotion to duty and personal fortitude, Sergeant Chretien's operational sorties, and in particular this last one, are completely outstanding and merit recognition.  This Non-Commissioned Officer is specially recommended for the immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISMAS, P/O William Clarence (J26080) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.19 SFTS - Award effective 5 May 1944 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1133/44 dated 26 May 1944. Home in Nanton, Alberta; enlisted in Edmonton, 13 August 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 27 November 1940), No.5 EFTS (graduated 16 January 1941), and No.3 SFTS (graduated 4 May 1941).  When recommended he had flown 1,684 hours, including 1,440 hours as instructor, 250 hours in previous six months.

 

This officer has displayed outstanding ability as a flying instructor.  His keen interest and outstanding devotion to duty have set an excellent example to all flying instructors.  On one occasion he carried out a ferry flight to Egypt in a very efficient manner, returning in the shortest time possible to resume his duties, even though he had the opportunity to delay his return.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHRISTIAN, F/O Charles Donald (J27454) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945.  Born 1921 in Victoria, British Columbia; home there (reception clerk); enlisted in Vancouver, 19 May 1942.  Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 30 December 1942), No.2 BGS (graduated 14 May 1943) and No.5 AOS (graduated 25 June 1943).  Commissioned 1943.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 29 September 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (159 hours five minutes), 22 May to 25 September 1944.

 

This officer has now completed 32 sorties and, throughout, his courage and devotion to duty has been outstanding.  Flying Officer Christian's consistent determination to achieve accuracy in his bombing, and his exceptional interest in familiarizing himself with every detail necessary for the success of his operations, have made him an invaluable member of his crew and squadron.

 

On precision targets his bombing results have been quite remarkable and he has secured no fewer than 15 photographs plotted within 400 yards of the target.  If circumstances demand it, he has made no fewer than three bombing runs to ensure steady and accurate bombing.

 

When attacking heavily defended targets, he has never allowed enemy opposition to interfere with his bombing run and, under all circumstances, he has insisted on a steady and accurate approach.

 

I consider the outstanding devotion to duty, the outstanding example and the complete disregard of personal danger shown by this officer fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIANSEN, F/O Paul Eric (J86550) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.78 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1945 and AFRO 563/45 dated 29 March 1945. Home in Ponoka, Alberta; enlisted Edmonton, 2 March 1942.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 31 July 1942), No.5 EFTS (graduated 6 November 1942) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1943).  Award presented 9 July 1949.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/8831 has recommendation dated 9 November 1944 when he had flown 37 sorties (160 hours 48 minutes) as follows:

 

15 Feb 44      Berlin (8.00)                                22 Jun 44       Laon (4.29)

15 Mar 44      Stuttgart (8.30)                           24 Jun 44       Noyelle E.C (3.13)

26 Mar 44      Essen (5.09)                               25 Jun 44       Montorgueil (3.10)

30 Mar 44      Nuremburg (7.17)                      27 Jun 44       Mont Condon (3.03)

9 Apr 44         Lille (4.32)                                   1 July 44         St.Martin le Mortier


10 Apr 44       Tergnier (5.09)                                                          (3.23)

18 Apr 44       Tergnier (4.28)                           4 July 44         St.Martin                            le Mortier        DNCO                                                                                    (1.10)

20 Apr 44       Ottignies (3.37)                          5 July 44         St.Martin le Mortier

22 Apr 44       Dusseldorf (4.40)                                                      (3.14)

24 Apr 44       Karlsruhe (6.10)                         6 July 44         Croixdale (3.20)

26 Apr 44       Paris (5.26)                                12 Jul 44        Thiverny (3.39)

27 Apr 44       Montzen (4.06)                           23 Jul 44        Kiel (5.04)

30 Apr 44       Acheres (4.10)                           24 Jul 44        Stuttgart (2.29) DNCO

10 May 44      Lens (3.25)                                 28 Jul 44        Foret de Nieppe (3.13)

19 May 44      Boulogne (2.50)                         7 Aug 44        TOTALIZE (3.29)

22 May 44      Orleans (4.53)                            9 Aug 44        Foret du Mormal (3.10)

31 May 44      Trappes (5.08)                           10 Aug 44      Dijon (6.25)

12 Jun 44       Amiens (3.50)                            14 Aug 44      Falais (3.38)

14 Jun 44       Douai (3.59)                               15 Aug 44      Tirlemont (3.33)

15 Jun 44       Fouilliard (5.12)                          17 Aug 44      Brest (.22) DNCO

16 Jun 44       Domleger (3.23)                        25 Aug 44      Watten (3.00)

 

This officer has now completed his first operational tour consisting of 37 sorties (119 points) involving a total of 160 hours.

 

He has on a number of occasions, in spite of very heavy flak opposition, pressed on and dropped his bombs and returned with a photograph.  He has also shown great resourcefulness and considerable skill in handling his aircraft.  Recently when taking off on operations with a full bomb load his port outer engine cut at the end of the runway at a height of only 50 feet.  The weather conditions were bad at the time and the aircraft heavily laden as it was, was very difficult to climb on only three engines.  The pilot handled the situation with great skill and coolness in very difficult circumstances.  After a considerable time he managed to climb sufficiently to enable him to drop two bombs on "safe" on the bombing range, when he was able to obtain enough height to take his bombs out to sea to the jettisoning area where he dropped a sufficient number of his bomb load to bring him within the prescribed weight for landing.  He then returned to base and made a perfect landing on three engines.

 

For this officer's fine operational record and first class fighting qualities so often shown, he is most strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                            * * * * *

 


CHRISTIE, P/O James Oliver (J17256) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.50 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943.  Born 1922 at Griffin, Saskatchewan; home in Regina; enlisted in Calgary, 17 March 1941.  Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 7 December 1941) and No.5 BGS (graduated 5 January 1942).  Award presented 27 June 1945.

 

Pilot Officer Christie has taken part in many operational sorties against most of the enemy's heavily defended German targets.  His aircraft has been severely damaged on several occasions but this has not diminished his enthusiasm for operational flying.  At all times this officer's technical ability and devotion to duty have been outstanding.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, P/O Kenneth (J88370) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.90 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 12 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1919 in Rocanville, Saskatchewan; home there (farmer); enlisted Regina, 14 January 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 15 October 1943).  Commissioned 1944.  Award sent by registered mail 11 March 1950.  No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy."  Public Records Office Air 2/8881 has recommendation dated 22 September 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (133 hours 39 minutes), 2 May to 6 September 1944.

 

                                                         * denotes daylight sortie

 

2 May 44        GARDENING, Frisians             9 July 44         Nucourt (3.38)

(2.32)                                           22 Jul 44        Mont Caudon (3.29)

15 May 44      GARDENING, Ile de Ro            24 Jul 44        Acquet (3.23)

(5.50)                                           25 Jul 44        Stuttgart (7.56)

25 May 44      Air/Sea Rescue (6.20)              28 Jul 44        Stuttgart (7.52)

2 June 44       GARDENING, Heydt and          30 Jul 44        Caen (3.37)

Flushing (2.28)                           3 Aug 44        L'Isle Adam (4.30)*

3 June 44       GARDENING, Knocke              4 Aug 44        Bec d'Ambs (7.56)*

(2.15)                                           8 Aug 44        Lucheux (3.10)

5 June 44       Special Duties, no                     12 Aug 44      Brunswick (5.21)

target given (4.39)                     16 Aug 44      GARDENING, Kiel Bay

21 Jun 44       Northern France                                                 (6.57)

(2.55)                                           18 Aug 44      Bremen (4.48)

24 Jun 44       Rimeaux (2.52)                          29 Aug 44      GARDENING, Gulf of

27 Jun 44       Cleres (3.22)                                                      Danzig (9.20)

30 Jun 44       Villers Bocage (3.22)                31 Aug 44      Port Remy (3.31)*

2 July 44         Beauvoir (3.01)                          5 Sept 44       Le Havre (3.34)*

5 July 44         Wizernes (2.12)                         6 Sept 44       Le Havre (3.47)*

7 July 44         Varies (4.34)


 

As tail gunner, this officer has been involved in several combats with German night fighters over enemy territory.  On no occasion, however, has his own aircraft sustained damage, and this has been largely due to the fine team work which he has achieved with his pilot.  He has always applied himself assiduously to the improvement of this co-operation, and the results have had a direct bearing on the success of many sorties.  His careful vigilance has resulted in the shooting down of one enemy aircraft and probably a second, and his clear directions have enabled his pilot to evade combat on several occasions.  This officer has displayed courage and determination of a high order, and the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross is recommended.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, F/L Ralph MacLaren (C1278) - Distinguished Service Order - No.407 Squadron - Award effective 30 May 1942 as per London Gazette dated 16 June 1942 and AFRO 880-881/42 dated 12 June 1942. Born at L'Orignal, Ontario, 15 February 1919.  Educated in North Bay, Ontario; home there (Royal Bank employee).  Enlisted at Camp Borden, 13 December 1939.  Graduated from CFS, Trenton, 8 January 1940.  Award presented 1942.  Cited with P/O Francis Albert Kay, DFC.

 

On the 15th May 1942, Flight Lieutenant Christie and Pilot Officer Kay each led a force of bombers in an attack on an enemy convoy including armed ships and destroyers off the Dutch coast.  The escorting vessels also carried balloons and the attack which was delivered in the fading light was pressed home in the face of a barrage of the utmost intensity.  Pilot Officer Kay, who was first to attack, received wounds on the fingers when shrapnel tore through the floor in front of him.  Despite this he flew in firing his guns and bombs were released on a ship almost at deck level.  Flight Lieutenant Christie followed in and releasing his bombs from mast height scored hits on a large ship. Both aircraft were damaged and that of Flight Lieutenant Christie was hit in wings, fuselage and tail causing damage which made the aircraft exceedingly difficult to control.  Pilot Officer Kay's aircraft was hit in both engines while he himself received a further wound in the arm.  Despite extreme difficulties both Flight Lieutenant Christie and Pilot Officer Kay flew their damaged aircraft back to this country and made a skilful crash landing.  Throughout both these officers displayed skill and daring of a high degree.

 

CHRISTIE, F/L Ralph McLaren, DSO (C1278) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHRISTIE, FS Richard Harold (Can 6052) - British Empire Medal - No.116 Squadron (Canada) - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per Canada Gazette dated 9 January 1943 and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943.  Born 5 November 1906 at Minnedosa, Manitoba.  Home in Plumas, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 15 September 1939.  Award presented 16 April 1943.

 

The services of this NCO at this squadron have been exceptional and his skill and diligence have, in no small part, contributed to the efficiency of the squadron.  While working under unfamiliar and adverse conditions it has been due to his untiring efforts that vitally required aircraft have been available for operations.  He sets a very fine example to those under him by his devotion to duty.  This NCO is keen, conscientious and reliable.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, F/L Robert Davison (C1508) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945.  Born 1916 in Hamilton, Ontario; home in Regina; enlisted Montreal, 15 December 1939.  Commissioned December 1939.  Award presented 18 February 1949.  No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy."  DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 17 September 1944 when he had completed 24 sorties (126 hours 50 minutes) from 6 June to 6 September 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Christie has displayed outstanding ability as a Navigator.  He has while on this squadron put to the best of use the extensive knowledge of navigation which he had acquired as an instructor.

 

His personal leadership soon singled him out as Deputy Navigation Leader of the squadron.  He has always carried out his operational duties with the utmost determination.

 

The fine courage with which Flight Lieutenant Christie has undertaken his duties fully deserve the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, FS (now P/O) Robert Gunn (R133381/J18884) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.97 Squadron (deceased) - Award effective 22 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 April 1945 and AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945.  Born 1914 in River Hebert, Nova Scotia; home in Regina or Edmonton (farmer); enlisted Vancouver, 8 October 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 27 March 1942) and No.3 AOS (graduated 31 July 1942).  Commissioned 1943.  Killed in action 23/24 September 1943 (Lancaster ED868).  Award presented to next-of-kin, 10 December 1947.

 

This airman has taken part in a large number of operational missions against the enemy in the course of which he has invariably displayed the utmost courage, fortitude and devotion to duty.

 


                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTIE, Sergeant Thoburn Wesley (R262844) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 19 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 471/45 dated 16 March 1945. Born 1909 at Watertown, New York; home in Ottawa, Ontario; enlisted there 30 August 1943.  Trained at No.10 BGS (graduated 10 March 1944.  Award presented 10 December 1947.  Cited with F/O Robert J Brodie (RCAF, pilot, awarded DFC).  Incident was 2 November 1944.  Died in Ottawa, 24 August 1997.

 

This officer and airman were pilot and rear gunner respectively of an aircraft detailed to attack Dusseldorf.  Soon after the target had been attacked the aircraft was engaged by three enemy fighters.  As they closed in, Sergeant Christie opened fire.  His bullets struck one of the attackers, causing it to give up the fight.  Nevertheless, the other two fighters attacked with great persistence.  Flying Officer Brodie's aircraft sustained much damage.  Despite this, he manoeuvred with much skill.  Meanwhile, Sergeant Christie used his guns to good effect and the enemy aircraft were finally driven off.  Sometime later the bomber sustained further serious damage.  Displaying the greatest coolness, Flying Officer Brodie maintained control and effected a successful crash landing on an open patch of ground in friendly territory.  He displayed a high standard of skill, courage an tenacity on this his first sortie as a captain.  Sergeant Christie also proved himself to be a resolute and devoted member of aircraft crew.  This was his first operational mission and his coolness and confidence in such trying circumstances set a fine example.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTISON, F/L William Ritchie (J15143) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.404 Squadron - Award effective 17 October 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2534/44 dated 24 November 1944.  Born 1919 in Montreal; home in Lennoxville, Quebec; enlisted Sherbrooke, 21 July 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 30 September 1940), No.2 EFTS (graduated 11 December 1940) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1941).  Commissioned 1942.  Killed in action with No.404 Squadron, 24 March 1945 (Beaufighter NV428); name on Runnymede Memorial.

 

This officer has completed a large number of sorties and has at all times displayed exceptional coolness and determination.  On a recent sortie he was flight commander in an attack upon enemy shipping in Le Verdon harbour.  During the action his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire rendering one engine useless.  However, Flight Lieutenant Christison completed the attack and made a successful return flight, landing at an advanced base in France.  This officer has led his squadron with great skill and has set a fine example to all.

 

CHRISTISON, S/L William Ritchie, DFC (J15143) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.404 Squadron - Award effective 30 March 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945.


Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross this officer has taken part in a number of attacks on enemy shipping and throughout has displayed courage and resolution of a high standard.  In February 1945, Squadron Leader Christison participated in an attack against an enemy force of eleven naval vessels.  The ships were sheltered by high cliffs rising steeply from the water's edge and defended by anti-aircraft batteries on the shore.  In the face of fire from these guns and from those of all the enemy ships and also opposition from enemy fighters, Squadron Leader Christison led his squadron into the attack which was pressed home with the greatest determination.  His undoubted skill contributed materially to the success achieved.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTMAS, S/L Beverly Evans (C925) - Mention in Despatches - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943.  Born at St.Hilaire, Quebec, November 1919.  Educated in Westmount and at Lakefield School.  Joined RCAF, 3 January 1939.  Flew with No.1 (C) Squadron in Battle of Britain when credited with the following: 31 August 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed; 1 September 1940, one Do.215 damaged (shared with two others); 11 September 1940, one He.111 damaged; 27 September 1940, one Ju.88 destroyed (shared with another pilot); 5 October 1940, one Bf.109 destroyed.  Sent to North Africa in November 1941, attached to RAF and South African Air Force; shot down in January 1942 but parachuted to safety.  Attached to South African Air Force for liaison duties in South Africa itself, May 1942.  DHist file 181.009 D.1636 (RG.24 Vol.20604) has application for Operational Wings dated 11 February which indicates 80 hours ten minutes flown with No.1 (F) Squadron, January 1940 to April 1941, 50 hours ten minutes with No.403 Squadron, May to September 1941;  Middle East service was with No.4 SAAF Squadron on Tomahawks (November 1941 to March 1942, 112 hours five minutes) and thirteen hours with No.260 Squadron (March to 5 May 1942).  Total of 171 sorties.  Subsequently served at Patricia Bay.  In June 1944 attended RCAF Staff College.  Then posted to No.126 Wing.  Returned to Canada, December 1945 and stayed in postwar air force; duties included command of Station Bagotville (June 1951 to February 1954) followed by much service with NATO, returning to Canada in August 1957. Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 while a Wing Commander at North Bay.  When he retired (March 1973) he was the last Battle of Britain veteran in the RCAF.  No citation to MiD.

 

CHRISTMAS, S/L Beverly Evans (25471) - War Cross, 1939 (Czechoslovakia) - Canada Gazette dated 24 January 1948 and AFRO 81/48 dated 6 February 1948.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTOFF, Sergeant Christopher (R2003210) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946.  Home in Oba, Ontario; enlisted in North Bay, 11 June 1943.  Certificate sent 22 September 1948.

 


                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHRISTOFFERSEN, WO1 Bjorn Henning (R151767) - Mention in Despatches - Western Air Command Marine Squadron - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Enlisted in Vancouver, 3 February 1942.

 

On the night of December 27th, 1944, during a heavy storm at sea, a Supply Vessel, M467 "Malahat" under the command of Flying Officer Garrard, when towing two large transportation scows, got into serious difficulties.  The second of the two scows parted the tow line and proceeded to drift on a lee shore.  Flying Officer Gerrard, showing superb seamanship, brought the "Malahat" alongside the drifting scow in heavy seas.  Warrant Officer Christoffersen, in an attempt to save the scow from destruction, accompanied by Leading Aircraftman Hosken, leaped from the "Malahat" to the scow and passed a tow line around the towing stanchions and leaped for the "Malahat".  In an attempt to save Air Force equipment this Warrant Officer showed high courage and an utter disregard for his own personal safety, thereby setting a fine example for others to follow.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHURCH, FS Donald Bullock (R87987) - British Empire Medal - No.7 Photo Wing - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Vancouver; enlisted there 1 February 1941.  Award presented 29 January 1947.

 

This non-commissioned officer has been in charge of the orderly room of No.7 Photographic Wing for over three years, except for a period of a few months.  He has at all times displayed outstanding ability and devotion to duty.  The calm efficiency and exceptional resourcefulness and initiative which he exerts have been a steadying hand on those working under him and of great assistance to his officers.  He has developed the work during the expansion of the unit into squadrons and wing headquarters in a most praiseworthy manner.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHURCH, F/L Robert Douglas (J3266) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.148 Squadron - Award effective 27 May 1942 as per London Gazette dated 2 June 1942 and AFRO 880-881/42 dated 12 June 1942. Born Ottawa, 4 May 1910; enlisted there 4 June 1940.  Graduated from No.1 BGS, 26 November 1940, and No.1 ANS, 23 December 1940.  Commissioned 1941.  Award presented 25 February 1944.  Died in Toronto, 12 March 1998.  Public Record Office Air 2/9588 notes that when he was recommended he had flown 429 operational hours and 41 sorties.

 


As an observer this officer has performed his operational tasks in an efficient and conscientious manner.  He has at all times shown great keenness and courage thereby setting an excellent example to his fellow navigators.  For the past three months he has fulfilled the duties of Squadron Navigation Officer.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHURCHILL, Nursing Sister Eva Blanche (C5015) - Associate, Royal Red Cross - No.6 Convalescent Hospital - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946.  Home in Natiskemin, Alberta.  Enlisted in London, Ontario, 16 November 1940.  Award sent by registered mail 18 November 1955 (living in Hamilton).

 

A deep and mature understanding of human nature with a full appreciation of the scope and objective of medical convalescent treatment in its fullest concept has stimulated and given guidance and direction to all associates and patients of this Nursing Sister.  The attitude of helpfulness and willingness which permeates her work has assured the success of the convalescent hospital atmosphere and program.  Its very purpose is exemplified in her genuine interest in all patients and staff.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHURCHILL, F/O John Mervyn (J16176) - 9th USAAF - United States Distinguished Flying Cross - Award effective 20 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Home in Kamloops, British Columbia or Prince Albert, Saskatoon; enlisted Saskatoon, 16 April 1941.  Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 16 August 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.4 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942).  Public Records Office Air 2/9599 has citation from General Order No.31, HQ US Army Air Forces in the Middle East, 28 April 1944.  A newsclipping datelined "Kamloops, March 22" says he won it with No.178 Squadron, attached to American forces; had left RCAF in December 1944; was a native of Vernon, British Columbia.

 

For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flights during the successful invasion of Sicily by Allied Forces.  These operations, which included the destruction of strategic enemy targets, were conducted despite intensive anti-aircraft fire of enemy ground installations, strong fighter opposition by enemy aircraft, and adverse weather and field conditions.  The outstanding performance of his duties contributed in a marked degree to the successes achieved by his squadron on operational missions while with the Ninth United States Air Force in the Middle East prior to 24 July 1943.

 

                                                                        * * * * *

 


CHURCHILL, FS Joseph Ronald (R207967) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.578 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 14 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945.  Born 1923 in Bathurst, Ontario; home in Perth, Ontario (farmer and textile worker); enlisted in Ottawa, 16 February 1943.  Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 1 October 1943).   Award presented 19 November 1948.  No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty."  Public Records Office Air 2/8823 has recommendation dated 21 August 1944 when he had flown 37 sorties (169 hours 42 minutes) as follows:

 

                                                         * denotes Daylight sortie

 

17 Apr 44       Tergnier (4.40)                           4 July 44         St.Martin L'Hortier           

20 Apr 44       Ottignies (4.43)                                                  (3.49)*

22 Apr 44       Dusseldorf (4.44)                       6 July 44         Croixdale (3.54)*

24 Apr 44       Karlsruhe (6.56)                         9 Jul 44           Les Cartelliers

26 Apr 44       Villeneuve (5.26)                                                (3.50)*

27 Apr 44       Aulnoye (4.37)                            12 Jul 44        Thiverny (4.39)*

30 Apr 44       Acheres (4.50)                           15 Jul 44        Nucourt (4.32)                  

22 May 44      Orleans (5.22)                            17 Jul 44        Bois de la Hai (3.46)*

24 May 44      Aachen (4.27)                            18 Jul 44        Vaires (4.34)*

27 May 44      Bourg Leopold (4.46)                20 Jul 44        Bottrop (4.21)

31 May 44      Trappes (5.28)                           24 Jul 44        Stuttgart (7.48)

2 June 44       Harinzeles (3.24)                       28 Jul 44        Foret de Nieppe

4 June 44       Boulogne (3.40)                                                 (3.40)*

5 June 44       Mont Fleury (4.55)                      30 Jul 44        Battle area (4.12)*

6 June 44       Chateaudun (5.48)                     1 Aug 44        Anderbelck (3.21)*

8 June 44       Alencon (6.41)                            2 Aug 44        Le Nieppe (3.22)*

11 Jun 44       Massy Palaiseau                       3 Aug 44        Foret de Nieppe

(4.47)                                                                   (3.24)*

12 Jun 44       Amiens (4.24)                            6 Aug 44        Hazenbrouck (3.00)*                   

15 Jun 44       Foulliard Dump (5.15)               9 Aug 44        Foret de Mormal

22 Jun 44       Siracourt (4.02)*                                                (4.01)*

18 Aug 44      Sterkrade (4.43)*

 

Flight Sergeant Churchill has completed 37 sorties totalling 169.42 hours during which he has taken part in many operations upon targets in strongly defended areas in Germany and occupied territory.

 

This Air Gunner's aggressive spirit during many operations and his instant readiness to deal with any onslaught, combined with a steady coolness during combat, have on more than one occasion ensured the safe arrival of his aircraft at the target after passing through areas of considerable fighter activity.  In particular his calmly spoken running commentary, not only assisted his captain when engaged by fighters but had the effect of reassuring his crew.  In this way, therefore, he contributed an essential part towards the exceptionally good operational record of his crew.

 

His courage and fortitude are of the highest order and his conscientious devotion to duty deserve great praise.  It is recommended that he should receive the award of the Distinguished Flying Medal.


                                                                        * * * * *

 

CHURCHILL, F/L Rae Edward (J23054) - Netherlands Flying Cross - No.295 Squadron - Award effective 28 September 1945 as per Canada Gazette dated 6 April 1946 and AFRO 388/46 dated 12 April 1946. Home in Edmonton; enlisted in Vancouver, 26 September 1940.  Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 3 January 1941), No.16 EFTS (graduated 20 February 1941) and No. 10 SFTS (graduated 7 June 1941).  Public Records Office Air 2/9556 has recommendation for "Dutch Award" dated 18 August 1945 from W/C H.E. Angell, CO of No.295 Squadron.  Mentioned 21 sorties (93 hours).

 

Flight Lieutenant Churchill completed a tour of operations with this squadron in May 1945.  During this tour he carried out 21 operational sorties over the Continent in support of the Underground Movements of France and Holland.  Also he took part in the three major Airborne Invasions over the Continent.  Of these 21 sorties, 19 were highly successful.

 

On the night of the 3rd/4th of February 1945, Flight Lieutenant Churchill was captain of an aircraft detailed to drop two S.A.S. troops and five containers on FABIAN 23.  This operation was completely successful.

 

During his tour Flight Lieutenant Churchill proved himself to be an extremely capable and efficient captain of aircraft.  He displayed great courage and devotion to duty in the face of extremely bad flying weather and heavy enemy opposition and he always showed great keenness for operational flying.

 

                                                                        * * * * *