ANDERSON, F/L Albert Erik (J10784) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.31 Squadron - Award effective 30 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 6 November 1945 and AFRO 133/45 dated 8 February 1946. Born in 1920 at Allenby, British Columbia; home in Sardis, British Columbia; enlisted in Vancouver, 20 February 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 24 September 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 3 December 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 27 March 1942). Award presented January 1947. Photo PL-8296 shows him in a group getting their wings (back row, second from left); PL-27683 taken August 1944 with No.31 Squadron showing F/O Charles Griblin (WOP, Three Hills, Alberta), F/O Robert Berry (navigator, St.Lambert, Quebec) and F/L A.E. Anderson.

 

As pilot and captain of aircraft this officer has taken part in a large number of operational sorties, many of which have been completed in the face of enemy ground fire. These operations include Imphal, Tiddim and the first Chindit operation. Flight Lieutenant Anderson has accomplished excellent work in supply dropping missions and he has at all time set an inspiring example by his leadership, courage and determination.

 

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ANDERSON, W/C Alton Lester (C1309) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.4 SFTS - Award effective 21 April 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 802/45 dated 11 May 1945. Enlisted at Camp Borden, 3 October 1939.

 

This officer has given excellent service both on operational flying duties in Western Air Command and as a flying instructor in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. He has proved himself to be an exceptionally good pilot and flying instructor who is always ready to undertake any task to the best of his ability. His fine example and ability as a leader have inspired others serving under him to put forth their best efforts both in flying and their other air force duties.

 

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ANDERSON, AW1 Audrey Mary (W306630) - British Empire Medal - No.8 Bombing and Gunnery School - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1360/44 dated 30 June 1944. Born in Vancouver; educated there; enlisted there 28 July 1942. Award presented January 1945.

 

This airwoman's devotion to duty surpasses by far the normal requirements. She is an outstanding airwoman and a clerk who is scrupulously accurate in her work, and fulfils all her duties in a highly satisfactory manner. She has set a fine example and is an inspiration to her fellow airwomen.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O Charles Henry (J86228) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.11 Squadron - Award effective 23 March as per London Gazette dated 3 April 1945 and AFRO 765/45 dated 4 May 1945. Born 1921 in British Honduras; home there. Shipping clerk, enlisted Toronto, 22 February 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 3 July 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 20 August 1941) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 7 November 1941). Commissioned February 1944. Award presented 11 July 1949.

 

This officer has taken part in a large number of operational sorties. He has always shown great courage and pressed home his attacks with determination and vigour. Flying Officer Anderson has often penetrated deep into Japanese held territory seeking out and destroying enemy vehicles and supplies and returning with valuable information. At all times he has set an inspiring example to the other members of his squadron.

 

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ANDERSON, S/L Clifford Arthur Stevenson (J6956) - Mention in Despatches - No.410 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1395/45 dated 31 August 1945. Born 15 May 1917. Home in Belleville, Ontario; enlisted Toronto 18 November 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 22 April 1941), No.9 EFTS (graduated 7 June 1941) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 20 August 1941). Posted overseas 3 September 1941; repatriated 11 May 1944; remained in postwar RCAF (service number 20002; Squadron Leader as of 1 October 1946 and still serving as of 1954). Destroyed one Ju.88 and one Ju.188, night of 22/23 February 1944 (radar observer, F/O G.R.A. Bedard). Photo PL-26988 shows him alone; PL-26989 shows him with Bedard; PL-57978 is portrait taken July 1953.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Donald Robert (J23911) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.582 Squadron - Award effective 15 March 1945 as per London Gazette dated 23 March 1945 and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born 1921 in Stratford, Ontario. Home in Toronto (clerk). Enlisted there 14 March 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 10 October 1942) and No.4 AOS (graduated 19 February 1943). Commissioned February 1943. Award presented 22 June 1949. No citation other than "completed...many successful operations against the enemy in which [he has] displayed high skill, fortitude and devotion to duty." Public Records Office Air 2/9051 has recommendation dated 22 December 1944 when he had flown 45 sorties (187 hours 30 minutes), 18 March to 6 December 1944.

 

18 Mar 44 Frankfurt 23 Jul 44 Foret du Croc

22 Mar 44 Frankfurt 3 Aug 44 L'Isle Adam

24 Mar 44 Berlin 4 Aug 44 Trossy St.Maximum

26 Mar 44 Essen 5 Aug 44 Coulon Villers

30 Mar 44 Nuremburg 16 Aug 44 Stettin

11 Apr 44 Aachen 25 Aug 44 Brest


11 May 44 Louvain 27 Aug 44 Marquis Mimocque

21 May 44 Duisburg 3 Sept 44 Volkel

24 May 44 Aachen 6 Sept 44 Emden

27 May 44 Rennes 12 Sep 44 Framkfurt

31 May 44 Montcouple 15 Sep 44 Kiel

7 June 44 Foret de Cerisy 25 Sep 44 Calais

8 June 44 Fougeres 5 Oct 44 Saarbrucken

11 Jun 44 Toures 14 Oct 44 Duisburg

15 Jun 44 Lens 15 Oct 44 Duisburg

16 Jun 44 Renniscure 19 Oct 44 Stuttgart

23 Jun 44 Buzz Bomb Base 31 Oct 44 Cologne

24 Jun 44 Buzz Bomb Base 2 Nov 44 Dusseldorf

5 July 44 Buzz Bomb Base 20 Nov 44 Koblenz

9 July 44 L'Hey 21 Nov 44 Aschannburg

10 Jul 44 Nucourt 28 Nov 44 Leuss

12 Jul 44 Thiverny 6 Dec 44 Leuna (Leipzig)

15 Jul 44 Nucourt

 

This navigator has displayed a high standard of skill and contributed materially to the success of his Marker crew. He is exceptionally keen and shows a fine aggressive spirit at all times. He is strongly recommended for the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Douglas Robert Brian (C27052) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.120 Wing (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas" - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 726/46 dated 26 July 1946. Unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1124 (RG.24 Vol.20595). Born 28 March 1916 at Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Attended public Schools in British Columbia and Saskatchewan, 1922-1928, King Edward High School 1929-1931, Vancouver Technical School, 1932-1933, specializing in motor mechanics and diesel engineering. Enlisted in RCAF, 1 June 1939 as a Fitter (aero engines). With No.6 (Torpedo-Bomber) Squadron, 1 June 1939 to 2 October 1940; to Central Flying School, Trenton, 16 December 1940 for Elementary Flying Instructors Course; as of 22 January 1941 he was qualified as an instructor and granted leave without pay; at No.16 EFTS, Edmonton, 24 January 1941 to 17 May 1942; brought back on RCAF service strength, 22 May 1942 in rank of Sergeant; took course at No. 7 SFTS, McLeod, 23 May to 12 June 1942; promoted WO2 and WO1, 22 June 1942; instructing at No.6 EFTS, Prince Albert, 22 June 1942 to 8 May 1944 (commissioned 26 April 1943); refresher instructor training at No.10 SFTS, Dauphin, 8 May to 30 September 1944; transport course at No.6 OTU, Comox, 7 October 1944 to 31 January 1945; at No.1334 TSCU, Gurat 23 April to 8 August 1945 (Transport Conversion Course); with No.435 Squadron, Burma, 16 August to 31 August 1945. En route to Down Ampney, 1-6 September 1945; with No.436 Squadron, Down Ampney, 6 October 1945; took Check Pilot's Course with No.120 Wing, Odiham, 13 December 1945 to 13 January 1946. Repatriated to Canada, 1 April 1946. Released 18 November 1946. Photo PL-33811 shows a F/L D. Anderson from Toronto with No.437 Squadron, but not sure if this is the man commended. Although no recommendation has been found, the following assessment was written on 23 January 1946 by W/C R.L. Denison of No.436 Squadron:

An officer of more than usual ability. Former ground crew (Regular), Flight Lieutenant Anderson has shown himself to be an outstanding officer and an above average transport captain.

 

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ANDERSON, LAW Edna Grace (W315189) - Mention in Despatches - No.6 Group Headquarters (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 418/46 dated 18 April 1946. Born in Collingwood, Ontario, 5 April 1925. Completed her education in England. Employed as a Stenographer in England, October 1941 to October 1943. Enlisted in London, England, 19 October 1943. Attended No.31 WAAF Depot, 29 October to 11 November 1943. To Headquarters, No.6 Group, 14 November 1943 (Intelligence Section). To Overseas Headquarters, 30 August 1945. Repatriated 11 March 1946. Released 9 April 1946. No citation. Certificate sent to Toronto, 12 October 1948. Served in RCAF Auxiliary, 2 April 1953 to 29 January 1954 (Intelligence, St.Hubert)

 

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ANDERSON, FS Francis Luiz (Can 2377A) - British Empire Medal - No.7 SFTS - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette dated 28 May 1943 and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. Born in Walton, Essex, England. Enlisted in Vancouver, 7 February 1939. Award presented May 1944.


Flight Sergeant Anderson has shown exceptional devotion to duty and, during the past two years, has displayed an aptitude and perseverance in organizing and controlling a system of maintenance, often under difficult circumstances. His cheerful disposition and conscientious manner have largely contributed to the stability and co-operation evident among the maintenance personnel of this school.

 

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ANDERSON, WO1 (now P/O) Gordon Doak (R123618/J53199) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.10 (Bomber Reconnaissance) Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 183/46 dated 22 February 1946. Home in St.Vital, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 7 August 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 6 December 1941), No.4 AOS (graduated 6 June 1942), No.4 BGS (graduated 25 July 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated 19 September 1942). Award presented 2 May 1948. As of award had flown 1,391 hours including 881 operational hours (107 sorties).

 

On the 10th of May 1945, several hundred miles out over the North Atlantic, Warrant Officer Anderson, as navigator of a long range operational aircraft, displayed great skill in pin-pointing the position of a surrendered U-Boat, directing the naval forces to the exact position and enabling them to effect its capture. Throughout this navigator's tour of operational flying he has displayed courage and skill of the same high standard.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O Gordon John (C29786) - Air Force Cross - No.23 EFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Home in Edmonton; enlisted there 24 October 1940. Had completed 3,500 flying hours to date, 3,200 hours as instructor, 260 hours in previous six months. Award presented 9 July 1949.

 

As Testing Officer in Examining Squadron, this officer is outstanding. Having instructed for almost five years, his experience and guidance are invaluable to more junior instructors, while his steadiness and energy are an example to all. The value of this officer's work to the unit and to the Service as a whole cannot be over-emphasized and he is worthy of high praise.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Gustav Sune Lawrence (J21153) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.436 Squadron - Award effective 9 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. Home in Mount Forrest; enlisted in Toronto, 1 October 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 6 June 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 1 August 1942) and No.14 SFTS (graduated 14 December 1942).

 


Flight Lieutenant Anderson has achieved striking results during his tour of operational duty. He has served with Coastal Command on anti-shipping operations, on one occasion damaging an enemy vessel severely and, on others, doing serious damage to enemy motor vessels. Since being posted to Transport Command, this officer has done most praiseworthy work on supply sorties in support of the Army in Burma.

 

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ANDERSON, Sergeant Hugh John (R64131) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1943 and AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, 1912. Home there. Enlisted in Hamilton, 10 May 1940. Trained at No.2 BGS (graduated 23 July 1941). Invested with award at Buckingham Palace November 1943. Photo PL-22356 shows him as a Flight Lieutenant outside the palace after investiture accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J. Clifford Lewis (friends); PL-22358 shows him with P/O L.L. Anderson (also invested that day; no relation); PL-24857 shows him on return to Canada; PL-35238 is a formal portrait.

 

Sergeant Anderson has taken part in numerous operational sorties against targets in the heavily defended industrial areas of Germany. He has also flown a number of anti-submarine patrols. In October 1942, while engaged in a low level attack on Flensburg, Sergeant Anderson's aircraft was illuminated by searchlights and subjected to a heavy concentration of anti-aircraft fire. Although wounded in the leg, with calm courage he continued with his duties saying nothing of his wounds until half way home. This airman has been acting as flight engineer leader for some months and is largely responsible for the high standard attained by his fellow flight engineers.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Jack Fenton (C11923) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Born in Exeter, Ontario, 19 December 1920. Home in Crediton, Ontario; enlisted Ottawa 5 January 1942. Trained Radar at No.31 Radio School, Clinton to 30 June 1942. Commissioned 25 May 1942. Arrived in UK, 30 July 1942. To No.60 Group, 30 August 1942. Subsequently at No.71 Wing. Promoted Flying Officer, 25 November 1942. Proceeded to North Africa 26 May 1943, joining No.8023 AMES. Joined No.8032 AMES, 4 July 1943. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 30 January 1944. To No.899 AMES, 22 April 1944. To No.8031 AMES, 2 August 1944. To No.8044 AMES, 24 August 1944; to No.9043 AMES, 1 September 1944. To No.8016 AMES, 4 September 1944. To No.2 OATS, 5 March 1943 (for course). To No.8016 AMES, 25 April 1945. Returned to UK, 27 June 1945. Repatriated 30 July 1945. Released 1 October 1945.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L John Alan (J25399) - Distinguished Service Order - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 6 February 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Home in Winnipeg; enlisted there 22 April 1942. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 25 September 1942), No.19 EFTS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 16 April 1943). In postwar period took a North Star course and flew with MATS. Also commanded No.408 Squadron. DSO presented 1 April 1949. Killed in crash of an Argus aircraft, No.404 Squadron, 23 March 1965. Photo PL-13912 shows him receiving wings from his brother, F/O Brodie Anderson; PL-35706 shows him shaking hands with F/L Bud Adams at Repatraition Depot, Lachine; PL-39735 taken at investiture; PL-57769 is a 1953 portrait; PL-62094 shows him at controls of RCAF Comet transport.

 

This officer has displayed a high degree of gallantry and devotion in operations against the enemy. He has completed very many sorties and has set the finest example in pressing home his attacks, often in the face of fierce opposition. On one occasion in September 1944 he was pilot and captain of an aircraft detailed to attack Bottrop. When over the target, intense anti-aircraft fire was encountered. Flight Lieutenant Anderson's aircraft was hit repeatedly by fragments of shrapnel. Both the port engines were put out of action. The hydraulic system was rendered unserviceable. The controls were so damaged that it became necessary for two members of the crew to assist their captain by pulling manually on the rudder controls. In spite of this, Flight Lieutenant Anderson executed a good bombing run. He afterwards flew the severely damaged aircraft to base where he effected a masterly landing. In most difficult and dangerous circumstances this officer displayed outstanding coolness and great courage.

 

NOTE: This award began as a recommendation for a Victoria Cross, submitted by Wing Commander D.C. Hagerman, 23 October 1944 when he had flown 22 sorties (127 hours 25 minutes), as follows:

 

Flight Lieutenant Anderson has completed 22 day and night operations against the enemy, during the course of which his outstanding devotion to duty and complete contempt of personal danger have been most remarkable. His determination to press home his attacks in spite of the fiercest opposition the enemy can put up has earned him the utmost admiration from all ranks.

 

On no fewer than ten attacks his aircraft has been badly damaged by enemy action but his enthusiasm to operate remains undiminished.

 

On July 28th, 1944, when detailed to attack Hamburg, his starboard inner engine failed when crossing Flamborough Head en route to the target. Although Flight Lieutenant Anderson was aware that he would probably lose height and be late on the target, he nevertheless, without hesitation, carried on, arriving on the target six minutes late and bombing from 8,000 feet below the main stream. On the return journey, when thirty miles off Heligoland, his aircraft was attacked by two FW.190s, one dropping fighter flares while the other made no fewer than five attacks. These were all successfully evaded and the attacking aircraft was so badly damaged by his gunners that it broke off the attack and was last seen in flames going down in a steep turn. This officer then brought his aircraft safely back to base, still on three engines.

 


On 25th August 1944, when detailed to attack Russelheim, his aircraft was badly damaged by flak on the way into the target. Many holes were made in the fuselage; nevertheless he pressed home his attack and, on his return, was diverted to Great Orton after ten hours 50 minutes flying. Again, on 27th August 1944, when attacking Mimoyecques, his aircraft was again hit by heavy flak over the target area, no fewer than 37 large flak holes being counted on his return to base. On 29th August, when attacking Stettin, his GEE and H2S equipment became unserviceable while crossing the English coast on the way out, but he proceeded on D/R navigation to the target, where he again suffered heavy damage from flak. While in the target area, his aircraft was coned for some considerable time while on the bombing run and was attacked by a Ju.88. Nevertheless he brought his aircraft safely back to base.

 

On 6th September 1944, when attacking Emden, his aircraft was hit by heavy flak while on the approach, but this did not prevent him from making an excellent bombing run and returning with a first-class picture of the aiming point. On 12th September, when attacking Dortmund, his aircraft was hit by concentrated heavy flak, many large holes being torn in the fuselage, but again he returned safely to base. On the 6th October, while attacking Dortmund, his aircraft was again hit by flak while on the bombing run and, after bombing, he was attacked by no fewer than five fighters, all of which were successfully evaded. On the 8th October, when attacking Bochum, 27 large flak holes were torn in his aircraft and, during an attack by two fighters, a cannon shell exploded in the fuselage, short-circuiting the entire electrical system and causing all the navigation lights to burn. With great skill and coolness, he successfully evaded the fighters which were attracted by his lights and successfully returned to base with his aircraft in a badly damaged condition. On the 14th October, when attacking Duisburg in daylight, his aircraft was again hit by predicted flak and a "scarecrow" but again he succeeded in returning to base with a badly damaged aircraft.

 

This officer's most outstanding feat was performed during a daylight attack on the oil refinery at Bottrop on the 27th September. On arriving at the target it was found that this was obscured by 9/10th cloud cover. The target was sighted through a gap in the clouds too late to afford an accurate bombing run. Anti-aircraft fire was very heavy, but without hesitation, Flight Lieutenant Anderson decided to do an orbit to ensure an accurate bombing run be made. At the beginning of the orbit, the aircraft was repeatedly hit by shell fragments and both port outer and inner engines were put out of action. The port outer engine was also set on fire, the hydraulic system was rendered unserviceable and the controls were damaged to such an extent that he had to call on the assistance of two members of his crew to pull manually on the rudder controls. With complete disregard of the heavy opposition, and the difficulty in controlling his crippled aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Anderson completed the orbit and made a steady bombing run, enabling his Air Bomber to attack the target very accurately.

 


Shortly after leaving the target, it was found that the starboard inner engine had also been badly damaged and was giving less than half power. Through superb planning, crew co-operation and flying skill, Flight Lieutenant Anderson successfully flew his crippled aircraft back to this country, with only full power from the starboard outer, half power on the starboard inner engine, and made a masterly landing without causing further damage to his aircraft or crew.

 

I consider Flight Lieutenant Anderson's great courage, whole-hearted enthusiasm to press home his attacks in the face of whatever opposition he may meet, and his brilliant flying skill and crew Captaincy, fully merit the award of the Victoria Cross.

 

ANDERSON, F/L John Alan, DSO (J25399) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 February 1945 and AFRO 625/45 dated 13 April 1945. Award presented November 1946.

 

Flight Lieutenant Anderson has completed many successful sorties against the enemy throughout his tour. He has displayed conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. On one occasion in July 1944, when en route to Hamburg, one engine of the aircraft failed. Although fully aware that height would be lost and the target reached late, without hesitation Flight Lieutenant Anderson pressed on and completed a successful attack. On the return journey the bomber was attacked by two Focke Wulf 190s. The attackers were eventually beaten off, one being so severely damaged that it was seen to dive towards the ground completely out of control. Flight Lieutenant Anderson then flew his crippled aircraft safely back to base. Another time in August 1944, while bombing Stettin, his bomber was illuminated by searchlights and at the same time was attacked by a Junkers 88. In the face of this fierce opposition he successfully completed the mission. Again in October 1944, undeterred by attack from five enemy fighters, he accomplished a most skilful attack and eventually evaded all of the hostile aircraft. On several other occasions during September and October 1944, Flight Lieutenant Anderson has flown his aircraft, although badly holed, safe back to base after pressing home some most successful attacks. His cool courage and outstanding leadership have at all times been exemplary.

 

ANDERSON, F/L John Alan, DSO, DFC (J25399) - No.419 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Croix de Guerre (France) - Awarded as per AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Presented by Colonel Marcel P. Faure in Ottawa, 22 January 1953. Public Records Office Air 2/9645 has citation.

 

This officer has completed 32 attacks on the enemy. On the night of 27th August, when attacking Mimoyecques, his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire and suffered severe damage. In spite of this he pressed home his attack with great vigour and excellent results. Thirty-seven large holes were counted in his aircraft on his return to base. The courage and determination exhibited on this occasion is only one of many such operations successfully completed by this officer.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O John Andrew Joseph Carruthers (J19611) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.20 Squadron - Award effective 25 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 2 October 1945 and AFRO 1822/45 dated 7 December 1945. Home in Montreal. Enlisted in Montreal, 22 September 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 1 February 1942), No.4 EFTS (graduated 6 June 1942) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 23 October 1942). Photo PL-44619 shows at his wedding, June 1945, in Britain.

 

Flying Officer Anderson has shown outstanding keenness to participate in operational flying over the Arakan, the Imphal and Burma fronts. He has destroyed a large number of Japanese stores and motor transport and, on one occasion, his skill and ability in locating and destroying the first tank, culminating in the destruction of most of the tank force opposing our ground forces at the Wyinmu Bridgehead. His determination and cheerfulness have always been outstanding.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9132 has recommendation (undated initially but cleared by No.221 Group on 2 June 1945) stating he had joined squadron in September 1943, commencing operations in December 1943. Credited with 227 hours 50 minutes of operational time. Much of his achievements had been in first three months of 1945; had destroyed first tank claimed by the unit that year and had since destroyed another.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O John Devlin (J20995) - Air Force Cross - No.2 WS - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Born at Quesnel, British Columbia, 19 June 1916; educated there. Plant Superintendent with Mission Farm Product before the war. Enlisted in Vancouver, 14 October 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942), No.16 EFTS (graduated 1 August 1942) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 20 November 1942). As of award had flown 1,800 hours, 1,000 as instructor, 180 in previous six months. Award presented February 1946.

 

This officer has shown great devotion to duty while serving as an instructor at this unit. His ceaseless effort has been instrumental in the efficiency of all pilots that have passed through his hands at Conversion Unit. Further to his instructional duties he has been ready, willing and efficient in other tasks that he has been called upon to carry out. His fine record is most commendable and praiseworthy.

 

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ANDERSON, LAC Juhl Arthur (R139624) - Mention in Despatches - East Moor - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1647/45 dated 26 October 1945. Home in Outlook, Saskatchewan. Enlisted in Saskatoon, 30 October 1941. AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Vol 20607) has list of MiDs this date with unit. No citation in AFRO or biographical file. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 3 February 1945 when he had served 18 months in Canada, 18 months overseas. ACH/Armament Assistant.

 

This airman is employed in the Bomb Stores as an Armament Assistant. His loyalty and devotion to duty have made him outstanding among his fellow workers. He cheerfully tackles any tasks assigned to him and can be depended upon to successfully complete the most arduous task.

 

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ANDERSON, P/O Leonard Gerhard (J88645) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.408 Squadron - Award effective 5 April 1945 as per London Gazette dated 17 April 1945 and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Born 1913 in Saskatchewan; home in Lacadena, Saskatchewan (grain elevator agent). Enlisted 29 February 1942 in Saskatoon. Trained at No.7 ITS (graduated 18 December 1942) and No.5 AOS (graduated 30 April 1943). Commissioned August 1944. Award presented 18 June 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost courage and devotion to duty". DHist file 181.009 D.1515 (RG.24 Vol.20600) has recommendation dated 6 December 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (170 hours 20 minutes), 23 June to 12 October 1944.

 

Pilot Officer Anderson has now successfully completed a tour against the enemy on four-engined bombers. He has navigated over many heavily defended targets on the continent, including Hamburg, Duisburg and Essen.

 

Throughout his tour he has proven to be a most able navigator and on many occasions was responsible for the safety of his aircraft and crew by skilful navigation.

 

His cheerfulness, co-operation and disregard for dangers has been an inspiration to his crew members and other navigators of the squadron.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Leslie Scofield (J7543) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.420 Squadron - Award effective 3 June 1943 as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1943 and AFRO 1294/43 dated 9 July 1943. Born in Calgary, 1917; home there. Enlisted there 19 January 1941. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 29 April 1941), No.5 EFTS (graduated 23 June 1941) and No.3 SFTS (graduated 20 September 1941). Commissioned 1941. Award presented 2 November 1941.

 


Throughout all his operational sorties Flight Lieutenant Anderson has displayed a fine offensive spirit and great devotion to duty. He has always pressed home his attack with great vigour and determination and has secured many excellent photographs. He has completed operational missions against practically every heavily defended target including Hamburg, the Ruhr, Cologne and Bremen, in addition to two sorties to Italian objectives and several mine-laying operations. Flight Lieutenant Anderson has completed a fine operational tour and has set a splendid example.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Lloyd Harold (J20843) - Mention in Despatches - No.11 (BR) Squadron - Award effective 7 July 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1291/45 dated 10 August 1945. Home in Blackie, Alberta; enlisted in Edmonton, 29 July 1941. Trained at No.6 ITS (graduated 24 April 1942), No.9 EFTS (graduated 17 July 1942) and No.11 SFTS (graduated 6 November 1942).

 

This officer has recently completed a tour of operations and has at all times carried out his duties in a most commendable manner. His untiring efforts to improve the efficiency of his crew members has been a fine example.

 

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ANDERSON, Sergeant Leslie Lester (R101990) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 25 April 1943 as per London Gazette dated 7 May 1943 and AFRO 1035/43 dated 4 June 1943. Born in Quebec, 1914. Home in Ontario or Winnipeg (miner). Enlisted in Winnipeg, 10 May 1941. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 13 April 1941) and No.4 WS (graduated 29 September 1941). Cited with Pilot Officer Dallas Laskey (RCAF), awarded DFC. Both were in crew of P/O D.L. Kennedy; incident occurred 4 April 1943. Invested with award at Buckingham Palace November 1943. Photo PL-22358 shows him after investiture with F/L Hugh J. Anderson; caption states he was from North Bay; PL-23615 is a formal portrait.

 

One night in April 1943, Pilot Officer Laskey and Sergeant Anderson were bomb aimer and wireless operator, respectively, of an aircraft detailed to attack Kiel. Whilst over the target area the aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire which damaged the rear turret, trapping the gunner. By a strenuous effort, Pilot Officer Laskey was able to move the turret sufficiently to enable the gunner to free himself. Afterwards the target was successfully bombed but, almost immediately, the aircraft was attacked by an enemy fighter and sustained further damage. In spite of this, the pilot attempted to fly the damaged bomber back to this country. During the flight Pilot Officer Laskey and Sergeant Anderson rendered much assistance but their efforts were unavailing. The aircraft came down on the sea and after five and a half hours drifting on an overturned dinghy, Pilot Officer Laskey and Sergeant Anderson, the sole survivors, were picked up. Both displayed great courage and fortitude in very trying circumstances.

 

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ANDERSON, FS Moffat (R61884) - Mention in Despatches - No.412 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas" - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Born Greenock, Scotland, 2 October 1921. Home in Saskatoon; enlisted there 30 March 1940. Trained as an Armourer at Trenton, with No.10 (BR) Squadron and at No.1 BGS, Jarvis, Ontario. Promoted LAC, 8 October 1940. Promoted Corporal, 15 March 1941. Embarked for overseas, 5 April 1941. Taken on strength of No.402 Squadron, 10 April 1941. Promoted Sergeant, 1 July 1941. To No.414 Squadron, 10 January 1942. To No.412 Squadron, 7 August 1942. Attended a Special Course (20-mm Cannon), 1 to 6 October 1942. Promoted Flight Sergeant, 22 February 1943. Repatriated to Canada, 28 February 1945. Released 2 May 1945. Postwar civilian instructor to No.702 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Cadets

 

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ANDERSON, Sergeant Murray Bouch (R86915) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.115 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 September 1943 and AFRO 2258/43 dated 5 November 1943. Born in Calgary, Alberta, 1917; home there (grain trader). Enlisted in Edmonton 12 February 1941. Trained at No.8 BGS (graduated 8 November 1941) and No.2 WS. Invested with award at Buckingham Palace 2 May 1944. Photo PL-21661 is a formal portrait; PL-29223 and PL-29224 taken with his wife after investiture.

 

This airman has been engaged in operational flying since December 1942. He has taken part in attacks on a great variety of targets, including Essen, Spezia and Stettin and has recently participated in the battle of the Ruhr. A most efficient and painstaking wireless operator air gunner, he has consistently displayed great keenness, courage and devotion to duty.

 

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ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russell (C40) - Mention in Despatches - Eastern Air Command Headquarters (now Overseas HQ) - Award effective 11 December 1943 as per London Gazette dated 14 December 1943 and AFRO 568/44 dated 17 March 1944. Born Walkerton, Ontario, 29 April 1893. Enlisted April 1916 in 168th (Oxford) Battalion. Transferred to Royal Flying Corps. Flew Spads with No.19 Squadron in France; returned to England as instructor. In immediate postwar period he was an aerobatic pilot with an RAF team touring Britain to raise funds for charities, and thus may have been the first Canadian aerobatic pilot. Appointed to RCAF, Camp Borden, with rank of Squadron Leader, 1 April 1924. Various postings between Ottawa, Camp Borden, U.S. and U.K., 1924-29. Station Winnipeg, January 1929 to December 1932; AFHQ, Ottawa, December 1932 to June 1938; Station Ottawa, June 1938 to January 1939; EAC HQ, January 1939 to February 1942; AFHQ, Ottawa, February 1942 to 1945. Retired, 12 December 1945; died in Ottawa 31 July 1948. Numerous photographs of him at Canadian Forces Photo Unit; PL-1181 shows him at desk, Dartmouth, August 1940 (Air Commodore); PL-117261 is a formal portrait; RE-75-307 shows him as a Squadron Leader in formal dress; HC-6655 held by National Archives of Canada shows him in 1933.

 

ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russel (C40) - Commander, Order of the Bath - Air Member for Air Staff, AFHQ (now Overseas) - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944. Invested with award at Buckingham Palace 15 February 1944.

 


Air Vice-Marshal Anderson, with outstanding organizing ability, energy and initiative, for many years very successfully filled a position of great responsibility as Air Officer Commanding, Eastern Air Command. As Air Member for Air Staff for the past twenty months, this conscientious and very thorough officer has efficiently and judiciously undertaken the responsibility of all Home War planning and operations. He also very capably fulfils the duties of Deputy Chief of the Air Staff and is a member of the Permanent Joint Board on Defence, Canada-United States.

 

ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russell (C40) - Officer of the Legion of Honour (France) - Award effective 12 September 1947 as per Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947 and AFRO 485/47 of that date.

 

ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russell (C40) - Croix de Guerre with Palm (France) - Award effective 12 September 1947 as per Canada Gazette dated 20 September 1947 and AFRO 485/47 of that date.

 

ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russell (C40) - Legion of Merit, Commander (United States) - Award effective 14 February 1948 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 135/48 dated 5 March 1948. On 15 April 1947 Air Vice-Marshal Hugh Campbell wrote to Colonel J.C. Hodgson, U.S. Military Attache in Ottawa. It is clear from this letter that the Americans had asked Canada to nominate some officers for U.S. awards and that in Anderson's case, Campbell was not only suggesting the person (along with Harold Edwards and A.L. James) but supplying a draft citation. There was some urgency, as Anderson was dying of diabetes:

 

Air Vice Marshal Anderson has held various important operational appointments on Canada's east coast, including Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Air Command during the war. Together with his American counterparts, he was responsible in no small measure for the effective air operations which were carried out against enemy U-Boats which were then operating so extensively in Atlantic sea lanes. He has, at all times, shown the utmost willingness and enthusiasm in his association with members of the United States Army Air Force.

 

ANDERSON, A/V/M Norman Russell (C40) - Order of the White Lion, 3rd Class (Czechoslovakia) - Award effective 5 March 1948 as per Canada Gazette dated 14 February 1948 and AFRO 135/48 of that date.

 

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ANDERSON, W/C Norman Stanley Alton (C784) - Air Force Cross - No.4 Training Command Headquarters (since moved to No.13 SFTS). Award effective as of 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date, Canada Gazette dated 6 January 1945 and AFRO 89/45 dated 19 January 1945. Appointed Provisional Pilot Officer 19 July 1937; received wings on 20 May 1938. With No.2 Squadron, Trenton, August 1939. When recommended he had completed 1,671 flying hours to date, 1,029 hours instructional, ten flying hours in previous six months. Awarded Queens Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 when a Group Captain in Maritime Air Command. Photo PL-53106 is portrait taken November 1952; PL-71055 shows him receiving Coronation Medal.

 

This officer has displayed a very keen and a most aggressive interest in flying training through many years of flying instructional work. He is an outstanding leader who by his own example of determination and ability, has made an excellent record in the training plan. His wide experience and unswerving devotion to duty have had a direct effect in improving the standard of flying throughout this command.

 

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ANDERSON, P/O Peter Murray (J16379) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.97 Squadron - Award effective 11 March 1943 as per London Gazette dated 26 March 1943 and AFRO 757/43 dated 30 April 1943. Born in Manitoba, 1922; educated at University of Manitoba; home in Union Point, Manitoba; enlisted in Winnipeg, 1941. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 16 August 1941), No.18 EFTS (graduated 10 October 1941) and No.15 SFTS (graduated 2 January 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 13 July 1948. Photo PL-17320 and PL-19320 taken after investiture with F/L Charles R. Blemengauer; PL-25551R is a portrait.

 

This officer has completed numerous sorties including several attacks on targets in Italy. He has always displayed great courage and skill. One night in February 1943 he completed a successful attack on Lorient in difficult circumstances. Three nights later he flew with distinction in an attack on the same target.

 

ANDERSON, F/O Peter Murray, DFC (J16379) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. No citation in AFRO.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O Phillip James (C11369) - Mention in Despatches - No.148 Squadron (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 726/46 dated 26 July 1946. Enlisted in Toronto, 1 May 1942. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 4 December 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 28 May 1943). No citation. DHist file 71/590 has an account in Polish indicating that on 4 August 1944 he was navigator of a Halifax dropping supplies to Warsaw; aircraft shot down by Bf.110 fighter; he evaded capture and joined the Polish Home Army (Underground)

 

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ANDERSON, F/O Robert Thomas (J35506) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 21 September 1945 and AFRO 1704/45 dated 9 November 1945. Born in Armstrong's Corners, New Brunswick, 1919; home in Welsford, New Brunswick. Former truck driver and clerk, ex-RCA, enlisted in Moncton, June 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 21 November 1941), No.17 EFTS (graduated 2 January 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 24 April 1942). Medal sent by registered mail 28 June 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation by W/C M.E. Ferguson dated 18 April 1945 when he had flown 30 sorties (220 hours ten minutes), 14 October 1944 to 22 March 1945. NOTE: Originally listed as No.438 Squadron, an error owing to typographical error in AFRO. Photo PL-8567 shows four recent BCATP graduates, April 1942; Sergeants T.R. Gallivan, R.C. Forsyethe, R.T. Anderson and R.E. Stewart.

 

As Captain of aircraft, this officer has shown great courage, determination and devotion to duty with an overwhelming desire to press home the attack. His ability as a leader has been outstanding and has been a great contribution to the operational efficiency of the unit. He has successfully attacked many major targets and has shown a complete disregard for opposition. His obvious ability, keenness and desire to serve have been an inspiration to all.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Ronald Amos (J6173) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.428 Squadron - Award effective 1 December 1944 as per London Gazette dated 8 December 1944 and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born 1921 at Port Elgin, New Brunswick; home in Moncton, New Brunswick. Enlisted in Moncton, 21 November 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 26 February 1941), No.5 EFTS 4 3 April 1941) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 15 July 1941). Commissioned 1941. Award presented 9 July 1949. No citation other than "..in recognition of gallantry and devotion to duty in the execution of air operations against the enemy." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 6 September 1944 when he had flown 40 sorties (229 hours 25 minutes), 15 February to 27 August 1944.

 

Flight Lieutenant Anderson has completed his first tour, carrying out forty sorties against the enemy, many of them on such targets as Berlin, Kiel, and the Ruhr Valley. In addition, he has attacked targets in France and successfully laid mines in enemy waters. He has always shown himself to be a determined and skilful pilot.

 

His willingness and the cheerful manner in which he has carried out his duties has been a source of inspiration for the younger crews on the squadron. For the completion of a most satisfactory tour of operations and for the support he has given the squadron, I recommends the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L Thomas George (J4250) - Air Force Cross - No.12 SFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Enlisted at Winnipeg (home there), 19 July 1940. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 31 August 1940), No.10 EFTS (graduated 12 October 1940), and No.4 SFTS (graduated 9 December 1940). Served overseas with No.418 Squadron with which he scored the following victories: 3 February 1944, one unidentified twin-engined enemy aircraft destroyed; 1 June 1944, one Do.217 destroyed and one unidentified twin-engined aircraft damaged. Award presented 11 June 1949. As of recommendation he had completed 1,254 flying hours as instructor in 18 months. Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 23 October 1953 when a Squadron Leader (No.31 Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron). Photo PL-57027 is 1953 portrait; PL-75025 taken on receipt of Coronation Medal.

 

This officer excels at all times in his cheerful, willing and co-operative spirit. His work as a flying instructor, flight commander and examining officer has been well above average and his capabilities are only exceeded by his untiring efforts. He has done much toward a high standard of morale among the flying instructors of this unit.

 

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ANDERSON, P/O Trevor Maxwell (J17875) - Distinguished Flying Cross (United States) - 82nd Squadron, 12 Bomber Group (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - effective 8 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette dated 4 May 1946 and AFRO 473/46 dated 10 May 1946. Home in Esquimalt, British Columbia; enlisted Vancouver 24 January 1941. Trained at No.2 WS (graduated 17 August 1941) and No.2 BGS (graduated 15 September 1941). As a Sergeant his number was R87853. DHist file 181.009 D.2622 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has citation as issued by United States Military Forces in the Middle East (Cairo, 14 September 1944). DHist file 181.009 D.1636 (RG.24 Vol.20604) has application for Operational Wings dated 29 February 1944 which indicates he was actually on strength of No.82 Squadron, 12th Bomber Group, 24 August 1942 to 27 September 1943 (Mitchells). Claimed 55 sorties (152 hours). When forced down in sea (80 miles from shore) he was wounded slightly; rescue vessel was stormbound three days. Repatriated to Canada 23 October 1943. Photo PL-56800 is portrait taken April 1953 while serving with No.412 Squadron (service number 19921).

 


For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight from 9 October 1942 to 15 July 1943 while on duty with the Ninth United States Army Air Force in the Middle East. Pilot Officer Anderson participated in forty-two combat missions against the enemy during the drive from El Alamein to Tunisia. His targets included desert airdromes, troop concentrations, tanks, motor transport, harbours and roads. Following the expulsion of the enemy from North Africa, he operated over the islands of Pantelleria, Lampedusa and Sicily. On one occasion, during a raid over the island of Crete, the aircraft in which Pilot Officer Anderson was acting as radio operator was forced down into the sea. Remaining calm in the face of danger, he transmitted distress signals up to the last possible moment, thereby enabling the crew to be rescued within twenty-five hours. Through his ability, courage and unswerving devotion to duty, Pilot Officer Anderson not only contributed immeasurably to the cause of the United Nations but also reflected great credit on himself and the Royal Canadian Air Force.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/9599 has letter dated 23 May 1943 which provides added details.

 

On January 2, 1943, Sergeant Trevor N. Anderson, R87863 RCAF, attached to 82nd Bomb Squadron, radio gunner on a B-25 medium bomber returning from an operational mission on the island of Crete. At 2.30 p.m. engine malfunctioning and subsequent exhaustion of fuel, made a forced landing in the hostile water imperative. In the landing, Sergeant Anderson suffered superficial wounds on the right upper eyelid and left side of his forehead, and mild brain concussion. Taking his turn at hanging alongside the raft in the icy waters because seven men crowded the five man life raft beyond capacity, spending twenty-five (25) hours under that strain, three more days in a rescue boat drifting through the worst storm in months and existing on cold cheese and hardtack, Sergeant Anderson and his fellow comrades finally arrived at the harbour of Bardia at noon, January 6, 1943.

 

For extraordinary achievement and heroism in the call of duty, it is recommended that Sergeant Anderson be awarded the Air Medal.

 

For suffering injuries in the line of duty as a result of operational missional activities,, it is further recommended that Sergeant Anderson be awarded the Purple Heart.

 

ANDERSON, Sgt (now P/O) Trevor Maxwell (R87853/J17875) - Air Medal with Seven Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters (United States) - 82nd Squadron, 12 Bomber Group (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - effective 8 November 1944 as per Canada Gazette dated 4 May 1946 and AFRO 473/46 dated 10 May 1946. Trained at No.2 WS and No.2 BGS. DHist file 181.009 D.2622 (RG.24 Vol.20628) has citations as issued by United States Military Forces in the Middle East (Cairo, 14 September 1944). The first Air Medal was "for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flight against the enemy on 2 January 1943 while on duty with the Ninth United States Army Air Force in the Middle East". Succeeding Oak Leaf Clusters for duty as follows: First, 9 October 1942 to 22 February 1943; Second, 23 February to 1 March 1943; Third, 1-3 March 1943; Fourth, 17-26 March 1943; Fifth, 4-25 April 1943; Sixth, 27 April to 10 May 1943; Seventh, 7 June to 12 July 1943.

 

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ANDERSON, P/O Willard Leslie (J92447) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.434 Squadron - Award effective 5 July 1945 as per London Gazette dated 20 July 1945 and AFRO 1619/45 dated 19 October 1945. Born 1916 at Southey, Saskatchewan; home there. Farmer and lumberman, enlisted in Galt, Ontario, 25 August 1942. Trained at No.2 ITS (graduated 28 May 1943) and No.2 AOS (graduated 26 November 1943). Commissioned November 1944. Medal sent by registered mail 7 June 1950. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". DHist card says he was navigator to F/L V.L. Barr's crew - 35 trips (137 points). DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation dated 24 March 1945 when he had flown 35 sorties (254 hours 21 minutes), 23 October 1944 to 12 March 1945. Photo PL-43604 is a post-mission interrogation; F/L James Vipond and P/O W.L. Anderson debrief F/O Cliff Shaw.

 

Pilot Officer Anderson is an accurate and determined navigator who has operated against the enemy with consistent success. At all times throughout his tour of operations he has maintained a high standard of skill and cool courage, often in the face of strong enemy opposition. He has consistently displayed a high standard of efficiency, keenness and devotion to duty....

 

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ANDERSON, S/L William Andrew (C1099) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.407 Squadron - Award effective 15 December 1941 as per London Gazette dated 16 March 1943 and AFRO 616/43 dated 9 April 1943. Born in Winnipeg, 1918; home there. Enlisted there 9 September 1939. Trained at Camp Borden and Trenton. Killed in action on Hudson AM712, 12 February 1942; name on Runnymede Memorial. Medal presented to next-of-kin, 20 March 1944. Photo PL-4843 taken while with No.407 Squadron; PL-4619 taken en route to opertions office with two of his crew (Sergeant Neville Jordan, RAF and Sergeant Harold Spicer).

 

This officer has always shown the greatest keenness and enthusiasm for operational flying. On one occasion he carried out a successful low level attack on a well defended convoy off Ameland, obtaining a hit on the largest vessel of some 10,000 tons. On another occasion he attacked convoys at night, always at a low level, and in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, obtaining a hit on a 2,500 ton vessel from fifty feet. He also attacked the vessel with machine gun fire. On another sortie Squadron Leader Anderson was detailed to illuminate, with flares, the position of a convoy to direct a bombing force to the attack. He skilfully accomplished his mission in the face of fire from the ship. He assumed command of a flight in November 1941. This officer has at all times shown great courage.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9262 has recommendation dated 11 November 1941:

 


This officer is a Canadian serving with No.407 Squadron. He has always shown the greatest keenness and enthusiasm for operational flying. On one occasion he carried out a successful attack at very low level on a well defended convoy off Ameland, obtaining a hit on the largest vessel estimated at 10,000 tons. He also attacked balloons flown over the convoy with machine gun fire. On another occasion he has attacked convoys at night, always at a low level, and in the face of intense and accurate anti-aircraft fire, obtaining direct hits on [a] 2,500 ton merchant vessel from 50 feet and a probable hit on a 4,000-ton merchant vessel; he also attacked then [them ?] with machine gun fire, obtaining many hits on the superstructure. On one occasion he was detailed to light up a convoy with parachute flares to direct a bombing force to it; he carried out this task perfectly, dropping ten flares at five minute intervals over the convoy under fire from the ships and knowing that he was in an area frequented by enemy night fighters, an exceedingly long drawn out and hazardous enterprise. He has at all times displayed great personal courage and has set a fine example to the squadron.

 

On 15 December 1942 the Commanding Officer of No.407 Squadron forwarded a further recommendation to his superiors, reading as follows:

 

This officer was recommended by me for an award of the Distinguished Flying Cross on 11th November 1941, but it has not yet been awarded. This recommendation is forwarded to add weight to the previous one, a copy of which is attached. Since the 11th November, Flight Lieutenant Anderson has assumed command of a Flight in No.407 Squadron and has already proved himself a very capable Flight Commander. He has up to date carried out 17 operational sorties, some in very bad weather. In addition to these exploits which have already been retailed [sic] he has now attacked and hit at night a merchant vessel of 8,000 tons leaving it enveloped in clouds of dense smoke and steam. He has a total of three ships hit and confirmed damaged or seriously damaged and one probably damaged. He has at all times shown great personal courage.

 

This was finally edited to the following for Air Ministry Honours and Awards Committee:

 

This officer has always shown the greatest keenness and enthusiasm for operational flying. On one occasion he carried out a successful low level attack on a well defended convoy off Ameland, obtaining a hit on the largest vessel of some 10,000 tons. He also attacked balloons flown over the convoy with machine gun fire. On other occasions he has attacked convoys at night, always at a low level, and in the face of intense anti-aircraft fire, obtaining direct hits on a 2,500 ton vessel from fifty feet and a probable hit on another vessel; he also attacked the vessels with machine gun fire. On another sortie Flight Lieutenant Anderson was detailed to illuminate the position of a convoy to direct a bombing force to the attack. He skilfully accomplished his mission by dropping ten flares at five minute internals over the convoy in the face of fire from the ships. He assumed command of a flight in November and he has since carried out a further 17 sorties. During one of these flights he attacked a large merchant ship leaving it enveloped in dense smoke and steam. This officer has at all times shown great courage.

 

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ANDERSON, S/L William Brodie (J8924) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.429 Squadron - Award effective 7 July 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2032/44 dated 22 September 1944. Born in Winnipeg, 1914; home there. Educated at University of Manitoba. Enlisted in North Bay, Ontario, 22 April 1941. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 15 July 1941), No.4 EFTS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.13 SFTS (graduated 21 November 1941). Commissioned 1941. Medal presented 2 December 1946. On 7/8 June 1944 he was severely wounded during raid on Acheres. He ordered crew to bale out and the navigator, bomb aimer and wireless operator did so over the continent. The aircraft was flown back to England by the RAF flight engineer. Near Benson, the remaining crewmen assisted Anderson into parachute and got him out; parachute seen to open. The flight engineer and two gunners baled out safely, but Anderson died before being located. Halifax LW128 crashed one half miles north of Benson airfield. CGM (Flying) to Sergeant G.E.J. Steere (RAF, Flight Engineer), DFMs to Sergeants J. Mangione and G.J.M. Ritchie (RCAF).

 

This officer has taken part in many attacks on targets in Germany and has invariably displayed a high degree of skill and gallantry. On a recent occasion when returning from an operation against Karlsruhe, his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire. Squadron Leader Anderson was injured about the eyes by flying splinters. Although temporarily blinded he piloted the aircraft clear of the target area. Later the second pilot took over the controls, but Squadron Leader Anderson fully maintained his duties as captain throughout the remainder of the homeward flight. This officer is a most efficient flight commander whose leadership and devotion to duty have set a fine example.

 

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ANDERSON, S/L William George (J4428) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.424 Squadron - Award effective 30 March 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 721/45 dated 27 April 1945. Born in Winnipeg, 1919, home in Union Point, Manitoba. Enlisted in Winnipeg, 22 August 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 3 November 1940), No.7 EFTS (graduated 3 December 1940) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1941). Commissioned March 1941. Medal presented by Governor General, 7 November 1949. Photo PL-35925 is formal portrait; PL-40087 with No.424 Squadron; PL-48167 taken after investiture with his wife and mother.

 

One night in December 1944 Squadron Leader Anderson piloted an aircraft detailed for a mine laying mission in narrow enemy waters. In the runs to the target he was subjected to intense anti-aircraft fire from shore batteries and also from ships when flying at a very low level. A cruiser appeared and passed almost directly beneath the aircraft. Squadron Leader Anderson immediately gave orders for his gunners to engage the enemy. During the fight his aircraft sustained some damage but owing to the clever evasive action by this gallant officer it was not extensive. Squadron Leader Anderson has at all times set a splendid example of courage and devotion to duty.

 

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ANDERSON, F/L William John (J24471) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 8 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Born 1922 in Lansdowne, Ontario; home in Westport, Ontario. Enlisted in Galt, Ontario, 14 February 1941. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 20 June 1942), No.13 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 19 March 1943). Commissioned 1943. Medal sent by registered mail 26 April 1952. Died in Brockville, 21 March 1999. Photo PL-29856 taken with Sergeant Paul Barton and Bill Mann after successful combat with a Junkers 88. REP 70-131 to REP 70-134 are portraits taken in 1970.

 

This officer has completed numerous sorties and has displayed courage and resolution of a high order. On one sortie his aircraft was attacked by three enemy fighters. Flight Lieutenant Anderson skilfully outmanoeuvred the attackers and went on to execute a successful attack. On another occasion when over Versailles his aircraft was intercepted by a Junkers 88. In the ensuing fight which ended with the destruction of the enemy aircraft, Flight Lieutenant Anderson displayed great coolness and determination.

 

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ANDERSON, F/O William Robert Weir (J13558) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 17 August 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 2005/43 dated 1 October 1943. Born in 1920; home in Vancouver. Enlisted in Vancouver, 28 July 1941. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 14 August 1942) and No.2 WS (graduated 14 September 1942). Commissioned 1942. Medal presented 16 May 1942. Photo PL-23723 is portrait.

 

One night in July 1943, this officer was mid-upper gunner of an aircraft which was attacked by an enemy fighter during an operational flight. Although he sustained four wounds in the left arm, Flying Officer Anderson continued to fire his guns during seven subsequent attacks until the hostile aircraft was sent diving towards the ground with one engine in flames. Flying Officer Anderson displayed great courage and fortitude in most trying circumstances.

 

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ANDRAS, S/L Kenneth Bertram (C6511) - Mention in Despatches - No.6 Group Headquarters (AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas") - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. No citation in AFRO. Photo PL-22443 shows him at administrative work with S/L E.T.M. Duggan; PL-29677 working at his desk.

 

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ANDREW, W/C Byron (C1295) - Air Force Cross - No.10 SFTS - Award effective 5 May 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1133/44 dated 26 May 1944. Enlisted in Vancouver, 3 October 1939. As of award had flown 1,127 hours, including 850 hours as instructor, 87 hours 30 minutes in past six months. Award presented 12 January 1945.

 

This officer has been employed on flying instruction for over three and one half years during which time he has very capably filled the positions of Flight Commander, Squadron Commander, and Chief Instructor, respectively. He has put forth a persistent, untiring and unceasing effort all through the initial and matured phases of the Combined Training Organization. His organizing ability has been noteworthy, resulting in a consistently high standard of instruction and morale, and his outstanding leadership and devotion to duty have been of great value and an inspiring example to all ranks.

 

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ANDREW, F/L Emerson William (J24423) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.78 Squadron - Award effective 5 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 293/45 dated 16 February 1945. Born in Toronto, 1918; home in given both as Collingwood, Ontario and Summerside, Prince Edward Island. Enlisted in Toronto, 12 December 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 3 July 1942), No.20 EFTS (graduated 9 October 1942) and No.1 SFTS (graduated 5 March 1943). Commissioned 1943. Award presented 14 June 1945. Photographs PL-4128 and PL-41229 are portraits.

 

Flight Lieutenant Andrew has completed a large number of sorties including attacks on such targets as Kiel, Stuttgart and Munster. He is a keen, courageous and resourceful captain of aircraft and his example has greatly inspired his crews. In a sortie on one occasion, two engines failed whilst over the sea. It became necessary to bring the aircraft down onto the water, a task which Flight Lieutenant Andrew accomplished with great skill. None of his crew was injured and they were rescued a few hours later.

 

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ANDREW, P/O Raymond (J92444) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 8 September 1945 as per London Gazette dated 25 September 1945 and AFRO 1768/45 dated 23 November 1945. Born 1925, Pickering, Ontario. Home there (farmer); enlisted in Toronto 19 January 1943. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 14 January 1944. Commissioned October 1944. Award presented 7 August 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1941 (RG.24 Vol.20612) has recommendation by W/C M.E. Ferguson dated 22 March 1945 when he had flown 31 sorties (192 hours 35 minutes), 27 August 1944 to 13 February 1945.

 


Pilot Officer Andrew has completed thirty-one operational sorties against many of Germany's hottest targets. He has proved himself to be an extremely valuable member of his crew and on many occasions his cool and reliable instructions have resulted in eluding enemy fighters. On two occasions the skilful manipulation of his guns have damaged and driven off attacking fighters.

 

I consider the courageous example set by this officer and his selfless devotion to duty fully merits the award of the D.F.C. (Non-Immediate).

 

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ANDREW, F/L Robert Arthur (J41123) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.101 Squadron - Award effective 12 November 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946. Home in East Coulee, Alberta; enlisted Calgary 2 November 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 10 July 1943), No.5 EFTS (graduated 4 September 1943) and No.7 SFTS (graduated 11 February 1944). Photo PL-128944 is a portrait taken June 1961. Award presented in Toronto 30 November 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." Public Record Office Air 2/9137 has recommendation dated 15 May 1945 when he had flown 32 sorties (214 hours 28 minutes), 29 November 1944 to 7 April 1945:

 

29 Nov 44 Dortmund 14 Feb 45 Dresden

2 Dec 44 Hagen 20 Feb 45 Dortmund

4 Dec 44 Karlsruhe 21 Feb 45 Duisburg

5 Dec 44 Soest 5 Mar 45 Chemnitz

6 Dec 44 Merseburg 11 Mar 45 Essen

12 Dec 44 Essen 12 Mar 45 Dortmund

16 Dec 44 Ludwigshaven 13 Mar 45 Gelsenkirchen

18 Dec 44 Ulm 15 Mar 45 Misburg

26 Dec 44 St.Vith 16 Mar 45 Nuremburg

28 Dec 44 Bonn 21 Mar 45 Bruchstrasse

31 Dec 44 Osterfeld 23 Mar 45 Bremen

3 Jan 45 Nuremburg 25 Mar 45 Hanover

29 Jan 45 Zuffenhausen 28 Mar 45 Paderborn

1 Feb 45 Mannheim 31 Mar 45 Blohm/Hamburg

2 Feb 45 Weisbaden 4 Apr 45 Lutzendorf

7 Feb 45 Cleve 7 Apr 45 Kiel

 

Flight Lieutenant Andrew, a Canadian, and an extremely successful pilot of proven ability, has completed 32 sorties against a wide variety of targets and on many occasions fighters and flak were encountered.

 

This officer's determination to press home his attack has been am inspiration not only to his crew but to the whole squadron. The successful results obtained have been to a great extent due to his outstanding leadership and example, together with his firm intention to strike the enemy as hard and as often as possible.


This officer has at all times displayed a very high order of personal courage which combined with his cheerful confidence and unequalled spirit of determination has resulted in a splendid record of achievement.

 

It is recommended that Flight Lieutenant Andrew's fine offensive spirit and sustained bravery in the face of the enemy be recognized by the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * * *

 

ANDREWS, F/O Arthur Ellis (J25099) - No.620 Squadron - Distinguished Flying Cross (United States) - Award effective 15 May 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Home in St.Stephen, New Brunswick; enlisted Moncton 10 March 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 28 August 1942), No.3 EFTS (graduated 11 December 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 2 April 1943). Public Records Office Air 2/9644 has recommendation.

 

Flying Officer Andrews participated in three sorties during the Arnhem operations. As captain of aircraft he towed a glider aircraft on the second day of the operation, and later he was engaged in delivering supplies. Intense and accurate gunfire was encountered and on one occasion Flying Officer Andrew's aircraft was severely damaged. The greater part of the rudder was shot away which made the aircraft extremely difficult to land. Nevertheless, Flying Officer Andrews, displaying outstanding resolution, finally landed successfully, without causing injury to his crew.

 

ANDREWS, F/L Arthur Ellis (J25099) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 155/46 dated 15 February 1946. Certificate sent 10 August 1948.

 

* * * * *

 

ANDREWS, P/O Donald Roy (J87068) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.415 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 19 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born in Toronto, 1921; home there; enlisted there 15 April 1942. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 5 December 1942), No.11 EFTS (graduated 20 February 1942) and No.5 SFTS (graduated 11 June 1943). Commissioned 1944. Award presented Toronto, 30 November 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.1750 (RG.24 Vol.20608) has recommendation (undated, about mid-October 1944) when he had flown 33 sorties (169 hours ten minutes) between 24 April and 15 September 1944.

 


Pilot Officer Andrews has participated in very many attacks on targets important to the enemy's war effort. He has displayed great determination and his skilful efforts have contributed materially to the successes obtained. On several occasions the aircraft in which he was flying has been damaged by enemy action, but his keenness for operations remains unabated. Pilot Officer Andrews has set a good example of courage and devotion to duty...

* * * * *

 

ANDREWS, F/O Frederick John (J19906) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.437 Squadron - Award effective 8 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1219/45 dated 27 July 1945. Home in Porcupine, Ontario; enlisted North Bay 9 January 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 26 May 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 18 August 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 27 September 1941) and No.2 ANS (graduated 27 October 1941). Award presented 5 June 1949. DHist file 181.009 D.4855 (RG.24 Vol.20657) has recommendation dated 1 April 1945 when he had flown 1,127 hours (155 in previous six months), 589 operational hours (83 sorties). It said his first tour had been on Coastal Command and on current tour had "acted as Map Reader in the leading aircraft on all airborne operations on the continent since D-Day."

 

This officer has completed two tours of operational duty. He is a highly skilled navigator whose exceptional ability has played a good part in the successes obtained. Cool, devoted and resolute, Flying Officer Andrews has proved himself to be a most valuable member of aircraft crew.

 

* * * * *

 

ANDREWS, FS William Ernest (R99770) - British Empire Medal - AFHQ - Award effective 13 June 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 660/46 dated 5 July 1946. Home in St.Thomas, Ontario; enlisted in London, Ontario, 20 May 1941.

 

Flight Sergeant Andrews' outstanding attributes were his relentlessness in pursuit of duty, his exemplary conduct and his power of accomplishment. His industry and resourcefulness enabled him to perform prodigious feats of work in an amazingly short time. He was ever punctual, courteous and imbued with a fine appreciation of his responsibilities to the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Senior non-commissioned officer.

 

* * * * *

 

ANGELL, WO (now P/O) Gerald Ellis Lintott (R57572/J85622) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.77 Squadron - Award effective 19 June 1944 as per London Gazette dated 30 June and AFRO 1861/44 dated 25 August 1944. Born in Calgary, 1921; home in Vancouver; enlisted there 8 February 1940. Mill worker before enlistment, 1940. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 23 October 1942). Award presented 11 March 1949.

 


This Warrant Officer has completed a tour of operations. On two occasions his aircraft has been attacked by enemy fighters. In December 1943, during a sortie against Leipzig, his aircraft was attacked by a Junkers 88 but Warrant Officer Angell's accurate return fire drove the enemy aircraft off with smoke and flames coming from the port engine. Later in the same month, when his aircraft was subjected to three attacks from a Messerschmitt 210, the enemy's attacks were again frustrated largely owing to the skill of this Warrant Officer and his fellow gunner and the excellent evasive direction they gave to their captain. Throughout his tour Warrant Officer Angell has shown coolness, courage and great devotion to duty.

 

* * * * *

 

ANGELL, Corporal Ronald Ford Chapman (R109773) - Mention in Despatches - Station Patricia Bay - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 1127/45 dated 6 July 1945. Enlisted in Windsor, Ontario, 15 July 1941. Later in Western Air Command Marine Squadron and No.3 Repair Depot, Vancouver. Certificate sent to No.3 Repair Depot, 4 July 1945.

 

In the performance of his duties over a long period of time, Corporal Angell has always displayed outstanding keenness and devotion to duty. On one occasion his prompt and efficient action was undoubtedly an important factor whereby the lives of five out of seven members of the crew of an aircraft, which crashed in the water, were saved. His part in this rescue was most commendable and an indication of the manner in which this non-commissioned officer carries out his duties.

 

* * * * *

 

ANGERS, Sergeant Joseph Arthur Angus Bruneau (R78161) - Mention in Despatches - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 232/43 dated 12 February 1943. Home in St.Lambert, Quebec. Enlisted in Toronto, 11 October 1940. Trained at No.3 WS and No.5 BGS. Later commissioned (J15966). No citation to MiD. Story told in G.A. Brown, Those Who Dared. Angers was in crew of an aircraft that crashed in Belgium, 17 July 1942. He was injured, first when his parachute snagged a tree, then when he fell out of the tree. He managed to evade capture, obtain medical help, and then got on the escape network through Belgium, France, and Spain, from whence he was repatriated 18 August 1942. However, DHist card says he went missing 17 June 1942, reported "safe" 22 January 1943 and repatriated 15 November 1943. Clipping from Montreal Star, February 1946 reports his reaction to news that Mlle Andree DeJohgh of Belgium had been awarded the George Medal.

 

"No award would have been too great for the magnificent young woman who was known as the Soul of the Belgian Underground. For years she fought against tremendous odds and expected nothing but bullets.

 

"When I first met her in Paris in 1942 she was only 22 years old. About 5 feet 2 inches, weighing about 105 pounds and very pretty, she was a brunette when her clever disguises did not make her a redhead or a blond.

 


"Mlle DeJongh was very clever; she always did the unexpected. The Nazis feared her so much they placed a price of 10,000 marks on her head, and sent some of their keenest Gestapo agents in search of her.

 

"She not only acted as guide for Allied airmen from Paris across the Pyrenees to San Sebastian, but she provided food, clothes, cigarettes and other comforts. She organized false certificates of residence, false identification cards with photos and false passports. When a special seal was needed as a stamp of approval for a phoney document, she found a way to secure one."

 

Angers...jumped from his burning bomber over Duisburg on June 16, 1942 and made his way into occupied Holland. A Dutch peasant on the outskirts of Eindhoven took him across the border to Turnhout in Belgium where he made contact with the underground....

 

Two weeks later, Angers was one of a party to leave Paris with Mlle Dejongh on the first leg of their journey to freedom. Following her usual daring routine they travelled in a coach with German officers.

 

Arriving at St.Jean de Luz, the party spent two days in a flat immediately above where the regional Gestapo agent dwelt ! Thence on to Urrunge, from where they commenced an attempt to cross the Pyrenees. Unfortunately, about this time smuggling had reached such proportions that the Germans had a patrol everywhere in the mountains. The party had reached the first peak (4,000 feet) when they were ambushed by two German soldiers.

 

"To create the impression they were strong numerically, " said Angers, "the Germans yelled and fired rapidly and haphazardly. Up to this point we had been climbing in Indian file. The shooting startled us and the party was divided.

 

"I stayed with Dedee [DeJohngh] and we returned to our rendezvous at Urrugne. The others drifted back within 24 hours but my navigator was caught. Two days later we made another attempt and were successful."

 

Upon reaching the village of Oyarzun on the Spanish side of the Pyrenees, the party had to cross the Bidasao River. Swollen by icy-cold mountain streams the river, though 50 yards wide, was not very deep. The current was so swift that all had to cross "au naturel" holding their clothes aloft.

 

Angers fell into a pot hole and was nearly drowned. All were utterly exhausted when they reached the other side. The men lay on the bank unable to go further.

 

The next contact point was San Sebastian, five miles away, and Mlle DeJongh set off to obtain a conveyance. "She returned with an automobile, saw us all in safety, bid us au revoir, and returned along on her 40th trip over the Pyrenees.


"When she had gone we all felt a personal loss," Angers added.

 

As soon as Belgium was liberated, Angers contacted Major Count Temmerman, Chief of the Belgian underground. From the latter he learned Dedee's name for the first time and secured her address. He also learned that the important figure known only as "The Professor" was Dedee's father, a professor in Brussels University. He had been shot by the Gestapo.

 

Public Records Office Air 2/5684 has a recommendation which both confirms and contradicts some of the above:

 

This airman was a member of the crew of an aircraft which crashed over Belgium when returning from a bombing raid on Essen on 17th July 1942.

 

On baling out his parachute caught in a tree, and in freeing himself he was severely injured in falling to the ground. Despite this mishap, and although in great pain he succeeded in avoiding capture by enemy patrols, by crawling away from the scene of his landing.

 

Following a period of hiding he managed to obtain aid to his injuries and nothing daunted, set out on his way to France, into which he successfully crossed.

 

He was finally able to make his way into Spain, whence he was repatriated on 18th August 1942.

 

* * * *

 

ANGUISH, F/L Jack Mills (J8435) - Mention in Despatches - Linton-on-Ouse - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1478/45 dated 21 September 1945. Home in Brantford; enlisted Toronto 13 November 1940. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 22 April 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 18 August 1941), No.1 BGS (graduated 27 September 1941) and No.2 ANS (graduated 27 October 1941). AFRO gives unit only as "Overseas"; DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Vol 20607) has list of MiDs this date with unit. DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 3 February 1945 when he had served 13 months in Canada, 37 months overseas. Photo PL-7323 shows P/Os J.F. Anderson, J.E. Durocher, J.M. Anguish and J.P. Sullivan at an OTU.

 

Flight Lieutenant Anguish became a Flying Control Officer after being grounded from aircrew for medical reasons. While not robust physically, this officer has never spared himself and has been outstanding in his devotion to duty. Flight Lieutenant Anguish has done especially good work over the past year in training new control officers and in helping other ranks in Flying Control in their studies to attain higher groupings in their trade. Altogether an outstanding officer and man.

 


* * * * *

 

ANGUS, F/O Arthur George (J22435) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.419 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born in North Bay, Ontario, 1913; home there. Served with 2nd Algonquin Regiment before enlisting in North Bay,17 October 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 11 September 1942) and No.1 AOS (graduated 30 December 1942). Commissioned 1942. Award presented 20 August 1949. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 29 September 1944 when he had flown 30 sorties (156 hours 50 minutes), 22 April to 18 September 1944. Photo PL-14290 shows LACs A.G. Angus, H.M. Schade, Goyer, H.J. McNenly and E.H. Buckerfield. Died in Kitchener, Ontario, 8 September 2000.

 

Flying Officer Angus has successfully completed 30 operational day and night sorties against the enemy. Included in these sorties are many attacks on the enemy's most heavily defended areas.

 

By his example of steadfastness under all circumstances, he has materially assisted a crew which started operating rather shakily, to become an above average operational combination.

 

The standard of navigation Flying Officer Angus has set has been such that his track-keeping and timing has enabled his aircraft to escape enemy attention throughout his tour.

 

I consider the dependability, loyalty and determination of this excellent Navigator fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * *

 

ANGUS, F/L Claude Allison (C8852) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas Headquarters - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Home in North Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; enlisted in Saskatoon, 15 November 1941. No citation. Photo PL-19040 shows F/O Claude Angus of Marshall, Saskatchewan, described as Adjutant of No.421 Squadron, with LAC W.S. Morrison, Flight Sergeant M.G. Hertel, LAC W.T. Barnett, Corporal L.O. Crawford and Corporal K.H. Main.

 

* * * * *

 


ANGUS, F/O James Russell (J36118) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.426 Squadron - Award effective 10 May 1945 as per London Gazette dated 22 May 1945 and AFRO 1147/45 dated 13 July 1945. Born 1914 in Vancouver; home there. Lab teacher, formerly in Royal Canadian Artillery; enlisted in Toronto 6 August 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 6 March 1943) and No.1 AOS (graduated 1 October 1943). Commissioned 1943. In No.426 Squadron, 30 June 1944 to 23 January 1945 (navigator to P/O C.I. McKinstry). Medal sent by registered mail 21 December 1950. No citation other than "completed...numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". DHist file 181.009 D.2891 (RG.24 Vol.20633) has recommendation dated 20 December 1944 when he had flown 32 sorties (159 hours 35 minutes), 17 July to 18 November 1944.

 

This officer Navigator has completed 32 sorties against the enemy, many of them against the German cities of Hamburg, Kiel, Duisberg, Cologne and other heavily defended targets. Throughout his tour his coolness and determination has been a constant source of inspiration to all navigators and has been responsible in no small way for the success of his aircraft's missions. His energy has at all times been directed towards improving his own navigational ability to a high degree and has set a splendid example to other navigators. He has always shown a high degree of courage and his perseverance is worthy of high praise. He is, therefore, strongly recommended for the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross (Non-Immediate).

 

* * * * *

 

ANGUS, FS John (R153882) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.15 Squadron - Award effective 5 February 1944 as per London Gazette dated 18 February 1944 and AFRO 644/44 dated 24 March 1944. Born in Aberdeen, Scotland, 1919. Home in Toronto where he was a soap oil refiner. Enlisted in Toronto, 6 February 1942. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 22 January 1943). Award presented 5 July 1944.

 

One night in January 1944 this airman was the rear gunner of an aircraft detailed to attack Brunswick. Whilst on the bombing run the aircraft was attacked by a fighter. Some damage was sustained but Flight Sergeant Angus drove off the attacker with accurate bursts of fire. Some fifteen minutes later another fighter attacked. Flight Sergeant Angus engaged the attacker from close range, however, and his telling bursts of fire caused the enemy fighter to burst into flames and fall to the ground where it exploded. This gunners skill and coolness contributed materially to the safe return of the aircraft. He has completed many sorties against well defended targets and his keenness and confidence have set a good example.

 

* * * * *

 

ANGUS, P/O Thomas Anderson (J16350) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.115 Squadron - Award effective 4 October 1943 as per London Gazette dated 19 October 1943 and AFRO 2457/43 dated 26 November 1943. Born in Toronto, 1915; home there (fitter and formerly in Royal Canadian Artillery); enlisted there 3 July 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 7 November 1941), No.6 BGS (graduated 28 March 1942), No.4 AOS (graduated 14 February 1942) and No.2 ANS (graduated 27 April 1942). Commissioned November 1942. Award presented 9 April 1948. Photos PL-24057 and PL-25224 are portraits.


Pilot Officer Angus has played a most important part as bomb aimer in a very successful crew. He has always shown the utmost coolness in directing his aircraft to [through ?] concentrations of anti-aircraft fire and in bombing the objective accurately in the face of opposition. This officer is an exceptionally intelligent and able bomb aimer who has set a fine example in operations over many highly fortified targets.

 

ANGUS, F/L Thomas Anderson, DFC (J16350) - Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross - No.149 Squadron - Award effective 18 October 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 November 1945 and AFRO 133/46 dated 8 February 1946.

 

Since the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross Flight Lieutenant Angus has completed a second tour of operational duties during which he has participated in attacks against such heavily defended targets as Duisburg, Dortmund, Essen and Nuremburg. As bombing leader his cheerful courage, determination and efficiency both in the air and on the ground have set a magnificent example to all.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9112 has recommendation dated 12 May 1945 when he had flown 52 sorties (256 hours 18 minutes); since his previous award he had flown 22 sorties (114 hours 59 minutes); sortie list appears to cover only this latter part of his career:

 

11 Nov 44 Castrop (4.35) 11 Jan 45 Krefeld (4.50)

15 Nov 44 Dortmund (4.30) 22 Jan 45 Hamborn (4.55)

16 Nov 44 Heinsberg (4.30) 28 Jan 45 Cologne (5.00)

20 Nov 44 Hamburg (4.20) 1 Feb 45 Munchen-Gladbach (5.00)

11 Dec 44 Ostergeldt (4.00) 2 Feb 45 Weisbaden (6.10)

24 Dec 44 Bonn (5.00) 19 Feb 45 Wesel (5.25)

26 Dec 44 Cologne (4.25) 20 Feb 45 Dortmund (5.50)

31 Dec 44 Vohwinkel (4.40) 25 Feb 45 Kamen (5.30)

2 Jan 45 Nuremburg (7.15) 2 Mar 45 Cologne (5.35)

5 Jan 45 Ludwigshaven (5.20) 11 Mar 45 Essen (6.05)

6 Jan 45 Nuess (4.45) 29 Mar 45 Hallendorf (7.10)

 

This officer, Air Bomber, has completed 52 sorties with Bomber Command, 30 of which were during his first tour, for which he received the Distinguished Flying Cross. Since then he has completed a second tour of 22 sorties. At all times, during this second tour, he has shown determination and enthusiasm for operations even against the most hazardous of targets, such as Duisburg, Ostrefeld, Dortmund, Essen and Nuremburg.

 


During his second tour as Bombing Leader, his example and efficiency both in the air and on the ground has been an inspiration to his air bombers. His continual cheerfulness and eagerness to take part in all difficult operations has greatly raised the morale of this squadron and singled him out above his fellow aircrew as an outstanding individual.

 

I have therefore no hesitation in strongly recommending this officer for the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

* * * * *

 

ANGUS, F/O William John Anderson (J87104) - Mention in Despatches - No.190 Squadron (AFRO says only Overseas; unit given by his daughter, Wendy Carnegie, in letter dated 5 April 2002) - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 388/46 dated 12 April 1946. Home in Toronto; enlisted there 16 September 1941. Trained at No.9 BGS (graduated 2 April 1943).

 

* * * * *

 

ANNABLE, FS (now P/O) Harold Cecil (R214012/J89416) - Distinguished Flying Medal- No.419 Squadron - Award effective 15 December 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. Born in Hamilton, Ontario, 1917; home in Lindsay, Ontario (foundry worker); enlisted Toronto 18 December 1942. Trained at No.3 BGS (graduated 17 September 1943). Commissioned December 1941. Award presented 18 October 1947. DHist file 181.009 D.3260 (RG.24 Vol.20637) has recommendation dated 8 October 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (158 hours), 22 May to 25 September 1944. Recommendation has more details; raiding Aachen (24 May) aircraft attacked at intervals by three enemy fighters; his oxygen failed but he stayed at post until overcome by lack of oxygen. Attacking Bourg-Leopold (27 May) aircraft attacked three times by fighters but all were evaded before they could open fire. Photo PL-34876 is a portrait.

 

As mid-upper gunner this airman has participated in a large number of sorties, including attacks on such targets as Dortmund, Brunswick, Bolmen and Kiel. He has at all times displayed the greatest determination and devotion to duty. On many occasions his aircraft has been attacked by enemy fighters. His timely combat manoeuvres and good shooting on these occasions have played a good part in the safe return of the aircraft.

 

* * * * *

 


ANNAN, F/L Douglas Bruce (J4554) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.13 EFTS - Award effective 28 May 1943 as per London Gazette of that date, Canada Gazette dated 2 June 1943, and AFRO 1459/43 dated 30 July 1943. Born 5 May 1917 at Hamilton, Ontario. Home in Hamilton, Ontario. Attended Queen's University before the war where he was a prominent athlete. Enlisted in Montreal, 14 September 1940. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 7 November 1940), No.1 EFTS (graduated 4 January 1941), and No.2 SFTS (graduated 7 March 1941). Associated with post-war RCAF Auxiliary (No.424 Squadron and No.16 Wing). Honourary Aide-de-Camp to Governor General Vincent Massey, 1950-55. Awarded Queen's Coronation Medal, 13 October 1953 while a Group Captain, ADC and OC No.16 (Auxiliary) Wing. Joined de Havilland of Canada, April 1959. Died in Oakville, Ontario, 22 July 1990. Photo PL-40809 shows him tracking course with his navigator, F/O Alvin MacIntosh; PL-40799 is a more passive shot of both men; PL-41142 shows W/C Jack Wickett, S/L Annan, S/L Pete Leggat; PL-44232 shows him alone. Governor General's Records (RG.7 Group 26, Volume 57, File 190-I) has citation.

 

This officer, as Chief Flying Instructor at this school, has fulfilled all his duties in a very satisfactory manner. He can be relied upon to carry through to completion the most difficult tasks. Flight Lieutenant Annan possesses organizing and administrative ability and has, at all times, been an outstanding flying instructor. He has completed 1,400 flying hours, 1,209 of which have been instructional.

 

ANNAN, S/L Douglas Bruce (J4554) - Commended for Valuable Services - No.13 EFTS (now No.3 Training Command) - Award effective 1 January 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 113/44 dated 21 January 1944.

 

This officer has completed 1,200 hours of flying of which 870 have been instructional. Employed as Chief Flying Instructor at this school, his ability to organize and lead and his outstanding devotion to duty have been extremely valuable to flying training. His unfailing zeal and efficiency have been an inspiration to all with whom he has come in contact.

 

ANNAN, W/C Douglas Bruce (J4554) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.418 Squadron - Award effective 3 September 1945 as per London Gazette, 14 September 1945 and AFRO 1672/45 dated 2 November 1945.

 

Wing Commander Annan has completed a successful tour of operations during which he has made many telling attacks on the enemy. He has damaged one enemy aircraft, over fifty motor transport vehicles and eight trains. While in command of his squadron Wing Commander Annan has displayed outstanding eagerness to take part in operations. His untiring efforts have done much to maintain the high level of efficiency prevalent in the squadron.

 

ANNAN, S/L (now W/C) Douglas Bruce, DFC (J4554) - Air Force Cross - No.13 EFTS - Award effective 1 January 1946 as per Canada Gazette of that date and AFRO 82/46 dated 25 January 1946. Had been commended 1 June 1943 (which see for biographical details). This may be the citation for his Commendation of 1 January 1944.

 

This officer has completed 1,200 hours of flying of which 870 have been instructional. Employed as Chief Flying Instructor at this School, his ability to organize and lead and his outstanding devotion to duty have been extremely valuable to flying training. His unfailing zeal and efficiency have been an inspiration to all with whom he has come in contact.

 


* * * * *

 

ANNAND, P/O Favell Clinton (J16435) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.51 Squadron - Award effective 1 July 1943 as per London Gazette dated 13 July 1943 and AFRO 1724/43 dated 27 August 1943. Trained at No.4 BGS (graduated 20 April 1941) and No.1 WS (graduated 22 December 1940). Born in Milford, New Brunswick, 1919; enlisted in Halifax, 4 June 1940. Commissioned 1942. Award presented 5 September 1945. Photo PL-4349 shows Sergeant A.E. Shaw, Sergeant H.C. Tice, Sergeant T.R. Chattale and Sergeant Annand; PL-10856 shows him alone during Coastal Command tour; PL-23654 shows him on return to Canada.

 

Since Pilot Officer Annand was posted to this unit he has completed numerous anti-submarine patrols and bombing raids. He is a wireless operator of outstanding ability and exceptional keenness. Throughout a long and arduous tour of operations his fine fighting spirit has never wavered and in addition to his work in the air he has given much assistance in training aircrews. Pilot Officer Annand has participated in attacks on Emden, Berlin, Kiel and Frankfurt and many other heavily defended targets.

 

 

* * * * *

 

ANNESLEY, WO (now P/O) George William (R150830/J88535) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.626 Squadron - Award effective 2 October 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 October 1944 and AFRO 2637/44 dated 8 December 1944. Born 1916 in Biggar, Saskatchewan; home in Edmonton. School teacher; enlisted Edmonton 13 March 1942. Trained at No.4 ITS (graduated 14 August 1942), No.5 BGS (graduated 4 December 1942) and No.7 AOS (graduated 22 January 1943). Award presented 26 February 1949. No citation other than "completed... numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty". Public Records Office document Air 2/8827 has recommendation dated 9 July 1944 when he had flown 29 sorties (175 hours 40 minutes). The sortie list is badly damaged and many dates cannot be deciphered.

 

23 Nov 43 Berlin 30 Mar 44 Nuremburg

25 Nov 43 Berlin 11 Apr 44 Aachen

2 Dec 43 Hanover (last resort) 20 Apr 44 Cologne

20 Dec 43 Mannheim 22 Apr 44 Dusseldorf

23 Dec 43 Berlin 24 Apr 44 Karlsruhe

29 Dec 43 Berlin 26 Apr 44 Essen

? Jan 44 Berlin ? May 44 Bruz

5 Jan 44 Stettin ? May 44 Merville

14 Jan 44 Brunswick ? May 44 Hasselt

? Feb 44 Berlin ? May 44 Orleans

19 Feb 44 Leipzig 21 May 44 Duisburg

20 Feb 44 Stuttgart 22 May 44 Dortmund


24 Feb 44 Schweinfurt ? May 44 Aachen

26 Feb 44 Augsburg ? May 44 Tergnier

24 Mar 44 Berlin

 

Warrant Officer Annesley, a Canadian, as Air Bomber, has carried out 29 operational sorties against the enemy. Many of these have been on such important and heavily defended targets as Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Schweinfurt and Berlin, the latter being the objective on six occasions.

 

The successful operational career of his crew was to a very great extent the result of the cool and calculating courage of Warrant Officer Annesley in pressing home each attack in the face of the strongest opposition the enemy could muster. His skill as a Bomb Aimer is abundantly evident in the high standard of photographic results he obtained.

 

I strongly recommend that for his sustained fortitude and wholehearted devotion to duty, Warrant Officer Annesley be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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ANNIS, W/C Clare Levi (C196) - Officer, Order of the British Empire - Eastern Air Command - Award effective 1 January 1943 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 55/43 dated 15 January 1943. Born in Highland Creek, Ontario, 22 January 1912. Enlisted in Toronto, 13 June 1936. Qualified for pilots wings, 4 May 1937. With No.10 (BR) Squadron at outbreak of war. Widely credited with Eastern Air Command's first attack on a U-Boat (25 October 1941), there is some doubt as to whether a U-Boat was in the area at the time). Reappointed to command of No.10 (BR) in February 1942; to AFHQ in July 1942 as Director, Anti-Submarine Warfare. Made CO, Station Ganger, August 1943. Overseas in 1944 as CO, Station Linton-on-Ouse. Postwar he rose to rank of Air Marshal, Chief of Technical Services in unified forces. Retired 1967 when he became General Manager of Canada Patents and Development Limited (Crown Corporation). Died at National Defence Medical Centre, Ottawa, 1 January 1994. See Fall 1976 issue, Journal of the Canadian Aviation Historical Society for his recollections of Eastern Air Command. Canadian Forces Photo Unit has many photographs including the following: HC-10812 (portrait, 1940); PL-8932 (in front of Digby aircraft); PL-110227 (portrait, 1951).

 


Wing Commander Annis has been engaged on Reconnaissance work for a considerable period of time in various operational squadrons and has completed approximately 40 operational flights. He has always set a good example by taking more than his share of the hazardous sorties. He has rendered exceptionally valuable services in connection with important staff duties and other work of a specialized nature. Even while employed on these special duties he successfully accomplished several important and hazardous flight. As a squadron commander his ability to instil confidence, enthusiasm and morale into all personnel of his squadron made it possible for this officer to maintain the efficiency of the squadron at an extremely high level.

 

ANNIS, G/C Clare Levi, OBE (C196) - Mention in Despatches - Station Linton-on-Ouse (No.62 Base in AFRO) - Award effective 1 January 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 337/45 dated 23 February 1945. No citation in AFRO; DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Volume 20606) has recommendation dated 15 August 1944 which errs by crediting Canadian service to BCATP when, in fact, he was more involved in Home Defence anti-submarine work:

 

Prior to proceeding overseas, Group Captain Annis rendered valuable service in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan in Canada. Since his arrival in the United Kingdom he has been in command of RCAF Station Linton-on-Ouse. He is a tireless worker and by his personal example and ability has won the respect and whole hearted co-operation of all personnel on the station, which has reflected creditably in the high standard of operational efficiency.

 

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ANNIS, F/L Edward Stewart (J12725) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1395/45 dated 31 August 1945. Born 25 November 1917. Home in Owen Sound, Ontario; enlisted in Hamilton 11 July 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 19 February 1941), No.3 AOS (graduated 9 April 1942), No.2 BGS (graduated 23 May 1942) and No.1 ANS (graduated and commissioned 3 July 1942). Further trained at No.31 GRS, Charlottetown (3 July to 1 September 1942) and No.31 OTU, Debert (1 September to 6 November 1942). On strength of "Y" Depot, Halifax, 7-30 November 1942; on strength of No.3 PRC, Bournemouth, 30 November 1942 to 15 March 1943; with No.1 (C) OTU, 15 February to 23 April 1943 (32 hours on Hudsons); with No.224 Squadron, 25 April 1943 to 1 October 1944 (five hours on Blenheims, 700 hours on Liberators); with No.1674 HCU, 1 Auctioneer 1944 to 24 June 1945 (including detachment to LORAN Training Unit, Northern Ireland - flew 31 hours on Oxfords and 11 hours on Wellingtons with No.1674 HCU); with No.426 Squadron, 24 June 1945 to 6 January 1946 (275 hours on Liberators); with No.437 Squadron, 6 January to 20 April 1946 (165 hours on Dakotas); on special duties with Transport Command Headquarters, 15 June 1946 to 6 June 1947; Remained in postwar RCAF, retiring 22 June 1967 with the rank of Wing Commander. Died at Wasaga Beach, Ontario, 29 January 1999. PL-48357 shows F/L R. McKee, F/L E.G.F. Vrooman and F/L E.S. Annis while crew on round-the-world North Star flight with Lester Pearson, 1950; PL-133495 is portrait taken 1961.

 

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ANTHONY, FS Elmer Harold (R76463) - Distinguished Flying Medal - No.405 Squadron - Award effective 1 September 1943 as per London Gazette dated 10 September 1943 and AFRO 2322/43 dated 12 November 1943. Born in Hants., Nova Scotia, 1919; home in Port William, Nova Scotia. Hatchery assistant; enlisted in Halifax, 13 January 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 21 July 1941), No.7 BGS (graduated 20 December 1941), No.5 AOS (graduated 8 November 1941) and No.1 ANS (graduated 18 January 1942). Invested at Buckingham Palace 22 September 1944. Photo PL-21736 is formal portrait.

 

The skill and devotion to duty displayed by Flight Sergeant Anthony and his determination in action have been an inspiration to his crew. During all his sorties against targets in enemy territory he has shown outstanding navigational ability together with coolness and tenacity of a high order.

 

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ANTHONY, F/O Roy Frederick (J85881) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.432 Squadron - Award effective 4 November 1944 as per London Gazette dated 17 November 1944 and AFRO 239/45 dated 9 February 1945. Born 1920 in Hamilton, Ontario; home there. In Militia before enlisting in Hamilton, 21 February 1942; commissioned April 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 29 August 1942), No.20 EFTS (graduated 20 November 1942) and No.16 SFTS (graduated 2 April 1943). Photo PL-16340 shows him on left soon after receiving wings; on right is LAC D.A. Burnell of Hamilton; PL-30514 shows debriefing after a raid (Sergeant Bill Dennis, P/O R.F. Anthont, Flight Sergeant W.P. Metcalfe). Award presented Hamilton, 27 July 1949. No citation other than "completed... numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.5557 (RG.24 Vol.20668) has recommendation dated 10 July 1944 when he had flown 33 sorties (157 hours ten minutes), 6 March to 9 August 1944.

 

Flying Officer Anthony has completed a large number of operational sorties. At all times he has proven himself an extremely capable pilot, displaying the utmost keenness and efficiency in his duties which contributed much to the success attained by his crew. Out of thirty-five sorties, only twice has he failed to bomb his target and that was due to engine failure.

 

For his fine record and determination to carry out his missions successfully, this officer is recommended for the Distinguished Flying Cross.

 

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ANTON, P/O George Joseph (J92443) - Mention in Despatches - No.432 Squadron - Award effective 14 June 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1600/45 dated 12 October 1945. Enlisted 18 December 1942. Trained at No.3 BGS. Unit identified in AFRO only as "Overseas"; proper unit identified in DHist file 181.009 D.1725 (PAC RG.24 Box 2067). DHist file 181.009 D.1719 (PAC RG.24 Vol.20606) has recommendation dated 3 February 1945.

 

During thirty operational sorties this officer has performed his duties both on the ground and in the air in an exemplary manner, the performance of which has been a sterling example to all Air Gunners in this squadron.


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APPLEBY, Sergeant Arthur William (R53561) - British Empire Medal - Marine Section, Station Dartmouth - Awarded 11 June 1942 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1000-1001/42 dated 3 July 1942. Incident killed two - F/L R.E. Shaw (pilot) and Sgt. A.N. Van Allen (navigator). Long account in Mackenzie King Papers - Microfilm C-4872, pp.271500-501. Born 1916 at Sand Point, Ontario; home there where he was described as a "general worker". Enlisted November 1939. Born in 1916, Sand Point, Ontario; home there or Almonte. General worker; enlisted in Ottawa, 2 November 1939. Invested by Governor General at Government House, 3 December 1942. By then he had remustered as a pilot. Trained at No.3 ITS (graduated 8 May 1942), No.21 EFTS (graduated 14 August 1942) and No.8 SFTS (graduated 4 December 1942). Commissioned December 1942. Remained in postwar RCAF (service number 20049). Photographs include PL-36580 (being married); PL-39739 (with wife and mother after investiture); PL-44038 (P/O R.C. Hubbard, P/O R. Boucher, F/L Appleby, F/L A.C. Golab, all former football players in Ottawa); PL-104010 (formal portrait, 1950); PL-137284 (portrait, 1962).

 

At about 2225 hours, G.M.T., 9 September 1941, Catalina Z2139 crashed while landing in a heavy sea about two miles off shore at Northwest River, Labrador. Although the sea was so heavy as to discourage the most experienced water men of the settlement from going out in small boats, Sergeant Appleby put out immediately in an RCAF dinghy with an outboard motor and by consummate skill and daring reached the scene of the crash in time to rescue six of the eight occupants of the aircraft. The survivors were clinging to the wing over which the seas were breaking and, numbed by the cold, could not have lasted much longer. After taking the survivors off the wing and transferring them to a larger boat when it arrived, Sergeant Appleby continued to search the surrounding waters until it was too dark to see. He also stayed with the aircraft until it sank and then circled the spot until a large boat came out with the equipment to buoy the position. All survivors, and witnesses aboard other boats and ashore, were unanimous in the praise of the skilful and daring seamanship displayed by this NCO at great personal risk. But for his coolness and gallantry more lives might easily have been lost before other boats reached the scene of the crash. His courage and devotion to duty have set a fine example to all members of the Service.

 

APPLEBY, F/L Arthur William, BEM (J21402) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.684 Squadron - Award effective 23 March as per London Gazette dated 3 April 1945 and AFRO 765/45 dated 4 May 1945. Award presented 1 April 1949 while serving with No.413 Squadron, Rockcliffe.

 


This officer has proved himself to be a determined and efficient operational pilot. He has completed many operations flying all over Burma and Thailand on long range reconnaissance duties and has always displayed exceptional boldness in the execution of his duties. In October 1944 he obtained valuable photographs of enemy shipping in Malayan harbours, returning safely to base after a flight of 2,008 miles, most of which had been accomplished in adverse weather. Flight Lieutenant Appleby has always displayed great resolution and courage on operations.

 

NOTE: Public Records Office Air 2/9062 has recommendation dated 2 January 1945, at which time he had flown fourteen anti-submarine patrols (136 hours ten minutes) and 28 photo reconnaissance sorties (151 hours ten minutes) - total of 287 hours 20 minutes. The original recommendation is more detailed and worthy of quotation:

 

This officer has carried out 28 operational sorties over Burma and Siam flying long range reconnaissance Mosquitoes and has at all times displayed exceptional boldness in the execution of his duties. This fearlessness and veracity [tenacity ?] has enabled him to reach targets in the extremely bad weather conditions on the monsoon period and on the 30th October 1944 he succeeded in making the 900 mile journey to Victoria Point flying through frontal conditions to obtain photographs of enemy shipping located there which were urgently required by the Staff. Not only did he get there but he pressed on to the port of Khao Huagang covering the 60 miles stretch of railway across the Kra Isthmus to Jumbhorn and visiting Paknam for the first time where six coasters were located, returning to base with much valuable information after a trip of 7.05 hours in a short range aircraft involving a distance of 2,008 air miles.

 

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APPLETON, F/L Charles Arthur Plewman (J26064) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.433 Squadron - Award effective 6 January 1945 as per London Gazette dated 16 January 1945 and AFRO 508/45 dated 23 March 1945. Born 1920, Chesterton, England. Home in Toronto. Served in militia before enlisting in Toronto, 3 June 1941. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 25 September 1941), No.10 EFTS (graduated 5 December 1941) and No.6 SFTS (graduated 27 March 1942). Commissioned 1943. Award presented 9 October 1947. Died in Port Moody, British Columbia, 9 December 1998. Photo PL-29616 shows him with W/C Clive Sinton while with No.433 Squadron; PL-38660 with wife after investiture. No citation other than "completed... numerous operations against the enemy in the course of which [he has] invariably displayed the utmost fortitude, courage and devotion to duty." DHist file 181.009 D.2609 (RG.24 Vol.20627) has recommendation dated 20 October 1944 when he had flown 35 sorties (156 hours 30 minutes) from 6 May to 15 October 1944.

 

This officer has now completed a tour of operations comprising thirty-five sorties over enemy territory and involving attacks against a wide variety of well defended targets in France and Germany.

 


Under a calm and quiet manner he has a fine offensive spirit in action which inspires confidence in not only his crew, but the entire squadron. He has repeatedly displayed ability to make instant decisions in emergency, and his skilful pilotage and good judgement have contributed much to the successful completion of his many operational sorties.

 

Flight Lieutenant Appleton has been acting in the capacity of Deputy Flight Commander of "A" Flight for a considerable time, where his splendid example and untiring efforts with junior crews has been most praiseworthy.

 

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APPLETON, F/O Douglas Charles (J18563) - Mention in Despatches - Overseas - Award effective 8 June 1944 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 1729/44 dated 11 August 1944. Home in Toronto; enlisted there. Trained at No.1 ITS (graduated 27 January 1941), No.1 AOS (graduated 20 July 1941), 1 BGS (graduated 1 September 1941) and No.2 ANS (graduated 28 September 1941). No citation in AFRO.

 

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